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MALLETT & SON (ANTIQUES) LTD, ELY HOUSE, 37 DOVER STREET, LONDON W1S 4NJ TEL: +44 (0)20 7499 7411 FAX: +44 (0)20 7495 3179 info@mallettantiques.com ALSO IN NEW YORK AT 929 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK NY 10021 TEL: +001 212 249 8783 www. mallettantiques.com


Introduction

This year we celebrate the 150th anniversary of the founding of Mallett. The company opened in 1865 the same year as the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox Court House that brought to an end the American Civil War and the first ascent of the Matterhorn by Edward Wymper. The company has grown from a small business dealing in silver and pearls in the English country town of Bath to one of the world’s leading purveyors of glamorous furniture and rare works of art with galleries in Mayfair and Madison Avenue. We have through our own modest history been fortunate to furnish some of the world’s great collections, particularly in the United States of America whose energetic collectors have been most supportive and kind to Mallett and our trade over many generations. We have as part of our celebrations, the pleasure to host a number of exhibitions through the year starting in May with the Venetian glass maestro Lino Tagliapietra whose work has never been shown in the UK, and later in the calendar the American ceramicist Clare Potter which will also be a first on these shores. Both Lino and Clare are enthusiastically collected in the United States so we look forward to introducing them to a new audience. This is also the 6th year of our fair Masterpiece London opening on June 25th to July 1st. We do hope as many of you that can come will do so to see this increasingly important event in the art world calendar. It is a true polymath experience! Meanwhile all of us look forward to seeing you in our galleries and the fairs we attend throughout the year.

Giles Hutchinson Smith Chief Executive


The Mentmore Torchères An exceptional pair of George II giltwood torchères attributed to Thomas Johnson. The carved central figures of Chinese ceremonial courtiers in flamboyant costume supporting foliate columns, the circular tops with cascading tendrils of coral, braced on two pierced and carved plinths with c-scrolls and rocaille detailing, the legs joined by a three part stretcher. The candle-stands replaced. England, circa 1755 Height: 49in (125cm) Width: 17in (43cm) F3E0237 PROVENANCE

Baron Mayer de Rothschild, Mentmore Towers and by descent Sotheby’s Mentmore House Sale, 20th May 1977, lot 862 Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

The celebrated carver and designer Thomas Johnson – highly regarded in his own lifetime – spent a racy youth that compelled him to leave London in 1746 to escape arrest. He spent a decade in Liverpool and Dublin, before returning to London in 1755. There he enhanced his reputation by publishing numerous designs in a vivacious rococo idiom. The influence of his style is apparent in both English and Irish furniture of the period. The torchères exhibited here belong to a small group clearly produced in the same workshop. One pair comes from Kenure Castle in Ireland, for which it was probably bought in the 19th century, after a fire. The others are first recorded in England. A third pair is in the Lady Lever collection at Port Sunlight. MENTMORE TOWERS

Mentmore Towers was designed by Joseph Paxton and his son-in-law, George Henry Stokes, in the 19th-century revival of late 16th and early 17th-century Elizabethan and Jacobean styles, for the banker and collector of fine art Baron Mayer de Rothschild as a country home, and as a display case for his collection of fine art. The mansion has been described as one

of the greatest houses of the Victorian era. When Lady Eastlake visited Mentmore, home of Mayer Amschel Rothschild, she gushed, ‘What a palace it is! And filled like a museum with every form of art and virtú.’ Mentmore Towers came first in the Rothschild building craze in the nineteenth century. Mayer hired Sir Joseph Paxton, designer of the Crystal Palace, to redesign Mentmore in 1851, the same year as the Great Exhibition. Mentmore’s Elizabethan exterior supported a glass and iron roofed central hall, a technological feat for its time. Inside, Mentmore’s Hall takes centre stage. The enormous space with its domed ceiling and first floor gallery recalled the Italian Palazzo style. The room was covered in Gobelins tapestries, Savonnerie carpets, and Italian gilt baroque furniture. The room also featured gilt Venetian lanterns from the Doge’s barge, and the fireplace came from Ruben’s home in Antwerp. This room, with its incorporation of French and Italian decoration, reflected the massive and decadent qualities of the baroque style, which preceded the taste of the ancient régime. Disraeli lauded

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‘What a palace it is! And filled like a museum with every form of art and virtú.’ Lady Eastlake on visiting Mentmore

the hall as a ‘masterpiece of modern art and decoration… and yet [it is] the most comfortable and liveable--‐in apartment in the world.’ The white and gold boiseries on the wall came from the Parisian Hôtel de Villars

with panels of Genoese velvet inserted into them. The room contained gilt Italian tables and large mirrors at each end of the room and above the mantelpiece. With its earlier Italian objects mixed with French wall panelling, this room fused the Baroque and ancient régime styles. A third room, the White Drawing Room, offered a more pure representation of the ancient régime style. The walls featured white silk with Fragonard doors and Boucher paintings. The Louis XV and Louis XVI furniture, Sèvres porcelain, and miniatures completed the ancient régime look.

The Great Hall, Mentmore Towers, circa 1890

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An Empire Chandelier A very fine Empire ormolu chandelier, surmounted by an anthemion and foliate corona above six chains suspending a dish, surmounted with a central ­cherub figure, supporting twelve winged ­caryatid figures, holding twelve foliate cast ­sconces. The dish cast with detailed anthemion and neo-classical symbols above a pine cone drop finial. France, circa 1810 Height:43½in (110cm) Diameter: 29½in (75cm) L3F0023 PROVENANCE

Godmersham Park, Kent Mallett, London.

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Godmersham Park House in Kent was built in 1732 as the ancestral home of Thomas May Knight (b. 1701 – 1781). Educated at Balliol College, Oxford, Knight was a wealthy landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1734 to 1741, having previously served as the Sheriff of Kent in 1729. Thomas Knight was related to George Austen, father of the celebrated romantic novelist Jane Austen and her brother Edward. Unable to have children of their own, Thomas Knight and his wife Catherine ‘adopted’ Edward when he was twelve years old, securing an entitlement as their legal heir.

Following Thomas’ death in 1794, Godmersham Park passed into Edward’s ownership making it his own family home until 1852. Jane was a frequent visitor to her brother’s home often staying for weeks at a time. Inspired by the magnificent surroundings and grand occasions of Kentish society, literary historians believe that Godmersham Park may well have provided the backdrop for Mansfield Park and Persuasion, her last completed novel before she died in 1817.


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A Rare Mirror Painting An exceptionally fine and rare 18th century Chinese-export reverse-painted mirror; depicting three ladies in relaxed pose and a child playing with a small spaniel in the foreground.

Chinese lanterns and choice pieces of elegant furniture add to the opulence of the interior scene, behind which we see a detailed landscape setting in the distance.

In a later japanned frame.

Chinese export mirror painting was greatly admired in Europe during the 18th and 19th centuries, in particular their very fine depictions of indigenous flora and fauna in decorative landscapes. Consequently, this mirror painting is particularly rare in its depiction of a majestic interior in such detail with three ladies of distinction.

China, circa 1800 Height: 21in (53cm) Width: 25½in (65cm) P3E0230

Reputedly part of the Summer Palace of Peking, the interior portrays a sumptuous setting for courtiers, with beautiful painted screen and bamboo dividers on a dark blue ground offset against red wooden supports. Decorative

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Records show a gentleman by the name of Richard Hall, a successful British merchant living in China between 1785 and 1803, amassed a large collection of Chinese export mirror paintings.

Among them a large pair representing the Emperor (recognisable by the Imperial dragons on his coat) seated with a walled palace in the background; the other depicting the Empress and her ladies in waiting within a palace milieu – likely to have been the old Summer Palace of Peking which was destroyed in 1860. It is unknown whether this picture is part of the pair, but strengthens the attribution to the old Summer Palace, of which very few records remain of the interior after its destruction. If opulent interiors such as these are authentic illustrations, the old Summer Palace must have been an extraordinary sight to behold. LITERATURE

Jourdain, M & Soame Jenyns, R, Chinese Export Art in the 18th Century. Country Life Limited, London, 1950. p.37.


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A Regency Mahogany Wine Cooler An early 19th century Regency mahogany sarcophagus wine cooler, the pitched lid adorned with a recumbent bronze lion framed with acanthus leaves, above a panelled base with re-entrant mouldings. The frieze decorated with circular bronze paterae above lions head masks holding ring handles at each corner. The whole on a rectangular shaped base.

A wine cooler, or cellaret, was designed to sit underneath a sideboard in a Regency dining room, as illustrated in several issues of Rudolph Ackermann’s Repository of Arts, Literature and Fashions. A cellaret was typically mounted with lion masks, emblem of Bacchus the god of wine. However, the recumbent lion on the top of this example is unusual. It may well be the crest of the original owner.

The rectilinear form of this piece is nevertheless highly sculptural, with a bold cavetto frieze and with canted corners that invite the viewer to look at it in the round. This sophisticated design is complemented by carefully selected flame-figured and burr veneers, punctuated by the stylish brass paterae and ring-handles. The placing of four handles at the corners instead of two at the sides is another unusual device.

England, circa 1820 LITERATURE

Height: 28in (71 cm) Width: 31in (79 cm) Depth: 20in (51 cm) F3E0295 PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

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Ackermann, R, Repository of Arts, Literature and Fashions. London, October 1822, second series, pl. 21.


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The Spencer House Stools An impressive pair of George II fustic wood carved long stools; the fluted seat rails of serpentine arched form having carved beaded reserves are centred by a palm flower, each headed by a palm leaf cartouche and having scrolled feet in the French style. Attributed to designs by James ‘Athenian’ Stuart and supplied by John Gordon. England, circa 1760 Height: 19in (49cm) Width: 46in (117cm) Depth: 18½in (47cm) F3E0158 PROVENANCE

Supplied to John Spencer, later 1st Earl Spencer (1734-83), almost certainly for the Ground Floor Apartments at Spencer House, London. Thence by descent to George John, 2nd Earl Spencer (1758-1834), by whom possibly moved to the new Holland Library at Althorp House, Northamptonshire by 1814. Thence by descent to John Poyntz, 5th Earl Spencer (1835-1910), where it is recorded in the Long Library by 1892 and thence by descent. It seems most probable that this suite was originally commissioned for the ground floor apartments at Spencer House - probably for the Drawing Room on the North West corner of the building. Importantly, this room has only one long wall opposite the fireplace - and only one sofa in hardwood is recorded. This was one of the principal reception rooms on the enfilade of the ground floor and adjoined the Great Eating Parlour to the West, which was also furnished with Vardy’s mahogany dining chairs. These suites of seat furniture are likely to have been executed by the carver and chairmaker John Gordon (d. 1777) of St. James’s, who may well be the

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‘Mr Gordon upholder....to Sir William Chambers’ listed as a subscriber to Chamber’s Treatise on Civil Architecture, 1759. Moreover, they almost certainly reflect his association with William Gordon, who was a subscriber to Chippendale’s Director in 1754. Surviving documents show that the firm of Gordon and Taitt, with whom John Gordon formed a partnership in 1767, was supplying furniture and carrying out repairs for the Spencers by 1772, including the ‘repairing and gilding’ of the hall lantern at Spencer House and the making of ‘loose covers’ for Stuart’s Painted Room suite. Arthur Young, writing of Lord Spencer’s house, noted - ‘The hangings, carpets, glasses, sofas, chairs, tables, slabs everything are not only astonishingly beautiful, but contain a vast variety. The carving and gilding is unrivalled. The taste in which every article throughout the whole house is executed is just and elegant’. LITERATURE

Albert Edward John, 7th Earl Spencer (1892-1975), Althorp, Furniture, Vol. I, circa 1937 and later ‘Treasures from Althorp’, Exhibition Catalogue, London, 1970, F11.

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A Portrait Bust of a Bearded Soldier A fine North Italian carved hardwood bust of a bearded soldier in the manner of Pompeo della Chiesa of Milan, the armour incised with the monogram ‘M’. Italy, circa 1850 Height: 23in (58 cm) Width: 24in (61 cm) O3E0232 PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

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The name ‘Pompeo della Chiesa’ refers to a particular type of armour manufactured in Milan during the second half of the 16th century. An early masterpiece of construction, the armour was particularly favoured by the European Courts, some of the most notable including the Farnese and Savoia. Formed by interchangeable links allowing more flexibility for the wearer, the armour was characteristic for the beautiful surface engravings – featuring detailed interwoven decoration among

allegorical scenes, polished and often gilded to a high shine. Towards the end of the 17th century, the surface designs evolved to emulate the style of fashionable textiles of the day; resulting in a slightly softer, more fluid appearance from which the beautiful decoration on this bust was clearly inspired. The most comprehensive early collections of Pompeo della Chiesa armour can be found in the Armeria Reale in Turin, and the Poldi Pezzoli Museum in Milan.


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A Silver Guernsey Milk Jug

A Wool and Silk Soho Tapestry

An Edwardian silver milk jug in the style of a traditional Guernsey milk can, having a round body with pull-off lid and insulated wicker-work handles. Made by William Clark & Son, Birmingham and bearing the symbol for the island of Guernsey. The underneath with the maker’s mark of J. Cook & Sons Ltd, the hallmarks erased.

A rare 18th century tapestry by John Vanderbank, Sr., ‘yeoman arras-maker’ of the Great Wardrobe. Vanderbank’s Soho workshop in Great Queen Street, London, produced tapestries of stylised chinoiserie scenes throughout the late 17th and early 18th centuries, the designs taken from similar motifs on chinoiserie lacquer screens. This tapestry depicts a brightly coloured scene within a landscape of islands filled with animals and flowering bushes, a central palace visible behind a group of courtly revellers enjoying their tea beneath a canopy, a scholar surrounded by children and a hunter on horseback pursuing game in the foreground. All framed within a foliate border of bright reds and blues.

England, 1901 Height: 7in (18cm) Width: 6in (15cm) O3E0132

England, circa 1700 Height: 94½in (240cm) Width: 102in (260cm) T3E0240

Three weavers dominated the production of tapestries in Soho in the very early 18th century, John Vanderbank, Joshua Morris and William Bradshaw, each surpassing their contemporaries in terms of originality of design and quality of execution. Of these Vanderbank was by far the most whimsical, and the uniqueness and charm of his creations kept the admiration of collectors throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. The Mallett tapestry belongs to a well documented and very individual series of almost forty known pieces. The first record of these are of a set supplied to Kensington Palace in 1690, 1691 and 1696 , noted as ‘seven pieces of Tapistry hangings with India figures 9 foot deep’ in a 1697 inventory. At the time Vanderbank was a yeoman arras-maker of the Great Wardrobe, a department of the royal household based in Great Queen Street. In the year 1619, King James I had founded the workshops at Mortlake to rival those of Henry IV in Paris,

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but towards the end of the century many of the weavers had left to work independently, either in Soho or its immediate surroundings. By 1703, Mortlake was closed and so those of the 1690s through to the 1730s are generically known as Soho tapestries. The yeoman arras-makers were retained on a salary by the royal household, regardless of whether any work was required, and paid a further wage for each individual commission. Vanderbank held his position from 1689 until his death in 1717. Together with the now lost Kensington Palace group there is another at Castle Howard, about which the architect Nicholas Hawksmoor refers in a letter to the Earl of Carlisle on the 2 July 1706. In it, he describes the exact dimensions he required of Mr Vanderbank and that they were ‘due to be hung in the Countesses bedchamber’. At least part of the set remain at Castle Howard and hang on the great staircase. A third well documented set are those that were supplied by Vanderbank to Elihu Yale, East India merchant and founder of the eponymous university, between his return from India in 1692 and his death in 1723. These are on view at the Yale University Art Gallery, together with another that was donated later. As well as these, there are examples in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the Art Institute of Chicago and in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London as well as various notable private collections, several of which were acquired through Mallett.

to the viewers. However, the chair upon which the foremost figure sits is distinctly Mughal in style, as is the mounted huntsman directly in front. The snarling wild animal appears to be a cross between both Chinese and Indian iconography, though the delicately drawn flora owes much to Mughal miniatures, and perhaps even 17th century Indian hardstone work known as parchin kari. Whilst not as prevalent as that from China, Indian art was collected in England and engravings published, not least of the famous set of drawings by Rembrandt depicting Indian miniatures. With the family group on the left, and the pagoda topped temple behind, the overall scene is of one very close to those depicted in contemporary Chinese lacquer screens. The designer of these tapestries follows their technique of reducing scale towards the top of the panel to aid a sense of perspective, and though Vanderbank’s vignettes are all anchored upon solid ground, each island sits against the sea of the black ground in the style of the floating landscapes of Chinese art. This decorative formula was supremely adaptable to the size of panel required and the taste of the patron. Each island depicts a different scene and Vanderbank could pick and choose the overall scene from his repertoire of images. Similar tents to that in the Mallett tapestry can be seen in the Art Institute of Chicago example, and in another, now lost but formerly owned by Christabel, Lady Aberconway.

The tapestries Vanderbank created in the ‘Indian Manner’ are uniquely successful in uniting elements from the entire repertoire of ‘the exotic’, as known to the English at the time, in a visually coherent whole. The Mallett tapestry centres upon three seated figures beneath a four-pillared canopy. Whilst the long facial hair, and pony tails describe them as Chinese, the figure holding aloft his cup almost has an air of depictions of Christ at the Last Supper. They are waited upon by a fancifully dressed Nubian pouring from a porcelain coffee pot, of Chinese export form, that would have been very familiar M A L L E T T LONDON • NEW YORK

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A Pair of Tôle Ware Urns

> A Pair of Giltwood Torchères

An unusual pair of late 18th century tôle ware chestnut urns of tapered oval form, having carrying handles in the form of lion heads with upswept covers surmounted by an acorn finial. Each finely decorated throughout with gilt pastoral landscape scenes in the Chinese taste, on a black ground.

A fine pair of early 19th century carved giltwood and ebonised torchères. The circular dish tops with moulded edge above a reeded tapered column carved with tiers of lotus leaves and acanthus collars. Each standing on tri-form bases with winged lion monopodiae and panelled sides, applied with stars and Apollo masks on winged scroll paw feet.

The Netherlands, circa 1780 Attributed to Thomas Hope. Height: 13in (33cm) Diameter: 6½in (17cm) O3F0085

England, circa 1815 Height: 64½in (164cm) Width: 25½in (65cm)

PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

F3F0011 PROVENANCE

An important private UK collection.

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These finely proportioned torchères reflect the work of the pre-eminent designer Thomas Hope during the early part of the nineteenth century. Hope was greatly influenced by his extensive Grand Tour travels across Europe as well as Greece, Turkey, and Egypt. His Duchess Street home in London became the showcase for Hope’s vision of antiquity across the different cultures, including Egyptian, Greek, Roman, and Indian elements. Hope officially opened his home in 1802 to visitors, with the Prince of Wales understood to have made an appearance at the grand opening. Duchess Street became a popular attraction for the discerning connoisseur, and many notable figures travelled to see Hope’s grand interiors, including the artist Benjamin West, who proclaimed that it was ‘the finest specimen of true taste... either in England or in France.’

allegiance to neo-classical design and recalls John Flaxman’s recent illustrations for Dante in 1793. Whilst no specific pattern can yet be found for this pair of torchères in their entirety, almost every element is illustrated in Hope’s book of household designs. For example, the distinctive winged monopedic sphinx atop the base is taken from plate XIX, ill. 7 (1), while the fluted and leaf wrapped shaft issuing from lotus leaves bears similarities to plate L, ill. 2 (2). These torchères

also relate to the work of Hope’s contemporary, George Smith, particularly in the solid concave triangular pedestal base as featured in an 1808 design illustrated in the Pictorial Dictionary of British Nineteenth Century Furniture Design, p. 553 (3). LITERATURE

Joy, E, Pictorial Dictionary of British 19th Century Furniture Design. The Antique Collectors’ Club, 1984, p. 553.

Hope went on to publish his designs in 1807 with full measurements as a way to encourage accurate imitation of his work, rather than the lesser imitations that were being produced by his contemporaries. This publication, Household Furniture and Interior Decoration, was noteworthy for the manner in which the illustrations for furniture designs were displayed. The designs are represented in graphic outline only, which eliminates any sense of depth, shadow, or stylistic contrasts. Hope’s decision to depict his designs in this way reflects his fundamental

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A Pair of Harpist Chairs

An 18th Century Cut Glass Tureen

An unusual pair of Regency period revolving harpist’s chairs; the lyre-shaped backs, turned supports and tripod bases profusely decorated in gilt work with scrolling foliage, neoclassical urns and birds, all against a black japanned background, resting on scroll feet.

A large late 18th century cut glass tureen of oval shape, having a corresponding cover surmounted by a spherical finial. The glass of exceptional colour throughout. England, circa 1790

England, circa 1815

Height: 10in (25.5cm) Width: 10½in (27cm) Depth: 14½in (37cm)

Height: 34½in (88 cm) Width: 17½in (45 cm) Depth: 17½in (45 cm)

O3E0065

F3E0087

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Portrait of Caryll Molyneux and his Grand-Niece Mary Clifton An oil on canvas portrait of Caryll Molyneux, 6th Viscount Molyneux, with his Grand-Niece Mary Clifton, seated by his knee within a drawing room. By Arthur Devis. England, circa 1770 Height: 29½in (75cm) Width: 25in (63cm)

Lytham Hall, now considered to be ‘the finest Georgian House in Lancashire.’ The portrait by Devis formed part of an impressive collection of family portraits at Lytham Hall, including other portraits of Caryll Molyneux, 6th Viscount, painted by Thomas Hudson and Thomas Gibson as well as a portrait of Mary Clifton by Thomas Bardwell. Many of these pictures remained in Lytham Hall through the 20th century and are still at the Hall today.

The Devis portrait appeared in the 1960 Country Life feature on Lytham Hall. An image of the portrait is included along with a description of the painting as follows, ‘There is a charming picture at Lytham, probably painted by Arthur Devis, showing fat old Lord Molyneux with his granddaughter Eleanor Clifton [Mary Clifton?], who is riding his walking-stick like a hobby-horse.’ (July 28, 1960, p 190).

P3E0300 PROVENANCE

By descent, Henry Talbot de Vere Clifton, Lytham Hall Sotheby’s London, November 19, 1969. Rutland Gallery, London, 1972 An important private UK collection. EXHIBITED

Harris Museum and Art Gallery, Preston. Pictures from Lytham Hall on Loan during December 1955 and January 1956 Rutland Gallery. This England: an anthology of paintings from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries’. This picture depicts Caryll, the 6th Viscount of Sefton with his great-niece, Mary Clifton (b. circa 1730). Caryll Molyneux (1683-1745) belonged to the branch of the Molyneux family based in Lancashire. The connection with the Molyneux family arose when Thomas Clifton (1696-1734) married Mary Molyneux (c. 1708-1752). The couple had two children, Thomas and Mary, and the latter appears in the Devis portrait with her great-uncle, Caryll Molyneux. Mary’s brother Thomas Clifton commissioned John Carr of York to plan and build a new house in the place of Lytham Manor in 1752. The result was

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A Pair of Tôle Chestnut Urns

> A George III Bureau Bookcase

A charming pair of early 19th century tôle urns decorated with floral sprigs and flowering branches against a black japanned background, the unusual shape a variation on the classical urn, each with gilt acanthus scroll handles.

A finely proportioned Chippendale period George III mahogany bureau bookcase with well-figured veneers and thin, cross-grained stiles, the cabinet with moulded glazing bars forming octagonal shapes, the top with a boldly carved architectural swan’s-neck pediment, the scrolls with delicately carved acanthus decoration, and dentil cornice, having a secretaire drawer opening to reveal an arranged interior of pigeon holes and drawers, and baize-lined writing surface, retaining the original cast and gilt bronze handles inside and out, the fall front and base with shaped astragal mouldings with flame-figured veneers, opening to a

England, circa 1825 Height: 12in (31cm) Width: 9½in (24cm) Depth: 5in (13cm) O3F0062 PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

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fitted interior of two short and two long drawers each with their original cast handles, standing on elegant ogee bracket feet. England, circa 1760 Height: 91in ( 231.5cm) Width: 41in (104cm) Depth: 23in (58 cm) F3E0302 Right: A pen and ink drawing by Thomas Chippendale for a bookcase featured in Sir William Chambers’ proposal for a study at Pembroke House, London in 1760


The Mentmore Torcheres Each carved as robed Mandarin figures incised with floral decoration tied with tassels at the waist, holding a later branch and circular top carved with stalactites on tripod base with scrolled supports and rockwork stretchers, traces of gilt. Height | 49.2 in | 125.0 cm Width | 16.9 in | 43.0 cm F3E0237

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quis nostrud exercitation ullamcorpor suscipit laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis autem vel aum irire dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse molestaie son consequat, vel illum dolore eu fuguiat nulla pariatur. At vero eos et accusam et justo odio dignissim qui blandit praesent lupatum delenit aigure duos dolor et molestais exceptur sint occaecat cupidat non provident, simil tempor sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum et dolor fugai. Et harumd dereud facilis est er expedit distinct. Nam liber a tempor cum soluta nobis aligend optio compque nihil quod a ijpedit anim id quod maximr ne ad eam non possing accommodare nost ros quos tu paulo ante cum memorite it tum etia ergat. Nos amice et nebevol, olestias access postest fier ad augendas cum conscient to factor tum toenlegum odioque civiuda.

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This elegant bureau bookcase relates closely in design and construction to a number of examples from the 1754 1st edition of Thomas Chippendale’s Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker’s Director. In particular, the upswept arched pediment with inwardly carved scroll detail, and the characteristic truss-scrolled feet, which both feature on plate 78 for one of his Desk and Bookcase patterns. A vast compilation of a master in his trade, Chippendale’s Director identifies only three patrons in his prefatory notes to the patterns, the Earls of Morton and Dumfries, and Lord Pembroke. We know that Chippendale received commissions for the extensive furnishing of Dumfries House between the late 1750’s and 1760’s, supplying some of the finest pieces of furniture from his early rococo phase, including a very similar breakfront bookcase although of larger scale.

Lord Pembroke, having inherited Wilton near Salisbury and Pembroke House in London, employed the architect William Chambers in 1760 for “Various designs for fitting up rooms.” Invoices verify that Chippendale provided numerous pieces of furniture for the new interiors, often having to consult with Chambers to make sure the designs were congruent. An illustration by Chippendale, forming part of Chambers’ architectural plan for Pembroke House, portrays a large scroll-crested bookcase in elevation, which corresponds very closely to a pair now at Wilton, likely sent along with the contents of Pembroke House after its demolition in 1913. Again of a larger scale to this bookcase there are clear similarities in the cresting and panel work.

As well as its fine proportions, the quality of construction and the fine timbers used support an attribution to one of the leading cabinet makers of the day. Along with the stylistic similarities noted above the ogee feet are strengthened with laminated blocks, typical of Chippendale’s recorded work. The cabinet retains a fine patina and its original finely cast handles to the secretaire drawer, and simpler brass handles internally. LITERATURE

Gilbert, C, The Life and Work of Thomas Chippendale. Christie’s, London, 1978, pp. 45, 98 & 145, pl. 69.

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A Cut Glass Pedestal Bowl

Twelve Chinese Gouache Pictures

A fine early 19th century cut glass pedestal bowl on a circular stand, decorated throughout with delicate overlapping leaf shaped bands. The matching base, cover and faceted finial decorated in a conforming manner.

A set of twelve Chinese export watercolours of silk production, the complete set illustrating the highly important production of silk for both the export and domestic market. China, circa 1780

England, circa 1820 Height: 8in (20cm) Diameter: 6in (16cm)

Height: 23in (58cm) Width: 27in (69cm) P3E0303

O3F0027

The early history of the Chinese silk market has been described as ‘that trade which drew the threads of its exquisite material as a bond of economic unity across the whole of the old world from the Pacific to the Atlantic.’ The demand for the export of raw silk declined during the 16th century after the silk worm was smuggled into Europe, however, the demand for Chinese wrought silk remained high. Chinese woven silks and embroideries were exquisitely crafted, renowned for their unusual floral designs and beautiful colouring, becoming a highly sought after luxury in the courts of 18th century Europe.

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Each painting is described in Chinese script from the picking of mulberry leaves to the making of clothes, in order of production they are as follows: 采桑 Picking mulberry leaves 对蚕蛾 Matching male and female silk moth caterpillars 浴蚕纸 Washing silkworm seeds sheets 蚕上箔 Silkworm getting on beds 灸箔 Heating the silkworm beds 蚕初眠 The first sleep 蚕二眠 The second sleep 蚕三眠 The third sleep 护茧 Cleaning cocoons in boiling water 解系理经 Spinning 染色机织 Dying and weaving 裁剪成衣 Making clothes LITERATURE

Jourdain, M & Soame Jenyns, R, Chinese Export Art in the 18th Century. Country Life Limited, London, 1950. p. 14.


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A Pair of Iron Griffin A pair of mid 19th century cast iron models of griffins, after designs by Sir William Chambers, each shown naturalistically modelled, the wings terminating in scroll work and the forked tails curled. England, circa 1870 Height: 21½in (55cm) Width: 8in (21cm) Depth: 22in (56cm) O3E0143

The griffin is a mythological creature that was recorded as far back as 1600 BC in Bronze Age Greece. Half eagle and half lion, a griffin combines the power of both of the elements, air and water, thereby dominating all the creatures of the earth and the skies.

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An Inlaid Oak Draw-Leaf Table In the ancient world, its role was primarily as a guardian of priceless treasure and as a symbol of divine power. Its perceived qualities of courage, loyalty, strength and intelligence, combined with a singular devotion to its master or mate, led to its widespread heraldic use and the fashion for fine large scale models, such as this pair of objects, to flank entrances to parks and steps to houses. Iron had already been used for many years to make weapons and domestic items however it had always been hard to cast, due to the presence of excess carbon and other impurities. In 1709 Abraham Darby, who owned an iron works at Coalbrookdale in Shropshire, developed a new process for smelting iron using coke, which meant that iron could be cast much more effectively and cheaply. Throughout the 18th and 19th centuries, cast iron was used widely for furniture and particularly in gardens and conservatories.

An early 17th century oak draw-leaf table, the framed plank top above a bog-oak and holly chequer-inlaid frieze, above a gadrooned apron upon lobed and leaf-carved baluster legs, all joined by stretchers. England, circa 1630 Height: 33½in (85cm) Width: 72in (182cm) Depth: 36in (92cm) Width Extended: 120½in (306cm) F3E0219


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The top of the draw-leaf table is in three separate sections, the two short draw leaves supported on two long lopers. The ends of the lopers cantilever below the midrail when each leaf is withdrawn. The weight of the central section stabilises this mechanism. ‘Drawing tables’, as this type was known in the 16th and 17th centuries, were a popular form of dining table in both Britain and the Netherlands. The mechanism was developed specifically for long tables where a pair of folding leaves would not be practical. When closed these tables were often covered with a purpose-made table carpet, sometimes in ‘turkeywork’, a knotted wool textile patterned in imitation of Turkish rugs. The bulbous legs of this table are of Flemish origin, and were introduced into England through immigrant craftsmen with Continental pattern books by designers such as Vredeman De Vries of Antwerp (1527-1606). The inlaid apron, with its geometric patterns, is characteristic of work by Dutch and Flemish refugee craftsmen working in Southwark, London. This area of London, south of Tower Bridge, was the centre for artistic creativity during the late Elizabethan period. It was here at this time that Shakepeare’s Globe Theatre was constructed. The foliate carving and gadrooning on the bulbous vase legs is typical of draw tables made in England from the period of 1585 to 1620.

‘Diminished slide’ draw table of Elizabethan type

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A Pair of Qianlong Vases and Covers An unusual pair of Qianlong period Chinese export porcelain vases, each of upturned baluster form standing on circular bases, the inverted lids with a stylised pine cone finial. The shoulders with four tied draped swags, decorated throughout with painted blue and gold foliate detail on a white ground, painted in the manner of Swedish Marieberg faience. China, circa 1760 Height: 16in (41cm) Diameter: 8½in (22cm) O3F0029

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The art and alchemy of porcelain making, practised in China centuries earlier, was not discovered by the Europeans until the early 18th century. The earliest records of Swedish collections of Chinese porcelain were built in the early 17th century when King Gustavus II Adolphus was presented with a gift of Chinese ceramics from the city of Augsburg in 1632, inspiring a long tradition of collecting through society. As other European countries increased their trade with the Far East, through the rapid expansion of the East India Company at the turn of the 18th century, Sweden established their own trading company in 1731 with approval from parliament. The Swedish East India Company made one hundred and thirty two expeditions before going bankrupt in 1813, porcelain being

one of the most important imports until the mid 1770s. The Marieberg factory was established around 1758 on the island of Kungsholmen, Stockholm by Johan Ludvig Eberhard Ehrenreich (17231803), under the privilege of the King. Recognised as a centre for manufacturing fine tin-glazed earthenware, known as faience, the factory specialised in decorative tableware and was one of the first at the time to develop the distinctive urn shape of these vases, heralding the new fashion for classicism. Towards the end of the Ming dynasty in China, imperial support for porcelain producers had swiftly declined, resulting

in their having to explore new markets and ways of distributing. The early trading posts established by the West were a vital means for porcelain export. Alongside placing specific orders Swedish merchants sent examples of Marieburg porcelain to Chinese manufacturers to replicate, in order to adjust the shapes for different use. Marieburg pieces are slightly heavier in style with a more ivory based ground, the Chinese export versions feature inventive interpretations of the traditional style, for example unusual appliquĂŠ leaf sprays as seen on this pair, elaborate swag detail, and a more vibrant use of colour of which blue and white decoration was the most prevalent.

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A George I Giltwood Pier Glass

A Pair of Regency Cache Pots

An exceptionally fine and tall George I carved giltwood and gesso pier glass, retaining its original divided and bevelled plates, the frame carved with delicate leaf motifs, bell flower and stylised shells amongst a strap work border and set against a background of punch work decoration, surmounted by an acanthus cresting flanked by scrolls and floral work.

A decorative pair of Regency tôle cache pots, painted with scenes of Chinese gardens on a black ground with gilt ­decoration throughout. England, circa 1815 Height: 7in (18cm) Diameter: 8in (20cm) O3F0021

England, circa 1715 Height: 83½in (212 cm) Width: 31½in (80 cm) F3E0199

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A Carlton House Desk An elegant George III satinwood Carlton House writing desk. Resembling that of the Prince Regent’s table in form, it is equipped with identical handles, but in brass and with a central patera in place of the Royal coronet. The marquetry ornament, in an earlier neo-classcial idiom, is characteristic of Kerr’s style. Attributed to John Kerr. England, circa 1795 Height: 33½in (85cm) Width: 55in (139cm) Depth: 28in (71cm)

The ‘Carlton House Desk’ is perhaps the most characteristic form of Regency writing table, which remained in fashion from the 1790’s to about 1820. Examples were published by George Hepplewhite in 1792 and by Thomas Sheraton the following year. The name was first attached, however, to a watercolour among the Gillows’ Sketch Books, styled ‘Carlton Table made for Carlton House for Prince Consort’.

Recently the very first Carlton House Desk has been identified, of a simpler, more stylish model than the multistepped version published by Gillows. It was delivered for the Prince of Wales in 1790 – when Carlton House was his prime passion – by the royal cabinet-maker John Kerr. Kerr’s account describes ‘a large Elegant Sattin wood Writing Table containing 15 Drawers and 2 Cupboards … ’, equipped with ’16 Elegant Silver handles with Coronets rais’d on Centers 32 Silver Knobs as Drapry 17 Ditto [silver] Escutchions’.

F3E0235 PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

The first ‘Carlton House Desk’

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Portrait of Ann Dixie By Thomas Hudson Portrait of Ann Dixie, standing threequarter length, wearing a black satin dress, a white blouse and a black hat with a white plume, she holds ostrich feathers in her left hand, with a landscape beyond. Oil on canvas, by Thomas Hudson (1701 – 1779). England, circa 1760. Height: 49in (125cm) Width: 39in (100cm) P3E0254 PROVENANCE

Possibly commissioned from the artist by Sir Wolstan Dixie, 4th Bt. (1701-1767), Bosworth Hall, Leicestershire. An important private UK collection.

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Ann Dixie (b. circa 1730) was the daughter of Sir Wolstan Dixie, 4th Bt. (1701-1767) and his first wife Anna Freer (d. 1739). The Dixie Baronetcy was created at the time of the Restoration of the Monarchy in 1660 for Sir Wolstan Dixie (1602-1682), and the family resided in Bosworth Hall, Leicestershire; the country seat of the Dixie family for nearly three hundred years. Anne Dixie’s father, Sir Wolstan Dixie 4th Bt., was known to have a notable temper and colourful character, and local legends abound; one unverified record even suggests that he accidentally caught his daughter Ann in a ‘man-trap’ after trying to prevent an unsolicited meeting between her and a young man in Bosworth Park. Another portrait of Ann Dixie, as part of the Dixie family portrait with Sir Walston Dixie, 4th Bt., is known, currently in a private collection. This group portrait was painted by Henry Pickering (fl.17401771) in 1755, and was most likely executed only several years before the present portrait was painted. A young Ann Dixie is seen along with her five sisters, two brothers, and her stepmother and father’s third wife, Margaret Cross (d. 1797).

Thomas Hudson (1701-1779) studied under Jonathan Richardson (1667-1745), and later married Richardson’s daughter. Hudson was a hugely successful portrait painter, and between 1745 and 1755 was the leading portraitist in London. The present work was most likely painted between 1755 and 1760, when Hudson’s style had reached its full maturity. The portrait, like several others by Hudson from the 1740s and 1750s, was greatly influenced by Ruben’s Portrait of Hélène Fourment, his second wife (now held in the Museu Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon). Through the dissemination of mezzotints and copies after this painting it became hugely popular and provided great inspiration to British portrait painters working in the 1730s to 1750s. The dress, hat and ostrich feather that Ann Dixie wears all derive from Ruben’s painting, and are a regular feature found in Hudson’s portraits of this period, including notable portraits of Lady Lucy Manners, Duchess of Montrose, circa 1742-1475, and Mary Panton, Duchess of Ancaster, 1757, amongst others. The present portrait of Ann Dixie was painted at the height of Hudson’s creative and elaborate interpretation of this model.


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A Sicilian Library Table A rare mid 18th century marquetry circular chestnut and walnut library table. The top with patterns of rococo acanthus creating frames for seven dancing figures, two young men and five young ladies in dance posture and evening costume; also having an inlaid floral frieze above a column support, centred by a shaped lambrequin plinth, on a tripod base supporting three hippocamps, all supporting the upper leading edge. The tripod base terminating in stylised foliate feet. Sicily, circa 1770 Height: 30in (76cm) Diameter: 46in (117cm) F3F0060

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A Pair of Regency Wall Lights

A George III Tea Caddy

A fine pair of Regency period carved giltwood and ebonised wall lights in the form of lit torches, the tapering and fluted bodies bound with ribbon decorated with ebonised pearl work and crowned by flaming torches, the scrolling branches with ebonised flower heads and chains, each bearing gilt bronze candle sconces.

A very unusual George III tea caddy, the tortoiseshell of a fine deep colour and figuring edged with silver beading and sparingly decorated with silver rococo mounts and handle. The box retains its original silk lining and contains a pair of fitted silver tea caddies engraved in the rococo chinoiserie style, with Chinese characters meaning ‘prosper’ and ‘righteousness’, both with marks for sterling silver and the initials ED.

England, circa 1815 Height: 22½in (57cm) Width: 8in (21cm) Depth: 9in (23cm)

England, circa 1800

L3E0096

Height: 4½in (12cm) Width: 7in (18cm) Depth: 5in (12.5cm) O3E0139

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A Set of Ten Regency Dining Chairs A fine set of ten Regency mahogany dining chairs consisting of eight side chairs and two carvers. The curving back rests of finely figured mahogany, the seats upholstered in the original red leather covers, retaining their original brass metal nail heads, standing on turned reeded and tapering legs.

This unusual set of chairs possibly made by the great firm of Gillows in the first quarter of the 19th century, reflect the moment of change from the formality of the late 18th century into the growing sense of comfort in the 19th century. The over-scaled broad beamed backs and generously stuffed seats with a

deep front rail, allowed for the dining experience to be one that lasted many hours as the appetite for a dinner of many courses adopted from French cuisine, introduced itself into English society. These extremely comfortable chairs retain their original red morocco leather seats, which was at the height of fashion during this period.

England, circa 1815 Height: 33½in (85cm) Width: 19in (48cm) Depth: 21in (53cm) F3E0145

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A George III Pier Mirror A fine rococo period giltwood and gesso pier glass in the manner of Thomas Johnson. The two part plate within a moulded slip and cross stretcher, surmounted by a figure of a huntsman with rifle, seated within a stylised pagoda above c-scroll foliate supports; in turn above pierced sides richly decorated with naturalistic foliate detail in the chinoiserie taste, mounted with figures of hunting hounds, the apron centred by a hare within a c-scroll cartouche. England, circa 1770 Height: 80½in (205cm) Width: 39½in (100cm) F3E0298

This charming pier glass embodies the rococo spirit of the mid 18th century with its multiplicity of ornamental detail entwined into the pierced framework

of broken curves and foliate scrolls. Rococo period pier glasses were often of significant scale, yet considering the complexity and quantity of carved detail, they retain a particular grace and sense of weightlessness. The 18th century European passion for all curiosities in the chinoiserie taste, a result of the ever expanding trade routes to the Far East, resulted in skilled craftsmen drawing

inspiration from new designs, adapting to the clients taste. The ‘East meets West’ period of great trade, coupled with the exuberance of the short-lived rococo, encouraged talented craftsmen to invent fantastical scenes, often appealing to the romantic whimsy of the public. Chippendale’s contemporary, the carver and gilder Thomas Johnson (b. 1714), was a leader in creating wonderfully ornate designs for mirrors, girandoles, candle stands and console tables. Like Chippendale, Johnson also produced a series of pattern books including, Collection of Designs published between 1756 and 1758, and One Hundred and Fifty New Designs of 1761. His style is characterised by the use of rustic themes, including bucolic figures, animals and birds, from which he often then incorporated Oriental motif, primarily the Ho Ho bird or stylised pagoda, as seen on this pier glass.


A Chinese Reverse Painted Mirror A rare Chinese-export reverse-painted mirror depicting a weaving scene. In a later craquelle bordered gilt-wood frame. China, circa 1770 Height: 13in (33cm) Width: 15in (38cm) P3E0229

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A George III Pedestal Desk A fine late 18th century mahogany ­pedestal desk, having three frieze ­drawers above a rectangular tooled leather inset top, above an arched kneehole with panelled doors on each side enclosing further hidden ­drawers. The whole standing on a moulded plinth base. England, circa 1770 Height: 30in (77cm) Width: 50½in (128cm) Depth: 29in(74cm) F3F0081 PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

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A Pontypool Ware Cheese Coaster A rare George III crimson japanned Pontypool ware cheese cradle, crescentshaped and with one division, having scrolled ends and decorated throughout with foliate gilt work with tiny blue flowers, resting on the original brass castors.

A Regency Steel Fire Grate or were flat with the base covered with baize. These coasters would hold half a stilton cheese or similar, standing up on end thereby making it easier to slice and would be rolled up and down the centre of the long dining room tables. In the same way, decanters in coasters would also be rolled up and down.

England, circa 1800 Height: 6½in (17cm) Width: 16½in (42cm) Depth: 11in (28cm) O3E0191

Cheese was eaten daily in large wealthy households and the cheese coaster or cradle would have been a necessity. They were crescent-shaped, sometimes with a division and were made in a variety of materials, although often in mahogany. They had either four brass castors to the base, sometimes covered with leather,

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Pontypool ware came about through the establishment of the workshops of Edward Allgood in Monmouthshire in the 1730s. Imitation lacquer or japanned work on a variety of materials had increased in popularity during the beginning of the 18th century. Allgood and his brother experimented with a slightly thicker tin and repeated firings at lower temperatures, resulting in a silky smooth yet granite-hard surface. After Allgood retired in 1760, Pontypool continued to be an area synonymous with superb quality pieces for the households of the nobility and gentry.

An unusual early 19th century steel fire grate, the back plate cast with a laurel wreath above an oval basket, supported on each side by finely figured statues in the form of classical maidens. England, circa 1815 Height: 31½in (80cm) Width: 31½in (80cm) Depth: 14in (36cm) F3F0076


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A Chinese Painting of a Deer Hunt A mid 19th century Chinese painting of a deer hunt, the oblong panel depicting in watercolour on silk horses and riders in the foreground with their hunting dogs and servants, looking from the high ground. A large tree to the right hand side, looking to the valley floor at galloping horses and riders in energetic pursuit of a quarry, a mountain in the far distance. China, circa 1860. Height: 78½in (200cm) Width: 34in (87cm) P3F0087

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A Pair of Meissen Models of Pug Dogs A fine pair of porcelain pugs known as the ‘Grosserer Mops’ (male) and ‘Mopsin mit Jungem’ (female), modelled by J.J. Kaendler and possibly P. Reinicke as a male and a female with a puppy, each naturalistically painted in shades of grey and black, wearing a collar applied with gilt bells and bows at the back, the bases applied with leaves and flowers. Both mounted on a gilt bronze base. Germany, circa 1750 Height: 9in (23cm) Width: 5in (12.5cm) Depth: 7in (18cm) O3E0220

The art of making porcelain was an incredibly secretive industry in Europe during the 18th century. The elusive Chinese ‘white gold’ porcelain, produced in the Tê-hua factories (known in the West as Blanc de Chine), was inspirational to the manufactories of the time. Through a combination of artistic creativity and the accidental discoveries of a German alchemist, the technique was discovered and allowed the European manufactories; in particular the German Meissen factory, to create some of the most beautiful porcelain pieces of the rococo era. Primarily ornaments and table decoration, Meissen figurines embodied the full flourish of the rococo, from bright coloured decoration to charming facial

expressions. White porcelain models of animals such as this pair first appeared in Europe in the 1730s, when Meissen produced a number of them at the behest of Augustus the Strong, King of Poland. Inspired by the produce, the models were commissioned to decorate his Japanese palace at Dresden. In theme they were derived, it is suggested, from the lead animals of the Labyrinth at Versailles, which depicted Aesop’s fables. Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706 –1775, Meissen) was the leading modelleur of Meissen porcelain. Having developed his talents with the famed sculptor Balthasar Permoser – a pioneer in the exuberant taste of the late Baroque and early rococo, Kaendler joined the Meissen factory as an assistant and rapidly rose to become Model Master in 1733. In 1731 he was appointed Court Sculptor by Augustus II the Strong, and became infamous for his charismatic depictions of animal sculpture. Peter Reinicke (b. 1715 – d. 1768) worked closely with Kaendler, from 1743 until his death. The original models of the pugs, by Kaendler, are in the German National Museum in Nuremberg, and the Bavarian palace, Residenz Ansbach. Records from June 1744 state an order was placed for ‘two new pugs seated on grass, of the same action and form, completed by Reinicke’, which may well relate to this pair.

A pair of almost identical pugs, modelled by Johann Kaendler. Meissener Porzellan 1710-1810, p. 268

Kaendler’s work can be seen in the Victoria & Albert Museum in London, the Getty in Los Angeles, and the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. LITERATURE

Coffin, S. Davidson, G. Lupton, E & Hunter-Stiebel, P, Rococo: The Continuing Curve, 1730 – 2008. Smithsonian Institution, New York, 2008. pp. 144-145. Ruckert, R, Meissener Porzellan 1710-1810. Munich, 1966. Cat. Nos. 1091 & 1092, plate 268. pp. 30,34 & 194.

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The Mentmore Torcheres Each carved as robed Mandarin figures incised with floral decoration tied with tassels at the waist, holding a later branch and circular top carved with stalactites on tripod base with scrolled supports and rockwork stretchers, traces of gilt. Height | 49.2 in | 125.0 cm Width | 16.9 in | 43.0 cm F3E0237

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A Pair of Porphyry Urns

A Pair of Gainsborough Chairs

A pair of early 19th century porphyry urns of shallow form, with spiral twist handles in gilt bronze and ormolu bands and finials, resting on square plinth bases with finely chased gilt mouldings.

A very fine pair of Chinese Chippendale mahogany library armchairs with arched backs flanked by padded arm rests with foliate and blind fret carved supports, raised on square chamfered legs similarly carved with blind fret and joined by pierced stretchers; the chairs upholstered in very fine yellow silk needlework with flowers and foliage in vibrant greens, reds, blues and pinks.

France, circa 1810 Height: 16in (41cm) Width: 11in (28cm) Depth: 9in (23cm) O3F0094

The Chairs English, circa 1760 The Needlework, French circa 1730 Height: 15½in (40cm) Width: 11in (28cm) Depth: 8½in (22cm) F3E0257

The pierced stretcher and blind fret carving on this pair of armchairs reflect the 18th century taste for chinoiserie that was popularised by Thomas

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Chippendale’s ‘The Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker’s Director’, with a first edition in 1754 and two more in 1755 and 1762. The serpentine crest rails and curving arms enhance the overall effect. The term ‘Gainsborough’ was introduced in the 20th century to describe armchairs of grand proportions that typically would have been commissioned for a drawing room. These chairs, with their comfortable and deep seat, reflect the relaxed yet grand mood captured in the portraits of 18th century British nobility by Thomas Gainsborough. The French needlework with large stylised flowers in shades of red and pink with blue-green foliage on a gold ground combine the most expensive colours of the period. The needlework is in a remarkable state of preservation and with strong, fresh colouring.


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A Pair of Terracotta Boxer Dogs

A Pair of George III Card Tables

A fine pair of lifesize late 19th century French terracotta boxer dogs, each depicted seated with its head slightly turned and wearing a collar with chain link tethers, supported by an integral plinth.

A pair of late 18th century George III Sheraton satinwood demi-lune card tables of superb colour throughout. The tops with fabulous book matched veneers, having two broad marquetry bands surrounding an inner mahogany lozenge with marquetry flowers, both opening to reveal a baize interior, above a plain frieze with square tapering legs and further marquetry floral inlay, terminating in spade feet.

Attributed to Mandeville and Combeleran, Castelnaudary Aude. France, circa 1880. Height: 27½in (69cm) Width: 10in (26cm) Depth: 23in (59cm) O3E0156

England, circa 1785.

These tables are the essence of Sheraton’s design of a simple line, paired back in the design of furniture to allow for the extravagant use of exotic veneers. Often used as a backdrop for the quintessential English appreciation of flowers and nature in their sophisticated marquetry; where taste was moving away from the neo-classical influence of Italian and Greek decoration, to a more simplified form before the resurgence of French design, remodelled into a much more affluent taste.

Height: 30in (77cm) Width: 41in (105cm) Depth: 20in (51cm) F3F0100

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A Pair of Famille Rose Cache Pots

A Pair of Still Life Paintings

A pair of Qianlong period famille-rose cache pots of hexagonal form, the sides with stylised pierced decoration with floral motif and turquoise borders, on plinths decorated in shades of pink and green. Each fitted with modern brass liners. China, circa 1760

A pair of late 18th century oil on canvas still life paintings. One panel depicting a marble vase with abundant flowers and a basket of fruit with pears, tipped on a stone plinth. The other panel depicting a centred wicker basket with further rich floral displays of summer flowers, to the right a pewter jug with trailing forget-me-nots.

Height: 6½in (16cm) Width: 11½in (29cm)

Both in carved shaped giltwood modern frames.

O3F0028

Italy, probably Venetian, circa 1750 Height: 66in (168cm) Width: 44in (112cm) P3F0102

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A Long Case Clock by Joseph Windmills A fine Queen Anne walnut long case clock by Joseph Windmills. The case, of particularly elegant proportions, has a double moulded top to the hood with two frets to the front, single frets to the sides, and brass capitals to the plain columns. The trunk, which is unusually shallow in depth, is cross-banded and veneered with walnut, the trunk door with square top and lenticle has a very rich burr veneer of warm colour. The arched brass dial has finely cast ‘Indian head’ spandrels within a herringbone imprinted edge. The signature is engraved on a brass boss in the arch, supported by two cherubs; the chapter ring has inner quarter hour marks, fleur de lis half hours and diamonds at the intermediate quarters. The hands are of blue steel with ringed bosses to all three. The movement having deep plates and six crisply ringed pillars, the steel pendulum rod with a small brass bob, and brass cased weights suspended from a pair of dished pulleys. England, circa 1710 Height: 92in (234cm) Width: 20in (52cm) Depth: 10in (25cm) O3E0159

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Joseph Windmills (c.1640 – 1725) was a prolific maker of clocks and watches, first recorded working in St Martin’s Le Grande before moving to the Tower Street area, near the Tower of London. Early records indicate the growing scale and importance of Windmills’ business, through having at least ten apprentices and often using outworkers to help with demand. In September 1691, Windmills was elected Assistant to the Worshipful Company of Clockmaker’s; the oldest surviving horological institution in the world, before being made the youngest Warden in 1699, and Master in 1702. The mid 1690’s onwards saw his development of two series of longcase clocks; one type was cased in walnut and decorated with panels of detailed marquetry. The other was cased in beautifully figured burr walnut, such as this one, retaining elegance in its simplicity. Manufacture and trading of the longcase clock and the earlier traditional lantern clock, resulted in the majority of Windmills’ success. An exquisite attention to detail specifically in the brass work, for example the use of cherub spandrels on the clock face as seen here, have become a distinguishable features of Windmills’ work.


A Pair of George III Giltwood Armchairs An important pair of George III carved giltwood armchairs by Thomas Chippendale. The shaped backs with a guilloche pattern surmounted by a laurel wreath tied with ribbon. The scrolled arms carved with pearl and husk detail, the seat rails carved with a running border of overlapping leaves, standing on fluted, tapering legs with foliate decoration, on reeded feet.

There are several documented suites by Thomas Chippendale of ‘French’ inspired giltwood seat furniture, including an impressive group supplied to Sir Penistone Lamb around 1773 for Brocket Hall, Hertfordshire and a set of twelve armchairs supplied to Lord Egremont for Petworth in the late 1770s.

PROVENANCE

In 1762 Thomas Chippendale dedicated the 3rd edition of his Gentleman and Cabinet-Maker’s Director to Prince William Henry, Duke of Gloucester, the grandson of George II. If this was a bid for patronage it proved successful, securing payments of just under £135 between 1764 and 1766. This brief span is the only period covered by the Prince’s surviving bank account, so it is very likely that further commissions followed later.

Most probably HRH Prince William Henry, 1st Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (1743-1805), younger brother of George III.

Only one set of furniture now in the Royal Collection can be directly linked to the Prince’s patronage of Chippendale:

England, circa 1770 Height 39in (99cm) Width: 27in (68cm) Depth: 26in (67cm) F3E0245

a set of two sofas and eight armchairs of identical pattern to this pair (later extended by thirteen plain chairs and two bergères). A very closely related set of chairs and sofas was supplied to Viscount Melbourne for the Saloon at Brocket Hall, c. 1773. In none of these suites did Chippendale precisely repeat himself, however, so it is safe to conclude that the present pair of chairs are part of the original Royal suite. LITERATURE

Gilbert, C, The Life & Works of Thomas Chippendale. London, 1978, p.82 & 109, pl. 17 & 186.

The saloon at Brocket Hall, Country Life, 18 July 1925 M A L L E T T LONDON • NEW YORK

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Fallow Deer in a Wooded Landscape By William Daniel, RA A fine oil painting of fallow deer in a gently sloping wooded landscape. Possibly exhibited Royal Academy 1828, number 204, as ‘View of Windsor Park near Bishopsgate’. England, circa 1825 Height: 23½in (60cm) Width: 29in (74cm) P3E0249 PROVENANCE

Frost & Reed, June 1989 Possibly exhibited Royal Academy 1828 No 204: “View in Windsor Park near Bishopsgate” An important private UK collection. William Daniell R.A. (1769-1837) was a fascinating artist and man of his time. He went to live with his uncle the landscape artist Thomas Daniell (1749-1840) whom he accompanied to India in 1784. They travelled widely, using local engravers to create portfolios of prints of their works which they then auctioned, using the proceeds to fund subsequent journeys. On their return to London William set himself to learning aquatint engraving and the resulting collection of their paintings the hugely influential Oriental Scenery was a critical and commercial success. In 1813 Daniell began a series of six journeys which over ten years allowed him a complete overview of the British coast. His Voyage Round Great Britain was published by Longman in eight volumes over the period 1814 to 1825 during which he would also exhibit his oils at the annual Royal Academy exhibition. Daniell was a prodigious talent, who mastered subjects from the exotic topography of the East to marine subjects and his highly acclaimed views of Windsor and Virginia Water painted in the late

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1820s. The Mallett painting is one of this series, showing Windsor Great Park and its historic deer. Daniell continued to paint and exhibit up to his death in 1837. His works can be seen in the Royal Academy of Art, the National Portrait Gallery, the Tate, the National Maritime Museum and the Courtald Institute of Art all in London, as well as many other collections in Britain and abroad.


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A Pair of Giltwood Wall Appliques

A Collection of George III Tea Caddies

An unusual pair of early 19th century Regency giltwood wall appliques, the ribbon backs with a large bow at the top and gathered tassels at the base, centred with inward facing eagles perched with wings aloft on a rocky eerie. The two candle arms with chain links decorated with cut glass diamond lozenges.

A collection of three late 18th century fruitwood tea caddies, two in the form of apples and one of melon form. Each fitted with an original lock and key above a hinged cover and stalk finial, the interiors with traces of zinc lining.

England, circa 1820

Height: 4in (10cm) Diameter: 4in (10cm)

Height: 34½in (88cm) Width: 13in (33cm) Depth: 8½in (22 cm) F3F0009

England, circa 1790

Height: 5½in (12.5cm) Diameter: 4½in (11.5cm) Height: 5in (12.5cm) Diameter: 4½in (11.5cm) O3F0068

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A Bronze and Ormolu Ceiling Light A fine early 19th century bronze and ormolu pendant ceiling light, having eight branches issuing from a circular dish body suspended from a gilt corona by chains. Russia, circa 1815 Height: 36in (92cm) Diameter: 27½in (70cm) L3F0013 PROVENANCE

An important private UK collection.

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A Victorian Brass Doorstop

A George I Walnut Desk

A finely figured late 19th century brass doorstop in the form of a fox head and whip.

A very fine early 18th century walnut kneehole writing desk of superb colour and patina. The finely figured quarter veneered top above a single long drawer in the frieze, with three further small drawers, flanking an inset kneehole cupboard, below a secret sliding document drawer, all retaining their original handles. All the drawers with cock bead detail and featherbanding, the whole supported on double bracket feet.

England, circa 1880 Height: 12in (30cm) O3F0069

England, circa 1725 Height: 29½in (76cm) Width: 34in (87cm) Depth: 19in (48.5cm) F3F0083 PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

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A Silk and Wool Soho Tapestry Fragment

> An 18th Century Ivory Armchair

A silk and wool Soho arabesque tapestry fragment, attributed to Joshua Morris. The dove grey field central floral swag above a cockatoo and basket of flowers, within Greek key and foliate scroll surround in reds, blues, greens and browns, originally one of a pair.

A rare Vizagapatam engraved and veneered ivory armchair, in the manner of a pattern of chair designed by Thomas Chippendale. The open back with a pierced and interlaced splat, the whole profusely decorated with engraved foliate ornament within borders, standing on square chamfered legs and stretchers.

England, circa 1725 Height: 86½in (220cm) Width: 47in (120cm) T3E0224

India, circa 1770 Height: 37in (94.5cm) Width: 23½in (60cm) Depth: 22½in (57cm)

PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

F3F0040

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This armchair is a very fine example of late 18th century Vizagapatam furniture production. The sandalwood frame strongly inspired by traditional English models pioneered by Chippendale, is then veneered in ivory and etched with black decoration, detailing intricate floral and foliate design alongside geometric pattern. Furniture production in India was largely unknown before the arrival of Europeans in the latter part of the 16th century.

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The Portuguese were the first European nation to establish a permanent trading settlement, followed soon after by the English and the Dutch. The district of Vizagapatam lies on the northern Coromandel coast between Calcutta and Madras; a natural harbour, the British East India Trading Company set up a post from 1668, and by 1756 the whole area had come under British control. The early pioneers, unable to bring furniture with them, soon realised the extraordinary skill of the

native craftsmen, able to copy from the European pattern books with meticulous detail. A tradition subsequently developed, where furniture and objects of Western design were decorated in the distinctive manner of ivory inlay or veneer, which was then etched with black lacquer. The ornate decoration was inspired by Mughal culture, often featuring broad bands of exotic foliage and pattern – expertly altered to appeal to Western tastes, yet still retaining these exquisite characteristics.


IVORY CHAIR

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A Louis XV Bureau Plat A fine Louis XV ormolu-mounted kingwood and rosewood bureau plat. The moulded, rectangular serpentine top with a gilt-tooled brown leather writing surface, above three frieze drawers to one side and three simulated frieze drawers to the other; divided by ormolu c-scroll mounts, on cabriole legs headed by foliate mounts, terminating in ormolu sabots. Stamped François Reizell. France, circa 1765 Height: 31½in (80cm) Width: 56in (142cm) Depth: 29½in (75cm) F3E0161 FRANÇOIS REIZELL

A German artisan who began work in the faubourg St. Antoine and became established 1770 in the Rue de Saint Peres. He became a master in 1765 and employed as his companion Joseph Baumhauer. His principal client was the Prince de Conde, for whom he made a number of pieces at the Palais-Bourbon, and also at Chantilles. His work is much admired for its floral marquetry and the richness of its decoration, always considered to be both sophisticated and elegant. His later work during the 1770’s and 80’s was dominated by marquetry of geometric motifs and, particularly, of trophies. His works are in the collections of the Louvre, Palais de Versailles, and the Musee des arts decoratifs in Paris.

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An Aesop’s Fable Looking Glass A rare mid 18th century George III carved giltwood looking glass. The glass plates within a frame of stylised rococo, the upper corner sections adorned by two Ho Ho birds with a fox in the centre. The lower section divided by a central band with a carved goat climbing from a well, the base of the frame having a carved squirrel. The whole mirror frame is magnificently carved with stalactites, c-scrolls, acanthus leaves and various rocaille forms. England, circa 1760 Height: 55in (140cm) Width: 44in (112cm) Depth: 3in (8cm) F3F0054

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This mirror is particularly unusual due to its narrative quality, representing one of Aesop’s fables, ‘The Fox and the Goat’. The fable tells the story of an unlucky fox who has fallen into a well from which he cannot climb out; a passing thirsty goat looks down and asks what he is doing down there to which the fox, recognising an opportunity to escape, makes a lavish display in the water saying it is refreshing beyond measure, encouraging him to descend.

The goat, mindful only of his thirst, jumps down and immediately the fox leaps onto his back and horns, thus escaping from the well. The goat bleats his discomfort, and the fox turns and replies: “You foolish old fellow! If you had as many brains in your head as you have hairs in your beard, you would never have gone down before you had inspected the way up, nor have exposed yourself to dangers from which you had no means of escape.” The moral: Look Before You Leap.


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A Carved Marble Portrait Relief

A Pair of Mahogany Peat Buckets

A fine carved marble portrait relief possibly of Louis XIV, in a later faux marble and gilt frame.

A pair of mahogany and brass bound peat buckets, with brass swing handles above moulded and brass banded tapered bodies, each fitted with modern brass liners.

France, circa 1800 Height: 15½in (39cm) Width: 11½in (29.5cm) O3F0019

England, circa 1815 Height: 18in (46 cm) Diameter: 15½in (40cm) F3F0015

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Portrait of the Children of Sir Walter Stirling, 1st Bart. A fine oil painting of the children of Sir Walter Stirling, by Sir William Beechey, RA. Oil on canvas. Inscribed on reverse in old handwriting Sir Walter Stirling, Bart. In whose family it had been from the time it was painted, to the present date, with the names of the sitters. England, circa 1790 Framed Height: 54in (132.5cm) Framed Width: 65in (164.5cm) P3E0248

Sir Walter Stirling, 1st Bart of Faskine Co., Lanark was married to Susannah - daughter of George T. Goodenough of Bordwood on the Isle of Wight. She was the sole heiress. Sir Walter served in the Royal Navy and was appointed Commander in Chief of the Fleet at Nore by George III. Together they had four children, pictured here. From left to right are Sir Walter George Stirling, 2nd Bart born 1802, Georgiana Matilda, (who later married Sir T.B. Lennard, Bart and became Lady Lennard), Dorothy Anne born 1796 (later Mrs John Barrett-Lennard) and Mary Jane born 1795 (later Lady Flower, wife of Sir James Flower, Bart).

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A Japanese Lacquer Centre Table A fine and rare Meiji period lacquer centre table, profusely decorated throughout with scarlet and black lacquer, the top shaped and the stem also, the tripod base formed from six leaping carp. Japan, circa 1880 Height: 29in (74cm) Diameter: 43in (109cm) F3E0008

The Meiji era (1868 – 1912) represented a period of enlightenment for Japan. After the Meiji Emperor was restored to Imperial power in 1868, Japan opened its doors to the West after being closed for almost two centuries. Rapid development as a result of increased trade with the West, transformed Japan into a leading economic and military power in Asia. Eager to promote themselves, Japanese art was one of the first disciplines to be exhibited overseas, received with great enthusiasm at the Vienna Exposition of 1873. Furniture and decorative arts in particular became highly sought after, from the slightly heavier style of Victorian furniture, Japanese pieces introduced a more modern aesthetic.

Paired with the delights of colourful lacquer and exotic motif, a market for Japanese export furniture developed, combining traditional western design, with eastern motif of exotic dragons, birds and flowers. The carp or ‘koi’ was a particularly favoured fish used by Japanese artists and craftsmen during the 19th and early 20th centuries. A leaping carp is believed to signify the uplifting of one’s social status through success, either into the upper echelons of society or into a royal family. LITERATURE

Yu-kuan, L, Oriental Lacquer Art, New York, 1972, p.210 & p.285.

A very similar centre table visible on the right hand side of the Drawing Room at Hardwick Hall. Country Life, 1928.

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An Italian Earthenware Vase

A Set of Seven Brass Measures

An early 19th century large scale earthenware vase with lid, the carrying handles framing a ‘cartouche’ depicting a spiralling Chinese dragon on each side, surmounted by the initials G.C. The vase is profusely decorated with bamboo motif and chinoiserie detailing throughout.

A fine set of seven mid 19th century brass weights and imperial measures, supplied by De Grave, Short and Tanner of 59 St. Martin’s Le Grande, in the City of London. All are stamped and issued for use in the County of York, the largest having carrying handles, the sizes as follows: imperial gallon, imperial half gallon, imperial quart, imperial half quart, imperial pint, imperial half pint, imperial gill and imperial half gill.

Italy, circa 1830 Height: 37in (94cm) Diameter: 19in (49cm) O3E0208

Each engraved with ‘Tadcaster and Wetherby District, West Riding of Yorkshire’, numbered 1416 and dated 1867. The set retains the original signed and witnessed verification document from the department of the Board of Trade.

England, 1867 Height: 6½in (17cm) Width:10½in (27cm) Diameter: 8½in (21cm) O3E0151

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Queen Victoria and Prince Albert Viewing the Llamas in The Home Park, Windsor By Gourlay Steell, RSA. (1819-1894) Signed and dated 1845 Oil on slate Height: 33in (85cm) Width: 47½in (120cm) P3E0272 PROVENANCE

The Nicoll Family Her Majesty the Queen and the Prince Consort are depicted in the Home Park at Windsor in 1845 astride their horses Tajar (the grey on which the Queen is seated - a most distinctive horse with dappled haunches and strikingly dark fetlocks) and Hammon, a chestnut. Tajar was acquired by Prince Albert in 1844, and was often ridden by the Queen, while Hammon was presented to the Queen in 1844 by the King of Prussia. Both horses were painted by Herring in 1844. With them, in the foreground, is Albert Edward, Prince of Wales (later Edward VII) on his Shetland pony. The painting comes from the Nicoll family, whose forebears, H.J. and D. Nicoll, were pioneers of large-scale retailing in London and Paris with further premises in Liverpool, Manchester and Birmingham. It is believed that this painting was commissioned to be part of a decorative scheme for their shop at 114-120 Regent Street, which opened in 1845 and was so lavishly decorated that the building became an attraction for visitors. The royal couple are depicted wearing Nicoll’s paletot that the firm patented in 1845. This ‘paletot,’ a cloak made of alpaca wool from llamas in a markedly simple silhouette, was described as containing ‘a gentlemanly neatness and an absence of all unsightly vulgarity. It has met with the highest approbation in the court circle.’ This style sold so well that it formed the basis of the Nicoll family fortune. The picture is painted on slate, which is a most unusual support for an oil painting. The use of slate for this picture

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further suggests that this painting was commissioned to be part of the decoration of the Regent Street shop, and the slate is pierced by four screw holes in the corners that would have been used to fix the picture to the wall. The slate has implications for the stylistic quality of the oil painting as it produces a very even paint surface and little impasto to create a sharp and clear image. The painting was reproduced as an engraving for a newspaper in India, The Bengal Hurkaru and the India Gazette in July 1848 as an advertisement for the famous paletot. The painting was once again illustrated in black and white in Vaughan Wilkin’s article ‘The Last Romance of a Prime Minister’ in the July 1937 publication of Modern Woman with the title ‘Queen Victoria Riding with the Prince Consort – as often, in Windsor Great Park, She had ridden with Lord Melbourne.’ The artist, Gourlay Steell, was best known for his paintings of animals. He was particularly skilled at modelling and focused his attention on horses, dogs, cattle, and larger hunting scenes. He was appointed to the post of Animal Painter for Scotland by Queen Victoria after the death of Landseer in 1873. This prestigious award, along with his appointment as Painter to the Highland and Agricultural Society, ensured him a virtual monopoly of animal and sporting commissions in Scotland, although he also painted genre and historical scenes. He exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1865-80 and at the Royal Scottish Academy from 1832-94, becoming an Associate of the latter in 1846. LITERATURE

Engraved in ‘The Bengal Hurkaru and The India Gazette’ 21st July 1848, illustrated p.1; Vaughan Wilkins, “The Last Romance of a Prime Minister” in ‘Modern Woman’, July 1937, illustrated p.23.


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A Set of Steel Fire Irons

A Pair of Tôle Wall Appliques

A set of early 19th century polished steel fire irons, having knopped brass baluster handles decorated with acanthus detail, the spade with rectangular geometric perforations to the base.

A pair of early 19th century green ­painted tôle wall appliques decorated throughout with gilt enrichments, each headed by a female gilt metal bust above a tapering column decorated with trophies, the oil container ending in a pendant berry finial and decorated with stylised flowers and scrolling foliage, each with a tôle shade and glass drip pans.

England, circa 1830. Length: 28in (71cm) O3F0098

France, circa 1815 Height: 18½in (47cm) Width: 9in (23cm) L3E0269

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A Terracotta Figure of Ceres A fine terracotta sculpture of Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture, holding ears of wheat with a sheaf by her side. Adorned in billowing drapery, she stands on a square base, later painted. France, circa 1740 Height: 56½in (143cm) Width: 21in (53cm) Depth: 17in (44cm) O3F0018 PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

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Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture, grain and fertility has been a particularly fashionable subject in sculpture since Antiquity. The mythological equivalent to Ancient Greece’s Demeter, Ceres formed one of the twelve Dii Consentes, or primary deities in the Pantheon of Ancient Rome. During the medieval period in Rome, a religious sect formed, based more on her domesticity and from the Renaissance onwards she has been considered a link between Christian

female icons and the mythology of the Ancients. The elegance of her stance relates stylistically to both the 17th and 18th centuries, the classical contraposta pose looks back to the great masters of the court of Louis XIV; while the beautifully soft hand movement through the wheat, coupled with the whimsical detail of her clothing and hair look forward to the exuberance of the rococo.


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A Pair of Copper Watering Cans

A George III Mahogany Commode A fine George III serpentine mahogany commode, the cross-banded and moulded top above three long graduated drawers of very fine figured mahogany, flanked by projecting angles on a shaped apron stand with bracket feet.

Hill’s success was governed by his versatility as a craftsman; able to employ and adapt the popular furniture styles of the day to suit the requirements of his clients, as well as offering more competitive prices than his equally established counterparts in London.

A pair of Victorian beaten copper watering cans, with loop handles and oversized spouts. Stamped P.P.A

This piece is an excellent example of Hill’s characteristic mahogany model of the ‘French commode’, employing a subtle bombé form and serpentine top, with the lobed apron at the front. His talent as a craftsman and businessman earned him the patronage of many noble landowners of the time, most notably the Duke of Somerset; however, he also commissioned fine pieces for the collections at Corsham Court, Cirencester Park and Stourhead in Wiltshire.

O3E0221

England, circa 1880 Height: 16½in (42cm)

Attributed to Henry Hill of Marlborough. England, circa 1770 Height: 32½in (83cm) Width: 63in (160cm) Depth: 22in (56cm) F3F0017

Henry Hill of Marlborough led a particularly

innovative career as a skilled cabinetmaker from the 1740s until his death in 1778. Primarily based in Wiltshire,

PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

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A Chinese Export Mirror Painting

> A Pair of Parcel Gilt Stools

A fine Chinese export reverse painted mirror depicting a bucolic lakeside scene centered on a girl playing the flute. In a later craquelle-bordered giltwood frame.

A pair of Piedmontese cream painted and parcel gilt stools, each with gilt paterae and laurel carved seat rails on tapered turned legs, with gadrooned caps and acanthus collars on ball feet.

China, circa 1770 Height: 17½in (44cm) Width: 29in (75cm)

Retaining their original needlework seat covers. Italy, circa 1790

P3E0228

Height: 19in (48cm) Width: 18in (46cm) Depth: 18in (46cm) F3F0014 PROVENANCE

An important private UK collection.

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A Pair of Louis Philippe Bergères

A Pair of Trumpet Vases

An unusual pair of Louis Philippe satin birch bergères, the padded curved backs inlaid with ebonised line inlay, above drop in seats on lotus carved sabre legs, upholstered in vibrant green silk.

A fine pair of early 19th century cut glass and ormolu-mounted trumpet vases, attributed to Baccarat, the flared necks cut with horizontal bands above a wave cut central band, the base section with spirally fluted collars.

France, circa 1830 France, circa 1825 Height: 31in (79cm) Width: 21½in (55cm) Depth: 21½in (55cm)

Height: 7in (19cm) Diameter: 6½in (16cm)

F3F0016

O3F0026

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A George III Sideboard A George III mahogany serpentine sideboard of large scale, the crossbanded top above a fluted frieze centred by an urn with swag detailing, concealing a later drawer. The whole standing on six reeded tapered legs. In the manner of Robert Adam. England, circa 1770 Height: 36in (92cm) Width: 105½in (268cm) Depth: 38in (96cm) F3F0079 PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

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> A Set of Twelve Chinese Watercolours A set of twelve late 18th century Chinese watercolours on rice paper, depicting scenes of theatrical studies, interspersed with mythological characters. China, circa 1790 Height: 20in (51cm) Width: 24½in (62cm) Depth: 1in (2.5cm) P3E0153

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A Pair of Copper Ship’s Lanterns

A Tortoiseshell Writing Table A rare mahogany and tortoiseshell veneered writing table with four drawers on each side and barley sugar twist legs, with gilded mounts. By Maison Franck Belgium, circa 1930 Height: 31in (79cm) Width: 55in (140cm) Depth: 34in (86cm) F3E0309

Maison Franck was originally a wallpaper specialist in Antwerp, and it was not until Franz Franck, together with his brother Charles, took over the company in 1894 that its furniture production flourished, at one time employing over 150 craftsmen. Under Francis Franck, the son of Franz, from 1932 until the 1960s, Maison Franck produced furniture of style and luxury particularly noted for its tortoiseshell.

A pair of late 19th century Admiralty pattern brass, copper, and glass ship’s lanterns used for navigational purposes. Each bearing the maker’s mark of Griffiths & Browett of Birmingham

Cabinets and tables are most commonly found, while desks are relatively rare. One similar example with solomonic twist legs and similar veneers remains in a private collection in Antwerp.

L3E0218

England, circa 1890 Height: 18½in (48cm) Width: 10in (25cm)

LITERATURE

Mullendorff, E. The Furniture of Maison Franck, Furniture History Society, 2002.

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A Cut Glass and Malachite Chandelier A particularly fine early 19th century Russian chandelier, the gilded metal frame supporting three tiers of faceted drops in unusually good condition, with two rings veneered with malachite and centered with cobalt glass. The six arms, with cobalt glass drip pans, separated by swags and pendant tear-drops, sit below six unusual festooned coronets and spiral arms above. Russia, circa 1800

Height: 45in (114cm) Diameter: 34in (87cm) L3E0171 PROVENANCE

Ex-collection Tony Hail Ex-collection of Majorie Merriweather Post (d. 1973)

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At twenty-seven, Marjorie Merriweather Post (1887-1973) inherited Postum Cereal Company and soon became the richest woman in America. In 1936, her third husband, Joseph Davies, was appointed the American Ambassador to Moscow. They spent two years in the Soviet Union during which they acquired a large collection of Imperial Russian objects that were sold through special commission shops established by the cash starved Soviet government. This elegant chandelier with its distinctive malachite bands was likely acquired at this time.


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A Steel and Brass Basket Grate

A 19th Century Ivory Elephant

A fine late 19th century steel and brass basket grate, with an arched cast iron back and baluster finials, on projecting chased knopped urn supports with ring handles, on pierced scroll feet.

A charming late nineteenth century carved ivory Shibayama baby elephant with semi precious gem stone eyes and gilt metal toes. Japan, circa 1880

England, circa 1890 Height at front: 24½in (62cm) Height at back: 32in (81cm) Width: 35in (89cm) Depth: 22in (56.5cm) F3F0022

Height: 4½in (12cm) Width: 6in (15cm) Depth: 3½in (9cm) O3F0056

Shibayama is an art form originating in the town of the same name in Japan, the technique involves skilled craftsman applying semi-precious shells or stones in variant colours onto lacquer and ivory. A variety of objets d’art can be decorated in the Shibayama style including vases, boxes, table-screens, swords and even entire ivory tusks.

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A Rare Ivory Armchair A very rare late 19th century carved Dieppe bone and ivory armchair, the entire surface finished with applied stylised leaves, the crest decorated with an elaborate coat of arms, the arms terminating in beautifully carved lion’s heads, also with heraldic beasts and masks, with carved rope twisting throughout the design. The back similarly worked. France, circa 1870 Height: 44in (112cm) Width: 25in (63cm) Depth: 26in (66cm)

The city of Dieppe on the north coast of France has been a notable centre of decorative work in ivory from the sixteenth century. It was a busy port and played an important role in the history of navigation. In 1628, a fleet of ships returned from the coast of Guinea bringing back large quantities of gold, malaguette (pepper) and ivory. From this time onwards, sailors in port as well as local craftsmen sculpted figures in ivory. By the early 1700s approximately 5% of the total working population carved in ivory.

The very nature of the ivory tusk makes it impossible to work with on a grand scale and most items were small devotional and historical figures. However, by the mid 19th century, artists in Dieppe introduced a unique technique of applying small carved pieces of ivory to larger items of furniture. It was a detailed and time consuming art form so very few pieces were made. The same workshop undoubtedly created a similar pair of armchairs in the Mallett archives.

F3E0144

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A George III Writing Table A fine George III mahogany library writing table, in the manner of Thomas Hope, the rectangular top inset with a gilt tooled leather panel, above a moulded frieze with six drawers and carved paterae to the corners, on husk and lambrequin headed-stop fluted sabre legs with brass caps and castors. England, circa 1800 Height: 30in (76cm) Width: 51in (130cm) Depth: 39in (99cm) F3F0070 PROVENANCE

An important private UK collection.

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A Set of St. Cyr Needleworks A set of six mid 18th century needlework pictures, the gros point background surrounding a petit point central escutcheon shaped vignette, depicting finely dressed figures in Arcadian landscapes of exotic flowers and picturesque landscapes. The figures including an exotic man with a blue turban and gilded vase, ladies in splendid gowns carrying musical instruments and objects of virtue. Probably St Cyr, France, circa 1760. Height: 12in (30cm) Width: 12in (30cm) T3F0031

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The embroidery school of St Cyr was founded at the Convent of St Cyr by Madame de Maintenon (b.1635 – d.1719) the second wife of King Louis XIV of France. Although not officially Queen, Madame de Maintenon was a very highly respected figure of political and religious influence, often persuading the King into patronage of more noble pursuits. Louis XIV was in fact a great supporter of those gifted in the art of fine

embroidery. He encouraged Madame de Maintenon’s development of the St Cyr school, established specifically to help ladies from impoverished families learn a vocation. After the King died in 1715, she retired to the school and continued to teach until her death, to this day beautifully elaborate wall pieces from St Cyr still hang in Versailles.


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A Pair of Giltwood Wall Appliques

> A Pair of George III Giltwood Consoles

An unusual pair of late 18th century giltwood three branch wall appliques. Each surmounted by tiers of leaf sprays on guilloche moulded plinths, above tapered foliate and paterae aprons, supporting acanthus leaf arms with stiff leaf sconces and drip pans.

An important pair of late 18th century giltwood and gesso console tables, with magnificent scagliola tops attributed to Pietro Bossi, finely inlaid in the classical manner on a white marble ground, supported by three downswept, reeded legs with carved ribbon-tie detail, crowned by three lion’s head masks.

France, circa 1780 England, circa 1770 Height: 35½in (90cm) Width:23½in (60cm) F3E0299

Height: 33in (84cm) Width: 58in (148cm) Depth: 23½in (60cm)

PROVENANCE

F3E0297

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

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A design by Robert Adam for a console table with in-curved ogee legs may be the inspiration for the more tautly swept legs seen here. The scagliola tops resemble the work of Bartoli and Richter, who were also regularly patronised by Adam. The legs, formed as ribbon-tied fasces, are more directly echoed in a table attributed to Mayhew & Ince, who may also be responsible for a set of chairs from Bramshill Park, with comparable carved lion-heads. The profile of the top likewise recalls the work of this firm, who often adopted a serpentine outline in powerfully neo-classical designs.

Robert Adam’s design for a console table for Lansdowne House, 1768. The Soane Museum.

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> A Set of Miniature Portraits Two framed sets of three miniature portraits depicting Chinese figures, reverse painted on glass. China, circa 1780 Height: 2½in (6cm) Width:1½in (3½cm) P3F0030

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A Pair of 19th Century Perfume Vases A pair of early 19th century perfume vases attributed to Matthew Boulton, each with a foliate cover with a leaf and berry finial above a pierced rim, the body with a guilloche band with masks and foliate clasps above a ribbon-tie and drapery socle on a beaded plinth. The fluorspar authenticated by the Earth Sciences department of The Natural History Museum, London as possibly originating from a Cornish mine. England, circa 1800

The sale of Messrs. Boulton and Fothergill’s Manufactory, at Messrs. Christie and Ansell’s on April 11-13, 1771, included a dozen vases described as being in ‘the antique taste radix amethysti [bluejohn] and or moulu, lined with silver and perferated for essence, supported by four sphinxes upon an ornamented base of ebony’. A pair of bluejohn vases of this model were supplied to George III, in 1771, by Boulton and are in the Royal Collection, Windsor Castle.

The present vases belong to a group of perfume-burners which are related to the sphinx vases in form, although they are without the sphinx supports and the lower plinth. They have white marble bodies, with spreading pierced foliate covers, with some variation in the masks adorning the bodies. They may relate to those in the Boulton and Fothergill sale of 20 May 1778, lots 6, 12, 24, 34 and 35, as ‘One pair of statuary marble vases on pedestals, mounted in or moulu and perforated for essences’.

Height: 10in (25cm)

LITERATURE

O3E0273

Goodison, N. Ormolu: The Work of Matthew Boulton. London, 1974, p. 163 & pl. 94.

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Portrait of Captain Beauchamp, RN

A Horn and Bone Tea Caddy

By George Romney (1734 – 1802)

A rare late 19th century stag’s horn tea caddy in excellent condition, the lid with an inset oval panel depicting a stag with accompanying hinds in a woodland setting, the front with a panel and key escutcheon carved with tethered deer hounds. The interior partially retaining its zinc-foil lining with twin lidded compartments, each with a horn lid with relief carved knobs depicting recumbent deer. The base with the original paper label for the retailer or manufacturer, ‘Bing Gebr’ (Bing Brothers) ‘Frankfurt A m’ (Frankfurt am Main).

Portrait of Captain Beauchamp, RN, full length, wearing naval uniform, standing beside an estuary with a Man O’War beyond. Oil on Canvas England, circa 1760 Height: 49in (125cm) Width: 36½in (93cm) P3E0252

Germany, circa 1880 PROVENANCE

Lord Wavertree Arthur Ackermann & Son Ltd. Ex Collection of Lord Wavertree

Height: 6½in (16cm) Width: 10in (25cm) Depth: 6in (15cm) O3E0195

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A Specimen Marble Centre Table An unusual early 19th century Regency rosewood centre table, having a black marble specimen top inlaid with a large variety of lozenge shaped specimen marbles, including malachite and lapis lazuli, surrounded by a band of violet brocatelle marble. The top supported on a rosewood base, the upper circular support with beaded carving, which is in turn supported by a triangular plinth, enriched with carved foliate detail at the corners. The base plinth is of concave sided triangular form and is supported by boldly carved lion paw feet. England, circa 1820 Height: 27½in (70cm) Diameter: 33in (84cm) F3F0061

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A George III Four Poster Bed A rare George III mahogany four poster bed, the elaborately pierced canopy decorated in the rococo taste, having finely carved c-scroll and acanthus leaf decoration. The top supported by four reeded columns each with ribbon tie detail, resting on acanthus carved baluster bases with beadwork, in turn supported on pedestals with small brass roundels terminating in a square base. Now upholstered in Fortuny apricot silk. Attributed to Thomas Chippendale. England, circa 1770

The importance of the bed in the great country houses should not be underplayed. In most cases, it was the most expensive furnishing often designed by highly regarded craftsmen, and upholstered in the most luxurious silk or embroidery available at the time. It is well known throughout history that the bed was not just a place of sleep but also of politics; the French Kings were renowned in particular, for receiving ambassadors and courtiers to their bed chamber for business. Many of the

grandest beds in country houses were acquired as perquisites, by the favoured courtiers after a Sovereign’s death. This bed, with its exquisite pierced carved rococo canopy, and exceptional ribbon scrolled columns would have occupied the home of a family of great distinction. During this period in history, the bed was for personal, not state use, nonetheless it would have been shown off to friends and acquaintances to reflect the wealth and position of its owner.

Height: 107in (272cm) Width: 69in (175cm) Depth: 84½in (215cm) F3F0084 PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

Thomas Chippendale’s design for the Dumfries House palm-wrapped bed, featured in the 1762 edition of The Director, pl. 39.

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A Set of Four Giltwood Wall Brackets An exceptionally rare and fine set of four carved rococo giltwood wall brackets, in the manner of Matthias Lock and attributed to the carver, John Gilbert, the shelf supported by carved c-scrolls and floral swags entwined around boldly carved dragons with open mouths and with wings spread. For a direct comparison, see the set of six brackets carved by John Gilbert for the vestibule in the Mansion House, London, in 1752. England, circa 1755 Height: 28in (71cm) Width: 22in (56cm) Depth: 9in (23cm) F3B0056

A comparable sketch of a carved bracket by Charles Dance

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The Mansion House was designed specifically as the official residence for the Lord Mayor of London. The Corporation of London instructed George Dance the Elder as architect and interior coordinator. It took 14 years to complete and was ready for its first occupant, Lord Mayor Alderman Crisp Gascoyne, in November 1752. Gilbert’s six brackets were described as ‘6 Stands for Candles for the Vestable’ in the first inventory of the Mansion House. Both Thomas Chippendale and Matthias Lock published designs with close similarities to these brackets, each incorporating dragon-like feathered creatures amongst c and s curves, leaves and flowers. It is likely that Dance would have had access to these designs.

A group of designs by Chippendale are titled ‘Brackets for Bust’s’ but the Mansion House brackets were included in Dance’s ‘Proposal to Light the Mansion House’ and were never intended for busts. John Gilbert was at one time trading from Mount Street, Mayfair. The Mansion House commission involved the set of brackets and some carved tables. He also unsuccessfully proposed work for the Great Hall in 1755. This commission came early in his career. He went on to work on designs for Robert Adam at Lansdowne House and Osterley. He was paid £15 (£2 10s. each) for the brackets at the Mansion House. LITERATURE

Jeffery, S. The Mansion House. First published for the Corporation of London by Phillimore, 1993.

The Vestibule at Mansion House, Country Life.


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A 19th Century Brass Club Fender

> A Pair of Charles X Armchairs

A late 19th century brass club fender with leather upholstered seats. The leather with embossed detail on each surface, depicting a dragon within a circular background of stylised starburst decoration.

A pair of Charles X mahogany armchairs, the floral inlaid back rests with unusual protruding carved lion’s heads, supported by bold swept arms with box wood stringing and carved acanthus decoration, terminating in fantastical masks issuing acanthus, which in turn form scrolls. Standing on turned tapering front legs and bold, outswept back sabre legs, resting on brass castors.

England, circa 1880 Height: 21in (53cm) Width: 60in (152cm) Depth: 22in (56cm) F3E0225

France, circa 1835 Height: 36in (91.5cm) Width: 24½in (62cm) Depth: 33½in (85cm) F3E0012

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A Pair of Brass Panniers

A Leather Cartridge Case

An unusual pair of late 19th century polished brass grape panniers of tapered form, embossed with figures and details of a country house within a scroll border and ropetwist frieze.

A bespoke brass bound oak and leather cartridge magazine by James Purdey & Sons, modelled on the ‘Audley’, designed to hold five hundred cartridges. The hinged top opening to reveal four dividers for different gages of cartridge, having bramagh locks and external straps.

Alsace, circa 1890 Height: 34½in (88cm) Diameter: 13in (33cm) O3F0020

This extremely fine cartridge case was manufactured at the time of the great country house parties, the weekends taken up with sophisticated driven shoots of partridge and pheasant. At the peak of its social interest, the ability to be considered an excellent shot opened the doors to the higher strata of society.

England, date by label 1921 – 1938. Height: 11½in (29cm) Width: 17in (43.5cm) Depth: 10in (25cm) O3F0097

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A Victorian Marine Stick Barometer A fine late 19th century walnut veneered and carved marine barometer, having a bow-fronted case of rich colour and figure with square moulded pediment, the angled ivory register plates with weather indications protected by a piece of bowed and bevelled glass, the thermometer in its own moulded and glazed case calibrated with scales in fahrenheit. The maker’s or retailer’s name engraved ‘Cowland & Son, Liverpool’. Retaining the original wall-mounted brass gimbal support and reservoir. England, circa 1880 Height: 38in (96cm) Width: 4in (10cm) Depth: 3in (7cm) F3E0280

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A Silk and Wool Soho Arabesque Tapestry A fine silk and wool Soho tapestry attributed to Joshua Morris , after a design by Andien de Clermont. England, circa 1725 Height: 181in (460cm) Width: 106in (270cm) T3E0241 PROVENANCE

Lionel Harris, The Spanish Art Gallery, London Mrs John E. Rovensky, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, 22 January 1957 lot 1018 with French and Co. Mrs Hamilton Rice, Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, 23 October 1965, lot 343. An important private UK collection.

English tapestries of the eighteenth century are commonly known by the generic title of Soho tapestries, as opposed to those of the 17th century which were mostly woven in Mortlake. An integral part of domestic decoration in the grandest house for centuries; the fashion began to wane towards the mid-eighteenth century and the textiles created in and around Soho between 1700 and c1740 represent a last highpoint of the craft in England. The Royal workshops at Mortlake had been established in 1619 in imitation of those founded in Paris by Henri IV in 1607. By 1620 the Mortlake manufactory had recruited some fifty Flemish weavers and for the next fifteen years its work was ‘unequalled in quality anywhere in Europe’. The workshops closed in 1703 by which time most of the weavers had relocated to Soho, or to neighbouring Great Queen Street where the Great Wardrobe workshops were situated. As with most contemporary English furniture, few pieces were signed, and

it is often hard to distinguish between the different workshops. The series described below are important primarily for their quality but also for their homogeneity, and the ability to ascribe them all to one prominent weaver, Joshua Morris, whose signature appears on several examples. JOSHUA MORRIS (FL.1720-28)

Morris is regarded, with John Vanderbank, as the finest English weaver of the 18th century. Living and working on the south-east corner of Frith and Bateman Streets he took over a former dancing school in 1720 and converted the dance hall into a workshop for his looms. In November 1726 an advertisement in the Daily Journal announced ‘A large quantity of curious, fine, new tapestry hangings are to be sold by auction, by Mr Joshua Morris, Tapistry-Maker, at his house in Frith Street, near Soho-Square’. In 1727 the painter William Hogarth sued Morris for failing to pay for the use of a tapestry design. William Bradshaw, perhaps the most commercially

successful of the Soho weavers, gave evidence on behalf of Morris, arguing that “the painting (by Hogarth) was not performed in a workman-like manner and that it was impossible to make a tapestry from it.” The judge disagreed and found in favour of Hogarth who was awarded £30. The case paved the way for important legislation in 1735 that was the first to give artists legal copyright over their designs. The suit helped to cripple Morris financially and he was forced to move from Frith Street, whose premises were taken over by William Bradshaw, and nothing more is known of him after that. Morris occupies a unique position in English textile history. The quality of his weaving was exceptional, and in his defence against Hogarth he attributes his success to ‘using some of the finest hands in Europe in working tapestry, who were most of them foreigners, and had worked abroad as well as England’, but it is his uniquely elegant and sophisticated designs that are the basis of his reputation. They are the most successful M A L L E T T LONDON • NEW YORK

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Morris Tapestry, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

of all those that aimed to follow the French style, yet whilst adopting certain decorative elements such as the Berainesque strapwork and the classical vases overflowing with flowers, they have a lightness and lyricism, and certain wit in the depiction of the exotic birds, that sets them apart from their French peers. ANDIEN DE CLERMONT (D. 1783)

De Clermont was a French artist who is thought to have studied under Antoine Monnoyer (d 1747), the son of JeanBaptiste Monnoyer (1636-1699), the famous Regence painter who specialised in floral still lives. He moved to England in 1716 or 1717 and remained there until 1754. Clermont decorated interiors at Langley Hall, Wentworth Castle, Wilton House, and the Earl of Stafford’s now lost dining room at No. 5 St. James’s Square, London though perhaps his most famous is the Monkey Room at Kirtlington Park. This shows similar birds to those in the tapestries, while the scrolling leaves separating the colour tones of the ground can also be found on wall panels that are signed and dated by Clermont in 1742.

Clermont’s designs are arguably the most sophisticated of all those adopted by English weavers in the first half of the 18th century. His mentors, the Monnoyer family, had supplied designs for the workshops at Gobelins and Beauvais, producing cartoons of fruit and flowers, and, along with two other artists, created the suite The Emperor of China. Clermont must have been aware of these as many of the decorative elements he used are directly comparable with contemporary French work.

LITERATURE

Marillier, H.C, English Tapestries of the Eighteenth Century. London, 1930. Wingfield Digby, G, ‘English Tapestries at Burlington House’, Burlington Magazine. December 1955, p. 388. Roscoe, I , “Andien de Clermont, Decorative Painter to the Leicester House Set.” Apollo 123, 1986.

His creations are highly accomplished and were praised by Marillier as ‘The drawing and workmanship are of a high order, not unworthy of comparison with the Beauvais tapestries which they were no doubt intended to rival, and the use of fresh cartoons for the different sets points to the existence of some very capable artist in this class of work’, while Wingfield Digby comments ‘undoubtedly the best designed of eighteenth-century English tapestries are the Arabesque, or Grostesque series connected with the name of the weaver Joshua Morris’.

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Portrait of Thomas Bisse with Portraits of his Wives A fine oil on canvas portrait of Thomas Bisse, seated at a mahogany tripod table, with portraits of his wives. By Arthur Devis. Oil on canvas England, circa 1770 Height: 36in (92cm) Width: 28in (71cm) P3E0275

depicted in a private surrounding. He also specialised in small-scale portraits of single figures. Devis exhibited at the Free Society of Artists between 17611780 and became its President in 1768. Devis was born in Lancashire in 1712 as the eldest son of Anthony Devis and Ellin nee Rauthmell. Devis trained under Peter Tillemans, a sporting and topographical landscape artist. One of Devis’ early works, Hoghton Tower, Lancashire, reflects the influence of Tillemans in its use of a bird’s-eye perspective of the scene.

PROVENANCE

By descent Thomas Agnew & Sons Ltd. King George I of the Hellenes Exhibition London Burlington Fine Arts Club 1932 An important private UK collection. Arthur Devis was a leading exponent of the Conversation Piece, an informal group portrait of family or friends usually

Devis began to develop his portrait work and in particular the conversation piece genre. Devis was popular amongst the gentry and professional classes, particularly in the north of England and in London, where he moved in 1742. Devis’ father Anthony was a member of the Town Council of Preston, which would have provided him useful access

to influential groups in Lancashire. The conversation piece became a popular style with the work of William Hogarth in the 1720s and continued to be used by the greatest portrait painters of that generation, including Thomas Gainsborough and George Romney. Devis was involved with the Free Society of Artists throughout his later career, and was elected President in 1768. Devis’ style of portraits is recognisable in the way he presents his figures in legible and identifiable interiors and landscapes. He used to rely on wooden manikins to develop poses, which explains the stiff, doll-like quality of his figures. He also had to then place these figures into a realistic setting. To understand perspective, Devis and his contemporaries could have turned to a number of publications on the topic, including The Practice of Perspective, published in 1725 by E. Chambers. Despite the availability of guides such as this one, Devis still struggled to convincingly depict his interiors. Nonetheless, Devis was particularly skilled at signalling codes of behaviour within his portraits through hierarchies of age, gender, and property. Devis studied seventeenth-century Dutch masters and occasionally worked as a miniature painter himself, which explains the high crafted finish of Devis’ canvases. His brushwork is meticulous and delineates fine details within his interiors and accompanying props. He retired to Brighton in 1783 where he passed way four years later. Devis’ reputation suffered in the years following his death as he was not part of the wider circle of English artists that joined the Royal Academy and gained international prominence.

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A 19th Century Wall Clock

A Pair of Arts and Crafts Fire Dogs

An early 19th century ‘Sedan’ type circular wall clock, the red tôle case decorated with gilt flowers, the white enamel dial with Arabic numbers.

A pair of brass and iron fire dogs, the pierced circular foliate flower heads supported on wrythen stems and arched front legs.

France, circa 1820

In the manner of Ernest Gimson.

Height:18in (46cm) Width: 14in (36cm) Depth: 5in (13cm)

England, circa 1900

O3F0033

Height: 26½in (67cm) Width: 12in (30cm) Depth: 17in (43cm) O3E0222

Ernest Gimson (b.1864 – d.1919) was one of a select group of highly influential English designers from the Arts and Crafts movement, during the late

19th and early 20th centuries. Born in Leicester to an engineer father, Gimson’s passion for handicraft began at the age of twenty when William Morris stayed with the family, to give a lecture at the Leicester Secular Society on ‘Art and Socialism’. Profoundly influenced by his ideas, Gimson studied architecture in London on Morris’ recommendation, and shortly began working with architect John Dando Sedding. Using a more liberal Gothic style in his designs, Sedding also practiced stone carving and iron work, influencing Gimson to broaden his expertise. Gimson developed a passion for surface texture and naturalistic detail, designing and crafting works with a cleaner, more organic aesthetic, symptomatic with the Arts and Crafts movement.

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A Needlework Panel A very finely worked early 18th century needlepoint panel in a gilt frame, depicting a shepherd and shepherdess seated in a pastoral setting surrounded by their flock. The background with vibrant naturalistic detail including fruit trees, flowers and shrubbery with a church, a traveller and a windmill perched on a hill in the distance. England, circa 1720 Height: 16in (41cm) Width: 13½in (34cm) T3F0032

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> A Pair of Giltwood Mirrors A fine pair of George III giltwood and gesso wall mirrors, in the style of Thomas Chippendale. The rectangular plate flanked by border plates with fluted twin pilasters, surmounted by an urn and cover with drapes on foliate scroll supports, above open interlaced foliate borders, with a central anthemion. The mirror on the right a later copy produced by the Mallett workshops. England, circa 1790 Height: 69in (175cm) Width: 36in (92cm) F3F0010 PROVENANCE

Mallett, London. An important private UK collection.

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A Charles X Music Stool

A Pair of Silver Mounted Candlesticks

An unusual Charles X mahogany, steel and brass music stool, the saddle seat with mahogany sides above shaped steel supports joined by a height adjustment lever, the horse shoe legs joined by a brass stretcher, terminating in brass feet.

A pair of early 20th century Russian nephrite and silver candlesticks, the ovoid body below a gadrooned and guilloche patterned candle holder decorated with ribboned husk swags, supported by three stylised dolphins. The whole resting on a shaped tripod plinth.

The seat upholstered in diamond pattern green horsehair with the leading edge in brass studs. France, circa 1830 Height: 21in (53cm) Width: 19in (48cm) Depth: 12in (31cm)

Russia, circa 1900 Height: 7½in (19cm) Width: 3½in (9cm) O3F0055

F3D0088

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Index Firewares

Lighting

A Brass Club Fender 165 A Pair of Arts and Crafts Fire Dogs 179 A Pair of Brass Panniers 169 A Pair of Mahogany Peat Buckets 107 A Regency Steel Fire Grate 68 A Set of Steel Fire Irons 116 A Steel and Brass Basket Grate 137

Ceiling Lights A Bronze and Ormolu Ceiling Light 94 A Cut Glass and Malachite Chandelier 134 An Empire Chandelier 10 Lamps A Pair of Copper Ship’s Lamps 133 Wall Lights A Pair of Giltwood Wall Appliques 93, 145 A Pair of Regency Wall Lights 59 A Pair of Tôle Wall Appliques 116

Furniture Bureaux and Bookcases A George III Bureau Bookcase 34, 137 Commodes A George III Mahogany Commode 121 Consoles A Pair of George III Giltwood Consoles 145 Miscellaneous A George III Four Poster Bed 99, 158 A Set of Four Giltwood Wall Brackets 160 Sideboards A George III Sideboard 128 Torchères A Pair of Giltwood Torchères 26 The Mentmore Torchères 7

Mirrors Chinese Mirror Paintings A Chinese Mirror Painting 12 A Chinese Mirror Painting 123 A Chinese Reverse Painted Mirror Scene 64 Pairs A Pair of Giltwood Mirrors 181 Single A George I Giltwood Pier Glass 49 A George III Giltwood Mirror 181 An Aesop’s Fable Looking Glass 104 Objects

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Clocks/Scientific A Long Case Clock by Joseph Windmills 86 An Early 19th Century Wall Clock 179 A Set of Seven Brass Measures 113 A Victorian Marine Stick Barometer 170 Fire Irons A Set of Fire Irons 116 Glass A Cut Glass Pedestal Bowl 38 An 18th Century Cut Glass Tureen 31 A Pair of Trumpet Vases 127 Ivory A 19th Century Ivory Elephant 137 Miscellaneous A Leather Cartridge Case 169 A Pair of Copper Watering Cans 121 A Victorian Brass Doorstop 96 Porcelain A Pair of Famille Rose Cache Pots 82, 104 A Pair of Meissen Models of Pug Dogs 71 A Pair of Qianlong Vases and Covers 46 Sculpture A Carved Hardwood Portrait Bust of a Bearded Soldier 20 A Pair of Iron Griffin 42


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A Pair of Terracotta Models of Boxer Dogs 79 A Terracotta Figure of Ceres 118 Silver A Pair of Silver Mounted Candlesticks 185 A Silver Guernsey Milk Jug 22 Tea Caddies A Collection of George III Tea Caddies 93 A George III Tortoiseshell Tea Caddy 59 A Horn and Ivory Tea Caddy 155 Tôle A Pair of Regency Cache Pots 49 A Pair of Tôle Ware Urns 34 A Pair of Tôle Ware Urns 26 A Pontypool Ware Cheese Coaster 68 Urns and Vases An Italian Earthenware Vase 113 A Pair of Perfume Vases 153 A Pair of Porphyry Urns 74 Pictures Chinese A Chinese Painting of a Deer Hunt 70 A Set of Miniature Portraits 149 A Set of Twelve Chinese Watercolours 129 Twelve Chinese Gouache Pictures 38 Miscellaneous A Carved Marble Portrait Relief 107 Queen Victoria and Prince Albert Viewing the Llamas in The Home Park, Windsor 114 Oil Paintings A Pair of Still Life Paintings 82 Fallow Deer in a Wooded Landscape, by William Daniel, RA 90 Portrait of Ann Dixie By Thomas Hudson 54 Portrait of Captain Beauchamp, RN By George Romney 133, 155 Portrait of Caryll Molyneux and his Grand-Niece Mary Clifton 33 Portrait of the Children of Sir Walter Stirling, 1st Bart. 109 Portrait of Thomas Bisse with Portraits of his Wives 176

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Stools A Charles X Music Stool 185 A Pair of Parcel Gilt Stools 123 The Spencer House Stools 16 Tables and Desks Card Tables A Pair of George III Card Tables 79 Centre Tables A Japanese Lacquer Centre Table 111 A Sicilian Library Table 56 A Specimen Marble Centre Table 156 Desks A Carlton House Desk 51 A George III Pedestal Desk 66, 170 A George III Writing Table 140 A George I Walnut Desk 96 A Louis XV Bureau Plat 103 A Tortoiseshell Writing Table 133 Tables An Inlaid Oak Draw-Leaf Table 42 Textiles

Seating Chairs (Groups) A Set of Ten Regency Dining Chairs 61 Chairs (Individual) An Ivory Armchair 99 A Rare Ivory Chair 139 Chairs (Pairs) A Pair of Charles X Armchairs 165 A Pair of Chippendale Gainsborough Chairs 74 A Pair of George III Giltwood Armchairs 87 A Pair of Louis Philippe Bergères 127, 169 A Pair of Regency Harpists Chairs 31

Needleworks A Needlework Panel 180 A Set of St. Cyr Needlework Vignettes 142 Tapestries A Silk and Wool Soho Arabesque Tapestry 171 A Silk and Wool Soho Arabesque Tapestry Fragment attributed to Joshua Morris 99 A Wool and Silk SohoTapestry 22 Wine Coolers A Regency Mahogany Wine Cooler 14

M A L L E T T LONDON • NEW YORK

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Restoration Services Hatfields is one of the world’s longest established restoration firms dating back to 1834 when the original Hatfield family established the business. In the 1930s the company proudly noted on its letterhead that it had warrants from Queen Victoria, The Prince of Wales, King Edward VII, Queen Alexandra and King George V. Hatfields continues to offer an outstanding service in all areas of restoration including furniture, marquetry, boulle, polishing, gilding, lacquer, pietra dura, upholstery, caning, glass, clocks, sculpture, bronze, ormolu, metalwork and terracotta. One of our conservators is shown here working on the large earthenware vase on page 112 of this year’s spring catalogue. info@hatfieldsrestoration.com www.hatfieldsrestoration.com Tel: 020 7622 8169 26-28 Sidney Road, London S W9 0TS


Auction and Valuation Services Established in 1759, Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions have become Mallett’s parent company after their October 2014 acquisition of Mallett PLC. A leading UK auction house, Dreweatts hosts an extensive calendar of both mixed and single owner sales with an emphasis on fine art, antique and decorative furniture, jewellery, watches and clocks. Bloomsbury Auctions, based in Mayfair’s Maddox Street, is the UK’s largest auctioneer of antiquarian books, ancient manuscripts, modern first editions and a leading authority in contemporary limited edition prints and photographs.

The rich and diverse calendar of auction sales enjoys an enthusiastic following in the local community and is easily accessible from the Cotswolds, Heathrow airport and Southwest England. In recognition of the growing flexibility desired by buyers, Dreweatts has been at the vanguard of developing online live bidding facilities and is already selling around 50% of lots to internet bidders across the globe. In addition to the full range of traditional auction services, Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions also provide considered and researched advice on insurance and probate valuations and are approved counterparts for most major art insurers.

Dreweatt’s flagship premises, housed in the quintessentially English setting of Donnington Priory outside Newbury, provide a magnificent backdrop for For more information, contact a member of the Mallett displaying collections across the widest range of values. team, or Dreweatts: info@dnfa.com | 020 3291 2835


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MALLETT & SON (ANTIQUES) LTD

MALLETT INC

Ely House 37 Dover Street London W1S 4NJ

929 Madison Avenue at 74th Street New York N.Y. 10021

Telephone: +44 (0)20 7499 7411 Fax +44 (0)20 7495 3179

Telephone: 001 212 249 8783 Fax: 001 212 249 8784

George Bailey Chairman Stephan Ludwig Chief Executive Giles Hutchinson Smith Managing Director Michael Smyth-Osbourne Financial Director Richard Cave Director Felicity Jarrett Director Justin Evershed-Martin Director Gina Hamilton Katie Holyoak May Geolot Eleonore Halluitte Andrews

Henry Neville President Ana Gutierrez-Folch Deborah Peña Stephanie Ferro

Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without the prior permission of the publishers. Terms and Conditions: All business transactions are subject to our standard terms and conditions of sale, copies of which are available on request.

© Mallett & Son (Antiques) Ltd 2015 Printed in Belgium by Drukkerij die Keure

M A L L E T T LONDON • NEW YORK

A pair of early 20th century bronze lamps in the form of orange trees having fine quality stems with finely chased leaves with black onyx and brass square bases. France, circa 1900 | Height: 26in (65cm) | L3F0058

Mallett Spring Catalogue 2015  
Mallett Spring Catalogue 2015  
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