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2018

Design in Practice


Programs


About the Publication DESIGNER AND EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Malachi Gordon

COVER IMAGE

Carter & Associates PHOTOGRAPHY

Brian Reeves, Perfect Day Photos PUBLISHER’S STATEMENT

© 2018 AIA Atlanta. All rights reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced, reprinted, transmitted or stored in any form, or by any means now known or later discovered whether digital, electronic, mechanical or otherwise, without the specific written consent of the publisher AIA Atlanta. Opinions expressed by the authors are not necessarily those of AIA Atlanta nor do they accept responsibility for errors of content or omissions and, as a matter of policy, neither do they endorse products or advertisements appearing herein. Design Equilibrium is a trademark of AIA Atlanta. AIA ATLANTA

50 Hurt Plaza, Suite 109 Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (404) 222-0099 www.aiaatl.org

On the Cover Following the Atlanta Braves’ departure from Turner Field, developer Carter is leading the transformation of the once-bustling Summerhill neighborhood into a “vibrant commercial village.” MORE ON PAGE 2


On the Cover The Resurgence of Summerhill – One of Atlanta’s Oldest Neighborhoods CARTER & ASSOCIATES, LLC

Bob Dylan might say that the times they are a-changin’ in Summerhill. Turner Field, the former home of the Atlanta Braves, is now the Georgia State University football team’s stadium. The parking lots to the north of the stadium are now controlled by private developers, Carter, Oakwood and Healey Weatherholtz. Georgia State now has plans for a 1,500-seat baseball field in the footprint of the former Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium. The transformation is well underway and, with community input, the Carter team intends to develop the site in a measured, organic way, aiming to avoid the sterility that is often the byproduct of a single-phase development. “We see Summerhill as a catalytic opportunity to repair the fabric of the surrounding community by replacing dead parking lots with a vibrant commercial village that strengthens its surroundings,” says Jack Murphy, director at Carter. “We’re working with Kronberg Wall on the Georgia Avenue retail project and we have Perkins+Will helping to define the vision along Hank Aaron Drive to get some different perspectives and granularity to the overall plan.” Their canvas is a six-block avenue with wide sidewalks, mature trees and iconic vestiges of world-renowned athletic venues. By framing this space with customized storefronts in a plan that accommodates a blend of concentrated density, multiple uses and comfortable passive space, Hank Aaron Drive and Georgia Avenue will unfold as a cohesive collection of comfortable and engaging spaces, each with a familiar personality. The Carter team’s goal is to strengthen the surrounding neighborhoods: physically – through transit, bike and pedestrian interconnections, public space and human-scale structures; socially – by providing restau-

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rant and entertainment venues, and by partnering with Georgia State University to bring a higher-education anchor to the area; and economically – by cultivating businesses, jobs and community services. With control of over 1,800 feet of street frontage on both sides of Hank Aaron Drive, as well as almost 700 feet of street frontage along Georgia Avenue, the development team, taking cues from iconic commercial districts like Los Angeles’ Abbott Kinney Boulevard, Miami’s Lincoln Road and Austin’s South Congress, intends to create a walkable streetscape that is quintessentially Atlanta. The redevelopment of Georgia Avenue, with design led by Kronberg Wall architects, is expected to open in late 2018. The scope includes the restoration of eight existing street-front buildings and the addition of three contextual vernacular buildings linked by tree-lined sidewalks and outdoor patio spaces connecting the Turner Field redevelopment to the historic Grant Park neighborhood. The combination of the new and existing streetfront commercial buildings will create the type of public gathering place rarely found in Atlanta. Georgia Avenue will be an interlocked web of human-scale streets with garden courtyards, street-front cafes, art installations, offices and nightlife with urban residences integrated throughout. Atlanta’s historic intown neighborhoods, with their proximity to culture, parks, transit and jobs, are experiencing a tidal rebirth. Serviced by two interstates and only eight minutes from the world’s busiest airport, Summerhill is positioned to evolve into the gathering place that merges these historic neighborhoods with downtown Atlanta’s vibrant business and tourist core.


Building Atlanta Together You might say that we were built for each other. ConstructConnect is proud to support the AIA’s aims and objectives, achieving this through financial support, educational resources, and tools. In this spirit of collaboration, we ask in turn that you share your project information with us. More accurate data benefits our entire industry.

We get things done better, together. To learn more about ConstructConnect, visit ConstructConnect.com .

The companies of ConstructConnect :

DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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Welcome

Awards

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24

Contributors

Build Something Great

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26

Editor's Note

Honor Awards

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28

Letter from the President

09 2018 Board of Directors

Residential Design Awards

30 Mixed-use

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10 AIA Fellows

Single Family: Nontraditional

Table of Contents

36 Single Family: Traditional

What's New

38 Renovations/Adaptive Reuse: Less Than 5,000 ft2

12 AIA Atlanta Office Relocation

16 Open House Atlanta

20 Open House Atlanta Opens Minds About City’s Architecture

40 Renovations/Adaptive Reuse: Greater Than 5,000 ft2


Features

Programs

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An Architect's Role in Preserving History Through Art

High School Design Competition

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A Flight of Fancy for the People

Vision for Atlanta: Mayoral Forum

54 Employee or Independent Contractor? The Cost of Mislabeling

58 Towards Knowing What Architects Do (and Can Do)

72 10UP Competition

80 Summer Social

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URBANfronts

Retrofitting Suburban Malls and Creating Experiences

84 Red & Green Scene

86 Principals Roundtable

88 Programs and Knowledge Communities Directory


William de St. Aubin, AIA Bill de St. Aubin, CEO of Sizemore Group, provides expertise on town planning and architecture. He is a founding board member of the Atlanta Chapter of the Congress for New Urbanism and a subject matter expert for the United States Green Building Council. Bill has published several papers, conducted seminars and received design awards for his work in transforming communities and sites into vibrant town centers.

Michael Kahn, AIA Michael Kahn is an architect, lecturer and journalist. In practice at Rosser International, he also serves as the architectural contributor for ArtsATL, associate editor of Curbed Atlanta and is a regular contributor to “City Lights” with Lois Reitzes on WABE 90.1. Academically, Kahn writes and lectures on issues at the confluence of urban planning and architectural history, both locally and internationally.

Shaun Martin, AIA

Contributors

Shaun Martin is a registered architect with a passion for design, art and education. She serves on the Advisory Board for KSU's Zuckerman Museum of Art and holds several leadership roles with the Smyrna Arts and Cultural Council. She is currently employed by the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority, working on transit-related projects.

Paul Monardo, AIA Paul Monardo, AIA, has 34 years of design-focused practice experience. His previous role at Pond as Director of Architecture ensured that each project achieved the highest level of design and technical quality possible. Though Paul’s experience spans commercial office, corporate, retail and industrial project types, his passion for architecture and planning are firmly rooted in government services and the public design process.

Ganesh Nayak, AIA Ganesh Nayak, AIA, is a principal at Metier Consulting Inc, in Atlanta, consulting on sustainable design. An architect with over 20 years of experience in many project types, and quality control in construction, he won a Corps of Engineers award for excellence. He has a master’s degree from Kansas State University. He presently serves on the State Advisory Panel for Special Education in Georgia.


Design in Practice Editor's Note Design is the tool that shapes how we experience the world. As politics shift, technology evolves, the climate changes and our population grows, design must anticipate and respond. Many people ponder what architecture is and why architects are important. The “Design in Practice” issue explores the questions non-architects have about the profession, and discusses the many roles architects play in the design of our homes, offices and stores, and in public health. First, we provide insight into the future of the organization. Among numerous changes, we are excited about relocating to the Hurt Building, a downtown landmark built in 1912. We are leaving a space at the neighboring Robert W. Woodruff Volunteer Center following its unforeseen sale. We also reflect on our initiatives. Now in its thirteenth year, the High School Design Competition continued to challenge and engage young minds in the design process. The annual Vision for Atlanta forum, headlined by Atlanta’s mayoral candidates, helped residents learn about their visions for economic growth, historic preservation, zoning and safety. Finally, in the fall, we launched Open House Atlanta, our largest program to date. The two-day festival invited the public inside dozens of landmark buildings for free tours, attracting thousands of visitors. Through Design Equilibrium, AIA Atlanta aims to contribute to a growing discussion of the built environment and educate about design's effects on how we work, live and play. Great design is more than pretty buildings; it creates solutions, strengthens community and inspires lives.

Malachi Gordon Malachi Gordon is a designer and strategist, currently serving as Director of Branding & Communications at AIA Atlanta. He is also owner of branding agency Gordon Media Company, working with entrepreneurs and small businesses around the world. Malachi's expertise includes brand identity, graphic design, strategic communications and content marketing.

AIA Atlanta Staff EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

David Southerland

DIRECTOR OF MEMBERSHIP & DEVELOPMENT

Missy Bower

DIRECTOR OF BRANDING & COMMUNICATIONS

Malachi Gordon

DIRECTOR OF PROGRAMS

Chris Yueh

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Letter from the President

BILL CLARK, AIA­

Design Equilibrium is AIA Atlanta's annual publication highlighting our many programs and events, as well as the accomplishments of AIA members, students and our partners. In addition, Design Equilibrium features articles written by design professionals, lending unique insight into the growth of our communities. With over 1,700 members, AIA Atlanta is one of the largest chapters in the United States, and we are proud to have members making significant contributions to the built environment locally, nationally and internationally. There is much good news to share. This year, we are relocating our offices to the historic Hurt Building in Downtown Atlanta, in a prime street-level location easily accessible to our members and the public. The talented staffs of AIA Atlanta and AIA Georgia are working more closely than ever before to provide thoughtful leadership and engaged member support. Our diverse and active board of directors represents a wide range of firms within the Atlanta region. Chapter initiatives are supported by committees of members and volunteers, helping us increase the scope and proficiency of our programming. Based on the good work by our chapter's leaders before us, we will focus our efforts this year on the following initiatives: • Elevating public appreciation of our profession and the value of the practice of architecture to our clients • Celebrating the importance and contributions of design excellence • Reaching out to and participating with our local communities • Encouraging equity, diversity and inclusion within our profession The practice of architecture is one of the most noble and well-respected professions worldwide. Architects are grounded in ethical standards and we strive to perform

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our work with honesty and integrity. An architect’s work is difficult and risky, and requires robust business and management skills to be successful. Through media partnerships, events like Open House Atlanta and collaborations with civic, arts and educational groups, we will continue to build public awareness for the chapter and the profession. Design matters! Architects have heard this stated and have communicated this to others over the course of their careers. It is true! Design excellence elevates the human spirit; touches the emotions and senses of all who experience it; and provides joy, comfort and awe to those within these environments. Let's celebrate great design and honor those who are committed to producing it. Architects are some of the most innovative problem solvers in the world. Architects approach problems with creative energy and we are trained to provide not one but a wide range of solutions to resolve complex issues and problems. In a time when communities around us are in great need of new ideas and the support of others, let's reach out to them, get involved and contribute our creative skills to meaningful community solutions. AIA Atlanta can do this by promoting leadership and engagement in our communities, and by being a strong voice for the profession and affiliated members. The world is changing and the profession needs to change and adapt, too. Technology advances, the evolution of design processes and shifting demographics are just a few changes that will shape the future of profession in the decades to come. Additionally, equity, diversity and inclusion are top priorities within the profession and AIA Atlanta will be an advocate for these goals. The success of our profession, practices and chapter depends on achieving them. It is my honor to serve as your 2018 president and I look forward to a productive and effective year.


Board of Directors BILL CLARK, AIA President

KRISTA DUMKRIEGER, AIA Advocacy Director

CHRIS WELTY, AIA President-elect

MICHAEL KAHN, AIA Communications Director

RICHARD KRAMER, AIA Past President

ROBERT WOODHURST, AIA Communications Director

KAREN JENKINS, AIA Secretary

JESSIKA NELSON, ASSOC. AIA Programs Director

GREG MULLIN, AIA Treasurer

AARON ALBRECHT, AIA Programs Director

IAN HUNTER, AIA Development Director

BRANDON CHAMBERS, ASSOC. AIA Continuing Education Director

RYAN CAVANAUGH, AIA Development Director

KATIE YIELDING-HUGHES, AIA Allied Director

DESMOND JOHNSON, AIA Emerging Professionals/Membership Director

TIM KEANE Public Director

JOANNA ROBINSON, AIA Emerging Professionals/Membership Director

From left: Bill Clark, Karen Jenkins, Richard Kramer, Katie Yielding-Hughes, Ian Hunter, Desmond Johnson, Michael Kahn, Jessika Nelson, Brandon Chambers, Aaron Albrecht, Chris Welty and Greg Mullin. Not pictured: Ryan Cavanaugh, Krista Dumkrieger, Tim Keane, Joanna Robinson and Robert Woodhurst.


AIA Fellows

2018

Founded in 1952, the AIA College of Fellows comprises members recognized with the AIA’s highest membership honor for their exceptional work and contributions to architecture and society. The prestige of "FAIA" after an architect's name is unparalleled and the judging is rigorous. Architects who have made significant contributions to the profession and society, and who exemplify architectural excellence, can become a member of the AIA College of Fellows. Only 3 percent of AIA members have this distinction. Antonin Aeck, FAIA

Larry Lord, FAIA

Scott Braley, FAIA

Ivenue Love-Stanley, FAIA

Robert Brown, FAIA

L. Vic Maloof, FAIA

John Busby, FAIA

Cheryl McAfee, FAIA

Robert Cain, FAIA

Paula McEvoy, FAIA

William Carpenter, FAIA

C. Andrew McLean, FAIA

Walter Carry, FAIA

Linda Michael, FAIA

William Chegwidden, FAIA

Paul Muldawer, FAIA

Steven Clem, FAIA

Roger Neuenschwander, FAIA

Jerome Cooper, FAIA

Ivey Nix, FAIA

Gary Coursey, FAIA

N Newly elevated as of Jan. 2018 • Deceased

Jonathan Crane, FAIA

William Pulgram, FAIA

Stanley Daniels, FAIA

Jack Pyburn, FAIA

Ben Darmer, FAIA

Richard Rothman, FAIA

Robert Dean, FAIA

Edward Shirley, FAIA

Richard Diedrich, FAIA

Michael Sizemore, FAIA

Michael Dobbins, FAIA

Raymond Stainback, FAIA

Dagmar Epsten, FAIA

William Stanley, FAIA

James Fausett, FAIA

Preston Stevens, FAIA

Darrell Fitzgerald, FAIA

Eugene Surber, FAIA

Leslie Gartner, FAIA N

Stephen Swicegood, FAIA

Brian Gracey, FAIA

Richard Taylor, FAIA

Peter Hand, FAIA

Roberta Unger, FAIA

Helen Hatch, FAIA

Thomas Ventulett, FAIA

Marvin Housworth, FAIA

Daniel Watch, FAIA

James Kortan, FAIA

Howard Wertheimer, FAIA

Michael LeFevre, FAIA

Karen Elizabeth York, FAIA

Mark Levine, FAIA N

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• John Portman, FAIA


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W h at ' s N ew

AIA Atlanta Office Relocation BY HOUSER WALKER ARCHITECTURE Last September, less than four years after relocating its offices to the Woodruff Volunteer Center in Downtown Atlanta, AIA Atlanta, with AIA Georgia, was uprooted once again due to the sale of the building. After several months of searching for a new home, a committee decided on the historic Hurt Building just steps away from the former offices. Atlanta-based firm Houser Walker Architecture was selected to design the project, with completion slated for spring 2018.

AIA is the voice for architecture, advocating for the value of design, diversity of our profession and ecological strength of our communities. AIA Georgia and AIA Atlanta provide the platform and resources that enable over 2,000 members in

RENDERINGS BY HOUSER WALKER ARCHITECTURE

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the state to become better professionals for their communities. As designers for the new offices, we felt an obligation to physically demonstrate this commitment and representation. Our design focused on creating a series of


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What'sNew

experiences that balances the need for staff to work effectively on a daily basis, while welcoming members and the public at large. A flexible gallery space at the entry and large, flexible meeting spaces allow for a variety of programs and exhibits to be hosted. A more private work suite allows the staff to participate when needed but remain focused while other activities take place. We believe that architecture expresses its clearest power through a heightened material quality and presence.

Creating a greater awareness of the common traits – light, air, proportion, beauty – which we all share and which cost no more or less to use are values shared among all architects, regardless of how these are ultimately expressed. Working with the Hurt Building’s existing historic material fabric, we sought to involve local manufacturing, craft and fabrication to the greatest extent possible, as these create an equal investment in building collaborations (and, consequently, culture itself). ■

AIA Atlanta's former office.

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Jo R., Chicago, IL Joe S., London, England New trends, new directions, new networks. Free workshops, seminars, and demonstrations. Thousands

of exhibitors from more than 40 countries. Connect at the largest, most inspiring tile & stone show in North America. Connect at Coverings.

Register for free at coverings.com


Joining Open House Worldwide, the Open House Atlanta festival debuted to 5,000 visitors on October 2122, 2017. The inaugural event featured more than 40 sites that opened to the public for free tours. Open House allows visitors to explore new and historic architectural landmarks in the city, many of which rarely open to the public. OHATL.ORG

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PHOTOGRAPH BY MICHAEL KAHN

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BY THE NUMBERS

5,000 VISITORS

16

STATES REPRESENTED

5

FOREIGN COUNTRIES

3.1M

MEDIA IMPRESSIONS

AJC, CURBED ATLANTA AND ATLANTA INTOWN

100 ZIP CODES

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42 SITES


2017 PARTICIPATING SITES

HISTORY

Founded in London, in 1992, Open House is a worldwide movement dedicated to engaging the public in a city’s architectural legacy. Open House Atlanta, launched in collaboration with Midtown Alliance and Central Atlanta Progress, aims to promote a greater appreciation of the built environment through free access to architecturally and culturally significant sites seldom open to the public. Buildings include museums, high-rises, churches, hotels, offices and more. Atlanta, joining New York City, Chicago and San Diego, is the fourth Open House city in the United States, with more than 30 worldwide. Open House Atlanta provides visitors a better understanding of how the built environment sustains this bustling town as a unique place to work and play. It also allows attendees to meet some of the people who design, build and preserve the city. Coinciding with the festival, the Linger Longer program offered visitors exclusive food and drink specials at select restaurants, further engaging the local community. The festival will return for a second year in October 2018.

ARCHITECTURE FIRMS Collins Cooper Carusi Architects Cooper Carry EYP Architecture & Engineering Gensler Atlanta Heery International HKS Inc. HOK Houser Walker Architecture Praxis3 Rosser International Stevens & Wilkinson BUSINESSES Colony Square Equitable Building Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta Flatiron Building Hurt Building Odd Fellows Building Peachtree Center Peachtree Lofts Rose + RYE HOTELS Four Seasons Hotel Atlanta Georgian Terrace Hotel Loews Atlanta Hotel W Atlanta Buckhead MUSEUMS & GALLERIES AIDS Memorial Quilt Visitors Center APEX Museum The Breman Museum Center for Puppetry Arts Margaret Mitchell House Woodruff Arts Center OUTDOORS Piedmont Park Visitor Center Woodruff Park RESIDENTIAL AMLI 3464 Atlantic House Baltimore Block Hanover East Paces lilli Midtown Ponce Condominiums YOO on the Park SACRED Big Bethel AME Church Saint Mark United Methodist Church The Temple DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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Open House Atlanta Opens Minds About City’s Architecture ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY MICHAEL KAHN, AIA

The Ponce Condominium 1913

On a late October weekend last fall, Atlantans were given the opportunity to explore some of the city’s most exciting, historic and unique architectural spaces – for free. During the inaugural celebration of Open House Atlanta (OHATL), dozens of sites across Downtown, Midtown, and Buckhead – many of which are usually private spaces – opened their doors to the public in an effort to raise awareness about the architecture, design and history of Atlanta. Part of a larger program which exists in cities around the world, the architecture festival celebrated iconic, interesting treasures which too often hide in plain sight. The

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event drew thousands of participants, representing more than 100 zip codes across 16 states. Visitors from at least five foreign countries were even tallied. From historic hotels to modern offices, the event offered an array of building types and architectural styles spanning more than a century of design in Atlanta. Visitors were invited to explore buildings along the Peachtree Street corridor, with self-guided and guided experiences to fill a few minutes, or two full days. Beyond buildings, the city’s top architecture firms opened their doors for people to learn about the profession,


The Woodruff Arts Center 1968; 1970; 2005

The Odd Fellows Building 1913

Big Bethel AME Church 1922

Baltimore Block 1885

Saint Mark United Methodist Church 1902 DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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active projects, and the unique legacy of each practice. With food and drinks, stellar skyline views and passionate presentations, each firm highlighted their history, culture and the impact of architecture in everyday life. After more than a year of planning, the event kicked off on Saturday morning as the host committee and volunteers worked to address last-minute items. While the event was untested in Atlanta, and competed with Georgia Tech’s Homecoming game, the Atlanta Food and Wine Festival, and more than a dozen other city-wide events, within a few hours, it was clear OHATL could hold its own. By Saturday afternoon, hundreds of people could be seen strolling along Peachtree sporting the distinctive green Open House stickers. Participants flooded popular sites, nearly overwhelming even the most prepared among the dozens of options. During the weekend, the Federal Reserve welcomed nearly 500 visitors; eight sites saw more than 200 guests, exceeding expectations and wowing organizations such as the Margaret Mitchell House. Leasing agents at apartments who participated indicated that more people visited in the weekend than come through in a regular month. Through the crowds and unexpected surprises throughout the weekend, Open House Atlanta turned out to be an amazing event. OHATL went a long way in advancing the mission of AIA Atlanta to educate the community on the role of architects and architecture. In the coming years, the organization hopes to dramatically expand its footprint, programming and array of project types, to draw in more participants. But, for its inaugural year, Open House Atlanta was a success beyond expectations! â–

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191 Peachtree 1991


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WE DO BIG At Jordan & Skala Engineers, we are committed to doing big things. We THINK big. ENGINEER big projects. And design big SOLUTIONS for our clients. Make 2018 the year you do BIG. jordanskala.com

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Build Something Great NOVEMBER 16, 2017

Held in 2017 at Summerour Studio, AIA Atlanta’s annual award ceremony celebrated the Honor Awards and the Residential Design Awards. Sonia Miller, integration project manager at NASA, joined as guest speaker. The late John Portman, Jr., FAIA was honored with the Presidential Citation. The iconic architect passed away on December 29, 2017.

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY PERFECT DAY PHOTOS

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Awards

Honor Awards

Ivan Allen Sr. Trophy

Silver Medal

JAY SILVERMAN, AIA The most prestigious prize bestowed by AIA Atlanta, the Ivan Allen Sr. Trophy is given to the member who has exemplified a broad commitment to their profession’s community with a deep and lasting impact on their peers, AIA and the built environment, and therefore sustained the highest ideals of the profession of architecture.

ROBERT M. CAIN, ARCHITECT The Silver Medal is the highest honor bestowed by AIA Atlanta upon an architecture firm. The award honors a firm that has sustained outstanding performance as evidenced by a consistently high level of design quality and demonstrated community, political or AIA leadership in the interests of the profession.

Dorothy Spence Citizen Architect Award KEVIN CANTLEY, AIA The Dorothy Spence Citizen Architect Award honors a member who, outside of AIA, engages in their community with a design mentality. They break down silos, see how various community problems are interconnected and leverage solutions.

Tiny House Atlanta Executive Director Will Johnston (center) is awarded the Kwanza Hall Award by 2016 president William Carpenter (left) and Councilman Kwanza Hall (right).

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Robert M. Cain, Architect receives the Silver Medal Award.

John A. Busby Jr. Award NICOLE SEEKELY, AIA The John A. Busby Jr. Award is given to a young member who has excelled in leadership, community involvement, success in the firm management and/or started their own firm.

James G. Fausett Service to the Profession Award ERIC ANDERSON, AIA The James G. Fausett Service to the Profession Award spotlights a firm, group or individual for outstanding service to AIA and/ or profession at large.

Kwanza Hall Award WILL JOHNSTON Named after Councilman Hall, this award recognizes the leadership of a non-architect who has pushed members of the design community to elevate the quality of our work to improve the livability of our towns, cities and neighborhoods.

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Residential

Design Awards

The 4th Annual Residential Design Awards honored excellence in work built by AIA Atlanta members and architects registered in the state of Georgia. A jury deliberated on the criteria of innovative approaches to materiality, incorporation of natural lighting in design, use of new structural systems, design to accommodate a wider variety of lifestyles and adaptable design that acknowledges aging and changing physical needs. Jurors included architects Maria Casarella, AIA; Carlos JimĂŠnez; Marieanne KhouryVogt; Eric Osth, AIA; and Erik Vogt.

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7 6 MIXED-USE

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Honor Award

Broadstone Midtown Lord Aeck Sargent

RENOVATIONS/ADAPTIVE REUSE: LESS THAN 5,000 FT2 5

Honor Award

Mid-century Remix Robert M. Cain, Architect

SINGLE-FAMILY: NONTRADITIONAL

2

3

Honor Award

Inchyra House Robert M. Cain, Architect Merit Award

Brenner House Philip Babb Architect

SINGLE-FAMILY: TRADITIONAL

4

RENOVATIONS/ADAPTIVE REUSE: GREATER THAN 5,000 FT2

6

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Honor Award

Page Woodson School Smith Dalia Architects Merit Award

Lizzie Chapel Flats Chasm Architecture

Honor Award

A Traditional Country Home Historical Concepts DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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Awards

PHOTOGRAPHS BY W. SCOTT CHESTER PHOTOGRAPHY

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Mixed-use HONOR AWARD

Broadstone Midtown Lord Aeck Sargent

Broadstone Midtown is sited on the corner of Juniper and 6th streets in Atlanta’s Midtown neighborhood. Its 218 luxury apartments are within walking distance to a large job base, restaurants, bars, churches, Piedmont Park and entertainment such as The Fox Theatre. One- and two-bedroom apartments are available with a variety of floor layouts. Live/work units are incorporated at the street level to connect the project to the city and bring activity to the sidewalks. Residential amenities include a fitness center, large bike storage and repair facility, dog grooming room, fenced dog park, club room and several terraces overlooking Midtown. Patterns were painted over the stucco exterior at several locations to provide a glimpse of the buildings eclectic interiors and connect the building to Midtown’s vibrant community and public art displays. The project received the NGBS (National Green Building Standard) Bronze Certification. Throughout the building and in each residential unit there are sustainable features, including energy smart appliances, low flow plumbing fixtures, programmable thermostats and energy efficient lighting.

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Awards

Single Family: Nontraditional HONOR AWARD

Inchyra House Robert M. Cain, Architect

The design of the Inchyra House represents a return to family roots for the owners, one of whom grew up near the beautiful north Georgia property. Their interest in a sustainable lifestyle, organic gardening, viticulture, aquaculture and sustainable land use completely inform the design solution. The open site was formerly agricultural land, the context is rural and primarily farmland. The master plan of the 10-acre site includes locations of the main house, guest house, greenhouse, a pond for viticulture, orchards, crops, gardens, a labyrinth, privacy screenings of native plants, paths and gravel roads linking the various site functions. Southern views toward the mountains of the Chattahoochee National Forest were paramount in location and design of the house. The one-room-wide shotgun design of the house combines southern vernacular concepts of cross ventilation and livability. A traditional dogtrot transects the middle of the house as main entry on one side and open patio living on the other. The open east wing of the house comprises the day-to-day living areas while the west wing houses guest quarters, laundry, shop, gym and mud room functions. The house is a study in energy conservation, economy of materials and minimalist design. The east–west linear orientation is ideal for the southern climate. Extensive eaves shelter south-facing glazing in summer and allow winter sun to warm the floors. North facing walls of insulated concrete masonry units utilize thermal mass to retain investments in heating and cooling, and provide a sound and privacy barrier toward the adjacent highway.

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY FREDRIK BRAUER

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Awards

PHOTOGRAPHS BY PHILIP BABB ARCHITECT

Single Family: Nontraditional Designed for a retired professional couple, now an artist and a motorbike enthusiast, the Brenner House sits on a three-acre property near Newnan, Georgia, 40 minutes south of Downtown Atlanta. The wooded site is adjacent to a water reservoir with development restrictions protecting the surrounding watershed. The gently sloping terrain, the reservoir to the south and access from the north, offer

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MERIT AWARD

Brenner House Philip Babb Architect

ideal conditions for private outdoor entertainment space and panoramic views of the lake. The design responds to the site and program by placing four volumes around a central entry that link the public approach and views to the lake: car and bike garages to the north; guest and living spaces to the south. Wrapping the volumes with solid walls and service areas creates two L-shaped

forms that orient the spaces to the site and define the see-through entry. The second floor’s master bedroom and office are contained in a third L-shaped enclosure that sits atop the lower floor enclosures and spans the central entry. An open, cantilevered stair extends the entry to the upper floor and metal roof “hats” define the ground floor volumes from above.


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Single Family: Traditional This traditional country home was inspired by the works of McKim, Mead and White and Sir Edwin Lutyens, with a palette of materials suggesting a modern-American aesthetic. Classical details, such as the paired entry columns with stone capitals and painted brick shafts, are tempered by more contemporary elements. The grandly-scaled field room, for example, with clean lines punctuated only by floor to ceiling windows, is a study of proportion and restraint. The core was designed for social use, with a gracious entry gallery leading into a grand dining room. From here, the home extends outward to more intimate spaces. In the western wing, the sitting room and field room provide views across the surrounding meadows and farmland. The opposite side of the home includes rooms designed

HONOR AWARD

A Traditional Country Home Historical Concepts

for daily use; a family kitchen and casual dining area supported by a commercial-grade chef’s kitchen and pantry. Upstairs is the master suite, complete with a dressing room, sitting room, his/her offices and a private rooftop terrace. The opposite wing contains multiple guest suites. The lower level houses a viewing room, wine cellar, game room, gym and sauna. Adjacent to the home’s public arrival court, a porte-cochère leads to a private auto court and carriage house. Hidden just beyond, an outdoor pool and spa are cradled between lush landscaping, a shade trellis, and an open-air pool house. A sport court is cleverly concealed behind a landscape screen.

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Awards

Renovations/ Adaptive Reuse: Less Than 5,000 ft2 HONOR AWARD

Mid-century Remix Robert M. Cain, Architect

How a vaguely Eichler mid-century home came to be constructed in Virginia Highland is not known to the current owners. However, having lived in California, they recognized the form immediately and purchased the house. Our assignment: on a tight $220,000 budget, reorganize the chopped plan, expand the kitchen and dining area into the unusable carport, enhance the interior and exterior and renovate the basement. In respect to the origins of the existing house, we emphasized horizontality, added bands of glass, removed odd brackets, added a 5-footwide pivot door at the entry, replaced the siding and constructed a low horizontal wall to establish a public/private boundary. Parking for the house shifts from the inaccessible carport to an apron linked to the entry with concrete pavers. The house as described by Residential Design magazine: “Nestled in the Virginia Highlands, one of Atlanta’s toniest neighborhoods, is a diminutive MidCentury house recently resuscitated with a very light hand. The modesty of the intervention is the first thing one notices upon touring the house. The second

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notable aspect is that it exists at all amid the pseudo-Tudors, period bungalows and new builder-spec foursquares that characterize the pricey in-town location. Would that all of Atlanta’s new modern work were as skillfully done as Bob's."


PHOTOGRAPHS BY FREDRIK BRAUER

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Awards

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Renovations/ Adaptive Reuse: Greater Than 5,000 ft2 The adaptive reuse of Page Woodson School into affordable apartments marks a vibrant cultural rebirth in Oklahoma City. This historic African-American high school is an outstanding example of a Classical Revival red brick school building. Part of a larger plan to preserve black history while re-energizing an urban milieu, this project utilized LIHTC funding and historic tax credits to create a 100 percent affordable development. The original building was constructed in 1910; additions followed in 1919, 1934 and 1948. In 1934, it transitioned from an all-white elementary school to the already well-established Frederick Douglass, the city’s only African-American high school and a gathering place for the African-American community in OKC. Vacant for 20 years, the building attracted trespassers who set multiple fires. It was in an advanced state of decay when purchased in 2013. Conceptually, the project addresses the demand for affordable housing while preserving, restoring and adapting a National Register property. Extensive community outreach helped determine the best path for this treasured community resource. An additional story was added inside the gymnasium to optimize living space. The alma mater of author Ralph Ellison, the transformed school still bears Frederick Douglass’ name but now accommodates 65 apartments and a renovated 700-seat auditorium for community arts and performance groups. The adaptation capitalizes on the building’s art deco flourishes, limestone accents and school themes, with most original blackboards preserved in place. A portion of the apartments are scaled as lofts with soaring ceilings, and all living spaces feature abundant daylight.

HONOR AWARD

Page Woodson School Smith Dalia Architects

PHOTOGRAPHS BY BRANDON SNIDER

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Awards

Renovations/ Adaptive Reuse: Greater Than 5,000 ft2 MERIT AWARD

Lizzie Chapel Flats Chasm Architecture

Lizzie Chapel Flats, a circa-1930 building, has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1973 and was recognized as a contributing building within the locally designated Inman Park Historic District in 2002. Formerly a Baptist church, there were multiple failed reuse attempts. The successful design is one that preserved the historic essence of the building and responded to the community’s concerns to maintain limited impact on the character of the neighborhood. The well-received design maintained the appeal of Inman Park by restoring the original historic facades, preserving the Euclid Avenue entrance beneath the original columns, and leaving the church sign in place.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHASM ARCHITECTURE

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The church’s two stories are now comprised of three stories and six residential flats. Each flat is unique due to its location in the church and the historical details that were restored. The stained glass, along with the steeple, were ornamental additions made in the 1970s–1980s and therefore were removed. The tall windows were returned to their original design with window profiles that matched existing. The windows flood the open, loft-like units with natural light. The exterior restoration and interior renovation had to be addressed in an in-depth yet restrained manner. The challenge was to design an evolved space that wasn’t overdone. Over-designing the building would have lost character of the place – but, meticulous detailing and careful collaboration with the engineers was required to achieve 17,000 square feet of residential space.


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Awards

An Architect's Role in Preserving History Through Art BY SHAUN MARTIN, AIA

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Architects have a tremendous impact on communities, particularly when it comes to the preservation of historical structures. One example is John Carlsten, who discovered the impending demolition of the Eiseman building while preparing an architectural guide for the 1975 AIA Convention. The building was to be razed for the construction of the MARTA Five Points station. Now, over 40 years later, a portion of the old Eiseman building façade still hangs prominently as public art inside the station. In this example, history brings ambience and appreciation of the past to a public setting. This inspirational factoid is a profound example of the impact architects can have on the past, present and future. One of the reasons architects feel compelled to "save"

gems like these is because older structures perpetuate a sense of community history. While development is inevitable, balanced development preserves the finest aspects of a community's architectural fabric. Smyrna is reaping the fruit of new development, thanks to the Atlanta Braves’ new SunTrust Park stadium; yet, many residents and visitors are unaware of the community's rich and varied history. As an architect, resident and member of the Smyrna Arts and Cultural Council, I wish to be on the side of history that celebrates and respects this evolution. The City of Smyrna was incorporated in 1872 (approximately 145 years ago) and is dubbed the "Jonquil City" because of the profusion of flowers that appears on the grounds of its residences each year at springtime. Smyrna

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PHOTOGRAPH BY MARTA GUIDE

is one of the fastest-growing cities in Metro Atlanta and also one of the most desirable suburbs in the area. With close to 60,000 residents, the Jonquil City is also on track to become the most populous community in burgeoning Cobb County. As a longtime resident of Smyrna (since 1997), I've watched this lovely community go through transformation while still remaining a prime location to raise a family. A "Smyrna Girl" at heart, my service to community takes place in a multitude of ways, most recently working with the City through SACC to develop the Jonquil City Historical Trail (JCHT). The journey began in 2015, when I was encouraged to pursue artful ventures in Smyrna since none existed, or so I thought. I

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soon learned about the formation of the Smyrna Arts and Cultural Council (SACC) and joined the Steering Committee. At the inaugural meeting, I presented to membership the idea of applying for an "Our Town" grant sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts. It was to be a collaboration between the City of Smyrna and Kennesaw State University's Zuckerman Museum of Art. My position on the ZMA Board as Outreach Chair provided an opportunity to meaningfully engage the two organizations beyond the confines of city and campus. As ad hoc committee chair, I led the initial exploration effort with a team of Arts Council members who ultimately crystallized a vision for the Trail that continues to resonate. Ulti-

mately, the City of Smyrna decided to independently pursue a pilot project to build interest and establish a collaborative working history, which is favorable in the eyes of prospective grantors. The pilot program includes the marking of 20 sites significant to Smyrna's development along the Atlanta Road corridor, formerly known as Dixie Highway, and an online tour accessible by any mobile-ready device. The team met regularly to set the direction for the project. I now share the task of co-leading the JCHT initiative with Dr. William Marchione, retired history professor and Smyrna resident. He has authored a history of Smyrna (his seventh book), given countless lectures and continues to interpret Smyrna's history in ways


Shaun Martin presenting the arts component at the opening ceremony.

Dr. Marchione leading the tour at the opening ceremony.

that enlighten and inspire a richer sense of community. It was Dr. Marchione who generated the original Jonquil City Historical Trail proposal during Smyrna's Strategic Visioning effort several years ago. His contribution to the JCHT initiative has been tremendous. Dr. Marchione and I spent the next two years collaborating with the City, reviewing sites, historical content, potential programming and developing the online tour with the City's GIS coordinator. The Smyrna Arts and Cultural

Council and the City of Smyrna launched the JCHT in an opening reception held on October 15, 2017, at the Smyrna Public Library. Attendees learned about the development of the JCHT and participated in an abbreviated public tour of the Trail. With the launch behind us, we are now preparing for the next phase of the project which includes planning the expansion of the trail, developing the arts component and strategizing a fundraising campaign. My primary focus will shift to planning the arts and funding components while Dr. Marchione focuses on expansion. The City and SACC continue to collaborate in hopes of raising awareness and funding to support future planning and implementation. As the Eiseman façade story illustrates, architects have tremendous power to impact the community in very profound ways. With the advent of increased development in Smyrna, Dr. Marchione and I hope to share the history and wonder behind the structures that make Smyrna great, some which already have been lovingly preserved, like the Taylor-Brawner House & Hall and Aunt Fanny's Cabin. Our historical gems bring truth and meaning to the modern world. As Lord Acton said, "History is not a burden on the memory, but an illumination of the soul." We seek to highlight the stories so that a deeper sense of belonging can be experienced by all. ■DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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A Flight of Fancy for the People BY PAUL MONARDO, AIA

Rarely has a county-funded structure fulfilled as many disparate community visions as creatively as the Fulton County Aviation Community Cultural Center (FCACCC). The 16,200-square-foot facility deftly responded to the top-level goals for the project related to education, art and aviation history. Adjacent to Fulton County’s Charlie Brown Airport, the FCACCC unites these elements into a bold design statement that is exceeding expectations – aesthetically, culturally and economically. The $5.1 million long-hoped-for facility, designed and engineered by Pond & Company, was completed in 2014, and adds visual excitement to once-deteriorating

View of the educational wing's angled hallway, showing the aviation-inspired ceiling panels as well as the custom artwork (by Michael Reese) of African-American aviation heroes. Windows on the left provide daylight as well as views of the artwork from the street, day and night.

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neighborhoods in the Fulton Industrial Boulevard district, and is playing a key role in its turnaround. From start to finish, Pond was intimately involved in driving the turnaround. Pond’s architect-led design team wore many important hats – visionary, designer, salesperson, project manager and diplomat. After winning the job, Pond guided community decision making, moved the community’s vision forward, kept citizens actively engaged in every phase of the project, responsibly managed the county’s budget and respected its schedule. Pond clearly demonstrated the expansive role that architects play. Such is the power of architectural design to translate community values into the built environment. The FCACCC was initially conceived by a community advisory group as much-needed classroom and meeting space for the underserved populations of Carroll Heights, Collier Heights and Adamsville. A series of lively public discussions revealed an array of more specific concerns.Yes, they needed a gathering place, but they also wanted to fill a void in the area’s cultural and social resources with exhibit space, a welcoming children’s education space focusing on introducing them to career opportunities in aviation, and training facilities for adults interested in transitioning to aviation and other careers. Further, they wanted to honor the contributions of the Tuskegee Airmen, the African-American World War II pilots and other veterans, who resided in and continue to reside in the area. The center is an elegant example of how architecture reflects multiple human desires, in a structure that enriches its immediate surroundings, uplifts adjacent neighborhoods and serves as a visually inspiring launch pad for future redevelopment and community renewal. Says Jason Pinnix, CM, ACE, Assistant Airport Manager and President of the Georgia Airports Association, “It’s helping to change the face of Fulton Industrial Boule-


PHOTOGRAPHS BY JIM ROOF CREATIVE, INC.

A view of the rotating art gallery which serves as flexible exhibit space. The other gallery in the facility features a more permanent exhibit of the history of aviation and African-Americans in aviation.

vard, because it has traditionally been mostly warehouses and industrial space and this center lends a softer presence.” In agreement, Lionell Thomas, Director of Fulton County Arts & Culture adds, “I can genuinely say that the construction has lured many patrons to the center who find it a valuable asset to the community. Patrons have even insisted to conduct their business here because they admire the building so much. We are proud that we have such an attractive venue close to home.” The resulting facility now successfully serves three overarching purposes: Aviation: Provides training opportunities and educational resources to encourage careers in aviation, including aviation-inspired educational camps for the next generation of budding aviators. The center also showcases local aviation history, particularly

African-American contributions. Community: Provides a large multi-purpose room for civic meetings and special events plus a green space for outdoor activities and children’s play area.

The center is an elegant example of how architecture reflects multiple human desires ... Culture: Provides space for visual art exhibitions, including rotating collections from local artists and a permanent gallery spotlighting African-Americans’ contributions to the aviation industry, particularly those of the Tuskegee Airmen. Says Melody Harclerode, AIA, who led architectural programming as

the project progressed, “It was important to listen to the community and get their buy-in, but at the same time keep high expectations for the design team. One thing about this center is we were dealing with sterile industrial buildings all around. As a design team we could have played it safe. Instead, we wanted to give the most impactful design for the money.” This points to a subtle distinction between the practice of pure art versus architecture. The typical artist often works alone in a studio, while the architect is engaged in a collaborative process. “Our job as architects is to figure out a way to translate human goals and aspirations into the built environment,” explains Paul Monardo, AIA, Pond's former Director of Architecture and team leader on the project. “In designing the FCACCC, our challenge was DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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to take the community’s thoughts, hopes, dreams and aspirations and give the facility a form that communicates all these intangibles. In doing so, we were challenged to set the stage for ushering in an exciting new era for the community’s residents and for both existing and prospective businesses.” The architectural design team answered these challenges with sculptural design elements and historical symbols that are gracefully integrated to pay tribute to aviation. The Red Tail planes flown by Tuskegee Airmen are symbolized with an eye-catching metal canopy along the most public side of the building, as well as the brightly colored interior finishes, while a dramatic, glassed tower references an air traffic control tower and adds a dynamic element to the building. In fact, the overall building footprint is shaped like an airplane; when seen from above, it looks as though it is parked on the runway and ready to take off. Having championed the project from its nascent beginnings more than 16 years ago, Emma Darnell, Fulton County Commissioner for District 6, says, “Service in the military is a proud tradition in these adjoining communities

and because so many of the men who were members of the famed Tuskegee Airmen were from this area, they wanted to be recognized for their contributions to the aviation history of this country.” That recognition is generated in the overall expanse of the buildings, which contains two wings spanning out from a modest sunlit atrium. One wing is primarily for flexible event space; the other contains classrooms for all subjects including media, art and dance. Central to the building are two galleries: one is a gallery for rotating exhibits; the other is a permanent gallery geared toward the history of aviation, particularly African-Americans in aviation. Commissioned works by artist Michael R. Reese that use the achievement of flight as a metaphor from the Civil Rights movement salute World War II pilots, and aviation and space travel

Our job as architects is to figure out a way to translate human goals and aspirations into the built environment.

View of the multipurpose room in a large group performance set up, which can also accommodate lectures and other events. The black curtain system on all sides of the room create a 'black box' environment for dance and theater performances.

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View of main entry lobby with aviationrelated custom artwork and the view of the air traffic control tower-inspired clerestory windows above; with customdesigned colorful and illuminated reception desk. DESIGN

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View of the art instructional classroom serving children from the surrounding communities; other flexible classrooms address programs related to dance, career training, media/computer sciences, and aviation training.

heroes as well. A research library connects the galleries. The library serves as a place of learning, reflection and discussion. Lit all night, it illuminates an otherwise dark industrial corridor as a beacon of hope for those seeking to expand their knowledge and talent for years to come. The building’s signature design element, a metaphoric red lightning bolt above the research library windows, is another significant design element intended to make the center stand out along a generally empty stretch of Fulton Industrial Boulevard, amidst bland warehouses and commercial structures and abandoned buildings. The Red Bolt is divided into three sections: 1. The lower vertical part reflects the upward struggle of African-Americans prior to World War II. 2. The middle horizontal section represents wartime, when advancement was put on hold. 3. The upper vertical section suggests the war’s end, and rising above the roof it evokes the role of African-Americans in commercial aviation and space flight. A tapering at the top suggests the endless possibilities in aviation

that exist ahead, as well as the famous red tails of the P-51 planes used by the Tuskegee Airmen. Behind the building, an outdoor event area dubbed ‘Field of Flight’ features a large open green space set aside for children to have a place to fly model airplanes as part of educational camps and classes. Even the parking lot recalls aviation, as the visitor walkway is handsomely landscaped with subtle colors, textures and graphics designed to recall an airport runway. These elements seamlessly combine to demonstrate how architects use their design talents, technical capabilities and communication and

Pictured above: View of a community tour of the facility with the building's red bolt, which represents African-Americans in flight, in history and in the future. The red panels in the background serve as surfaces for applied signage advertising performances and events at the facility to the community.

listening skills, to assemble otherwise mute pieces of glass, steel and stone into meaningful articulations of social values, destined to give this and future generations a sense of pride and place in the world. This is the power and purpose of architecture at its core – to improve our lives and the society at large. ■ DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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Employee or Independent Contractor? The Cost of Mislabeling BY MALACHI GORDON

While most workers find job stability and set employee benefits ideal, a growing number are becoming independent contractors in favor of working nine-to-fives. Greater flexibility, according to studies, does improve happiness and productivity after all. Companies also benefit from independent contractors, relying on shortterm help and outside expertise at a fraction of the cost of hiring an employee. However, there are companies that treat independent contractors as though they are employees, which puts the business in legal jeopardy.

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According to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), independent contractors are considered self-employed workers and provide services without the company having extensive control over the worker's schedule, where the job is done or how the job is done. The greater the amount of control the company exercises over an independent contractor, the more likely this worker would legally be considered an employee. In such case, the company is responsible for withholding and paying applicable taxes for the worker. Some companies use independent contrac-

tors to get around paying employment taxes, with the full burden falling on the worker. THE PROS AND CONS OF BEING AN INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR

There are important differences between employees and independent contractors. In short, employees typically have predetermined schedules, paydays and at least some benefits. And, in addition to the employer sharing the burden of employees’ Social Security and Medicare taxes, it takes


care of employees' income tax withholdings. Drawbacks to being an employee may include an inflexible schedule, having to commute to an office and supervisors dictating your daily work. Independent contractors set their own schedules, but with additional flexibility comes more risk and responsibility. Although able to self-govern work, this may coincide with working longer hours to find clients. Many independent contractors also spend a fair amount of time invoicing clients and awaiting payment. Furthermore, those who are self-employed bear the full employment tax burden, the responsibility of withholding income tax and costs of health insurance. These additional responsibilities may be justifiable costs for freedoms like working with multiple=clients at once, flexible hours and being able to work remotely.

The greater the amount of control the company exercises over an independent contractor, the more likely this worker would legally be considered an employee. HOW COMPANIES MISLABEL EMPLOYEES AND INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS

Many companies hire independent contractors and impose limits to their independence while avoiding payroll taxes. They dictate independent contractors’ schedules, supervise their work and require them to work inside the company’s office – basically treating the worker as an employee. This practice is not legal, according to the IRS. A worker is either an employee or an independent contractor and should be treated accordingly. The IRS is clear: “You are not an independent contractor if you perform services that can be controlled by an employer (what will be done and how it will be done).” One common practice is a company, rather than hiring a worker, using independent contractor agreements over a “probationary period.” Again, the greater the extent of the company’s control, the more likely the worker would be considered a common-law employee. A company cannot treat a worker like an employee while also avoiding payroll taxes, even if it’s only temporary. It does not work both ways. Ride-share companies Uber and Lyft offer great examples of how independent contracting works. While these

companies set guidelines and safety standards for drivers, and also disburse their customers' payments, drivers are on their own schedules and do not report to anyone. Drivers determine when and where they will provide their services. And since drivers are not employees, taxes are not withheld and drivers are responsible for paying all applicable taxes on their income. CRITERIA FOR DETERMINING A WORKER’S APPROPRIATE CLASSIFICATION

Hiring an independent contractor should be beneficial and fair to all parties, and this is accomplished when laws are followed. “Although a contract may state that the worker is an employee or an independent contractor,” says the IRS, “this is not sufficient to determine the worker’s status.” Fortunately, the government provides the following rules to assess the company’s extent of control and determine the appropriate worker classification: 1. Behavioral: Does the company control or have the right to control what the worker does and how the worker does his or her job? 2. Financial: Are the business aspects of the worker’s job controlled by the payer? (These include things like how worker is paid, whether expenses are reimbursed, who provides tools/supplies, etc.) 3. Type of Relationship: Are there written contracts or employee type benefits (i.e. pension plan, insurance, vacation pay, etc.)? Will the relationship continue and is the work performed a key aspect of the business? The IRS recommends employers consider all factors to determine the correct classification. They also provide a service to determine a worker's status if it remains unclear. THE COST OF MISLABELING A WORKER

If it is determined that an employee is misclassified as an independent contractor, a company can face a number of penalties by both the U.S. Department of Labor and the IRS, including being required to pay fines, back-taxes and interest on wages. Also, misclassified workers may be able to claim employee benefits retroactively. (Some businesses qualify for relief from federal employment tax with reasonable basis defined under the IRS' Section 530.) Many class action lawsuits have materialized due to the mislabeling of independent contractors, resulting in multimillion-dollar settlements from companies like DoorDash and FedEx.

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REMEDIES FOR WORKERS WHO ARE MISLABELED

If you signed an independent contractor agreement but are being treated like an employee, there are solutions. First, you might speak with the company and explain what you’ve learned about worker classifications. Hopefully, the company will take action to investigate and, depending on their findings, agree to reclassify you and pay applicable taxes. Second, you can get the IRS involved. Misclassified workers can file Form 8919, Uncollected Social Security and Medicare Tax on Wages, to report the share of uncollected Social Security and Medicare taxes the company should have payed. Note that the IRS may contact the business to investigate before arriving at their determination, which can cause tension between you and

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the company. A third option is to file a complaint with the Dept. of Labor. To be clear: correctly classifying workers is the employer’s legal responsibility. In many cases, mislabeling is an honest mistake. In order to remedy mislabeling a worker before legal issues arise, employers may participate in the Voluntary Classification Settlement Program, allowing reclassification of workers as employees for future tax periods, “with partial relief from federal employment taxes for eligible taxpayers that agree to prospectively treat their workers (or a class or group of workers) as employees.” Independent contractors are vital to businesses across many industries. With more workers becoming contractors, it is imperative to understand classification. For employers, mislabeling a

worker can be costly legal mistake, whether committed knowingly or unknowingly. As an independent contractor, the worker must fight to protect his or her independence, and thus the ability to thrive as self-employed. Many businesses seek to protect their own interests first, so know your rights and be your own advocate. For more information on the rights of independent contractors and employees, visit irs.gov. ■ The information presented in this article is for general guidance on matters of interest. The application and impact of laws can vary widely based on the specific facts involved. This article is not to be considered legal advice and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with an attorney.


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Towards Knowing What Architects Do (and Can Do) ARTICLE AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY GANESH NAYAK, AIA

Architects outside their environs elicit a ‘wow’ factor from the general public when they identify themselves as one. This reaction is perhaps reserved for anyone from the creative class, which architects in public perception certainly are. Behind the ‘wow’ is intrigue and probably a cloud of incomprehension about the profession. It is this cloud that, while elevating us as a profession among others such as finance, media, law, etc., forms a distance in perception and relegates us from the forefront in decision-making regarding design and the built environment. It is this cloud that we need to lift. So, what do architects do and why should we matter? There are any number of significant responses to this query, and I will attempt to frame one around three points and lay out the fourth one that indicates the potential of what we can do.

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1. DESIGN THINKING.

This is one concept that has gained currency in the past decade. Tim Brown of Ideo, a global design company, defines it as a human-centered approach to innovation that was originally developed in the business world to create products, services, processes and even strategy. Thinking design of course is what architects do. One area where they are an integral part of the design thinking team is healthcare, where the concept of ‘empathic design’ is taking hold. Empathy for the user is core to the design of environments, procedures and processes, privileging the patient over patient care teams, and user-based over metric-based design. Apart from providing pleasant environments from colorful interiors and spaces of comfort such as gardens, there are other effects: waiting times become shorter, patient room clusters are designed so nurses can get quicker to the patient; sinks are more visibly located, improving hygiene and reducing chances of infection. Here, design is a direct factor in improved patient outcomes, faster healing and fewer errors. A case in point is the Rotterdam Eye Hospital, which revamped its design by turning the focus on the patient – specifically, their comfort and reducing anxiety – and now reports that patient intakes increased by 47 percent, with significant uptick in patient satisfaction.1 2. REMEDIATION.

Architects know how to remedy environments and repair gaps in the urban and rural fabric that are torn by the vagaries of economy and policy. We design safe environments that have the potential to nourish and nurture communities back to states where they can thrive and create opportunities for regrowth. We are among the first responders to an urban crisis. For instance, in Detroit, where entire neighborhoods have been hollowed out by the economy, a neighborhood is being planned with tiny homes ranging from 250 to 400 square feet, which will be rented out at $1 per square foot – a very affordable solution for low-income populations, and a move that restores humanity to the homeless. In Atlanta, Centennial Place, built before the 1996 Olympics, has gone a long way in repairing the fabric that was frayed by urban blight and has since provided safe, affordable places to live. The $20,000 homes designed by Auburn’s Rural Studio are high-performing, well designed solutions to affordability that enable people to live with dignity in their own communities, slowly making them whole again.

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3. RESILIENCE.

Our environments, be they cities or rural areas, are undergoing perceptible social, economic and environmental shifts. Climate change, however contentious the extent of its effects, is a major factor in the movement of populations to where vital resources are. The Rockefeller Center’s 100 Resilient Cities (100RC) refers to these shifts as acute ‘shocks’ and chronic stresses. The shocks come from natural disasters such as fires, floods, earthquakes, etc., while the stresses weaken the fabric on a daily or cyclical basis: unemployment, strained infrastructure, food deserts and water shortages. Resilience is “the ability to prepare for anticipated hazards, adapt to changing conditions, withstand and recover from disruptions.”2 Unless communities are resilient enough to the chronic stresses, the shock from a disaster could undermine their recovery. Architects are at the forefront of resilient design that addresses community problems and provides solutions that are environmentally sustainable. Here, the idea of sustainability expands to include the ability to adapt to vulnerabilities and risks that are known and anticipated. New Orleans, Louisiana, offers an example of a city still recovering from the shock of 2005’s Hurricane Katrina, when the systemic stresses imploded to make it a large-magnitude disaster. However, there are lessons that are being learned and the recovery focuses on rebuilding communities that will be more resilient in the face of future hazards. The Make It Right Foundation’s single-family


houses in the Lower 9th Ward are high-design, high-performance structures that are designed to withstand flooding in the future, raised several feet or even a story above grade. The architects learned from the disaster, local environment and practices, and designed houses that meet high sustainability goals and improve survival in the event of a natural disaster. 4. RECONCILIATION.

Architects are, by training, problem solvers. We have a unique approach to problem solving in several ways. We are trained to be always aware of the context and keep the hackneyed big picture in view. And we deploy both sides of the brain, arriving at solutions that meld creativity and technique; art and science; and theory and practice. Over the past few decades, the heroic idea of architect as solo creator has matured to more of a facilitator and leader of large teams that work on increasingly complex buildings. It is this strength – the ability to reconcile disparate entities – that, I would suggest, architects need to deploy more and more. We’re more divided as a society and nation than in the past that we can remember. There is a need to empathize with other people’s diverse views and mediate between them, be it in policy making or planning, and recognize challenges that affect us all (such as climate change).

There is a need to seek common ground and resolve contentious issues, be it at neighborhood planning unit presentations or zoning ordinance hearings. The philosopher Heidegger, in his famous essay “Building Dwelling Thinking,” lays out the unity of the fourfold as the central aspect of dwelling: earth, sky, mortals and divinities.3 But it is Heidegger's concept of gathering that is most intriguing: it is in the context of the bridge, which itself is a structure that connects banks, people and cultures. Heidegger says the bridge ‘gathers’ in its own way the fourfold. Like the bridge, architects have the ability to gather diversity of opinions, people and environments together, in many every day acts of reconciliation. It is what we do better than many others, and we only need to realize this fact and its power ourselves. ■ Sources Tim Brown, “Design Thinking," Harvard Business Review, June 2008. 1

National Institutes of Standards and Technology (NIST) Community Resilience Planning Guide for Buildings and Infrastructure Systems, 2015. 2

Martin Heidegger, “Building Dwelling Thinking,” Poetry Language Thought. Harper Colophon Books, New York, 1971. 3

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY SIZEMORE GROUP

Retrofitting Suburban Malls and Creating Experiences BY WILLIAM DE ST. AUBIN

How Architects Are Changing Regional Malls for an Urbanizing World We’ve seen recent announcements nationwide of planned store closures from JCPenney, Sears, Macy's and others. In fact, over one-third of shopping malls are at risk of dying. Simultaneously, the experiential economy is growing in place of traditional retail brick and mortars, with more money being spent at restaurants than in grocery stores in 2016, for the first time in U.S. history. Some suburban shopping malls have been hit hard by this phenomenon, compounded by suburbs urbanizing at remarkable rates. Public and private organizations have begun working together to re-imagine and retrofit malls at risk of becoming obsolete or vacant, and to improve the quality of life in the areas previously anchored by

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local and regional malls. How can a traditional mall compete with the types of experiences that can be had at 1920s-era warehouses converted into retail districts, river walks brimming with local dining and shopping, or charming, revitalized, historic downtowns? Some have found that they cannot compete on a retail basis, and converted shuttered malls into medical offices, call centers, or incubators for entrepreneurs. Others have doubled down on branding and creative place-making to create a favorable sense of place around existing malls. CREATING A CONNECTED EXPERIENCE

Sizemore Group is combining our expertise in town center architecture and suburban mall retrofits to help reshape suburban centers towards the urban experiential economy. The experiential preference is impacting not only how and where consumers want to spend,

but also how we create favorable places. The process of making places should be an experience itself; as Jane Jacobs once said, “Cities have the capability of providing something for everybody, only because, and only when, they are created by everybody.” When we bring clients along for the journey, and our teams are fully immersed in the community, the final product is superior. We’ve done this a number of ways: soliciting interactive input inside the mall itself, organizing a “Planners Pub Crawl” for stakeholders, a booth at a community festival and


Smyrna Town Center & Market Village

When we bring clients along for the journey, and our teams are fully immersed in the community, the final product is superior. more. Through these types of interactive and immersive activities, we bond with our clients, and thus get better,

stronger inputs into the design and planning process. This inclusive process can generate a higher level of community buy-in that is necessary to see completion.

we begin a master plan that undergoes extensive refinements to attract public and private investments. We create an implementation schedule and make a final presentation. Once approved, we offer architecture services to implement and manage the project delivery and design. In all cases, we aim to discover what the community wants, understand the market conditions and understand funding sources available (whether they are public, private or both). We focus where those three elements intersect to create an awesome experience for all involved.

THE RETROFIT PROCESS

CUMBERLAND BLUEPRINT

Our retrofit process begins by establishing goals with the client and community through vision sessions, community workshops and interviews. We then align these goals with reality by evaluating the market demand, physical attributes and funding sources. With those parameters established,

Our first engagement with major regional mall retrofits began with Georgia’s first and perhaps most successful community improvement district (CID), the Cumberland CID, where over 5 percent of the entire state’s economy and 33 percent of the county’s economy is generated. The CumDESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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Cumberland - Akers Mill Transit Seeking Redevelopment Master Plan

berland area was originally planned as a Corbusian dream at the intersection of I-75 and I-285 along the Chattahoochee River with three miles of national park space. While interesting to move through, it was neither a town nor a place. Leadership has demonstrated great success in infrastructure and commercial mixed-use experiential development, yet the area lacks housing and regional high-capacity transit. We were commissioned to master plan the 3,000acre area in the early 2000s to attract transit connectivity

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and redevelopment of strip centers into mixed-use, urban experiences. Our process demonstrated how a transit oriented mixed-use redevelopment would reinvigorate one under-utilized strip center. Unfortunately, the owner later opted out of redevelopment or sale. The project stalled, however, the seeds were sewn for well-planned future experiential redevelopment in the Cumberland CID. Within five years, the Atlanta Braves bought a nearby parcel and built a new stadium and development, The Battery Atlanta.


mitigate the negative impact, Cumberland CID has been building trails below the highway and pedestrian bridges above. To expand on this and further improve connectivity, Sizemore Group has planned The Baseline. The concept is a one-mile elevated path in the style of the New York’s High Line or Chicago’s 606, with four quarter-mile legs connecting The Battery to other elements within the Cumberland area. An elevated trail is a unique, safe experience that begins to fulfill the Corbusian vision, expanding the pedestrian and cycling experience in new and innovative ways. PERIMETER CENTER COMMUNITY IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT

The Perimeter CID is a dense suburban area, with four transit stations connected to the world’s busiest airport. Perimeter Mall is performing well in comparison to many others like it, and CID leaders proactively sought innovation to maintain their success. Sizemore Group led a Livable Centers Initiative Study of the area. Our research helped the community identify exactly what they wanted and needed out of the area around the mall, so the CID can position the area for continued success as suburban areas are expected to adopt urban principles of livability and connectivity. We recommended smaller block size to transform the mall into a city center. Since mall foot prints are too large for traditional, pedestrian-friendly urban street grids, implementing these measures would improve the pedestrian experience, urbanize the environment and improve connectivity to nearby transit stations. Another recommendation involved focusing new demand in transit villages around stations. Finally, we recommended adding missing SMYRNA BASELINE public spaces: sidewalks, bikeways, trails, parks and In 2016, we were engaged by the adjacent City of Smyrna more supporting connectivity, walkability and the to retrofit a gateway corridor into the new The Battery, with civic realm. With these improvements, the area is its surrounding mixed-use, experiential development. The better connected to transit and the mall. Since the Battery keeps the area interesting and active all year long, completion of our study, corporate vision has met even when there is no baseball game. While the place itself community vision, and the CID has attracted the $1 is compelling, pedestrian and cycle access from Smyrna is billion headquarters of State Farm, which employs negatively impacted by a major, six- to eight-lane roadway. To 8,000 people in the Atlanta region. DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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STONECREST MALL

Over the past 50 years, properly located regional malls evolved into regional centers that attracted office and out parcel development around the periphery. In the case of Stonecrest Mall, the area was missing regional connectivity, office demand and growth that are necessary to attract secondary development. The graded parcels meant for office parks and other uses around the mall were left vacant, and nearby hotels struggled to survive. There was little traf-

charrette. We learned that the community hoped it would become “the place to be.” They were looking for a multiuse destination that offered transportation alternatives and created jobs. We also learned that the community was under supplied in soccer fields. The team recommended a regional sports complex with soccer fields and supporting uses on these parcels. Now known as Atlanta Sports

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fic during the week in the area, even though the mall was performing well on the weekends. With no demand on the horizon for office or housing, we began to explore other options in partnership with Gibbs Planning Group. Large, level, empty land has many uses, so we evaluated the viability of performing arts centers, regional convention space, mixed-use development and more. None of these were in high demand nor would they simulate significant activity for the mall. To gather community input, we hosted an in-mall

City, the second-largest multi-sports complex in the southeast is preparing to add a sports medicine pavilion in partnership with Emory University Hospital. In recognition of the experiential economy, ownership is also preparing to invest nearly $50 million into a sports-themed pavilion connecting the mall to Sports City that will include around 250,000 square feet of restaurants, retail, attractions and

green space. The development will create 1,900 jobs, attract 3 million annual visitors, and generate $105 million in economic impact to the county, $97 million to the state and $80 million in food and lodging. In the process, Stonecrest became a new city. Mayor Jason Larry, who was deeply involved in our planning, recently said, “It is our salvation.” ■


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Suntrust Park, Atlanta, Georgia Photo: Hirshfeld Industries/Marc Dyer


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High School Design Competition AIA Atlanta's 12th Annual High School Design Competition (HSDC), presented in partnership with YKK AP America, saw nearly 200 submissions from students representing 30 high schools across Georgia. HSDC's mission is engaging high school students in the design process and educating them about career options in architecture, engineering and construction.

The competition features two levels: beginner and advanced, to accommodate students' varying levels of experience. Following the competition, AIA hosted a gallery of all the projects and announced the winners during a special ceremony. First, second and third place winners of the advanced competition received college scholarships.

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1st Eduardo Martinez Jackson County Comprehensive High School

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Rachel Bloom Decatur High School

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Adeline Andrew Decatur High School

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P rograms

Mayoral Forum Vision for Atlanta is an annual panel discussion with leading experts on design, community planning and real estate development. Moderated in 2017 by journalist Maria Saporta, the forum was headlined by seven of Atlanta's mayoral candidates, including Keisha Lance Bottoms, John Eaves, Kwanza Hall, Ceasar Mitchell, Mary Norwood and Cathy Woolard. The conversation covered design excellence, historic preservation, affordable housing, zoning codes and improvements to the BeltLine. The candidates also discussed their favorite buildings in the city, including existing ones and those that are demolished. On Election Day, Bottoms and Norwood finished first and second, respectively, prompting a runoff since neither candidate secured more than 50 percent of the vote. Bottoms ultimately declared victory with a margin of 832 votes, according to certified results. Bottoms was sworn in as the 60th Mayor of the City of Atlanta on January 2, 2018. Listen to the podcast recording of Vision for Atlanta 2017 by visiting aiaatl.org/vision-for-atlanta.

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P rograms

1ST PLACE WINNER Midtown ConeCTOR

Eric Balogh, Daniel Dixon, Adam Lamb, Sally Parker, Lauren Sherman and Ryan Woods.

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10UP COMPE TITION

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Organized by the Young Architects Forum (YAF) of AIA Atlanta, in collaboration with MA! Design is Human, the biennial 10UP Competition invites designers and artists from around the United States to contribute to Atlanta’s blossoming arts scene with a design for an original, temporary installation. The winning structure, Midtown ConeCTOR, was temporarily erected for the public to experience, first at Colony Square and later at Ponce City Market.

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P rograms

1

st

Midtown ConeCTOR ERIC BALOGH, DANIEL DIXON, ADAM LAMB, SALLY PARKER, LAUREN SHERMAN AND RYAN WOODS

ARTS

neCTOR IS A SELF-SUPPORTED STRUCTURE THAT CAN SURVIVE THE WEAR AND TEAR OF MIDTOWN. MODULAR IN NATURE, THE STRUCTURE SEMBLED AND DISSASEMBLED FOR RELOCATION AND/OR MODIFICATION. THE INSTALLATION FEATURES A MALLEABLE AND REFLECTIVE CONE H AN INTEGRATED SOLAR LIGHTING SYSTEM THAT ILLUMINATES THE HIGHLY REFLECTIVE BAND ON THE CONE PYLONS.

SOLAR LIGHT

LED SOLAR LIGHTING KITS MOUUNT BETWEEN THE ROOF STRUCTURE SMALL SOLAR PANEL ATTACHED ON OF THE STRUCT

ROOF STRUCTURE

THE ROOF FRAMING REINFORCES THE COLUMNS AND SAFELY CONCEALS THE OVERHEAD SOLAR LIGHTING SYSTEM.

FABRIC DET

TRAFFIC CONES HELD TOGETHE INDUSTRIAL ZIP-TIES AND FAST TO FRAME VIA 1/8” AIRCAFT C

CONE FABRIC

18” WHITE CONES ZIP-TIED TOGETHER CREATE MALUABLE AND DYNAMIC “URBAN FABRIC”.

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TAIL

BUDGET

ER BY TENED CABLE

18” WHITE PVC TRAFFIC CONES BLACK PAINT

1/8” AIRCRAFT CABLE AND FASTENERS LED SOLAR LIGHT KITS

320

$ 10.50

$ 3200.00

5 GAL

$ 10.00

$ 50.00

800 LFT

$0.32 / LFT +$64.00

$ 320.00

$ 15.00

$ 150.00

10

PREFABRICATION AND THE ABILITY TO FLAT PACK ALLOW THE ConeCTOR TO BE EASI A SITE AND ASSEMBLED. THE DESIGN-BUILD TEAM, EXPEREINCED WITH PREFABRIC DEVELOPED THE SYSTEM TO MEET THE SCHEDULE, PROVIDE FLEXIBILITY, AND BE EA

MAY

J

PREP WORK

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 0

PREFABRICATION

TED IN E WITH N TOP TURE.

CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULE

ON-SITE ASSEMBLY

TING

Midtown leads Atlanta's construction boom with more development activity occurring today that any time in the history of the district, with 37 major development projects currently proposed or under construction. Midtown's skyline, landscape and streets are in a state of perpetual transformation, creating disruption. Midtown Alliance has been the positive force behind this revitalization through longterm planning and 15 miles of streetscape improvements since 2000. Midtown ConeCTOR aspires to augment the way we experience midtown on foot, using the ubiquitous icon of urban transformation as a surprising and evocative design motif. Midtown ConeCTOR is a self-supported structure that can survive the wear and tear of the district. Modular in nature, the structure can be easily assembled and disassembled for relocation and/or modification. The installation features a malleable and reflective cone fabric “skin” with an integrated solar lighting system that illuminates the highly reflective band on the cone pylons. Each bay can be custom adjusted to alter the shape of the cone fabric depending on MATERIAL QTYof theUNIT PRICEThe gravity PRICEheld the length and curvature installation. base and "kit-of-parts" nature allows the structure to be PRESSURE TREATED $ 480.00 LUMBER assembled, adjusted, modified, expanded, disassembled and relocated easily.

ORDER CONES

08

PAINT FRAME

22

12

22

CONSTRUCT BASE

22

25

CONSTRUCT FRAME

30

CONSTRUCT FABRIC

ASSEMBLY

DISASSEMBLY

RE-ASSEMBLY

LIFECYCLE DE-CONSTRUCTION

1 2 3 4

REMOVE CONE FABRIC 4X8 “SHEETS” REMOVE LIGHTING KITS FROM ROOF UN-BOLT ROOF SUPPORT AND UN-BOLT FRAME FROM BASES FLAT PACK MATERIALS IN TRUCK, CLEAN AND RELEASE SITE

FRAMES

BASES DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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P rograms

2998

idea of atmosphere through the use of section. The use of this abstraction allows us to see the g with a line, projected with a plane, the installation provides a multitude of spatial readings and ies space. As people move in and out, the organic shape catches light and shadow. In perspective, the id depending on your viewing angle. As you move around the exhibit new shapes emerge as planes distance, it reads a solid. If projection orthographically the installation appears only as horizontal lity continues at night as LED lighting illuminates the spaces in-between making voids during the day

tall and is constructed out of 1/2 inch birch plywood stacked horizontally supported by 4� steel bars. a horizontal cross member provides lateral stability. The overall spacing allows for viewers to move e space between the slices is illuminated with LED lighting.

2

Front Elevation

Right Elevation

nd

Slice CHRIS WELTY

Slice is an installation that explores the idea of atmosphere through the use of section. The use of this abstraction allows us to see the play between space and object. Starting with a line, projected with a plane, the installation provides a multitude of spatial readings and experiences. It defines as well as occupies space. As people move in and out, the organic shape catches light and shadow. In perspective, the installation can look transparent or solid depending on your viewing angle. As you move around the exhibit, new shapes emerge as planes move in and out of each other. From a distance, it reads a solid. If projection orthographically the installation appears lateral stabilty

Plywood spacers

1/2� plywood sections

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only as horizontal lines lofted on vertical trunks. The duality continues at night as LED lighting illuminates the spaces in-between making voids during the day now becomes solid with light. The installation stands roughly 11 feet tall and is constructed out of half-inch birch plywood stacked horizontally supported by four-inch steel bars. Two vertical walls are connected with a horizontal cross member provides lateral stability. The overall spacing allows for viewers to move between the vertical walls. At night, the space between the slices is illuminated with LED lighting.


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Programs

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Old School Interactive CHRISTOPHER LOYAL

3380

MATERIAL + DIMENSIONS

PART OF THE COMPOSITE DOWEL IS REMOVABLE; PVC TUBE HOLDS STICKS OF CHALK; AVAILABLE FOR PUBLIC USE

36 COMPOSITE DOWELS PER FACE

10” O.C TY

7’-8”

5’-0” 5’-0”

AXON

Old School Interactive gets back to the basics. It is a voice for every person, an artist’s canvas, an author’s blank page – no technology required. OSI will be an ever-changing installation that visibly maps public opinion. An eraser or a hard rain wipes the slate clean, providing the opportunity to redraw or rewrite your views in a public forum. OSI is a four-sided chalkboard. It is 5-by-5 feet in plan and 7 feet 8 inches tall. It is constructed of plywood panels finished with chalkboard paint. The panels are lapped and pinned together by composite dowels and dimensional lumber. The dowels serve as wooden nails for construction, and are partly removable. The removable portion houses sticks of chalk for public use Stories will be crafted, sketches drawn, eraser marks visible and some dowels stolen. A slate-colored tower will quickly become a pink, green and blue multicolored sculpture that will be a product of anyone who chooses to

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AXON SECTION DETAIL

4” WO DOWEL; AND GLU PVC TU

WO WASHERS CUT, GLU WO D

ELEVATION

become a co-designer of this installation. OSI empowers anyone who wants to write or draw with a piece of chalk. Everyone has a platform.


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P rograms

r e m m u S ocial S

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AIA Atlanta, in partnership with Circle of Trust Atlanta and Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) Atlanta, hosted the 7th Annual Summer Social at Topgolf Atlanta Midtown. Summer Social offers the ultimate mix of business and pleasure for professionals in design, development, commercial real estate, engineering and banking. In addition to networking, guests were entertained by high-tech golf, beverages, tasty food and prize drawings. Summer Social is held in June, with venues subject to change each year. DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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P rograms

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URBANfronts Creative Expressions is a one-night gallery featuring works of art and multicultural entertainment, providing a public forum with the work of local artists and designers. The 2017 exhibition was held in partnership with the City's Atlanta City Studio in the Cascade Heights neighborhood. Renowned architect Oscar Harris served as guest speaker. Creative Expressions coincides with the launch of URBANfronts Storefront Galleries, the temporary adaption of empty retail storefronts with provocative art for a two-week period.

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]

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Programs

AIA Atlanta, in collaboration with ASHRAE Atlanta, ASID Georgia, CSI Atlanta, IIDA Georgia and USGBC Georgia, hosted its annual holiday celebration at the new Mercedes-Benz Stadium. The event offered an exciting evening of networking, small plates, desserts, beverages and a live DJ. Red & Green Scene also served as a fundraiser for Sustainable Design Collaborative Atlanta and a toy drive for Toys for Tots.

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P rograms

Principals Roundtable Each month, firm principals and representatives from local AEC companies meet at Principals Roundtable (PRT) to discuss topics relevant to the industry. Meetings include a breakfast buffet, presentation and moderated discussion. Topics include design, best practices, political issues, sustainability and technology. AIA credits are offered for qualifying topics.

Guest Speakers Row 1: Ellen Dunham-Jones, AIA; David Haddow; Stuart Romm, AIA; Howard Wertheimer, FAIA Row 2: Luca Maffey; Todd Bertsch, AIA Row 3: Greg Walker, AIA; Hank Houser, AIA Row 4: Keith Parker; Ed Riggins; Robert Brown, FAIA; Jim Cramer

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P ro g r a m s

Programs & Academy of Architecture for Health of Georgia The Academy of Architecture for Health (AAH) addresses unique issues related to improving the quality of healthcare through design. As a forum, it provides the exchange of ideas, concerns, failures, successes and resources to advance the practice of healthcare architecture. Networking and educational events are held periodically to help strengthen the local knowledge base of healthcare design expertise that will ultimately improve healthcare environments within the region and beyond.

Spotlight on Atlanta Projects In 2017, the Young Architects Forum of AIA Atlanta launched Spotlight on Atlanta Projects (SOAP), inviting the public to learn about recent and forthcoming developments in the Metro Atlanta. Local firms make presentations and attendees are able to ask questions to gain a better understanding of the built environment. SOAP also provides a unique networking opportunity, with attendees comprising architectural associates, licensed architects and other design professionals.

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DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

AIA Committee on the Environment (COTE) Committee on the Environment hosts a lunch-and-learn meeting on the second Friday of each month. The one-hour meetings comprise a presentation on various sustainable design topics, including federal regulations, energy efficiency and LEED certifications.

Box Lunches AIA Atlanta’s Box Lunch series allows education providers from AEC companies to meet with members and discuss the latest trends in the design and construction. Box Lunches are held monthly throughout Metro Atlanta, including in Midtown, Marietta, Buckhead and in the northeast area.

Design for Aging (DFA) Design for Aging was formed to more effectively represent the aging professionals who share common challenges, opportunities and passion for design for aging. As a knowledge community, this group collaborates to deepen its understanding of our aging society through ongoing learning and knowledge sharing.

AIAS AIAS, AIA’s student chapters, are active at the campuses of Georgia Institute of Technology and Kennesaw State University. The chapters hold networking events and job fairs throughout the year, and also participate in the Freedom by Design program, leading small projects transforming the lives of disabled members of the community. Volunteer architects are a fundamental part of these projects, helping ensure that they meet health, safety and welfare needs.

Discover Architecture Discover Architecture was created by Melody Haclerode, AIA and Phillip Alexander-Cox with a goal of raising awareness of architecture among schoolaged children. The program was inspired by the successful Portland, Oregon-based Architects In Schools, which demonstrated students’ desires for an education in architecture. Discover Architecture is now an after-school program fostering engaging design creativity with classroom and extracurricular activities.


Knowledge Communities Procrastination Day To maintain licensure and AIA membership, architects are required to fulfill a number of continuing education credits annually. While AIA Atlanta provides several of these opportunities throughout the year, busy schedules can make it difficult to attend. Procrastination Day is a full-day seminar allowing members to catch up on missing credits with AEC presentations.

Open House Atlanta Open House Atlanta is a free architecture festival giving the public an opportunity to explore new and historic architectural landmarks in the city. For just one weekend, attendees are invited behind the scenes of architecture, with exclusive access to sacred spaces, hotels, museums, offices and more – many spaces that seldom open to the public. Open House Atlanta joins more than 30 official Open House cities around the world, including four in the United States.

Slate of Ready-to-Assist Architects (SORTAA) AIA Fellows Rocky Rothschild and Cecil Alexander, with Sally Price, hosted the first SORTAA meeting on October 4, 1989, with the goal to gather architectural knowledge from the “old guard” and share these experiences with the emerging generation of practitioners through mentorship.

Tour and Sketch Tour and Sketch invites middle and high school students to tour the Zuckerman Museum of Art, being led by volunteer docents and mentor architects. Following, students and volunteers break into small groups to sketch drawings until their satisfaction.

Wednesday Night Drafting Club Wednesday Night Drafting Club is a monthly networking event where AEC professionals come together to unwind, connect and reconnect. WNDC travels throughout the city to a different location on the third Wednesday of each month, exploring new restaurants, bars and food trucks. We invite all with an interest in design.

Student Mentoring Program The student mentoring program matches students from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Kennesaw State University with design professionals varying in years of experience and areas of expertise. Students meet with mentors to gain insight on the field, attend AIA events together, enjoy office tours, and visit college studios. Students are paired with professionals with similar interests, offering a glimpse of the world beyond graduation and a chance to develop a long-lasting relationship with a fellow practitioner.

Tours In an effort to raise public awareness on great design, inform the about the design process and show the value of architects, our tour series invites the community inside of new and redeveloped architectural works in the Atlanta area. Tours are small and intimate, allowing for comfortable viewing. Attendees are also able to ask questions to gain a better understanding of the project. Past tours have included SunTrust Park, Mercedes-Benz Stadium, Don and Mary Ellen Harp Student Center and Commons at Imperial Hotel.

DESIGN EQUILIBRIUM

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Profile for AIA Atlanta

Design Equilibrium 2018  

Design Equilibrium's “Design in Practice” issue explores the many roles architects play in the design of our homes, offices, stores and in p...

Design Equilibrium 2018  

Design Equilibrium's “Design in Practice” issue explores the many roles architects play in the design of our homes, offices, stores and in p...

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