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exhibit design by makenzie kressin


beau•ty 1.

a combination of qualities, such as shape, color, or form, that pleases the senses; a combination of qualities that pleases the intellect or moral sense; denoting something intended to make a woman more attractive. 2. a beautiful or pleasing thing or person; a beautiful woman; an excellent specimen or example of something; the pleasing or attractive features of something; the best feature or advantage of something.


introduction

As a child, I was placed in the back row of school

father. He has taught me how to live a balanced life, one

photographs with the boys because I was the tallest

in which my accomplishments are never as important

girl in my class. I was the last child to jump into the

as my happiness. The power of their insightful advice

swimming pool because I had to wait for my sunscreen

and unwavering encouragement is best displayed in

to dry. I was one of the few girls in my school that was

the lives of their children. My brother and I can attribute

not allowed to wear earrings or makeup until I was

our success to our parent's commitment to raising kids

twelve years old. These experiences could be upsetting

that are inspired to reach their full potential.

for a young girl, but they didn't really faze me. While I enjoyed wearing the latest trends from the mall and dressing up like my favorite pop stars with my friends, I knew that the way I looked was not as important as my character, my intelligence or my creativity. I grew up with parents and mentors that empowered me to follow my passions, take risks, and make my own decisions. I believe that every young girl should be encouraged to reach for her goals and should be supported throughout her journey to adulthood. I have been blessed with amazing role models, the two most influential of which are my parents. My mother, the hardest working woman I know, has encouraged me take on challenges with confidence. She has allowed me to make my own mistakes and never forced me to do something that I was not passionate about. Her support is magnified by the confidence instilled in me by my

Whether it was my parents, my extended family, my teachers or my bosses, I have been privileged to be surrounded by role models who supported me and challenged me in all aspects of my development. It is these kinds of role models that I hope every young girl can have. As I transition from the life of a college student to that of a contributing adult, I am committed to being a positive role model and mentor to the young girls in my life. I have seen, first hand, the consequences negative body image and poor self-esteem have on the lives of young girls and women. I hope this project creates a dialogue that nurtures a supportive culture of physical, mental and emotional wellness.

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table of contents

1. 2. 3. 4.

Proposal Schematic Experience Identity


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exterior view


Proposal


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problem

Why does body image matter? The way girls feel about their bodies has consequences that reach far beyond how they react when they look in the mirror. How they feel about the way they look often has a direct effect on how they feel about who they are. Sure, it’s important for our daughters to know that they are smart and that they’re capable and that they can accomplish anything. But all the smarts in the world don’t matter if a girl refuses to raise her hand in class because she’s afraid her classmates will look at her and find her appearance lacking. Body image matters not because we all need to look like gorgeous super models to be happy; it matters because if we don’t feel good about what we look like and the body we live in, we are less inclined to show the world who we are. Learning to love one’s body means treating it with respect, making peace with one’s unique shape and reveling in a sense of physical competence. Body esteem allows girls to act with self-direction and create lives that have meaning. It is not about continuous good feeling or unwavering self-satisfaction, but it allows a girl to view her internal strengths, rather than her appearance, as a projection of her worth.


75%

of girls with low self-esteem reported engaging in harmful activities like bullying, smoking, drinking and cutting themselves.

25%

admitted to starving themselves, refusing to eat, or binging and throwing up.

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exterior objectiveview

understanding beauty culture allows women to analyze its effects and alter their habits to promote healthy, positive images of beauty.


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This exhibit empowers women to pursue positive body image and encourages them to teach young girls to become confident, passionate women.


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audience

primary audience relevance

desired behavior

Mothers raising daughters Mothers, and other women that interact with young girls, have the opportunity to serve as excellent examples of positive body image and self-confidence. Unfortunately, mothers are bombarded with the same negative images of idealized female forms as their daughters. In order for mothers to be models of confidence and healthy body image, they must first understand the constructions of negative body image in society and address their own insecurities. Mothers should leave the exhibit with a passion for instilling self-confidence in their daughters. This could take the form of speaking with their daughters about body image construction, providing them with resources about positive body image and healthy habits or encouraging their daughters to come to them with their insecurities about their appearance. The exhibit also encourages mothers to enroll their daughters in extracurricular activities that help promote independence and empower young girls to grow into self-confident women.


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secondary audience

Educators and school administrators

relevance

Educators have a large impact on their students’ lives. They have the responsibility to promote independence and confidence in the student body while also being available as counselors and role models. This exhibit provides them with information about what cultivates negative ideas of body image and how they can create a culture of positive body image and healthy habits within their school.

desired behavior

Young girls spend much of their time at school. Teachers and administrators are often the adults that first spot the signs of low self-esteem and habits that are detrimental to a student’s health. This exhibit furthers conversations about body image construction and gives educators ideas about how to promote positive body image. It also gives them an idea of what influences they should remove from the school environment to ensure that school is a place where girls are empowered.


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exterior view


Schematic


overview This 5,000 square foot exhibit will be constructed in an empty retail space within a popular shopping district. Shoppers and visitors will be able to come and go from the exhibit and cafe as they please throughout the day.


overview beautiful

surrounding area

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Entrance Exhibit Space Cafe Exit Retail Shops Pedestrian Space

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content The exhibit focuses on presenting cultural artifacts that contribute to the construction of body image. The timeline running through the exhibit gives the guest context about how beauty culture has transformed over the last hundred years. Body image tips are placed within each section of the exhibit to provide ideas for how mother's can help their daughters deal with the pressures of growing up in a culture obsessed with beauty.


content

a b c d e f g h i j k l

Guest Greeting & Check-In What is Body Image? History of Beauty Culture & Women's Rights The Psychology of Advertising Magazines, Models & Manipulation Modern Consumer Culture The Assault of Popular Culture Cosmetic Enhancement Permanent Alterations Eating Habit Disorders Body Image Tips Positive Retail

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technology Interactive experiences stationed throughout the exhibit allow the guests to share their thoughts about their own body image and about beauty culture. Guests are encouraged to continue participating on their mobile devices after leaving the exhibit.


technology

video screen interactive station

Video screens and interactive stations positioned throughout the exhibit create a genuine dialogue between its content and its guests. Interactive stations enable visitors to experience the exhibit independently and engage fully with the themes presented.

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guest flow Guest comfort is the top priority. All guests should be allowed to experience the exhibit at their own pace. Visual cues are used throughout the exhibit space to draw guests from one section to the next.


guest flow

exhibition route

Upon entering the exhibit, the guest is greeted by an employee. They are then encouraged to check-in using the touchscreen interface located to the left of the entrance. Next, the guest is directed towards an introductory panel in the center of the space. The guest can then continue to explore the beauty culture subtopics, timeline and media wall. At any time during their visit, a guest can relax and reflect in the exhibit’s central cafe and lounge. The guest experience is largely self-guided. Employees are available throughout the exhibit for additional information and to answer any questions that guests have. Written prompts accompany the interactive stations and video screens. All guests are acknowledged by employees as they leave the exhibit space.

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exterior view


Experience


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exterior view


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exterior experience Large windows and glass doors allow people passing by to view the exhibit's interior space. Exhibition graphics, imagery and screens will help draw guests into the space. The materials used on the building's facade reflect the materials used throughout the interior of the exhibit. Approaching the exhibit, the guest should feel welcome and safe. They should be able to gain an understanding of the exhibit's layout and content without having to enter the building.

BEAUTIFUL

exterior graphics The large glass window on the exhibit's facade presents guests and pedestrians with important definitions and statistics related to body image. This text, along with the exhibit's title, gives them insight into the content that is presented inside. A projector, mounted inside the exhibit's entry, projects the changing information on the window. The exhibit's title is set in three-dimensional type that is illuminated at night.

beau•ty 1. a combination of qualities, such as shape, color,

or form, that pleases the senses; a combination of qualities that pleases the intellect or moral sense; denoting something intended to make a woman more attractive 2. a beautiful or pleasing thing or person; a beautiful HOURS Monday – Saturday 10:00am – 9:00pm Sunday 11:00am – 6:00pm

woman; an excellent specimen or example of something; the pleasing or attractive features of something; the best feature of something


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welcome greeting the guest

The way girls feel about their bodies has consequences that reach far beyond how they react when they look in the mirror. How they feel about the way they look often has a direct effect on how they feel about who they are. Sure, it’s important for our daughters to know that they are smart and that they’re capable and that they can accomplish anything. But all the smarts in the world don’t matter if a girl refuses to raise her hand in class because she’s afraid her classmates will look at her and find her appearance lacking. Body image matters not because we all need to look like gorgeous super models to be happy; it matters because if we don’t feel good about what we look like and the body we live in, we are less inclined to show the world who we are. Learning to love one’s body means treating it with respect, making peace with one’s unique shape and reveling in a sense of physical competence. Body esteem allows girls to act with self-direction and create lives that have meaning. It is not about continuous good feeling or unwavering self-satisfaction, but it allows a girl to view her internal strengths, rather than her appearance, as a projection of her worth. When our grandmothers were young, their ideas about what they should look like tended to be more clearly tied to reality. There was certainly an interest in dieting at the start of the twentieth century, but character and a young woman’s inner beauty were still stressed more than outer appearance. It was a different world from the one we live in today. They had close extended families and stable communities filled with women of numerous body types. Of course, they also dreamed of romance and excitement but those dreams were encouraged via literature and the radio. These images were more a product of the individual’s imagination. As listeners and readers pictured a heroine, they adapted that image to a wide range of body types based on the women in their lives.

Each guest that enters the exhibit will be greeted by an employee. Because of the exhibit's personal, and sometimes emotional, nature, it is important that the guests feel welcomed and comfortable as they begin their experience. Much like an experience at a retail store, the employees will be encouraged to great the guest and offer them assistance. Some guests will prefer to begin the experience of interacting with the exhibit on their own, while others will welcome the assistance of an employee. Employees will be instructed to treat each guest as an individual and asses each guest's needs on a case-by-case basis. While it is important to be inviting and inclusive, it is also important to allow each guest to explore the exhibit independently and at their own pace.

guest check-in Greeters will ask guests to check-in at touch screen stations before beginning their journey through the exhibit. Guests will be informed about the interactive elements throughout the exhibit and asked to share some information in order to fully participate. They will be able to set their own privacy setting, allowing them to share their responses through social media or to keep all of their responses private. Each guest will also have the option of having their photograph taken. This photograph will accompany the records of their interactions throughout the exhibit.


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exhibit detail


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beauty culture Advertisers will say practically anything to convince people to buy their goods. People who create commercials try to convince us that a product can also make us feel a certain way. Some commercials can can be very deceptive. Try to keep this in mind as you watch advertisements. Consider the goals of the advertisers and the tools they are using to achieve them.

Artifacts, images, videos and interactive interfaces work together to educate guests about each section's topic. The topics are designed to create a discussion about cultural practices that are detrimental to the goal of creating positive, healthy images of beauty. To begin to use cultural forces for good, we must first shake ourselves awake from the current trance in American beauty culture. Body image tips are located throughout exhibit. Each tip provides a suggestion related to the section's topic.

Body Image Tips

If your daughter asks for a Barbie doll, Advertisers say practically anything consider herwill request an opportunity to to convince people to buy their communicate the message that goods. she has People commercials try to a body who that iscreate far superior to Barbie's. convince us that a product make In reframing Barbie's image,can it'salso important us feel certainyour way.daughter Some commercials that youa teach to accept can can be very deceptive. Try to keep her, despite her disabilities. Explain that this in mind as you watch advertisements. Barbie has been designed so unlike a real Consider theBarbie goals can't of thehave advertisers woman that as muchand fun thelife tools they daughter are using can. to achieve them. in as your Body Image Tips

Magazines, Models & Manipulation Consider the daily onslaught of more than a thousand

conducted by an independent research firm for People

visual and auditory commercial messages a day. A girl

magazine, in which one thousand women ages eighteen

walks into a store and sees a magazine rack filled with

to fifty-five were polled. Thirty-seven percent indicated

publications displaying computer manipulated images

that the portrayal of women on television and in the

of half-starved female bodies with long, shapely legs.

movies makes them feel insecure. Twenty-four percent

Several studies in the field of body-image research

were bothered by images in fashion magazines.

have linked dissatisfaction with appearance to the ultra-thin bodies reflected in the media. In fact, it seems that wherever Western magazines are found, so, too, is the drive to be reed thin. In the United States, an estimated one in six teenage girls has symptoms of

If you know someone who has become obsessive about limiting their food intake, you should immediately seek medical and therapeutic intervention. If, however, they are not diagnosed with an eating disorder, but you worry that they may eventually go that route, it may help to familiarize yourself with behaviors associated with disordered eating.

Body Image Tips

eating disorders such as bulimia or anorexia. Though these girls are labeled “sick” for seeing themselves as “fat,” they are responding to society’s distorted perception of what girls and women are supposed to look like.

To discourage your daughter from measuring her body against illusions created by the media, you can help her understand that images of celebrities represent only an illusion of beauty. If we were observing a young woman being prepared for a photograph, most of us would be surprised at the effort required. During photo sessions that can last for hours, hundreds of shots are taken. One is selected and may be altered with the use of a computer program that allows skin, eyes, eyebrows, or other features from different models to be “patched”

The media now promotes a look that can catch the eye

onto the photo. This supposedly natural shot is used in

to sell a product. With heights of five feet seven inches

a magazine or on a billboard. Explain to your daughter

or taller and weights between 100 and 110 pounds,

that some people confuse these photographic illusions

models are about twenty-three percent thinner than

with reality.

seventy-five percent of American women. A survey


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exhibit interactions

Permanent Alterations, Changing Our Looks The drive to improve physical appearance is not new

of such procedures. Once only available in the realm

and throughout human history, cultural beliefs have

of film starts and wealthy socialites, plastic surgery

often determined social practices related to the way

is now widely available and increasingly available free

the human body is presented. Much of this endeavour

of charge courtesy of publicly funded health services.

has been through the use of various types of makeup and forms of dress or jewelery. More permanent changes to physical appearance have been pursued, and over the centuries people have undergone pain and risk in order to conform to culturally prescribed modes of beautification or identification, or to mark rites of passage.

It is clear that adornment of the face and body is commonplace, and various techniques and procedures have been adopted by different cultures over many thousands of years. In contemporary, Western society, the availability of cosmetic enhancement procedures and increasing social pressure to look good have led to a massive increase in cosmetic procedures. Although

Just as tattooing and body piercing have become

some people are happy with the outcome of their

widely accepted in Western societies, plastic surgery

procedures, most are not, and it is important for family

is gaining popularity. The number of procedures

members and clinicians to pick up warning signs and

performed has risen dramatically over the last few

help these individuals deal with their underlying body

years. In many ways this is a reflection of increasing

image problems rather than undergoing cosmetic

leisure and wealth, longevity, and simple availability

procedures they are likely to be unhappy with.


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rfid bracelet Every guest that checks-in at the beginning of the exhibit will receive a bracelet that contains unique RFID technology. Prompts located at each interactive station instruct the guest to scan their bracelet in order to participate. This technology allows all of the guest's responses to be linked and will display the guest's name and image alongside each response.

web integration All guests that use the interactive stations in the exhibit can access their responses and profile on their smart phone, tablet or computer. This will allow guests to continue to participate in discussions and review their participation after leaving the exhibit. The exhibit's website also allows people who are unable to view the exhibit in person to view the exhibit's content and interact with it's interfaces.

interactive stations While the interactive stations each relate directly to the topic being presented in the space surrounding them, they all work in unison to provide the guests with an opportunity to consider questions that they have previously ignored or avoided. Some stations present content that is more personal or emotional that others. These stations always allow for guest privacy. Other stations are left open to the rest of the exhibit space, allowing guests to interact in pairs or groups. When they are not being used, the screens display responses given by previous guests. This allows guests to understand how other people feel about their own body image and cultural images of beauty.


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timeline & media women in america

American Beauty History When our grandmothers were young, their ideas about what they should look like tended to be more clearly tied to reality. There was certainly an interest in dieting at the start of the twentieth century, but character and a young woman’s inner beauty were still stressed more than outer appearance. It was a different world from the one we live in today. They had close extended families and lived in stable communities filled with women of numerous body types. Of course, they also dreamed of romance and excitement but those dreams were encouraged via literature and the radio. These images were more a product of the individual’s imagination. As listeners and readers pictured a heroine, they adapted that image to a wide range of body types based on the women in their lives. Those images narrowed as Hollywood sought out a body type that would look good on the movie screen and on television. Some of us came of age when there was pressure to be full bodied, like Marilyn Monroe. By the time today’s mothers of teenager’s reached adolescence, dictates had changed. The popularity of fashion models was growing, and the small-breasted slim hipped Twiggy was considered an ideal. Others first fretted over our bodies when models represented the 1970s ideal of full breasts and narrow hips. And most mothers remember that in the 1980s it was no longer sufficient simply to be slim. Women who sought perfect bodies had to be lean and taut. Before the close of the century, the stakes had been raised again.

This timeline layers the history of women's rights in America, the history of American beauty culture and images of America's most iconic beauties. At first glance, life-size images of American icons may seem superficial, but when read alongside information about the era in which they were most famous, the images take on new meaning. The timeline conveys an important message — the beauty culture that we currently experience has been constructed over time. The social, political, intellectual and spiritual achievements of American women are celebrated, while the physical features of the women presented fade , literally and figuratively, into the background.

timeline detail The historic information and artifacts included in the exhibit will be arranged chronologically. Each piece of information will be arranged in a box that protrudes from the wall displaying the iconic images of American beauties. Many boxes will display objects that are important to women's history and American beauty culture. Other boxes will present audio or video content relating to the section's time period. Captions will accompany each item, describing it's historical significance.

media screen An interactive media experience is situated on the back wall of the exhibit space. While the media can be seen from throughout the exhibit, seats stationed in front of the screen allow for optimal interaction. The content presented varies from documentary films to examples of positive and negative images of beauty in popular culture. At the end of each video segment, the audience is asked a question. They can respond to the question using their smart phones or tablets. The anonymous results of the question will be displayed on the screen after the responses are tallied. This real time projection of statistics will allow the guests to see how their responses compare to the public's responses to the same questions.


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The Assault of Popular Culture For a long time, parents have been stymied about how they can protect their daughters from being tyrannized by the images of popular culture. Most of them don’t want to isolate their girls, and yet they have become increasingly aware of societal messages that suggest that the female body exists purely for the entertainment and profit of others. Well they don’t have to take it anymore. They can teach their daughters how to view their bodies lovingly in the face of enormous pressure. With children spending an average of over four hours a day in front of some type of screen, it’s vital that we take a stand. Keep in mind that television and the internet offer passive, hypnotic experiences that can keep girls from pursuing the kind of active lifestyle necessary for them to maintain healthy bodies. Studies indicate that the more a child watches TV, the more likely she or he is to be obese and physically unfit. Television can cast a powerful spell. With its skilled use of lighting, camera angles and sound, it can manipulate and influence young viewers. The on-screen characters can seem so realistic that they can affect the way girls view every aspect of their bodies, whether measuring themselves against others or gauging the way they allow themselves to be treated.


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exit

alternative, positive retail As the guests exit the exhibit, they pass through a retail space designed specifically with positive images of beauty in mind. From t-shirts printed with the exhibit's logo, to magazines written to empower young girls, to posters displaying encouraging slogans, everything within the space is aimed at counteracting the endless number of negative messages being sold at traditional retailers.


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Imagine the possibilities of sending young women into the world who are confident about their bodies. Imagine the power of women moving through the world with self-possession.


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exterior view


Identity


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voice

"i think that whatever size or shape you are, it's important to embrace it and get down!" character tone

language

Authentic, Friendly, Passionate The visual identity is just one component of the brand; tone and personality of the language is another, equally important component. All written communication will be honest, energetic and conversational. The writing will be as intelligent as the content presented. The exhibit is not afraid to say something simply or wittily. The language used throughout the exhibit will be accessible to a wide range of audiences. The goal of the exhibit is to educate guests comfortably, without being preachy or overbearing. All content will be communicated in the most straightforward manner possible. Jargon and terms requiring definition are included in the exhibit's language.


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graphics

wordmark To ensure legibility and recognizability, the wordmark must have a minimum clearspace around it. In most cases, the wordmark should be of equal prominence to any other brands with which it is shown. The wordmark can be displayed in any of the brand's colors and in any tint of black.

colors Color is important to the exhibit's friendly identity. All marketing materials for the exhibit will use the defined palette. Within the exhibit, color will be used minimally. The exhibit's design will not compete with its photography, artefacts or video footage. Any secondary colors used must be approved by the exhibit's designer.

variations The wordmark serves as the primary graphic identifier of the exhibit. It's bold, simple design allows it to be applied in a variety of methods to a variety of materials. It can be displayed in the multicolor version displayed here and be reversed out of colorfields and photographs. Do not place a colored version of the wordmark on a colorfield. Drop shadows and other typographic effects may not be added to the wordmark.


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pms rhodamine red u cmyk 15/100/5/0 rgb 207/19/134 hex #cf 1386

pms 311 u cmyk 70/0/25/0 rgb 32/190/198 hex #20 bec 6

pms 3965 u cmyk 20/0/90/5 rgb 202/212/61 hex #cad 43 d

pms 158 u cmyk 0/70/75/0 rgb 243/112/75 hex #f 3704 b


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typography

Magazines and advertisers also collaborated on early market research. When J. Walter Thompson conducted an investigation of the toiletries market for Pond’s in 1923, McCalls Service Department mailed eighteen hundred questionnaires to women readers, and Hazel Rawson Cades, beauty editor of the Womans Home

body text avenir next, regular, 30 pt / 42 pt


ure section header sentinel, book italic, 215 pt / 242 pt

PAINTED FACES

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subheader avenir next, medium, 54 pt / 72 pt

Twenty years ago, models weighed 8% less than the average woman. Today, they weigh 23% less than the average woman.

24% said they were bothe by images in fashion mag and 19%, by models used caption avenir next, light oblique, 18 pt / 24 pt

pull quotes sentinel, semibold ,76 pt / 95 pt


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photography curated images by lauren greenfield Lauren Greenfield is an artist, documentary photographer and filmmaker. Her work deals with issues relating to the influence of popular culture on how we live, including youth culture, gender identity, body image, eating disorders, media, wealth, fashion, beauty, and consumerism. Her powerful work is displayed throughout the exhibit, signaling the shifts in the subject matter being presented.


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artifacts A wide array of artifacts from America's beauty culture are displayed throughout the exhibit. Each section of the space presents photographic images, interactive screens and physical objects relating to the topic discussed. Some displays, like a wall covered in glass shelving that holds implants used in plastic surgery procedures and a tanning bed, are designed to force the guest to look at objects that have been accepted by society in a new light. Others, like images of models on magazine covers and advertisements for wartime involvement, display the way images, combined with language, can create significant, cultural statements.


resources

research

photography

Lois W. Banner

Lauren Greenfield

American Beauty New York: Alfred A. Knoff, Inc., 1983.

Kids and Consumerism. Photograph. Web. 25 Feb 2013. www.laurengreenfield.com/index.php?p=8W0GTPNS

Women in Modern America: A Brief History 2nd Ed. Orlando: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Publishers, 1984

THIN. Photograph. Web. 25 Feb 2013. www.laurengreenfield.com/index.php?p=VQTME4W6

James Dobson Bringing Up Girls Carol Stream: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., 2010. Jeanne Elium and Don Elium Raising A Daughter Revised Edition. New York: Random House, Inc., 2003. Sharon R. Mazzarella and Norma Odom Pecora. Growing Up Girls, Popular Culture and the Construction of Identity Volume 9. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, Inc., 1999.

content Dara Chadwick You'd Be So Pretty If . . . . Cambridge: Da Capo Press, 2009. Roberta Honigman and David J. Castle Contemporary Issues, Living With Your Looks Crawley: University of Western Australia Press, 2007. Kathy Peiss Hope in a Jar, The Making of America's Beauty Culture New York: Metropolitan Books, 1998. Brenda Lane Richardson and Elane Rehr 101 Ways to Help Your Daughter Love Her Body New York: HarperCollins Publishers Inc., 2001. University of California Brand Guidelines www.brand.universityofcalifornia.edu/index.

Youth in Milan. 2007. Photograph. Web. 14 Mar 2013. www.laurengreenfield.com/index.php?p=BN8JWK6W Fashion Show. Photograph. Web. 23 Jan 2013. www.laurengreenfield.com/index.php?p=2IJFEV1T Child Pageants. Photograph. Web. 27 Jan 2013. www.laurengreenfield.com/index.php?p=KW1XXG0I Fashion Show. Photograph. Web. 27 Jan 2013. www.laurengreenfield.com/index.php?p=2IJFEV1T Kids and Consumerism. Photograph. Web. 25 Feb 2013. www.laurengreenfield.com/index.php?p=8W0GTPNS Botox Party. Photograph. Web. 14 Mar 2013. www.laurengreenfield.com/index.php?p=1E48S2RY Camp Shane. Photograph. Web. 23 Feb 2013. www.laurengreenfield.com/index.php?p=4TH1TH87 Nelson Mouellic. The Haggerston School for Girls. 2008. Photograph. FlickerRiver, London. Web. 12 Mar 2013. www.flickriver.com/photos/nelsonmouellic/2580909450/ Valentin Ottone. Portrait #119 – Friendly smoking. 2009. Photograph. Flickr. Web. 4 Apr 2013. www.flickr.com/photos/saneboy/3595175373/ Cassie Robinson. Mom. 2009. Photograph. Flickr. Web. 12 Mar 2013. www.flickr.com/photos/cassievivi/3571399776/in/photostream/ Julie Zahn. My Little Girls Off to School. 2012. Photograph. Wordpress. Web. 23 Mar 2013. www.juliezahnphotography.wordpress.com


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This book was created by Makenzie Kressin at Washington University in St. Louis with the help of Sarah Birdsall and Tony Schmidt. Makenzie produced the exhibit’s concept and schematic design. The book’s content was edited from multiple sources, and the captions were written by Makenzie. Typefaces used are Whitney, Avenir Next and Sentinel. Printed on Neenah Classic Crest 100lb Text.


Beautiful