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Fine Furniture A timeline in woods




FINE FURNITURE A timeline in woods The purpose of this summer’s catalogue is to show some exceptionally beautiful pieces within their historical context. On this occasion we thought it would be interesting to outline briefly the line of development and styles that shaped the basic forms, different woods, ornamental features and the numerous themes such as rococo, classical, gothic, chinoiserie and other fantasies that enlivened the main story in the progression of design. Here then is a basic outline of furniture history, seen largely through a progression of lovely woods from many parts of the world, with illustrations relating to each period. We hope you find it interesting and entertaining.

Lanto Synge Chief Executive

Opposite: A watercolour by Shirley Slocombe published in Percy Macquoid’s ‘The Age of Walnut’




Fine Furniture A timeline in woods

Louis XIV r. 1643 – 1715

William Kent c. 1685 - 1748 The central architect of the revived

Queen Anne r. 1703 - 1714

Palladian style in England, including classical interiors.

Battle of Blenheim 1704 Turning point of the War of the

Josiah Wedgwood 1730 – 1795

Spanish Succession

The industrialization of the manufacture

George I r. 1714 - 1727 John Harrison, 1693-1776, invented the portable clock, which enabled the navigation that was so crucial to world trading. Louis XV r. 1715 – 1775 Regence (1715 – 1723) George II r. 1727-60 Bach’s St. Matthew Passion 1727

of pottery Thomas Chippendale 1718-1789 The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker’s Director 1754 George Hepplewhite 1727-1786 The Cabinetmaker and Upholsterer’s Guide (1788, revised 1789) Thomas Sheraton 1751–1806 The Cabinetmakers and Upholsterer’s Drawing-Book (issued in parts 1791-4)

William Hogarth’s A Rake’s Progress



1732

George III r. 1760-1820

Handel’s Messiah 1741

Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones 1749


American Declaration of Independence

Mozart’s Don Giovanni 1787

1776 French Revolution 1789 Adam Smith, Wealth of Nations 1776 The Regency 1790-1820 The Royal Pavilion at Brighton was

Battle of Waterloo, 1815 Lord Byron’s Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage 1815

remodelled in Indian style by John Nash, 1815-1823, for George IV

George IV r. 1820-1830

when Prince Regent Ironbridge 1779 Birthplace of the Industrial Revolution Steam train 1804

Beethoven’s 9th Symphony, The Choral 1824 William IV r. 1830-1837 Jane Austen’s Jane Eyre 1847

Richard Trevithick, 1771-1833, built the first steam engine tramway locomotive

Queen Victoria r. 1837-1901

Napoleon I r. 1804 – 1814

The Great Exhibition 1851

Battle of Trafalgar 1805

Charles Dickens’ Great Expectations 1860

Matthew Boulton 1728-1809 Maker of gilt metal ormolu objects to rival French production.

Cutty Sark 1880 The epitome of the great age of merchant sailing ships




Fine Furniture A timeline in woods




The Age of Walnut 1700 – 1730 English furniture history can be divided into periods when particular woods were fashionable. These highly prized and expensive timbers mark out the crucial phases of Georgian cabinetmaking through the 18th century. Walnut was the cherished wood of the first decades of the century, 1700-1730, the time of the monarchs Queen Anne and George I. Furniture made with simple lines, perfectly proportioned and veneered with highly grained and carefully selected walnut, or crisply carved in the solid was greatly prized and has never been much out of fashion over the ensuing 300 years. In fact the safer ‘good taste’ characteristics of walnut furniture seem to reflect the traditional non-pretentious, high quality, upper middle class that represents the best of England and Englishness over the centuries. Good walnut furniture is notably well proportioned and wonderfully made. There is no sparing of craftsmanship either in the complex veneering (with cross bandings, herringbone inlay or contrast of grain) or in the use of well drawn carved ornament. The spectacular is avoided while well-mannered quality is easily evident on closer inspection. This was not a period of celebrities in furniture making or design books. Giles Grendy however became a famous name as a supplier and several clock makers such as Daniel Quare were well known and produced movements for magnificent clock cases.




Fine Furniture A timeline in woods

A SMALL SIZED QUEEN ANNE WALNUT CHEST OF DRAWERS A magnificent and rare small sized Queen Anne walnut chest of drawers, finely veneered in characterful burr walnut, of unusual proportions and with two tiers of small drawers above two long drawers; each retaining original brasswork with drop handles and stamp-decorated backplates. The drawers are framed with mouldings and the top and front crossbanded with herringbone inlay; standing on bun feet (of a later date); the side with large brass carrying handles. F2H0079 English, circa 1710 Height: 30in (76.2cm) Width: 25in (63.5cm) Depth: 16Âźin (41.3cm)

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The age of Walnut

A BURR WALNUT KNEEHOLE DESK An exceptional George I small kneehole desk in highly figured burr walnut of very fine colour, the quarter-veneered top with indented corners, crossbanding and herring-bone inlay, with one long drawer above three small drawers at each side, all with engraved brass handles and lock escutcheons, the kneehole recess with a shallow drawer and a sliding cupboard unit. F2A0572 English, circa 1720 Height: 30½in (77cm) Width: 28in (71cm) Depth: 17¾in (45cm)

The perfect compact proportions of the pieces on these two pages epitomise the charming ‘neatness’ of Queen Anne furniture at its best.

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Fine Furniture A timeline in woods

A WILLIAM AND MARY VERRE EGLOMISé PIER GLASS A rare William and Mary pier glass with arched top and bevelled mirror plates, the borders of red and gold verre eglomisé with decoration of strapwork, scrolling foliage and arabesques in the manner of Jean Bérain, within a carved giltwood frame, the sides carved with stylised foliage. F2E0416 English, circa 1700 The engraved top plate possibly later Height: 56½in (143.5cm) Width: 24½in (62cm) The art of engraving on gold under glass has origins which date back to ancient Damascus and Rome and which enjoyed a revival during the Italian Renaissance. At various times this process has been used to embellish looking glasses and in the late 17th century, when mirrors with glass borders were coming into fashion, some were decorated with what has become known as ‘verre eglomise’. The fashion emanated from France where the designs of Jean Bérain were proving so influential. In England such mirrors were produced during the reigns of William and Mary and Queen Anne. The borders would be inscribed with elaborate patterns of strapwork and arabesques, the gold leaf being set against a red, black or sometimes green background. Examples of great eglomisé mirrors and pier glasses are in the Victoria and Albert Museum, at Chatsworth in Derbyshire, at Penshurst Place in Kent and in the Gerstenfeld Collection in Washington DC. The descriptive term ‘verre eglomisé’ is derives from the name of Jean-Baptiste Glomy who popularised a similar process for framing pictures. He died in 1786.

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The age of Walnut

AN IMPORTANT QUEEN ANNE GILT GESSO DRESSING TABLE A highly important and very rare Queen Anne gilt gesso dressing table, retaining most of is original gilding, the rectangular top centred by an acanthus spray and issuing further foliate sprays within a moulded border surrounded by strapwork and foliate scrolls, above three short drawers over a shaped apron, the front and sides also decorated with scrolling foliage and acanthus, raised on cabriole legs with acanthus at the knees and on the pad feet, both at the front and back. F2G0033 English, circa 1715 Ring handles replaced Height: 28žin (73cm) Width: 30Ÿin (77cm) Depth: 20in (51cm) Literature: Percy Macquoid, The Age of Mahogany, p27, fig 23 Percy Macquoid & Ralph Edwards, The Dictionary of English Furniture, 1927, Vol III, p216, fig 7

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The age of Walnut

A PAIR OF QUEEN ANNE WALNUT SIDE CHAIRS A pair of Queen Anne walnut side chairs, the backs with scroll moulded top rail above a vase shaped splat veneered in burr walnut of fine colour and patination, carved at the top with a stylised shell with pendant harebells and at the sides with scrolling acanthus, the seats covered in period needlework with foliage and flowers on a dark blue ground, on cabriole front legs with similar shell and harebell carving on the knees, all four legs ending in diamond toes. F2E0481 English, circa 1710 Height: 39¾in (101cm) Width: 22½in (57cm) Depth: 23in (58.5cm) Provenance: Formerly in the collection of Mary Guthrie Mitchell (d.1864), the sister of Sir William Burrell Sir William Burrell was one of the greatest British collectors of the 20th century. He was born into a Glaswegian shipping family and had made his fortune while still a young man. Burrell had already begun collecting avidly as a teenager and after he retired he devoted the rest of his life to forming his collection. His taste was eclectic and the collection encompassed a wide variety of furniture, works of art and paintings. Also a philanthropist, the collection, which by his death had risen to some 8,000 items, was bequeathed to the City of Glasgow and is now on public display. It is highly likely that Sir William advised his ‘ favourite sister’ on her own acquisitions and he would himself have appreciated the quality, colour and form of this pair of chairs.

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The age of Walnut

A GEORGE I LONGCASE CLOCK BY QUARE AND HORSEMAN An important George I walnut longcase clock by Daniel Quare and Stephen Horseman, the arched dial flanked by brass mounted columns and surmounted by a stepped hood with fretwork frieze and brass ball finials, the whole case in walnut of superb colour, grain and patination. The dial with silvered chapter ring and brass filigree spandrels, enclosing Roman and Arabic numerals and date and seconds subsidiary dials, inscribed ‘Dan Quare Ste Horseman London N199’. The two-train movement of eight day duration and striking the hours. O2B0258 English, circa 1720 Height: 110in (279cm) Width: 19¼in (49cm) Depth: 10in (25cm) Daniel Quare (1648-1724), watch and clockmaker to George I and inventor of the repeating watch, was admitted to the Clockmaker’s Company in 1671 and became Master in 1708. A celebrated maker, he worked from two London addresses, St Martins-le-Grand and the Kings Arms, Exchange Alley. Stephen Horseman was apprenticed to Quare in 1702. He later became his business partner and joined the Clockmaker’s Company in 1709. Provenance: The Marjorie Wiggin Prescott Collection.

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The age of Walnut

Opposite:

Above:

A PAIR OF GEORGE I WALNUT SIDE CHAIRS WITH NEEDLEWORK SEAT COVERS

AN EARLY NINETEENTH CENTURY DUTCH BRASS CHANDELIER

A fine pair of George I walnut side chairs upholstered with Indian needlework, the upholstered seats and high backs standing on cabriole legs carved in the solid and joined by stretchers; the needlework covering being Indian made for the export market, in a meandering floral pattern and retaining bright natural colouring. Re-backed and conserved by the Royal School of Needlework. F2H0256 The chairs English, circa 1720. The embroidery, late-18th century Height: 17in (42cm) Width: 8in (21cm)

Of Queen Anne revival form, this extremely attractive chandelier is cast in brass, in sections, and held by an iron bar wedge at the top. The upper shaft with bulbous turning and the base with ball and inverted finial. The six scrolling arms with ring turned drip pans and nozzles. F2H0233 Probably Dutch, circa 1840 Height: 25in (64cm) Depth: 24in (65cm)

Depth: 7in (17cm)

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Fine Furniture A timeline in woods

A PAIR OF GEORGE I WALNUT SIDE CHAIRS A pair of early 18th century George I walnut side chairs, the backs with burr walnut veneers of very fine colour, with central vase shaped splats carved with scrolls and acanthus and flanked by shaped side rails, surmounted by an unusual shell carved cresting on a pounced ground, having drop-in seats covered in deep green silk velvet, raised on boldly carved cabriole front legs with a scrolling acanthus at each knee and ending in claw and ball feet, the back legs of curved and tapering form with pad feet. F2B0584 English, circa 1725 Height: 41in (103cm) Width: 22in (56cm) Depth of seat: 18in (46cm)

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The age of Walnut

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The age of Walnut

Opposite:

Above:

A WALNUT LOWBOY

AN OYSTER VENEEReD STRONG BOX

A fine early 18th Century Queen Anne walnut lowboy, the finely figured top quarterveneered and with herringbone stringing and cross-banded shaped edge, above three drawers in the frieze retaining their original brass handles and supported on circular tapering legs terminating in pad feet. F1J0264 English, 1710 Height: 28½in (72cm) Width: 28in (71cm) Depth: 18in (46cm)

A late 17th century oyster veneered kingwood strong-box the entire exterior profusely bound with brass foliate strapwork and borders and having brass hinges, carrying handles and lock escutcheon. The box which opens to reveal numerous compartments and drawers, stands on a Queen Anne style country pollard oak lowboy. F2H0059 English, circa 1690 Height: 11in (29cm) Width: 19in (49cm) Depth: 11in (29cm)

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Fine Furniture A timeline in woods

An early 18th century black and gilt japanned bureau cabinet An early 18th century black and gilt japanned bureau cabinet, the arched upper section with a pair of mirrored doors with replaced plates, enclosing a fitted interior of doors and simulated nashijilined drawers between painted pilasters; the bureau section with a flap enclosing a fitted interior of pigeon holes and drawers around a reversible section with an arch flanked by pilasters and with chequered parquet floor, the reverse of this section with a japanned panel flanked by three drawers on each side, above two oak secret drawers; above a bombé base with three graduated drawers, on claw and ball feet; the sides of the upper and lower sections with carrying handles. Minor restorations to the decoration and regilding of mouldings and feet. The cresting is a replacement, copied from an original in Dresden (see below). F2G0383 German, circa 1720 Height: 102in (259cm) Width: 42½in (108cm) Depth: 24½in (62cm) This superb black and gilt japanned bureau cabinet is part of a group traditionally thought to be German, based on a red and gilt japanned cabinet formerly at Schloss Pillnitz, Dresden, that has been attributed to the Dresden workshops of Martin Schnell. The latter was responsible for the embellishment of Dresden’s Hollandischen (Dutch) Palais and Schloss Pillnitz’s Wasserpalais (Water Palace) (G. Hasse, Dresdner Möbel, Leipzig, 1983, no. 141). That another cabinet of exactly the same type was sold in Madrid, 16th May 1974 (illustrated in Christie’s Review, 1974, p. 415) suggests the possibility of an Iberian commission, if not manufacture. Further confirmation of this theory is endorsed by two magnificent gilt gesso cabinets (Mallett 1977 and 2003) which share many features with this japanned bureau bookcase. One of these gilt cabinets had remained in Portugal with an unproven Royal Portugese provenance. The design shape, many features of the construction and the hardware appear to be indictative that these pieces came from the same workshop. Our cabinet has very close similarities to one illustrated in Dresdener Möbel des 18. Jahrhunderts, Seemann Leipzip, E.A., Germany 1993, which was the model for the reconstructed cresting.

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The age of Walnut

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Fine Furniture A timeline in woods

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The age of Mahogany

The Age of Mahogany 1730 – 1770 Mahogany became dominant as a wondrous imported timber from the West Indies and was at its height in fashion throughout the middle part of the eighteenth century. George II’s reign dominates the period. This extraordinary noble timber was hugely treasured for its rich, red-brown colour in solid carved pieces and flaming grain patterns in veneers on flat surfaces. Its use for strong shaped elements, as in chair making or crisply carved ornament equalled its other great virtue, that it could be polished to a glorious finish. Mahogany dominated furniture for 150 years, and its high point is marked by certain great furniture designers, such as Thomas Chippendale who published his Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker’s Director in 1754. The variety of mahogany furniture is almost unbounded in both style and in invention, in useful or simply decorative furnishing items. Earlier forms owe their origin to relatively sober shapes with features such as architectural pediments, fielded panels, stiffly carved shells and the ubiquitous carved claw and ball foot. Later, much more fanciful rococo scrolls and floral carving pervade designs with a florid lightness and increase of both movement and ornament. Alongside all this carved giltwood in the same lively forms, the use of other special woods and painted furniture added richness and variety to create and furnish rooms that above all had to be spectacular and entertaining. In this respect nothing has changed over 250 years.

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Fine Furniture A timeline in woods

A PAIR OF IRISH MAHOGANY MARBLE TOPPED SIDE TABLES A very fine pair of mid 18th century Irish mahogany side tables with marble tops, the frames having deep shaped sides with large scallop shells on the front and each carved with acanthus leaves at the corner with a stamped background and terminating in fluted spanish toes; the mahogany of excellent colour and patination and one table with an inventory number 352 and a cloth label; the marble tops being original of grey colour with white vein cut in symmetrical form. F2H0190 Irish, circa 1750 Height: 30in (76cm) Width: 56in (142cm) Depth: 26in (67cm)

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The age of Mahogany

Irish furniture shows some of the most interesting use of mahogany which was probably unloaded off ships from the West Indies at Cork. It was often extravagantly used in thick pieces. Notable features in design and construction include bold and deep carving, somewhat mannerist and the use of patterning on surfaces, such as the stamping here.

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The age of Mahogany

A pair of GILTWOOD MIRRORS An extremely fine pair of George II carved giltwood architectural mirrors, the later rectangular plates within an eared giltwood frame adorned with lion’s masks and rosettes beneath a broken pediment of triangular form. The inner matt-finished borders are of sand gilding. F2H0167 English, circa 1745 Height: 38in (96.5 cm) Width: 26½in (67cm) Depth: 22in (56.5cm) Depth of seat: 16½in (42cm)

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The age of Mahogany

Opposite:

Above:

A GEORGE III MAHOGANY SERPENTINE CHEST

A REGENCY MINIATURE MAHOGANY CABINET

A mid 18th century mahogany serpentine front chest of drawers, the finely figured top with moulded edges and canted corners, above four graduated drawers, all with brass swan’s neck handles, raised on shaped bracket feet. F2H0102

An early 19th century miniature cabinet, the flame veneered mahogany doors with reeded brass edge and lock, opening to reveal 24 numbered small drawers above one long drawer with a fitted interior (see p.29), the drawers retaining their original button handles, the cabinet ending in topie feet. F2H0103

English, circa 1760 Height: 33¼in (85cm) Width: 37¼in (95cm) Depth: 24in (61cm)

English, circa 1810 Height: 19in (48cm) Width: 19¼in (49 cm) Depth: 8in (20.5cm)

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Fine Furniture A timeline in woods

A PAIR OF GEORGE III MAHOGANY ARMCHAIRS WITH NEEDLEWORK SEATS A pair of mid 18th century Chippendale period carved mahogany open armchairs, each having a shaped and carved top rail ending in outswept scrolls above a pierced trefoil back splat, the dished arms ending in scroll hand rests, the drop-in seats within moulded rails and raised on square chamfered legs joined by stretchers. The seats upholstered in period needlework decorated with flowers including carnations and tulips amongst scrolling foliage on a deep blue ground. F2H0105 English, circa 1770 Height: 38in (96.5cm) Width: 26½in (67cm) Depth: 22in (56.5cm) Depth of seat: 16½in (42cm)

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The age of Mahogany

A LARGE GEORGE II MAHOGANY PIECRUST TRIPOD TABLE A very fine mid 18th century mahogany tripod table of grand scale, the circular tilt top with moulded piecrust edge on bird cage support, raised on a fluted and acanthus carved baluster stem above a band of egg and dart moulding, on boldly curved tripod supports with strapped acanthus leaf carving on the knees, ending in claw and ball feet inset with brass cup castors. F2D0412 English, circa 1755 Height: 29in (74cm) Diameter: 33in (84cm) Tripod tables were primarily made for holding tea and coffee equipage. Tea had been introduced to English from Holland in the early 17th century and in spite of the high prices and heavy duty imposed, it gradually became a fashionable drink around which great ceremony revolved. Towards the middle of the 18th century there was a shift from the former fashion of drinking in tea gardens to drinking at home. Consequently cabinetmakers turned their attention to the making of suitable ornamental tables, often for a special tea-room. In the ‘Female Spectator’ of 1745, a contributor writer: ‘The tea-table costs more to support than would maintain two children at nurse’. William Ince and John Mayhew illustrated designs for ‘Tea Kettle Stands’ in their The Universal System of Household Furniture, 1762, as did Thomas Chippendale in his The Gentleman and Cabinet Makers Director, London, 3rd ed., 1762, p.LV.

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The age of Mahogany

Opposite:

Above centre:

A GEORGE III MAHOGANY DUMB WAITER WITH DROP SIDES

A PALE COLOURED MELON TEA CADDY

A rare George III mahogany circular two-tier dumb waiter with unusual drop sides, the turned central stem leading to an elegantly downswept tripod base, ending in brass castors. F2H0149 English, circa 1760 Height: 34½in (88cm) Diameter: 23¾in (60.5cm)

Above left:

AN APPLE TEA CADDY A very fine example of a late 18th century fruitwood tea caddy in the form of an apple retaining remains of its original lead lining. O2B0044

An extremely fine late eighteenth century tea caddy in the form of a melon, of fine colour and patination. O2H0196 English, circa 1790 Height: 5in (13cm)

Above right:

A FRUITWOOD TEA CADDY IN THE FORM OF A PEAR A late 18th century George III fruitwood tea caddy in the form of a pear of fine colour and patination. O2H0277 English, circa 1800 Height: 6in (15cm)

English, circa 1790 Height: 5in (13cm)

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Fine Furniture A timeline in woods

MAHOGANY POLE SCREEN WITH DOUBLE SIDED NEEDLEWORK PANEL A very good early 18th century mahogany pole screen with finely carved tripod base, the legs with scallop shells and the toes carved with acanthus leaves; the adjustable screen panel having very fine needlework panels on both sides, the back panel being extremely unusual. F2H0115 English, circa 1730 Overall height: 51in (130cm) Height of panel: 24½in (62cm) Width of panel: 20in (51cm)

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The age of Mahogany

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The age of Mahogany

Opposite:

A GEORGE III MAHOGANY SETTEE OR LOVE SEAT A mid 18th century Chippendale period mahogany settee or love seat, the shaped upholstered back and arms raised on square front legs with concave fluting joined by a ‘H’ stretcher and ending in square block toes. F2H0083 English, circa 1760 Height: 37æin (96cm) Width: 43æin (111cm) Depth: 31½in (80cm) Depth of seat: 22æin (58cm)

Right:

A GEORGE III MAHOGANY URN / KETTLE STAND The square top with solid waved gallery above a slide, on square chamfered legs headed by pierced brackets, with concave-sided undertier, on brass castors, two angle brackets replaced. F2H0289 English, circa 1780 Height: 11½in (29cm) Width: 11½in (29cm) Depth: 26in (66cm)

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The age of Mahogany

Opposite:

Above:

AN ADAM PERIOD MAHOGANY SETTEE

A MAHOGANY MAGAZINE RACK

An extremely fine mahogany George III settee standing on seven legs, the moulded serpentine back carved with beading and flat acanthus leaves, the rounded hand rests with acanthus and bellflowers, the square legs headed by paterae and carved with swags of bellflowers and ending in their original brass castors. F010209

A modern three tier mahogany magazine rack designed by the Dowager Duchess of Devonshire and made in the cabinetmaker’s workshop at Chatsworth, Derbyshire. F2H0292

English, circa 1770 Height: 38in (97cm) Length: 72in (183cm) Depth of seat: 25in (63cm)

English, circa 2000 Height: 42in (107cm) Width: 42in (107cm) Depth: 18in (46cm)

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The age of Mahogany

a fascination for the East

Opposite:

Above:

AN INDIAN DYED AND PAINTED COTTON PANEL

A LATE 18TH CENTURY LACQUER TEA CADDY

A rare and charming panel of early 18th century dyed and painted cotton, depicting a vase of flowers beneath branches of exotic flowers and foliage, all in shades of red and blue. Almost certainly a fragment of a very rare much larger Palampore, this textile represents the many of its kind that enlivened English interiors with colour and the exotic, especially bedrooms. P2E0518

A rare late 18th Century Chinese export black lacquer tea caddy, decorated throughout with gilt chinoiseries depicting lakeside pavilions within oriental landscapes, the shaped and moulded lid painted with a stylised foliate border, opening to reveal rectangular caddies, the central canister with a sliding lid used for blending, each elaborately veneered with panels of mother of pearl, incised with decorative motifs of birds and flowers. 02F0167

Indian, circa 1710 Framed height: 52Âźin (133cm) Framed width: 37in (94cm)

China, circa 1795 Width: 10½in (27cm) Depth: 7in (18cm) Height: 6in (15.5cm)

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Above:

Opposite:

AN EMPIRE GUERIDON

A VERY FINE EARLY 18TH CENTURY SCARLET JAPANNED BUREAU

An early 19th century mahogany gueridon, the top of finely faded colour with moulded edge, the frieze with gilt bronze mounts of alternating dolphins and rose garlands, supported on three column legs with finely chased gilt bronze capitals and feet, ending in a three pointed star plinth with flattened bun feet. F2G0387 French, circa 1820 Height: 28½in (72.5cm) Diameter: 27¼in (69cm)

A very fine early 18th century scarlet japanned bureau. The fall front, drawer front’s, top and sides are all richly decorated with gold chinoiserie on a red background. The fall front opens to reveal numerous drawers and compartments, while the drawers below are further enriched with engraved brass handles. F2H0082 English, circa 1725 Height: 37¼in (94.1cm) Width: 36in (91.4cm) Depth: 19¾in (50.2cm)

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The age of Mahogany

Previous spread, opposite and above detail:

A GEORGE III MAHOGANY CIRCULAR REVOLVING LIBRARY TABLE A magnificent round mahogany library table with a revolving drum top standing on a cove sided triangular base; the top leathered with reading flaps and swivelling above the drawer section, also revolving and containing two tiers of drawers, each drawer with ivory number plates and each alternating in form, rectangular and triangular; some concealing secret drawers; The base with a cupboard door in one side and with a brass locking mechanism for the top; the angles of the base with pilasters terminating in scrolls at the bottom. All the woodwork of superb colour and patination. This wonderful table appears to be unique and unrecorded. Its large scale, two tiers of drawers, book flaps and the elegant triangular base are all features not seen before on such drum tables. F2H0077 English, circa 1790 Height: 31in (79cm) Diameter of top: 52½in (133cm)

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The age of Mahogany

A PAIR OF GEORGE III MAHOGANY BEDSIDE CUPBOARDS A fine pair of late eighteenth century bedside tables in figured mahogany, each with a dished top and a single sliding cupboard door, the sliding shelves below lined with leather and with a lion-head ring handle. F2H0239 English, circa 1780 Height: 32in (81cm) Width: 16in (41cm) Depth: 13½in (34cm)

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The Rococo

The Rococo 1750’s Following seemingly endless years of war and political struggle in Europe, Marlborough’s victory at Blenheim heralded a new mood of relief, with peace, prosperity and a great desire for relaxed times, even a period of frivolity. So out went much parade formality and in its place grew a longing for a happy prettiness in fashion, in furniture, in decoration and in gardens. The joy of flowers and flower power invaded everything in a spirit of rococo (rockery shapes, irregular, asymmetric, full of twirls and scrolls, shells, water, flowers and floral motifs). The rococo period also embraced further decorative fantasies, most notably Chinoiserie and the Gothick. Chinoiserie was a European playful (not mocking) imitation or parody of Chinese decoration with figures, pagodas, exotic birds and much else. In furniture terms painted furniture, inspired by Oriental lacquer were referred to as ‘japanned’. The quality varied from the professionally made to amateur pieces. Chinoiserie also featured in carving, in needlework, in porcelain and all the decorative arts, and was often exotic and frivolous. Gothick ornament was derived from Gothic architecture in essence, but was much lighter and ‘Georgian’ in proportion. It was not meant to be in any way religious or ‘churchy’ but wholly ornamental. Its quasi-serious side was as a thoroughly English and properly national style, as opposed to the grand Classical architecture that was the stuff of Roman/Foreign/Pagan Southern Europe! Its true French and German origins were transformed to the charmingly decorative.

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The Rococo

A GEORGE III RED LACQUER AUTOMATON MUSICAL BRACKET CLOCK A rare 18th century japanned musical bracket clock of large scale attributed to Stephen Rimbault (1744-1785), decorated throughout with gold chinoiseries of the finest quality on a deep red ground with Chinese figures, birds, deer, flowers, fruit and foliage; surmounted by a pagoda enclosing two ormolu figures with automaton arms, the figure on the right striking the larger bell on the hour and the figure on the left striking the smaller bell on the half hour, each corner and the top of the pagoda headed by an acorn finial and hung with bells; the sides with ormolu carrying handles decorated by a female head flanked by stylised masks, engraved fretwork above old red silk, with a repeat cord on the right side and a strike cord on the left side, the four corners with trailing mounts of flowers and scrolls; the enamel dial with Roman numerals within ormolu spandrels below a painted scene attributed to Johann Zoffany (1733-1810) of musicians with automaton arms playing instruments in a landscape with a windmill, the two enamel subsidiary dials indicating the twelve tunes and the strike / silence mechanism; the main body of the clock on a turntable base with further chinoiseries, the pierced apron ending in ormolu scroll toes; the reverse with glass back revealing the complicated musical workings playing on 14 bells and a richly engraved brass backplate. F2H0219 Continued overleaf

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Stephen Rimbault (1744-1785) came from an established family of 18th century London clockmakers of Huguenot descent. Rimbault is recorded at Great St Andrew’s Street from 1760 to 1781. He excelled at making rather complicated clocks, often with musical movements, and particularly automaton clocks with painted scenes of figures dancing or working on the dials. The red japanned decoration on this bracket clock with its oriental pagodas, figures and animals on a rich red ground continues in the tradition of John Stalker and George Parker who published A Treatise of Japanning and Varnishing - Being a compleat Discovery of those Arts in 1688. As well as designs for japanned decoration this publication included specific directions ‘To make Red-Japan’. The Treatise is a detailed work on the European interpretation of oriental decoration on furniture and objects, as well as the techniques of gilding and other decorative finishes. Including twentyfour copper plate engravings of chinoiserie designs, it was written not just for professionals but particularly to advise and encourage amateurs. The lacquer on this bracket clock is similar to that seen on traditional Chinese cabinets, but elaborated with the fantastical pagoda and chinoiserie figures, while the traditional musical bracket clock form is very much in the English grand manner. The eight-day three-train striking movement on the hour and half hour, with a verge escapement, and 12-tune musical automata playing every quarter on 14 bells. English, circa 1775 Overall height: 37in (94cm) Width: 21in (53cm) Depth: 14½in (36.5cm)

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Opposite:

AN 18TH CENTURY DANISH GIRANDOLE WITH MIRRORED BORDERS A very rare mid 18th century small girandole with bevelled and engraved mirror plate borders, the gilded edges decorated with penwork designs, retaining its original spiral brass candle sconce at the base. Offered together with a modern copy. F1A0263 Danish, circa 1750 Height: 27½in (70cm) Width: 10¾in (27cm)

Right:

A PAIR OF NEEDLEWORK BELL PULLS WITH COLUMNS OF FLOWERS AND BIRD A pair of 18th Century needlework bell pulls of large scale depicting classical columns entwined with flowers and birds. The needlework made into bell pulls in the 19th Century. T2H0282 The needlework English, circa 1760 Height: 98in (250cm) Width: 12in (30cm)

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a profusion of asymmetric scrolls

A SMALL GILTWOOD WALL SCONCE A mid 18th century George II carved giltwood girandole. The frame with stylised acanthus carving being entwined with further leaves and seascrolls. The glass mirrorplate is earlier, perhaps c. 1710. Offered together with a modern copy. F2G0106 English, circa 1755 Height: 37in (94cm) Width: 18in (46cm)

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CHINESE ALTAR TABLE A mid 19th century black lacquer altar table, profusely decorated with Chinese court scenes and with a pierced front frieze. F2H0278 Chinese, circa 1860 Height: 32½in (82½cm) Width: 51in (129½cm) Depth: 18½in (47cm) While European Japanned pieces were a significant aspect of furnishing throughout the 18th and 19th centuries equally Chinese Export items were also a feature. This table is interesting as being of a true Chinese form, eminently practical in Western houses.

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Opposite:

Above:

A CHINESE EXPORT PORCELAIN SERVICE COMPRISING 44 PIECES

PAIR OF CHINESE WOODEN STOOLS

A Chinese export porcelain part dinner service, decorated in famille rose enamels with the double peacock pattern, comprising 44 pieces, Qing dynasty, Qianlong (1736-1795). O2H0223

A splendid pair of Chinese red lacquer octagonal Chinese stools standing on numerous legs joined by a stretcher, all surfaces richly decorated in red, black and gold with floral patterns. F2H0244

Chinese, circa 1775 Width of tureen: 13½ x 8¼in (34 x 21cm)

Chinese, circa 1850 Height: 7in (19cm) Width: 8in (21cm) Depth: 8in (21cm)

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From left to right:

A PAIR OF 19TH CENTURY FAMILLE ROSE VASES WITH HUNDRED BOY PATTERN L2F0380 The vases Chinese, circa 1840 Height with shade: 28in (71.5cm)

A PAIR OF 19TH CENTURY OPALINE VASES L2H0060 The vases French, circa 1875 Height including shades: 24½in (61cm)

A PAIR OF JAPANESE FUKAGAWA VASES DECORATED WITH IRISES MOUNTED AS LAMPS L2G0410 The vases Japan, Meiji period, circa 1880 Height including shades: 30in (76cm)

A PAIR OF JAPANESE KUTANI VASES L2E0079 The vases Japan, circa 1880 Height including shades: 24½in (62cm)

A PAIR OF IMARI BOTTLE SHAPE VASES MOUNTED AS LAMPS L2H0014 The vases Japan, circa 1880 Height including shades: 30in (76cm)

A PAIR OF IMARI VASES MOUNTED AS LAMPS L2F0400 The vases Japanese, circa 1870 Height including shades: 24in (61cm)

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A JAPANESE LACQUER OCCASIONAL TABLE An unusual mid 19th century Japanese export black lacquer occasional table. The octagonal tip top is inlaid with a mother of pearl landscape showing a cart, birds and flowers. The table is supported on a turned baluster stem standing on a tripod of scroll feet, all decorated in the same style as the top. The inside bears the inventory label of the Hanoverian Royal Collection. F2F0369 Japanese, circa 1860 Height: 29in (74cm) Top: 21½in square (55cm)

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Royal and Imperial The countries of continental Europe, more so than Great Britain were dominated by the formal styles adopted by their Kings, princes and tiers of nobility. The decorative arts were centred on palaces and grand style furnishing, which was highly sophisticated, closely controlled in design and invariably extravagantly made, often with magnificent marquetry and with gilt metal (ormolu) mounts on furniture. This very splendid courtly manner became more or less universal from Versailles to St Petersburg and was distinctly in contrast to the relatively restrained, though dignified, achievements of the British Isles. Good examples of courtly furniture invariably incorporated highly designed formal patterns displaying elements of design from the leading artist’s workshops and craftsmen of each phase of the eighteenth century. Many splendid examples, some very rich, others more approachable and easier for us to live with today, fit neatly into modern interiors, where a desired formality is sought. With the French Revolution in 1789 Europe shook and England shuddered, though survived. Terrible changes occurred. However, like a forest fire, an Imperial spirit quickly sprouted from the ashes in France and under Napoleon the Empire style dawned and grew to be even more provocative in its own classical grandeur. A broad new Greek/Roman/Egyptian Imperial style swept, like the former courtly taste, across Europe, even to America. In England it was reflected in the very individual Regency fashions inspired by the wildly extravagant and superbly artistic impetus of the future George IV. The Georgian Imperial grandeur he achieved led to a great range of early 19th century neo-classical decorative styles, which nevertheless remained somewhat tempered by the elegance of the Georgian tradition.

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A LOUIS XIV BOULLE BUREAU MAZARIN A rare Louis XIV period Boulle bureau Mazarin profusely decorated on the top, front and sides with finely engraved ebony and brass, in geometric and foliate patterns. The bureau has three drawers on each side of the kneehole and a single drawer at the centre and a cabinet in the recess. The bureau stands on eight tapering column legs with brass domed capitals and feet. The whole is joined by an elaborately shaped stretcher similarly inlaid to the rest of the piece. The back, not as finished as the front, is however ebony veneered and inlaid with framed lozenges achieved in brass stringing. F2C0245 French, circa 1690 Height: 33in (84cm) Width: 47in (120cm) Depth: 25in (64cm)

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A TRANSITIONAL COMMODE BY STUMPF A rare small scale transitional two drawer breakfront commode having gilt bronze corner mounts and feet. The front is inlaid with kingwood panels against a rosewood background ‘sans travers’. The legs are surmounted by kingwood marquetry flutes and are of cabriole form with a single inlaid flute on the front edge and kingwood veneer on the inner face. Stamped Stumpf and JME. F2D0394 French, circa 1760 Height: 33½in (85cm) Width: 32in (81cm) Depth: 17¼in (44cm) Jean Chrysostome Stumpff (1731-1806) was originally from Schweigern, Souabe, Switzerland. He was married in 1760 in Paris at the Swedish Embassy, as was typical of other protestant Swedish compatriots. He was a friend of the cabinet-maker, Ferdinand Schwerdfeger and established himself in rue Saint-Nicolas where he remained all his life. He produced pieces in the Louis XV style, the transitional style and the Louis XVI neo-classical style. His work was always constructed to a very high standard and he had a particularly successful and prolific output of transitional and neo-classical commodes and neo-classical secretaires.

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Opposite:

Above:

A SAUNIER SECRETAIRE COMMODE

A PAIR OF LOUIS XVI CHENETS

An exceptional satinwood Louis XVI secrétaire commode having two drawers in the frieze, a writing slide and two doors below, which open to reveal shelves. Each element is bordered with a crossbanding of ebony with finely chased gilt bronze mounts. Throughout the satinwood is of exceptional figuring and quality. It is arranged in such a way as to make a unified pattern of the grain across the entire piece. The commode retains its original brocatelle marble top and stands on ormolu mounted topie feet. F2A0544 Stamped Saunier Height: 43in (109cm) Width: 43in (109cm) Depth: 18in (46cm)

An outstanding pair of finely chased gilt bronze Louis XVI chenets, taking the form of a wind blown flaming vase. The upper section of the vase is fluted and reeded and is supported by a tripod, terminating in hoof feet. The smaller end of the chenet has a finely wrought pinecone. The joining stretcher is decorated with applied leaf ornament and on the top edge with a Vitruvian scroll, supported on major and minor fluted columns; the former having an oak leaf band at the base. The identical model is illustrated in ‘Vergoldete Bronzen’ (Ottomeyer & Proschel, 1986 p.274, pl.4.11.10). Other examples are a similar pair from the ‘Barriol salon’ of the Hotel de Serres now installed in the Musee des Arts Decoratifs, Paris; at the Huntingdon Gallery in San Marino and in the Louis XVI room in the Villa Ephrusi illustrated on p.48 of ‘Villa Ephrusi de Rothschild’ O2C0390 French, circa 1780 Height: 16in (41cm) Length: 17¼in (44cm)

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A PAIR OF ITALIAN GILTWOOD CONSOLES A fine pair of late 18th century North Italian giltwood consoles each profusely carved with neo classical motifs. They are supported by two bold scrolls carved in high relief on the front edge with swags of honeysuckle and having further foliate carving within the scroll; they terminate in large scale dentils. The backs are formed as an arch made from facing scrolls again supported by foliate carving. The consoles retain their original verde antico tops, bordered with a gilt bronze cable. F2F0171 Italian, circa 1795 Height: 22½in (57cm) Width: 26in (66cm) Depth: 14in (36cm)

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Above:

Opposite:

A PAIR OF PARIS PORCELAIN CACHE POTS

AN EMPIRE CARD TABLE BY MOLITOR

A pair of Empire parcel gilt Paris porcelain, trumpet shaped pots. The bodies are decorated with neo-classical motifs consisting of leaf and open anthemion. O2H0069

A fine quality Empire period two tier demilune card table by Molitor, the top and the first tier veneered in densely figured acajou mouchete, each tier having a brass rolled edge. The whole standing on octagonal tapering legs with brass capitals and feet with castors. The back is finished with recessed panels bordered with delicately carved mouldings. The centre back leg pulls out to reveal a drawer for games pieces and to provide support for the two tiers. Stamped on the centre back leg, B Molitor. F2B0259

French, circa 1810 Max Diameter: 9in (22.9cm) Height: 9½in (24.1cm)

French, circa 1810 Height: 29½in (75cm) Width: 42½in (108cm) Depth: 21½in (54cm)

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A RUSSIAN COMMODE A highly unusual Russian small mahogany commode retaining its old marble top. The top drawer veneered in Cuban mahogany is richly mounted with ormolu rams heads interspersed with pendant swags each containing nine finely chased apples with foliate and floral scrolling husks above. This pierced frieze continues along each side panel and is framed by a moulded brass border. The two lower drawers are veneered in contrasting mahogany veneers, framed by a similar border to that above, with richly engraved ring pulls and central key escutcheon mounts of classical herms, with bearded philosopher’s masks. The whole stands on elegantly turned, tapering legs ending in brass collared toes. Attributed to Christian Meyer. F2B0077 Russian, 1780 Height: 34in (86cm) Width: 44½in (113cm) Depth: 22½in (57cm) This Russian commode is enriched with unusual gilt bronze mounts. In particular, the frieze drawer which presents material swags holding nine apples hanging between rams heads. In addition, the escutcheons on the lower drawers take the form of classical herms supported on plinths, flanked by an open key pattern element. In Russian Furniture, The Golden Age 1780-1840, Antoine Cheneviere, there is a commode illustrated (plate 72) by Christian Meyer

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Left:

A PENDANT GEORGE III LIGHT A mid 19th century pendant glass lantern, having a smoke cowl and suspended from a lead counterweight eagle. The glass bowl is supported by a gilt metal ring decorated with a vitruvian scroll motif. The lantern now has a modern three branch chandelier. F2D0507 England, circa 1820 Height: 50in (127cm)

Opposite:

AN EMPIRE MAHOGANY PEDESTAL DESK A rare and unusual Empire mahogany pedestal desk. The top has slides at each end and the central leathered surface lifts to create a reading slope. The front of the desk has a central frieze drawer enriched with finely wrought gilt bronze classical mounts. The pedestals have five drawers flanked by column pilasters. The reverse is similarly mounted but has cabinets. The sides are enriched with a gilt bronze mount in the form of an oil lamp framed by a border of of laurel. F2G0246 French, circa 1810 Height: 29in (74cm) Width: 53Âźin (135.5cm) Depth: 32Âźin (82cm)

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Opposite:

Above:

AN EMPIRE MAHOGANY ORMOLU MOUNTED SECRETAIRE

A LOUIS XV GILTWOOD FAUTEUIL

An unusual Empire mahogany secrétaire abattant, the front face and sides veneered in a single sweep of flame mahogany. The top is an unusual secret surmounted coffer, the lock being hidden behind the central mask. The fall is framed with a finely chased ormolu border and opens to reveal a blond wood fitted interior. The lower doors open to reveal shelves and a strong box. F1J0075 French, circa 1810 Height: 55½in (141cm) Width: 29in (74cm) Depth: 15½in (39cm)

A very fine quality and rare early Louis XV fauteuil, richly carved on all faces with rococo decoration. The apex of the back is carved with a cartouche, flanked by a stylised shell motif and foliate scrolls. The corners of the top rail are similarly carved in high relief with foliate elements issuing from a fluted scroll. The arms are serpentine in outline and have an unusually carved scrolling element at the join to the back. Similarly, the end of the arm is carved with a cabochon framed by ‘C’ scrolls. The chair stands on cabriole legs, the tops of which are carved with a stylised floral element. The bold cartouche on the centre of the seat rail reflects those central elements on the back frame above. F2A0750 Attributed to Jean-Baptiste I. Tilliard, b. 1686 d. 1766 French, circa 1745 Height of back: 40in (102cm) Height of seat: 17in (43cm) Width: 31in (79cm) Depth: 26in (66cm)

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Above:

Opposite:

A PLUM PUDDING MAHOGANY PEMBROKE TABLE

A REGENCY ROSEWOOD SECRÉTAIRE CABINET BY JOHN MCLEAN

A magnificent and rare mahogany drop leaf pembroke table in the French taste, the top with serpentine shaped sides and of superb colour and figuration, crossbanded and lined with stringing; standing on cabriole legs terminating in brass castors with their original leather wheels; the frieze containing a drawer. F2H0288 English, circa 1770 Height: 28in (71cm) Width: 34in (86cm) Depth: 28in (71cm)

A Regency ormolu-mounted rosewood secrétaire cabinet by John McLean (1770-1825), the cabinet with a single drawer in the frieze with a panelled front with lion’s head ring pull handles, decorated with garlands of flowers within an egg-and-dart border opening to reveal a writing surface in front of a series of small drawers and pigeon-holes, above two panelled cupboard doors with egg-and-dart moulding flanked with further drops of giltmetal flowers headed by lion’s masks below classical terms, all supporting a superstructure of bookshelves with inset mirrored glass back, pierced geometric panelled sides below a pierced gallery, all supported on turned parcel-gilt feet. F2A0069 English, circa 1810 Height: 59 in (150 cm) Width: 37 in (94 cm) Depth: 15 in (37 cm)

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Left:

A NORTH GERMAN PIER MIRROR An unusual brass and mahogany North German mid 19th century tall pier mirror. The top and bottom of the mirror have rectangular panels of watercolour grisaille, the upper panel depicting Apollo and the lower a bacchante. Each section is bordered with a brass moulding. The mirror plate is a later replacement. F2F0110 North Germany, circa 1840 Height: 86in (219cm) Width: 25in (64cm)

Opposite:

A REGENCY BOIS CLAIR OCCASIONAL TABLE A Regency circular bois clair tripod table in the continental style, in the manner of Edward Holmes Baldock, the top with delicate radiating inlay of flower stems, the triform pedestal also with stylised foliate inlay in contrasting wood and raised on down-curving scroll supports. Edward Holmes Baldock (b. 1777, d. 1845) F2G0161 English, circa 1820 Height: 28¼ in (72cm) Diameter: 23½ in (60cm) Edward Holmes Baldock was a furniture dealer and restorer known to operate from premises in Hanway Street, London from 1805. His business and specialisation steadily expanded and in 1821 he was described in the Post Office Directories as an ‘antique furniture and ornamental china dealer’, this entry was re-defined in 1826 to ‘buying, selling, exchanging and valuing China, Cabinets, Screens, Bronzes etc’. In addition to restoring existing furniture, he also produced designs for new pieces and had them made to his specifications. One of his commissions was to produce designs for a suite of bedroom furniture in 1841 for the Duke of Buccleuch. A design for a table in the Buccleuch papers is annotated, ‘No. 3 Amboyna wood ground with coloured flowers’ which is almost certainly the preliminary sketch for a table which was made later. He is known for a number of well-constructed, and in certain cases, finely inlaid pieces of furniture marked with his initials, ‘EHB’. Some of these pieces were pastiches of 18th century French furniture and others are executed in contemporary English style. Baldock’s bills survive in many important archives including the Windsor Royal Archives, George IV’s papers 1827-28, the Duke of Buccleuch and Queensbury’s private archives and the Duke of Northumberland’s private archives amongst many others.

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Opposite:

Above:

AN OVAL REGENCY MIRROR

A DRUM GAMES TABLE BY Totter

A rare small scale oval Regency mirror with original convex mirror plate ornamented by bronzed balls and a mahogany fillet and surmounted by an eagle raised on a foliate plinth. The back retaining two original maker’s labels for the carver and gilder, J Noel and William Gould for the mirror plate. F2H0262 English, circa 1810 Height: 31in (79cm) Width: 9in (22cm)

Having a rotating circular top inlaid with a chessboard of satinbirch and ebony. The frieze has two drawers fitted with compartments for the chess set. The table stands on a concave sided triangular pedestal supported on a platform terminating in scroll feet. Attributed to William Trotter (1772–1833) F2H0279 Scottish, circa 1810 Height: 30in (76cm) Diameter: 32¾in (83cm)

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A PAIR OF WILLIAM IV SIDE CABINETS A pair of painted small bookcases, the tops painted to simulate rosewood and gilt-bordered with a wide freize of scrolling acanthus leaves and contrasting central scenes, in the one case symbolising War and in the other Peace, the open fronts each with two shelves and flanked by neo - Egyptian term pilasters above a frieze painted with Greek key pattern above gadrooned feet. F2H0198 England circa 1830 Height: 33in (85cm) Width: 36in (91cm) Depth: 12 in (31 cm)

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This charming pair of small painted bookcases, owing something to the designs of Thomas Hope, epitomise the taste for Greco- Egyptian neo-classicism with motifs resembling sculpture on the tops and representing War and Peace, Hope’s wife shown as the latter. (Thomas Hope, Costume of the Ancients, 1809.)

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The Age of Satinwood and Neo-Classicism 1770 – 1820 SATINWOOD was the most beautiful and highly valued wood used in the later 18th century. This was a period closely associated with George III and a time of extraordinary invention and prosperity in England. Satinwood came from the colonies, from the West Indies and from Ceylon. Together with other precious, newly discovered and interesting timbers it soon represented the new, rich, light colourful and bright age of neo-classicism, which brought straight edges and clean lines. The name Thomas Sheraton is closely linked to satinwood; his cabinet designs epitomise the elegant late Georgian taste for finely made, neat and superbly scaled cabinets, which are surely on that Parnassus with the greatest English furniture. Following visits made by princes and aristocrats to Rome, ‘the cradle of civilisation’, in the 18th century, just as young back-packers travel the globe today to discover themselves, there was a craze for everything Italian, particularly everything Roman, throughout Europe. The adaptation of ancient forms into contemporary ‘classical’ decoration brought about a tremendously rich injection of ornamental forms based essentially on geometric shapes and straight lines, strictly in contrast to the frivolities of the rococo. While the taste was sometimes standardised it brought about a formulaic discipline that was welcomed. The classical rebirth was most invigorating, especially in provincial places, and in distant parts such as cities far from Rome, from Edinburgh to St. Petersburg. Robert Adam was the most famous amongst many great architects in this manner and interestingly Chippendale’s workshops made the greatest neo-classical furniture (e.g. for Harewood House) despite the fact that his great Director had been essentially a collection of earlier rococo forms. He, like many great designers and artists, showed an ability to adapt, develop and expand with the mood of the times.

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AN IMPORTANT MARQUETRY SIDE TABLE ATTRIBUTED TO JOHN COBB A superb George III satinwood and marquetry serpentine side table in the French taste, almost certainly from the workshop of John Cobb; the top crossbanded with tulipwood and inlaid at the centre with a ribbontied bouquet of flowers within an oval panel with broad rosewood border inlaid with interlaced roundels and floral motifs, the shaped frieze with central urn at the front flanked by paterae and with sunflowers at the sides, all draped with swags of husks, raised on most elegant, tapering cabriole legs cross-banded with rosewood and ending in ormolu sabots. F2F0020 English, circa 1775 Height: 33in (84cm) Width: 57in (145cm) Depth: 28in (71cm) Provenance: Formerly in the collection of the 5th Marquess of Anglesey (1875-1905), Plas Newydd, Llanfairpwll, North Wales Literature: J de Serre, Country Life, 5 February 1927, ‘An Inlaid Satinwood Table’ The Journal of the Furniture History Society, 1974, pl 30b and pp52-53, (photograph in the Symonds Collection at the Henry Francis du Pont Museum, Winterthur) This beautiful, transitional table displays the very best manners of English and French furniture design combined. It is a highly refined example of the successful union of the anglicised Louis XV style and the contemporaneous neo-classical revival. It is one of a select group of pieces of marquetry furniture that can be confidently attributed to John Cobb and his workshop. They are all designed in the ‘French’ taste and made primarily of satinwood, having central panels of marquetry flowers or fruits in the top. They share also the distinctive cross-banded outlines in contrasting timbers and similar neo-classical inlay. A lavishly inlaid bombé commode, with pair of torchéres en suite, is recorded as having been supplied by Cobb in 1772 to Paul Methuen at Corsham Court in Wiltshire. A bill is preserved at Corsham which describes it as an ‘extra neat inlaid commode’ and this has become the point of reference for subsequent attributions. A strikingly similar table formerly in the Tweedmouth collection is now in the Victoria and Albert Museum.

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Left:

A GEORGE III SATINWOOD MUSIC STAND BY ERARD An early 19th century satinwood double sided music stand with brass mounts, raised on a fluted stem with splayed tripod base ending in brass box castors and ball feet, bearing the stamp ‘155’ on the underside of the music rest. F2G0399 English, circa 1800 Height adjustable

Opposite:

A SHERATON 2 TIER SATINWOOD ETAGERE SIDE TABLE A fine and unusual Sheraton period satinwood side table of unusual form with turned and square tapering legs terminating in deep brass toes with castors, the woodwork crossbanded and inlaid with lines in various woods including kingwood; the top and the shelf bound with brass mouldings. (The top surface and the shelf have been relined). F2H0194 English, circa 1790 Height: 35in (90cm) Width: 43in (109cm) Depth: 15 in (38cm)

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exotic timbers from the New World

A REGENCY ROSEWOOD BREAKFAST TABLE A fine Regency period tilt top rosewood breakfast table, the well figured rectangular crossbanded top with ebony and boxwood stringing, the edge with further boxwood stringing, supported on a turned column base with four outswept legs in rosewood inlaid with stylised boxwood stringing, each leg terminating in gilt brass hairy paw feet and castors. F2F0263 English, circa 1815 Width: 55¾in (142cm) Depth: 40¾in (103.5cm) Height: 27½in (70cm)

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A FINE SHERATON PERIOD SATINWOOD SECRETAIRE CABINET A fine late eighteenth century secretaire cabinet in Satinwood and Purpleheart, the front profusely inlaid with marquetry of classical scrolls and anthemions, the base with a fall front drawer fitted with drawers and pigeon holes, the upper mirrored doors concealing shelving. In the manner of Mayhew and Ince. F2H0073 English, circa 1780 Height: 82in (208.3cm) Width: 44½in (113cm) Depth: 19in (48.2cm) The partnership of John Mayhew and William Ince was one of the most significant, and probably the longest lived of any of the major London cabinet makers of the 18th century. They were partners in business from 1759 until 1804. The highly skilful and adventurous use of marquetry, constitutes the firms most original contribution to furniture decoration in the 1770’s and 80’s.

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straight lines and refinement

A PAIR OF GEORGE III PAINTED SATINWOOD CARD TABLES A fine pair of late 18th century Sheraton period satinwood card tables of breakfront outline with bowed corners, the tops inlaid with broad purpleheart banding within ebonised and boxwood stringing and painted with a running band of foliate scrolls centred by Prince of Wales feathers, the frieze with ebonised and boxwood stringing, raised on square tapering legs with double gate-leg action, painted with pendant swags and headed by purpleheart tablets with painted flowerhead paterae, ending in collared feet; the interiors of the fold-over tops lined with green baize. F2C0296 English, circa 1790 Height: 29他in (75.5cm) Width: 34in (86cm) Depth: 16他in (42.5cm)

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Opposite & right:

BACCHUS BY LOUIS GARNIER An early 18th century bronze model of Bacchus having an outstanding original patination, by Louis Garnier (1638 – 1728), standing on a period sienna marble block plinth. O2E0588 French, circa 1700 Height of bronze: 15in (38cm) Height of plinth: 5in (13cm) Louis Garnier was a pupil of Girardon and made a member of the Academy St Luc in Paris, in 1685, later becoming a dean. He worked alongside the founders, Jean-Balthazard and Jean-Jacques Keller and was a protegé of the Marquis de Louvois. His work can be seen at the Palace of Versailles and the same model is illustrated in ‘The French Bronze 1500-1800’; M Knoedler & Co, New York, 1968, illustration number 19b. An example bought in 1699 by Leplat for Augustus the Strong of Saxony, as a pendant to M. Angier’s ‘Amphritrite’, is in the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, Dresden, Grünes Gewölbe (Inv. IX.38). There are several other bronze examples including two in the Hermitage and Leningrad museums.

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A PAIR OF SWEDISH PORPHYRY VASES

A LOUIS XV LANTERN

A pair of large scale mid 19th century Swedish campagna form porphyry vases. O2A0640 Swedish, circa 1860 (The base of one repaired) Height: 19in (48cm) Diameter: 15in (38cm)

An unusual Louis XV lacquered brass pentagonal lantern. Each panel is surmounted by a foliate arch in low relief and framed with applied foliate scrolls. The flat surfaces all have shaping to the outer edge. The lantern is supported from a finely wrought canopy with a smoke cowl, unusually mounted within its frame. F2C0194 French, circa 1760 Height: 32in (81cm) Width: 20in (51cm)

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A FINE SHERATON SATINWOOD SECRETAIRE CABINET An exceptionally elegant Sheraton satinwood secretaire cabinet of fine proportions, the upper section with glass shelves and lined with silk, enclosed by glass doors with moulded fenestration headed by gothic arches. The pediment with a gothic cornice, a key pattern moulding, painted swags and topped with painted finials; the lower section standing on splayed feet and with a secretaire drawer above three further drawers; the whole piece beautifully veneered with contrasting cuts of satinwood and with fine crossbanding; retaining its original brass ring handles. F2H0208 English, circa 1790 Height: 89in (226cm) Width: 31in (78cm) Depth: 18in (46cm)

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A SET OF FOUR OF ADAM PERIOD CARVED GILTWOOD ARMCHAIRS A rare and very fine set of four of Adam period carved giltwood oval back armchairs, the frame of the curved back carved with beading and scrolling ribbon and raised on acanthus supports, the arms with carved acanthus and fluting, the bowed seat rail with anthemion frieze and bead and reel borders, raised on fluted tapering legs headed by paterae. F2B0582 English, circa 1775 Height: 37Ÿin (94.5cm) Width: 24½in (62cm) Depth: 21in (53cm)

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A GEORGE III HEPPLEWHITE PEMBROKE TABLE A very fine late eighteenth century Hepplewhite period satinwood and marquetry Pembroke table, of superb colour, the shaped top richly veneered with classical motifs within a crossbanding of inlaid pearls, finished with ebony and boxwood stringing, the central panel depicting a classical urn in marquetry, against a rosewood background within a border of bell flowers. The frieze having a single drawer flanked by simulated fluting in boxwood, the square tapering legs further decorated with water leaf marquetry, ending on the original brass castors. F2H0040 English, circa 1775 Height: 26¾in (68cm) Width: 38½in (98cm) Depth: 27½in (70cm)

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A LATE 18TH CENTURY INDIAN SILVER MOUNTED PADOUK WRITING BOX ON GEORGE III STAND A late 18th century Indian silver mounted padouk writing box on a George III stand, the serpentine hinged lid enclosing a removable fitted interior with compartments for ink-wells and pens around a blue leather lined writing slope enclosing further drawers and compartments, above three lidded wells, on a original stand with patera-headed square tapering legs, with brass caps and castors. F2H0088 Height: 33in (83cm) Width: 22in (56cm) Depth: 14in (36cm) Anglo-Indian furniture is a significant aspect of English furniture history; a quantity of finely made pieces was made in India in more or less English or true Indian forms. This piece is a highly sophisticated example of the first category, and an especially notable Indian features are the wavy sides and curious and charming starburst silver mounts, perhaps inspired by the stars of the English noble orders, for example, the Garter and the Bath.

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AN 18TH CENTURY ROSEWOOD SOFA TABLE A very fine late 18th century sofa table in rosewood of distinctive figuring and rich colour, the top bordered with burr yew banding and boxwood and ebony stringing, the frieze with two drawers at the front and dummy drawers on the reverse, raised on sabre leg supports joined by a high arched stretcher and ending in brass box castors. F2G0016 English, circa 1800 Height: 28in (71cm) Length: 60½in (154cm) Depth: 27žin (70.5cm)

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The 19th century

19th Century Diversity Empire and Regency classicism faded out in England following the death of George IV. The arts associated with William IV are a good deal less colourful but often of good quality in craftsmanship. The 1840’s were certainly a time of woods – rosewood, mahogany, and exotic striped veneers such as calamander or coromandel, alongside other rarities, even palm tree. All seemed a preparation for the greater part of the nineteenth century for which one LABEL has always been used, Victorian. The adventures and confidence of manufacture in the reign of Queen Victoria were epitomised by the Great Exhibition in London in 1851 which was subsequently followed by many more exhibitions and today, plenty of shows and fairs. Ornament reached the ultimate in diversity and richness. Revivals of many styles were tied together, the best of each often working well in both design and execution. This was an extraordinarily rich period of revival and creativity, often wrongly berated but in fact, with much of great quality produced, always displaying a depth of intellect and extraordinary workmanship. Highly crafted accessories were made in new materials such as cast iron, challenging the use of wood.

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A PAIR OF JAPANESE OBI PANELS A pair of early 20th century Japanese woven panels in the Obi style. These splendid panels of patterned and textured weaving were made for an element of Japanese costume and display an exuberant reworking of Japanese motifs in an ornate and rich manner, by this date achievable in modern weaving techniques. T2G0342 Japanese, circa 1910 Height: 59in (151cm) Width: 31in (79cm)

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A VICTORIAN BURR WALNUT KIDNEY SHAPED DESK A fine quality early Victorian walnut kidney desk of traditional form. The frieze has a single central long drawer flanked by columns of five drawers of increasing size; each drawer has a walnut handle. The sides are locked by means of a winged pilaster with a sliding panel at the capital which marks the escutcheon. The central drawer is stamped Gillows and all the locks are Bramah. The back of the desk has shelves for books. F2G0111 English, circa 1840 Height: 28.5in (72.5cm) Width: 52in (132cm) Depth: 26in (66cm) The kidney desk originated from a table with a kidney-shaped top. This design, often referred to as an ‘haricot’, first appeared as a writing or dressing-table during the Louis XV period (1715-74) in France before being introduced into England in the late 18th century. The kidney table evolved to incorporate drawers and often small shelves for books and thus became the favoured knee-hole form desk of the Sheraton and Victorian periods. Its practicality of shape and design as well as its pleasing and innovative aesthetics made it very popular. The design for this form of desk, ‘Gillow’s Estimate Sketch Books’, no. 5293.

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A NINETEENTH CENTURY OAK LETTER BOX

AN AUSTRIAN LIMEWOOD EAGLE

An unusual oak letter box with brass fitments and postage instructions signed by Thornhill, 144 New Bond St, London and fitted with a Brahma type lock. O2H0243

A fine quality late 19th century Austrian limewood carving of an open winged eagle perched on a rock carved in fine naturalistic detail. O2G0289

English, circa 1880 Height: 8in (20cm) Width: 15in (37cm) Depth: 7in (19cm)

Austrian, circa 1880 Height: 32in (82cm) Width: 33in (83cm) Depth: 20in (50cm)


The 19th century

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The 19th century

Opposite:

Above:

A CAST IRON COALBROOKdALE UMBRELLA STAND

A MID 19TH CENTURY CLUB FENDER

A polished cast iron mid 19th century Coalbrookdale stick stand with open acanthus within Gothic arches at the sides and Gothic carrying handles, With space for twelve sticks. F2H0246

A mid 19th century club fender, the leather upholstered seat on a polished brass frame with circular rails. O2H0116

English, circa 1850 Height: 23in (59cm) Depth: 23½in (60cm) Width: 14in (36cm)

English, circa 1860 Height: 25in (64cm) Depth: 51in (130cm) Width: 18in (46cm)

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A JAPANESE LACQUER SCREEN WITH COCKERELS AND DOVES A Japanese large two-fold screen, decorated in high relief, lacquer, gilt and other embellishment, the interior with two pairs of cockerel and hen amongst chrysanthemum and peony blooms on a naturalistic wood ground, above panels of dragons in the clouds, the exterior decorated on each panel with three doves perched on large branches of flowering plum trees, open winged and in flight, amongst thin branches, all within hardwood frames, decorated with gilt flowers and foliage with incised metal work corners, frame supports, feet and hinges. F2H0297 Japanese, circa 1900 Meiji Period Height: each panel 68 in (171.01 cm) Width: 38 in (95 cm)

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The 19th century

Opposite:

A SET OF FRENCH BAYONET FIRE IRONS A set of late 19th century novelty fire irons in the form of stylised bayonets with brass and steel mounted wooden handles each with maker’s stamp. O2H0018 French, circa 1880 Length of poker: 25¾in (65.5cm)

Above, from left to right:

A BRASS DOOR STOP IN THE FORM OF A SEATED LABRADOR A mid 19th century brass doorstop in the form of a seated Labrador, with registration mark on reverse. O2E0266 English, circa 1860 Height: 13¾in (35cm)

ONE OF A MATCHED PAIR OF BRASS DOOR STOPS A matched pair of Victorian brass doorstops, the bell shaped bases with scroll details. O2H0235

A MATCHED PAIR OF BRASS DOOR STOPS

English, circa 1840 Height 17in (43cm)

A matched pair of Victorian brass doorstops cast in a stylised rope twist pattern, the stem surmounted with a decorative knot with tassels. O2F0394

A BRASS DOOR STOP IN THE FORM OF A FOX HEAD

English, circa 1845 Height: 16½in (42cm)

A 19th century brass door stop, the base in the form of a fox head with carrying handle formed by a hunting crop. O2G0103 English, circa 1890 Height: 16in (40.5cm)

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A group of Ball clocks

A PAIR OF PROFILES OF QUEEN VICTORIA AND PRINCE ALBERT

A group of late 19th century English and French ball clocks. Diameter of largest clock: 4in (Clockwise from top: 02H0242, O2H0110, O2H0111, O2H0172, O2H0109)

A pair of glass cast profiles of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, mounted on oval mirrors decorated with a band of convex printies, framed in ebonised ovals surmounted by a carved giltwood crown. O2E0401 The mirrors English, circa 1850 Height: 23¼in (59cm) Width: 14½½in (37cm)

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Royal patronage for the arts and industry

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A CARTON PIERRE COUNTER BOX

A WILLIAM IV CALAMANDER ETAGERE

A Louis Philippe carton pierre and gilt metal casket having a panel of floral needlework set into the mirrored top the sides are silvered and of bombé form. They are mounted with repoussé gilt metal handles and feet. The casket opens to reveal a pink interior and an applied engraving of a village scene. The interior has a removable carrier which retains four further carton pierre boxes, each with a mirrored top and an octagonal panel of needlework illustrating a butterfly. Each of the boxes contains stained ivory counters. O2D0212

A fine William IV brass mounted calamander four tier etagère, the top with a baluster gallery on three sides, the four shelves bordered with brass beading, the supports with gilt fluted columns, brass beading and carved foliate detail, raised on brass mounted turned legs ending in brass cup castors. F2B0382

French, circa 1850 Height: 3in (7.5cm Width: 9in (23cm) Depth: 7in (18cm)

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English, circa 1830 Height: 38in (96.5cm) Width: 27¼in (69.5cm) Depth: 15in (38cm)


The 19th century

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MALLETT PLC

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Directors George Magan* Chairman Lanto Synge Chief Executive Michael Smyth-Osbourne Finance Director Lord Daresbury* James Heneage* Giles Hutchinson Smith Eloy Michotte* Henry Neville Thomas Woodham-Smith

All business transactions are subject to our standard terms and conditions of sale, copies of which are available on request.

*Non executive

MALLETT & SON ANTIQUES (LTD) 141 New Bond Street London W1S 2BS Telephone: 020 7499 7411 Fax: 020 7495 3179 Lanto Synge Chief Executive Michael Smyth-Osbourne Finance Director Giles Hutchinson Smith Managing Director James Harvey Director (Gallery) Thomas Woodham-Smith Director Richard Cave Director Felicity Jarrett Associate Director Nicholas Wells Associate Director

MALLETT INC. 929 Madison Avenue New York NY 10021 USA Telephone: 001 212 249 8783 Fax: 001 212 249 8784 Henry Neville President Robin Hermanns Justin Evershed-Martin

WEBSITE www.mallettantiques.com

EMAIL info@mallettantiques.com

Š Mallett 2007 Design by District-6.com Printed by Orchid

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Mallett 2007 Catalogue