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Volkswagen Academy

Welcome to Volkswagen


Course Introductions

In a few minutes you will be asked to introduce yourself to the trainer and the rest of the group. Brief cover the following points:

Your name

Your job title

Your work experience in the motor industry

A skill you have that you are particularly proud of


review No. 1 /

Exploring team performance

The first exercise explores how we listen, plan, organise and involve ourselves in working together as a team. During any stage please use the clouds to record your observations/learning.

Learning & Observations

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review No. 1 /

So how do we Perform?

Within your group consider carefully the following questions. Feel free to record your own personal thoughts and then as a group, discuss and prepare overall feedback, using the flip chart provided. You will be expected to present your findings to the rest of the team today and may also be asked to contribute your feedback.

What was the point of this activity?

What negative behaviours and actions does this type of activity highlight?

What are the key learning points from this activity?

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inform No. 1 /

So how do we perform?

Key Learning points 99 99 99 99

To elevate performance everyone is needed Goals must be clearly communicated across the teams Everyone has a part to play To meet our business goal of No. 1 by 2018, we must all believe it is possible 99 It will require change to meet our goals 99 Everyone must buy into and support the change

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review No. 2 /

2010s

2000s 1990s 1980s

1970s

1960s 1950s 1940s 1930s

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The History of Volkswagen

The path to the top 2009 Volkswagen consolidated its position as the 10th highest selling brand in Australia, growing at 0.7%. An increase of 0.2% in total market share now brings Volkswagen’s total market share to 3.2%. 2009 Volkswagen Group Australia has achieved total combined vehicle sales of 30,087 - its fifth straight year of growth - and for the first time in recent history exceeded 30,000 vehicle sales. 2009 Golf wins “Wheels Car of the Year” Award 2009 Golf wins “World Car of the Year” Award 2009 Volkswagen reports a delivery record of 6.29 million vehicles 2009 The Jetta wins “Green Car of the Year” Award 2008 A new brand claim: “Volkswagen Das Auto” 2008 Volkswagen sells 27,400 vehicles and holds 2.6% market share 2007 Volkswagen has another reason to celebrate with its unique 1.4 litre TSI engine honoured with the most prestigious and fiercely competitive “International Engine of the Year” award for the second year in a row. 2006 The new Jetta is launched, replacing Bora in Australia 2006 In the Mexican plant Puebla, the New Beetle Cabriolet goes into series production. Its design is reminiscent of the old convertible Beetle. 2006 The Supervisory Board appoints Bernd Pischetsrieder Chairman of the Board of Management of Volkswagen AG. 2002 The Golf catches up with the success of the legendary Beetle. The 21,517,415 units make it the most built Volkswagen model ever. 2002 The “Transparent factory” in Dresden is officially opened 2001 Volkwagen group Australia Pty Ltd is established in Sydney as a wholly owned subsidiary. 11,000 units are sold (including passenger and commercial vehicles) 2001 The organizational structure of the Volkswagen Group is adapted to reflect the brand alliance. New brand management boards, whose chairmen are integrated in the Group management body, are responsible for day-to day operations at the four brands of Volkswagen, Audi, Seat and Škoda. 1991 SKODA, automobilova a.s. is acquired, an automobile manufacturer rich in Tradition which provides Volkswagen with an excellent access to the automobile markets in central and Eastern Europe 1986 51 per cent of the share capital of SEAT is acquired 1977 The last beetle to be assembled in Australia rolls off the production line 1977 The one millionth Golf! 1976 The first 4 cylinder 1.5 litre diesel engine with 50 hp leaves the factory. The new engine, developed over many years is used in the Golf Diesel the first time. It sets new standards of economy and provides the basis for Volkswagen’ leading role in low-consumption diesel technology. 1975 Polo goes into series production 1975 The last beetle leaves the assembly line in Wolfsburg 1974 Golf goes into series production 1974 Passat goes into series production 1973 In Woody Allen’s film “Sleeper”, a Volkswagen is still able to start after having been abandoned in a cave for 200 years. (“They really built these things, didn’t they?”) 1972 Volkswagen breaks the world car production record, with 15,007,034 units assembled. The Beetle surpasses the legendary mark achieved by the Ford Motor Company’s Model T 1969 A Beetle appears on the cover of The Beatles’ “Abbey Road” album 1969 The film “The Love Bug” is released. Disney set up a casting call for a dozen cars trying to audition. In the line up, there were a few Toyotas, a VR, a handful of Volvos, an MG and a pearl white Volkswagen Beetle. The crew walked to each car to try cast them, but they kept testing them by kicking the tires and tease with the steering wheels of each one to see how they handled. When they came across the humble Volkswagen, they reached out and petted it, as it was “innocent, calm, gentle and friendly” 1968 Full scale manufacturing in Australia ceases, as rising production costs, competition and the “95% local content” policy beginning to take their toll. However, import and assembly continue 1964 Volkswagen has sold 200,000 beetles in Australia, has 300 dealer sites and over 4,000 staff. The brands strongest year to date in Australia, with 31,419 units sold 1964 Annual production of one million vehicles is topped for the first time 1962 The one-millionth Volkswagen Transporter rolls off the assembly line in the Hanover plant. 1962 The first issue of Volkswagen shares with the proceeds transferred to “Stiftung Volkswagen“, set up to promote scientific research. 1961 The 100,000th Australian built beetle rolls off the production line, and Volkswagens market share in Australia is second only to Holden 1961 Full scale manufacturing begins in Australia 1959 Volkswagen becomes the largest car manufacturer in Brazil 1955 The first Karmann Ghia is produced 1954 Production became automated to help meet the demands of the recently entered international market and especially the increasing requirements of the US market 1950 Production starts on the Transporter series which dominated the market for station wagons and delivery vehicles, with a market share of about 30% 1949 The British Military Government turned over the trusteeship of Volkswagen to the German Federal government, in good condition and with approximately 10,000 employees and a monthly production of 4,000 vehicles 1947 The first Volkswagen is exported, launching the company onto the International market place. 1947 Series production of the Beetle begins with 55 vehicles 1945 American troops put an end to the production of military equipment and liberated the forced labourers. The long hoped for end of Nazi dictatorship meant the start of a new era for Volkswagen 1939 After the outbreak of WWII, the Volkswagen plant was reorganised for the production of armaments. The firm was contracted to supply fuel tanks and wings to the aircraft industry 1934 Ferdinand Porsche was commissioned to design a Volkswagen 1904 Talk about a “Volkswagen” begins in Germany

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activity No. 2 /

The History of Volkswagen

Based on the activity you have just completed using the history cards to trace Volkswagen’s history from the 1900s to the present day use the space below to note down 3 – 5 areas that to you represented defining moments that made Volkswagen what it is today.

Key defining Moment (and Why) 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99 99

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inform No. 3 /

The Volkswagen Brand

What is brand? Brand is the character and personality of an organisation, a product or a group of products. It is the impression people have formed – their perceptions of the organisation’s products, services, people and communications with the outside world.

99 It is not optional, it exists. 99 We cannot choose to have or not to have a brand image,

we can only try to influence what that brand image is. 99 A brand is a promise – a promise of what people can expect from an organisation’s products, services and people.

What makes up a brand? The perceptions people have about a brand are built up from all the information they receive about that particular product or organisation.

99 99 99 99 99 99 99

the the the the the the the

products themselves marketing and merchandising people who represent it stories people tell about it other people associated with it people who use it people who recommend it

Companies make products, people buy brands, and in doing so they buy what they believe the product is and what it stands for to them.

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inform No. 3 /

The Power of Brands

The key ingredients of a strong brand are consistency and appropriateness.

Consistency Consistency and attention to detail are vital in building and maintaining a successful brand. Every action we take will either add to the brand or take away from it, so it is vital that nothing is said or done that is out of character. Everything must support the brand promise – the advertising, promotions, people, after sales, financing, every letter, phone call, invoice and customer contact with the brand.

Appropriateness It is important that everyone involved with the brand has a sense of what is appropriate in any situation in order to represent and help build the brand. Companies which manage their brands well are constantly seeking to ensure that everything they do reinforces the brand promise and is appropriate to the brand image. Successful brands are very selective where they advertise, what events they sponsor or are associated with, the context in which their products appear on TV and in films, etc. They understand that every time people see or hear about them or their product, it will confirm or detract from their image.

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activity No. 3 /

The Power of Brands

In the team you have been assigned to, consider the following:

What justifies the extra cost for a quality brand?

What has led people to being prepared to pay more?

If you pay for quality brands, what impact does this have on the service you expect?

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review No. 4 /

The Power of Brands

Use this space to take notes from the Power of Brands presentation

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activity No. 4 /

The Power of Brands

What does the Volkswagen brand mean to our customers? What are they really buying when they buy a Volkswagen

Consider it from an emotional and rational perspective

Rational

Emotional

What behaviours are needed to support these expectations at Dealership level?

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review No. 5 /

The Power of Brands

Volkswagen Brand Presentation Use the next two pages to take notes from the presentation you are about to see

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review No. 5 /

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The Power of Brands

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inform No. 4 /

Product

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review No. 5 /

Forward Thinking

Forward Thinking The future in Volkswagen is exciting, and this is a great time to be with a growing, future driving company. In 2008 Volkswagen lay claim to a new brand - Das Auto, meaning [The Car]. This tag lines exemplifies Volkswagen, as it continues to shape the world of automobiles. Das Auto is simple and memorable and when people think of cars, they think of Volkswagen.

Volkswagen - The Goals up to 2018 The goals for Volkswagen have been driven from the brand vision - “Volkswagen The World’s most innovative high volume brand”. The goals, which have become the company’s mission until 2018 are:

99 99 99 99

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Improving growth Raising return on investment More attractive employer Enhancing customer Satisfaction - ranking in top 3 by 2018

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inform No. 4 /

Aligning Your Career Goals

Aligning your career goals with volkswagen corporate goals The achievement of these corporate goals cannot happen without the input, belief and drive from Volkswagen employees. Take a moment to write down your top 5 goals for your career with Volkswagen. Setting goals can prevent you from getting caught up by the everyday activity of your life where time goes by, but you never seem to get anywhere. With goals you can find a sense of direction and accomplishment!

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

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inform No. 6 /

Building loyalty – what creates loyalty

Now take a moment to think and write about how these goals fit in with the corporate vision for Volkswagen and how you can align them. By aligning your goals to the direction you know the company is moving in will add purpose and clarity to your role.

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activity No. 5 /

Where in the World?

Using the world map, identify where in the world each of the models in the Volkswagen range are manufactured, by placing the model cards into the appropriate space on the map.

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review No. 6 /

Value of Maintaining Loyalty

If we view the sale of a new car to a customer as a one off experience and don’t take steps to secure their loyalty for future sales and additional opportunities, we are in danger of missing out on a significant opportunity

Consider the two scenarios below

New and used sales p.a. Referrals that lead to new business Repeat Business To stand still each year you need to find customers Or if you sell at the same rate each year new and used sales will be And the following year

Dealership A

Dealership B

____

____

____

____

____

____

200 0 80 (40%)

200 20 (10%) 110 (55%)

Which business would you rather work for?

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Inform No. 6 /

Building loyalty – what creates loyalty

Think of a place you like to go to, or shop from – this could be the supermarket you use – your favourite restaurant – or clothing store – your local bar.

Think about what it is that they offer or do that makes you go back there. Then list these items on a flipchart.

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review No. 7 /

Building loyalty – what creates loyalty

Of course, many of the things that motivate us as customers are related to the quality of the product or service offered by the organisation –or its convenience– or price. But equally, there are many factors that are about how we are treated by the people in the organisation – about how they make us feel. It is these factors that really make us loyal customers –if we choose to buy because of price or convenience we have no real loyalty to the brand– if another alternative was available that was less expensive –or more convenient– as customers, we would switch. When we are made to feel good about the organisation – when they know us as customers – and know what we want – then we begin to feel a sense of loyalty. And so it is with Volkswagen customers – they do have a choice. Our competitors offer great cars too. Loyalty to the Volkswagen Brand is the customer experience we can provide through:

99 Understanding and anticipating our customers’ needs 99 Providing friendly, personal service where we make

them feel welcome in our retail outlet –we take care of them and treat them as individuals-. 99 Going the extra mile for our customer – just doing that bit extra. It is an industry-wide truth that loyal customers are profitable customers. They cost less to prospect. Because they already know you and trust you, they are easier to deal with. They also tend to spend more per car than buyers who are new to the Brand or to the Dealership. A recent report in the USA by JD Power (the Power Report) notes that, using data for the past three years, the Owner Loyalty Report quantifies the cost of losing a loyal owner at more than $10,000 per vehicle – this is the cost of finding and building a relationship with a new customer. And this cost is rising.

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review No. 8 /

Turning our customers into Advocates

“Anytime a customer comes into contact with any aspect of a business, however remote, is an opportunity to form an impression.” Jan Carlson

These customer contact points are know as moments of truth.

Moments of truth can be divided into two types – positive ones or moments of delight where we use them to delight the customer and negative ones or moments of misery where we miss the opportunity and sow the seeds of customer dissatisfaction.

Our goal within the Dealership should be to create moments of delight for all of our customers, even if they start out to be moments of misery.

Sometimes a customer may have a legitimate complaint. We not only need to fix problems and complaints, we also need to give customers a reason to want to come back and continue to do business with us again and again. Even if we fix a problem, it doesn’t mean the customer is coming back.

We need to manage our moments of truth. Seize every one of them, even if they are moments of misery, as opportunities to show how good we really are. This will go a long way in building longterm customer loyalty and total customer satisfaction.

Disney has taken moments of truth to an even higher level by focusing on very small areas as well. They understand the importance that these small moments of truth have on their customers. They train their cast members (Disney’s term for employees) to acknowledge the guest (Disney’s term for a customer) with a smile or facial expression if within ten feet. If the cast member gets within five feet of the guest, they are to acknowledge them verbally. All of the little moments of truth, combined with the major ones, with the addition of the cars or dealership services we are providing, add up to the overall level of a customer’s satisfaction.

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Moments of Truth Customer Journey map

activity No. 7 /

Take a moment to look at the map below. It is a typical representation of the sort of journey a customer could take when visiting your dealership for a sales or service enquiry.

map

ervic

er s ustom

c

rney es jou

rea

ver a

hando hop

works home

a

g are

waitin m

e roo

servic

“Per ardua ad astra�

room

(by striving we reach the stars)

main tion recep

es servic g parkin

show

Royal Australian Air Force motto

hip ealers

d

mer

custo

y map

ourne

es j servic

Your task is to consider where on this map do opportunities exist to delight the customer and provide a true service moment of truth.

Identify these moments by writing them down on post it notes and attaching them to the customer journey poster your team has been allocated.

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activity No. 8 /

The Next Big Thing

Your teams task is to create a brand new Volkswagen concept vehicle using the brochures you have been given. You can also add to these your own freestyle drawing skills.

Create a poster that shows your new vehicle and some of the technology it encompasses and then be prepared to present to the rest of the group the following areas;

99 What is unique about your concept vehicle?

99 What type of customers will it appeal to and why?

99 What is it about your concept vehicle that makes it uniquely Volkswagen?

99 How could you market / present this vehicle in your dealership in a way that would make it truly stand out and appeal to the designated target customer group?

Be prepared for a team photograph next to your concept vehicle!

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review No. 8 /

Staff Roles – what does excellence look like for each member of the Volkswagen team?

Let’s think about the role you play in the dealership. Every single member of staff has an important part to play in delivering a service experience to all customers. We will now consider what you, personally, can do to ensure that this experience is not average, or even good … it has to be exceptional!!

On the following pages, identify four aspects of your job function where your work has an impact on the customer. Take into account the following areas:

99 99 99 99

Responsibilities Attitudes Behaviours Relationships

For each of your chosen aspects, describe what you would consider to be an Average/Good role and then describe how that same role could be made Exceptional.

Finally, decide how your own performance compares with these two descriptions and what you might have to do to raise your game to the Exceptional level. For example;

Job Function: Receptionist Aspect of my job Receiving customer enquiries on the telephone

Average/Good Role

Exceptional Role

Answers the phone and transfers calls to Answers the phone and ascertains the exact relevant department nature of the customers enquiry and takes ownership of helping the customer to find a solution

Where am I? If no-one is available I will take details of the enquiry and pass those details on to the relevant person.

How can I raise my game? Obtain more information from every caller and follow-up with colleagues to ensure the customer has been satisfied.

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activity No. 9 /

Building loyalty – what creates loyalty

My role in the business: My Job Function: Aspect of my job Average/Good Role

Exceptional Role

Where am I?

How can I raise my game?

.

Aspect of my job Average/Good Role

Exceptional Role

Where am I?

How can I raise my game?

.

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activity No. 9 /

Building loyalty – what creates loyalty

Aspect of my job Average/Good Role

Exceptional Role

Where am I?

How can I raise my game?

.

Aspect of my job Average/Good Role

Where am I?

How can I raise my game?

.

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Exceptional Role


concluding activity

What makes Volkswagen unique

In your team design three posters that you believe highlight what is unique about Volkswagen in Australia based on what has been covered in the training program today.

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Volkswagen workbook