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W I L LY RIZZO

W I L LY RIZZO

PUBLISHED TO ACCOMPANY EXHIBITIONS IN LONDON & NEW YORK

5-16 OCTOBER 2009

Mallett 141 New Bond Street London W1S 2BS Telephone 020 7499 7411 2-14 NOVEMBER 2009

Mallett Inc 929 Madison Avenue at 74th Street New York 10021 Telephone 001 212 249 8783

mallettantiques.com

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orking with Willy and his wonderful wife Dominique has been one of the most stimulating and fascinating aspects of life at Mallett over the last few years. Since our first exhibition of his vintage work and portrait photography we have been amazed and delighted by the interest that has been generated both in Europe and in America. Many old friends and clients of Willy have been in contact and a whole new generation of enthusiasts has been born. Sitting in Willy’s dining room in Paris eating delicious pasta washed down by a glass (or two) of wine, one is constantly inspired by Willy’s sense of humour and energy. Many a time he would walk around and point to himself and ask me “why does everyone want vintage? Am I a vintage? Here I am.” He jokes that he is his own ‘père et fils’. In our minds we see the sign above the shop “Willy Rizzo, père et fils”. It is also true, he has had a long and successful career but he is also keen on the future and thinking about what next. Following the success and sell out of his last show his creative brain went into overdrive planning and trying to improve and reinvent the best pieces. The product, two years later, is the exhibition and catalogue that accompanies it. Included are some completely new pieces, others inspired by his creations from the 60s and 70s and finally adapted pieces from previous designs. All are offered with certification and, except for the lamps, are limited edition. In addition and perhaps with an eye to the ‘père’ sobriquet we are offering a collection of limited edition silver gelatin prints taken by Willy of dance and the ballet in Paris in the 1950s. This collection is largely unpublished and never before produced at this size. For both the enthusiast and the amateur we hope the marvellously conceived and executed images will prove enticing. To accompany the collection Willy has designed and made a new steel frame. We hope you enjoy the catalogue and have a chance to visit the show either in London or in New York. Please contact any of our sales team if you have any questions. Thomas Woodham-Smith

Left, Willy Rizzo at Gunter Sach’s Paris home in 1963 Overleaf, Willy with Audrey Hepburn in 1966

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uring the Fifties Willy Rizzo, master of the scoop, one of the world's greatest photojournalists in a golden age of reportage, was travelling around the world to cover the hottest stories. His Leica and Rolleiflex recorded the tragedies of war in Indo-China (now Vietnam) a coup d'état in Egypt. He was first in the Vatican to photograph the new Pope Pius XII. His colour portrait of Winston Churchill made the first cover of Paris-Match. He took pictures of the Kings of Morocco and Jordan and newly elected Presidents of France, where no one else could penetrate the protocol. A Rizzo photo reportage devoted to Maria Callas inspired Hergé to create ‘Walter Rizotto’, the ultimate cameraman, for a Tintin adventure The Castafiore Emerald. Away from the heat of reporting, he was preoccupied by an extraordinary variety of subjects. He carried out original research into the lives of Jules Verne and Leonardo da Vinci, and, not surprising given his love of movie stars, the history of Los Angeles. Willy Rizzo enjoyed being part of a charmed circle in Paris during the fifties. He was the ‘grand seigneur’ among a new photo-aristocracy. The houses of such cultivated friends as the surrealist artist Jean Cocteau, and Louise de Vilmorin, writer of exquisite novels, inspired him to start interior decorating, where he always put structure and space ahead of bibelots. Rizzo has always understood fashion, ordered his own suits from the finest tailors, adored beautiful elegant women. In the Fifties Alex Liberman art director of Vogue (Rizzo has always known EVERYONE), a creative genius who had commissioned such masters of photography as Kertesz, Capa and Brassai, asked him to 'use his eye' for haute couture. This was an immensely difficult new technique for Rizzo to master, after the immediacy of reporting. It meant experimenting with different lighting techniques, taking on an altogether unfamiliar artistic discipline.

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Opposite, Paris Match covers photographed by Willy Rizzo betwwen 1949 and 1957

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W I L LY R I Z Z O Above and opposite, spreads from Paris Match between 1949 and 1955

To follow his successful pictures of high fashion, the next step for Willy Rizzo was to catch the spirit of dance, an art form he has always loved. As a child he took modern dance and tap lessons, later classical ballet classes in the academies of the Champs Elysees. Another technical challenge to be faced, he had to devise a way to seize that airy leap, or fleeting expression, and to inspire the dancers. He told them to imagine being filmed by a movie camera which records 24 frames in a second. His ingenious device was a 'kalart' (invented in 1930 for military purposes) attached to the front of his Rolleiflex which allowed the focus to be synchronised with flash lamps. This system allowed him to catch natural movement on a still camera, impossible if he had to rely on natural or theatre lighting.

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Only flash will allow the camera to be set at a fast enough speed. Progress came years later when cameras were manufactured with an internal synchronised flash mechanism. An artist but also a gifted technical innovator, Willy Rizzo greatly expanded his photographic repertoire during the fifties from portraits of actors and reporting. He transformed fashion models into dream creatures and miraculously caught dancers in flight. His social life informed his interest in design and decoration, leading to furniture design in 1968, a new chapter in his life. Willy Rizzo has equal gifts as creator of unforgettable photographic images, and furniture on pure neo-classical lines, which will stand the test of time.

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THE WILLY RIZZO FRAME These are a new design made of bronze patinated brass sandwiching a filet of polished brass. They are signed and numbered, and are exclusive to the exhibition and catalogue. Height: 43in (109cm) Width: 39in (99cm)

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BALLET PHOTOG RAPHS 1949-1959

The images on the following pages are all silver-gelatine prints and of a larger size than Willy has hitherto produced. Each print will be signed and numbered and are in editions of eight. Especially for this exhibition Willy has designed and produced a new design of frame which will be both signed and numbered in the same edition size as the photographs. Each of the frames has been made under his controlling eye and offers a unique opportunity to enjoy the fusion of artist and designer that is Willy Rizzo. The brushed steel and brass design harmonises elegantly with the images and captures both the spirit of the age and our era. The frames can be ordered ‘off set’ and could be mounted with mirror plate.

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CARMEN ROJAS, 1955 THE SPIRIT OF FLAMENCO

Carmen Rojas, as Rosario in the Tanguillo de Cadix. Produced by Antonio y los Ballets de Madrid. She danced a mixture of old flamenco songs, which had been discovered and revived by the famous poet Garcia Lorca. The Flamenco is a deceptively easy dance to perform. When performed by a master it gives the impression that anyone can do it however the opposite is the truth as only years of training and probably Spanish blood make it both magical and accessible. P2J0127

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LA NUIT EST UNE SORCIÈRE, THÉATRE DES CHAMPS-ÉLYSÉES, 1955 BALANCING THE NEEDS OF THE DANCER WITH THOSE OF THE PHOTOGRAPHER

This ballet is most romantic, perhaps made more so in this performance by the fact that the two lead dancers Josette Clavier and Pierre Lacotte were married in real life. A bird seller, danced by Clavier, is sad because she has lost her favourite bird. A mysterious boy, danced by Lacotte, choreographer and founder of Les Ballets de la Tour Eiffel, brings it back and they fall in love. Sidney Bechet, who composed the music for this ballet, performed on saxophone, Daniel Wayenberg played the piano accompanied by Charles Aznavour, the world famous singer. “Photographing Ballet is extremely hard as it is impossible to take the same picture twice. One has to balance the needs of the dancer with those of the photographer; it is too often the case that beautiful steps are not photogenic. I like the poses in this photograph because though obviously static they give an idea of movement.” P2J0129

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FRED ASTAIRE AND AUDREY HEPBURN, 1956 WILLY RIZZO'S LEICA AND A GIVENCHY DRESS

In the film Funny Face, Fred Astaire caricatures the photographer trying to find the best angle for his model in her Givenchy dress. Hepburn took ballet lessons in order to be able to dance with this legend of dance. “I took these pictures with a Leica, we worked outside all day but my camera had a fault which would have been impossible to notice before and the pictures were ruined. I went to see Audrey to tell her how upset I was. I also knew Fred Astaire of whom I had taken several portraits. They were very kind and agreed to shoot the pictures again.� P2J0128

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SERGE GOLOVINE, 1958 THIS ‘BOND’ OR LEAP INSPIRED BY NIJINSKY

After Vaslav Nijinsky created Le Bond du Spectre de la Rose in 1911, Serge Golovine (1924-1998) rediscovers it. Bronislava Nijinska, Nijinsky’s sister, taught Golovine how to keep his balance in the air using the strength of his abdominal muscles. Golovine was a star of the Grand Ballet du Marquis de Cuevas throughout the 1950s working alongside dancers such as Rosella Hightower, Marjorie Tallchief, Georges Skibine, and Georges Zoritch. P2J0132

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SERGE GOLOVINE, 1958 AN ARTIST FAMOUS FOR HIS ACROBATIC LEAPS

“He (Golovine) demonstrated many different ballet positions. We choose one for him which he rehearsed many times. I fixed my lighting and I shot the picture. I know when I have the right image.� Golovine was famous for his airborne leaps and the lightness and articulation of his footwork. This shot was taken at the time he was performing in Le Spectre de la Rose and is typical of this ballet which features a number of challenging choreographic leaps. P2J0136

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MARJORIE TALLCHIEF, 1954 THE FIRST AMERICAN TO BECOME 'PREMIÈRE DANSEUSE ÉTOILE’ AT THE OPÉRA DE PARIS

Seen here in the costume by Alwyn Nikolais, who directed the choreography of the ballet L’Idylle. Tallchief is the daughter of the great Osage Indian tribal leader, Alexander Tall Chief and was the first American to become Première Danseuse Étoile at the Opéra de Paris. At the time this photograph was taken Tallchief was dancing with the Le Grand Ballet du Marquis de Cuevas. This picture is taken with a Rolleiflex and the new electronic flash. P2J0134

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MARJORIE TALLCHIEF, 1954 A MAGNIFICENT LEAP CAPTURING ONE OF THE BALLERINA’S FINEST ROLES

This was shot during a performance of L’Idylle at Théâtre de l’Empire. In the picture she is the Pouliche or Filly. The horse to the left is danced by her husband George Skibine – a Russian born dancer and choreographer, and to the right, is the stallion, played by Vladimir Skouratoff, who is going to seduce the Pouliche. Skouratoff specialised in character roles and choreographed parts in this ballet along with those in Serge Lifar's Dramma per musica and Shota Rustaveli (both 1946). This was one of Tallchief’s most highly acclaimed roles. P2J0133

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STUDENTS AT THE OPÉRA DE PARIS, 1954 A MOMENT OF LAUGHTER AMID INTENSE REHEARSAL

This building is significant in the history of ballet and its development as an art. Pierre Beauchamps, the first choreographer of the Opéra de Paris, used to throw grain to the pigeons to derive inspiration from the groups they formed. He has been credited with the codification of the five positions of the feet. Serge Lifar was director of the Opéra de Paris in the 1930s and began a strictly disciplined routine. He even asked to switch off the lights on the stage so that the ballerinas could not be recognised by their admirers. He instituted weekly ballet performances laying emphasis upon the art of ballet in its own right as opposed to solely in conjunction with opera. P2J0140

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CON COLLEANO, CIRQUE MEDRANO, 1949 A CAPTURED SPLIT SECOND OF COURAGE, BALANCE, COMPOSURE AND EXTREME TENSION

“Five minutes before this picture was taken, the wire had broken and Colleano had fallen.” At 51 years old Con Colleano (1899-1973) was the greatest tightrope walker in the world. Born in Australia he adopted a Spanish toreador persona in April 1924 in order to boost box office sales. His act included bull-fighting movements from the ring, Spanish dance moves on the wire along with a dangerous forward somersault. He worked with the fantastic Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey circus in the United States. P2J0131

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JEAN BABILÉE IN BALANCE À TROIS, 1956 DANCED AND CHOREOGRAPHED BY THE 'JAMES DEAN' OF PARIS BALLET

Born in 1923, Jean Babilée was known as the ‘James Dean’ of ballet. He married to Nathalie Philippart, who was also his partner in Les Ballets des Champs Elysées. He is very handsome, typically French and very muscular; different from the Russian school. Balance à Trois is one of several ballets Babilée choreographed, and was one of his most successful. P2J0142

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SONIA PETROVNA,1966 THE BIRTH OF A NEW TALENT

She was a student at the École de Danse de L’Opéra de Paris when she was photographed by Willy Rizzo. She is French and lived with her family in Paris but took a Russian theatre name as was fashionable after the fame of the Ballets Russes. Shortly after this photograph was taken she was chosen to star in a short film, Adolescence for which she received the San Georgio Prize at the Venice Biennale and which marked the start of her career as an actress. P2J0147

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SONIA PETROVNA IN ADOLESCENCE, 1966 ROMANCE AND BEAUTY CAPTURED BY INSPIRED LIGHTING AND INFORMALITY

The film Adolescence by Vladimir Forgency was nominated for an academy award in 1966. A beautiful movie, nouvelle vague in style, about the transmission of classic dance to a new generation by Russian star Lubov Egorova (1880-1972, later Princess Nikita Troubetska). Egorova began her dancing career at the Maryinsky Theatre, St Petersburg and went on to become one of Russia’s star ballerina’s, dancing with Diaghilev's Ballets Russes from (1921-2). Egorova founded her own ballet school in 1923, and in 1937 her small company Les Ballets de la Jeunesse was formed which inspired the filming of Adolescence. P2J0143

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SAUT DE L’ANGE,1955 ROLAND PETIT AND HIS PARTNER LEAP ENERGETICALLY

Performed by Roland Petit and a dancer from the company he formed in 1948. Petit was a pupil at the Paris Opera Ballet School from 1934 to 1940 after which he joined the same company for four years. Then he left to concentrate on his choreography and founded the ‘Ballets des Champs Elysées’ with Boris Kochno and Christian Bérard, where he was also the star dancer. Petit was renowned for his theatrical use of set and costume and his acrobatic choreography. P2J0141

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‘LA BELLE HÉLÈNE’, OPÉRA DE PARIS, 1955 TWO DANCERS CAPTURE THE FANTASY OF OFFENBACH

Micheline Grimoin and Josette Amiel, first dancers from L’Opéra de Paris, interpret the evolution of dance in a ballet inspired by ‘La belle Hélène’ by Jacques Offenbach. Choreography was by John Cranko, a South African most well known for his work with the Sadler’s Wells Ballet (later The Royal Ballet) and the Stuttgart Ballet. “I wanted a black background, so I took the picture from backstage with the room in black, and a violent flash light at the side for the relief.” P2J0135

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The prince, danced by Viktor Rona, principal dancer and later director of ballet at the Budapest Opera House, compares two shoes and realises that he has found the one which will fit Cinderella. Cinderella is danced by Galina Samsova, a Russian dancer who trained at the Kiev Ballet School but at the time of this ballet performance, was dancing at the National Ballet of Canada, which she joined in 1961. P2J0138

CINDERELLA, THÉÂTRE DES CHAMPS ÉLYSÉES, 1963 AT THE TIME THE MOST EXPENSIVE BALLET PERFORMED IN PARIS

At the time this production was the most expensive ballet ever mounted, costing 135 million Francs (the equivalent of 2 million dollars) to produce. Jacqueline de Ribes and Raymondo de Larrain (nephew of the Marquis de Cuevas) raised the money. It combined the children’s fairytale story with the modern choreography of Vaslav Orlikovsky, Master of the Basel Ballet. The clown was danced by Phillip Dalhmann. P2J0137

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LESLIE CARON, OPÉRA DE PARIS, 1950 DISCOVERED BY WILLY LAUNCHED THROUGH PARIS MATCH

Caron had her first magazine cover in Paris Match in 1950. Willy was looking for a subject for the magazine’s May edition: “I went to the Bar des Théâtres in front of Théâtre des Champs Élysées and looked at this young dancer crossing the street. It gave me an idea. I told her I wanted to put her on the cover of Paris Match. She laughed and said “I am not fooled by that old story!”. But she was persuaded and I shot her photo at her parents’ house the very next day in Bagatelle. I put a branch of lilies in her hand and took the picture. Sometime after Gene Kelly called the magazine and asked for me, he wanted to know how to find this girl. This was the start of her career.” P2J0145

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ROSELLA HIGHTOWER, 1951 A STAR IS BORN AT THE EMPIRE THEATRE

Along the Seine in Paris, the legacy of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes had inspired a new generation of dancers and was breathing new energy into classical ballet. Hightower is the proof. When she first danced in Paris at the Alhambra, 1947, with the Grand Ballet du Marquis du Cuevas, she received only a warm reception but went on to receive high acclaim for her role in Swan Lake amongst many others. The role of the Black Swan is a huge challenge for any ballerina. The music is composed by Tchaïkovsky and the choregraphy was by Marius Petipa (1822-1910). Hightower began her dance training at the class of Dorothy Perkins in Kansas City. In 1937 she went to Monte Carlo at the invitation of Léonide Massine, principal choreographer of Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes. She joined the Grand Ballet du Marquis du Cuevas in 1947. The Marquis du Cuevas (of Santiago, Chile), was the husband of a grand-daughter of Rockfeller; an eccentric personality who had a huge passion for dance and Ballet in particular. P2J0146

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TUTUS AT THE OPÉRA DE PARIS, 1954 THE MAGIC AND DRAMA OF BALLET SUSPENDED IN TIME

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This year witnessed the introduction of tutus for its ballerinas. Dance costume has evolved considerably since women began performing in 1681. The first ballerina to dance “without pannier, skirt or bodice”, wearing only a muslin dress over her petticoat, was Marie Sallé in 1734, in order to have freer movement and so that her audience could see her graceful footwork. However, it was not until the end of 19th century that the bell-shaped tulle skirts were replaced with 16-layer tutus which allowed ballerinas much greater mobility. These in turn were replaced with the short ‘powderpuff’ tutus instigated under George Balanchine’s directorship at the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo in 1950. This tutu design can be seen above and is used in ballet companies worldwide. “For me The Opera is the palace of the stars, where golden voices sing out and we attend the mysteries of this palace of mirages where the public can worship and pay homage to the lords of performance.” P2J0144

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LUDMILA TCHERINA, GALA, 1962 THE SHADOW OF DALI AND HIS ALL SEEING EYE

Gala was a collaboration between Maurice Béjart, choreographer and Salvador Dali, whose wife lends her name to the title of the production. Dali wrote the story and designed sets and costumes for the ballet which premiered at the Teatro La Fenice in Venice, 1961. We see him here silhouetted against the clock in the background. This was Tcherina’s last new dancing role after a long and illustrious career dancing with Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo, Les Ballets des Champs Élysées and appearing often with the Paris Opera, the Bolshoi Ballet and the Kirov Ballet as a guest performer. P2J0139

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W I L LY RIZZO MODERN DESIGN

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allett have collaborated with Willy Rizzo to launch a new collection of furniture. His sleek and innovative neo-classical designs, each as a pair and in limited edition in 'noble materials' such as stone, marble, brass and stainless steel, will be for sale at Mallett in London and New York during October and November. Each piece has been conceived for the way we live now. Rizzo chose to work with Mallett for a second time, confident that they combine a profound knowledge of craftsmanship with a feeling for changing fashion. They alone have rediscovered the Rizzo star quality and its contemporary relevance. Glamorous, comfortable, adaptable, indestructible, timeless furniture, equally at home in a minimalist as a grand traditional interior. Vintage pieces have been tripling in value over the last few years. Inferior versions, sometimes obvious copies, were beginning to appear. It seemed timely to re-introduce a new and original collection. Willy Rizzo made his name photographing beautiful people, who adored his company, and always will. But the bon viveur artist who charmed celebrities was also an inventor, a gifted technician, a follower of Leonardo. In 1968 he went to live in Rome and started to design furniture for his own apartment, inspired by classical principles, made by a small group of craftsmen. Antiques were uncomfortable, Scandinavian and psychedelic style unsympathetic. His ultra chic brown, black and gold decoration, glossy geometric furniture, including tables with a 'bassin' for chilled champagne, and a lamp to 'encourage flirting' brought all the Dolce Vita princes and playboys of the newly named Jet Set, wanting more of the same. Commissions came from Brigitte Bardot and Salvador Dali. The Rizzo atelier grew to employ 150 cabinetmakers, and the world took notice. But in 1980 Rizzo decided to return to photography. His furniture retreated into the shadows, but now thanks to Mallett prescience, returns to the limelight it deserves in a collection of signed, limited edition works, each piece supported by a certificate of authenticity.

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FURNITURE

THE PARALLÈLE A pair of side tables with a drawer ‘parallèle’ black Lacquer and stainless steel. Edition of 12, each piece is signed and sold with a certificate of authenticity. Height: 20in (60cm) Width: 23in (50cm) Depth: 20in (50cm) F2J0116

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THE PARALLĂˆLE A pair of side tables with a drawer either in black lacquer or in mother of pearl. Mounted in bright polished stainless steel. Edition of 12, signed and certificated. Height: 20in (60cm) Width: 23in (50cm) Depth: 20in (50cm) F2J0115

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FURNITURE

THE TCG (TAVOLO COMMODINO GIREVOLE) A pair of rotating circular table-commodes in white lacquer and stainless steel with 3 drawers, each side of which has a secret drawer. Edition of 12, signed and certificated. Height: 12in (32cm) Depth: 29in (75cm) F2J0118

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FURNITURE

THE WR TRIC TRAC 2009 A tric trac table, bronze patinated with brass enrichments the reversable top in dark brown suede, the playing surface in green and red leather in reference to the Italian flag. With hidden drawers in the frieze. Edition of 12, signed and certificated. Height: 29in (74cm) Width: 33in (85cm) Depth: 33in (85cm) F2J0119

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FURNITURE

THE LOVE TRIANGLE A pair of triangular table lamps in stainless steel, the interior copper plated and the lamps fitted with dimmers. Signed and certificated. Height: 25in (65cm) Width: 14in (35cm) Depth: 14in (35cm) L2J0117

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THE NEW GENERATION COMMODE A pair of commodes in ‘marron marbré’ with 10 drawers & 1 secret drawer. Edition of 12, signed and certificated. Height: 33in (85cm) Width: 47in (120cm) Depth: 17in (45cm) F2J0114

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FURNITURE

THE LACQUER LOW TABLE A rectangular lacquer and mother of pearl coffee table with internal polished steel liner. Edition of 12, signed and certificated. Height: 13in (34cm) Width: 55in (140cm) Depth: 31in (80cm) F2J0122

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FURNITURE

THE FLAMINIA END TABLES A pair of polished brass end tables with black granite tops and dark glass lower tier. Edition of 12, signed and certificated. Height: 20in (50cm) Width: 31in (80cm) Depth: 20in (50cm) F2J0121

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FURNITURE

THE FLAMINIA END TABLES A pair of polished brass end tables with Roman travertine tops and dark glass lower tier. Edition of 12, signed and certificated. Height: 20in (50cm) Width: 31in (80cm) Depth: 20in (50cm) F2J0120

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COPYRIGHT All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publishers. TERMS AND CONDITIONS All business transactions are subject to our standard terms and conditions of sale, copies of which are available on request.

Š Mallett & Son (Antiques) Ltd 2009 Designed by Sinclair Communications Printed in England by BAS

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Mallett - Willy Rizzo II