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winter 2014

Promoting a vibrant, localized economy!

WINTER 2014

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Promoting a vibrant, localized Minnesota economy

Your online community to SHOP & SELL Promoting a vibrant, localized Minnesota economy Minnesota Made Products Your online community to SHOP & SELL Minnesota Made Products

Promoting a vibrant, localized Minnesota economy

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Your online community to Promoting a vibrant, localized Minnesota economy SHOP & SELL Minnesota Made Products

no start up costs or listing fees be part of a minnesota marketplace

Your online community to SHOP & SELL Minnesota Made Products

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I went to bed, and it was autumn. When I awoke winter had come. Another issue has been completed and the second step in our new beginning has been taken窶馬ew in its own right but proof that, more than a dream or fantasy, Make It Minnesota is being realized step by step. It is fitting that we should find ourselves at this point in the winter. Like a heavy-laden hiker pushing each step through the deep snow of the north woods, we labor forth, each effort taking us closer to the goal. Sometimes it is slow and tiring, yet when the journey is over the goal would be forgotten but for the path that brought us here. Another goal has been reached and another step taken: another issue has reached your eyes. The future looks bright from the hilltop, and though the journey is just beginning we are well on our way.

Benjamin Matzke

Benjamin Matzke

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Publisher/Editor Benjamin Matzke Production Manager Leah Matzke

Benjamin Matzke was born on the 4th of July -70 days. He loves the Minnesota outdoors and enjoys a trek into the boundary waters whenever possible - even in January.

Print & Web Design Leah Kurth Megan Poehler Contributors Keri Langhorst Kara Larson Megan Poehler

Leah Matzke is wife to Benjamin and mother of four energetic children she loves watching learn and grow. Hobbies include camping, graphic design, and raising goats & rabbits.

Cover Photo By Isabel Subtil Copyright All images contained in Make It Minnesota are subject to copyright of the artist, illustrator or photographers as named, but not limited to.

Keri Langhorst currently lives on a farm near Lake Madison. She has a B.A. in Communication from Bethany Lutheran College. She is a wife and a stay at home mother with 2 small children and enjoys spending time outdoors with friends and family.

Reproduction of any part of this magazine without prior permission is prohibited. Copyright 2014. All rights reserved. Disclaimer The views and comments expressed by the writers are not always that of Make It Minnesota. While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy of the information in this publication, Make It Minnesota accepts no responsibility or liability for any errors, omissions or resultant consequences, including any loss or damage arising from reliance on information in this publication.

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Megan Poehler is just your regular social media savvy twenty-something with a B.A. in Communication. She is a small town southern Minnesota native who loves traveling and cooking.

Kara Larson may be a South Dakota transplant, but today, she is proud to call Minneapolis home. With a B.A. in English, she now finds passion in the spreading the word on the magic of Minnesota. She is also passionate about honest creative endeavors, movies, and omelettes.


14 16 04 Top Picks:

Minnesota’s Marketplace

06 Out And About: 08 Branding Minnesota 10 Minneapolis Craft’za 11 Featured Small Businesses

Stories from around the state

14 Northwest: 16 Northeast: 18 Central: 20 Southwest: 24 Southeast: 26 Metro:

Naturally Unique

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Schroeder Log Homes Hinkemeyer Tree Farm Kiyi Kiyi Minnesota Sno Flakes St. Croix Chocolate Co.

29 Minnesota Kitchen:

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Lefse

32 Classifieds

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All these and more available at: www.makeitminnesota.com/products

PERSONALIZED PINE TREE KITCHEN TRIVET From My Little Chickadee Creations, Farmington, MN This travertine tile (measuring 6 x 6) has been hand stamped in a pine tree design in shades of green and black with the quote “Good timber does not grow with ease; the stronger the wind, the stronger the trees. – J. Willard Marriott in between the trees personalization above and below the design, as you wish. The trivet comes with a mini care card and matching organza ribbon.

SIMPLE KNITTED TAN BUNNY IN FUZZY ANGORA WOOL YARN From Simply Playing ~ MIN This all natural bunny rabbit is made of un-dyed sheep wool and angora yarn (65% wool 35% angora.) She is stuffed with eco wool stuffing. Measuring at 5 1/2 inches long by 3 1/2 inches high (including her ears.) Her pom pom tail is made from my hand-spun 100% angora yarn. She is styled in a simple Waldorf fashion to let your child’s imagination give her expression.

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PATRIOT POPS POPCORN From Patriot Pops Popcorn ~ Lamberton, MN Pop On! The hulls of Patriot Pops Popcorn are packed with antioxidants. And, the bold, nutty flavor of Patriot Pops™ explodes from every kernel. Grown on the scenic Southern Minnesota prairie by a five-generation family farm and on certified organic soil. These pretty red, white and blue ‘gems’ make a beautiful gift and tasty treat for the whole family to enjoy

Pure Minnesota Maple Syrup From Scarlet Jewell Maple Products, LLC ~ Cottage Grove, MN Delicious, rich flavor produced from a licensed producer in Pine county Minnesota that runs 500-700 taps. This wonderful Minnesota maple syrup will liven up any breakfast. They also produce maple cream for all to enjoy.

SNO FLAKE SUN CATCHER BIRTHSTONE SERIES From Minnesota Sno Flakes ~ Mankato, MN Need to see in person to fully appreciate these lovely little sun catchers, handmade to brighten your day. The Birthstone Sun Catchers are a 5 inch diameter glass beaded sun catcher. The star shape is formed on a beaded wire frame with silver lined bugles. At the tip of each star point is a diamond shape accented with 6mm rocaille beads in the color of the month. Swarovski Crystals are set in the center of each side and a silver string to hang by finishes this design.

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BITS OF BROWN AND BLUE HAND CRANKED SOCKS From Minnesota Custom Woolens ~ Alexandria, MN Truly a one of a kind pair of socks. The hand dyed super-wash wool is so soft and the nylon will ensure that your beautiful socks will stand up to anything you do! Expertly hand cranked with an antique circular sock machine. Fiber Content: 75% Super wash Merino wool and 25% Nylon

24” BALSAM WREATH From Northlandsent Wreath Company ~ Duluth, MN This balsam wreath has three frosted pine cones, holly berries, and a red bow and hails from a mail-order wreath company just outside Duluth. Send a gift from the Northland to friends and relatives living far away. Nothing smells better than a fresh balsam wreath!

1.5” WORK/RECREATION CAMOUFLAGE SUSPENDERS From St. Clair Suspender Co. ~ St. Clair, MN The Suspender Guy has designed a pair of suspenders that are just right for you, no matter what your height, weight, or shape may be. These 1.5” Work/Recreation suspenders are made from the highest quality polyester and come in a wide variety of colors and sizes (camouflage pictured). Heavy duty yet soft and smooth to the touch. We know contractors who wear theirs everyday and are delighted with the no slip, perfect fit day in and day out.

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ORGANIC HEIRLOOM RED FIFE WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR From Good Earth Mill & Grains ~ Good Thunder, MN Enjoy real flour grown right here in Minnesota. Made pure & simple the way flour is meant to be. No bleaching, bromating, or enriching here. Good Earth starts with a whole grain, slowly stone mill the flour, and create a beautifully perfect flour with a nutty, earthy flavor. Enjoy this rich, delicate heirloom flour with flecks of red hues and a sweet flavorful undertone.

SWEATER CLIP PEARL AND RHINESTONE From Spin ‘Til Yur Dizzy ~ New Ulm, MN These vintage inspired sweater clips are fashioned with thrifted jewelry parts to create a one of a kind vintage inspired accessory. Featuring a big round half dome faux pear focal and with two marquise shaped rhinestones. Plus a 6” gold tone beaded chain for even more pizzazz. The sweater guard stays secure to your top with tie tack and clutch. 3/4” in diameter.

NATURAL YARN ARTEMESIA GRAY CORRIEDALE From Angora Gardens ~ Clarks Grove, MN This yarn is a new blend of fibers and a very silvery gray yarn. Angora Gardens combined Alpaca and Angora to this light gray Corriedale. Each skein is 200 yards and is a DK weight. See also their roving! They have an exact combination in roving and it spins up so easily into a very full, soft skein. One of our favorite combination of fibers! 50%, Alpaca 30%, Angora 20% 200 yd. DK

All these and more available at: www.makeitminnesota.com/products WINTER 2014

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by: KARA LARSON Here’s the thing: I’m not from Minnesota. I wasn’t born into weekend lake escapes and enduring heritage brands and urban diversity right alongside rural farmland. However, I grew to appreciate it all from the place next door (South Dakota) and peeked over the fence until, at last, I was able to move to magical Minnesota. I share this detail because, as an outsider who has recently made Minnesota home, attending “Midwest? The Past, Present, and Future of Minnesota’s Identity” was an intriguing experience. An event held at the Walker Art Center on November 19th, 2014, this forum consisted of an incredible conversation between the brightest design, marketing, and branding minds in Minnesota. Moderated by Poppy Harlow, CNN correspondent and Minnesota native, the panel also consisted of Bruce Bildsten, CMO of Faribault Woolen Mills; Andrew Blauvelt, Senior Curator of Architecture and Design at Walker Art Center; Thomas Fisher, Dean of the College of Design at the University of Minnesota; and Christine Fruechte, CEO of Colle + McVoy. This qualified group spouted a stream of ideas on Minnesota’s brand and identity, how to attract talent and innovation, and where we go from here. Panelist Andrew Blauvelt shares, “This idea of branding a place is a new kind of development … you see branding happen anytime you have a surplus of something and you need to create differentiation in the marketplace. So, what does that mean? Well, for tourism, I could visit any 50 states or I could go abroad. So, you’re in competition with other states and other locales—other geographies.” Beyond tourism, the right brand can draw in long-term Minnesotans. Blauvelt adds that this competition with other locales is also about strengthening our workforce. The goal is to attract a certain kind of talent—a skilled labor force for the state. With these goals in mind, for me, this conversation of branding Minnesota is best boiled down to three main aspects: geography, identity, and experience. As the building blocks of branding, these were heavily discussed and shaped my understanding of what it means to be Minnesotan.

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I. Geographical honesty. What defines us?

Geographically, where is Minnesota? For this panel, the Minnesota of today doesn’t call for the safety and shelter of the Midwest umbrella. One of most popular ideas for Minnesota’s new home was “The North,” and panelist Thomas Fisher believes this is an apt title for our blissfully brisk country—he even calls the coldness an advantage. Fisher offers, “We’re innovative in part because we’re in a place where there is a lot of adversity. I mean, it’s tough living here.” Instead of minimalizing the bitter winter to outsiders, perhaps embracing the cold and even romanticizing it might just be our ticket to geographic honesty. Another component of the geographical aspect of branding comes through the choice of city versus regional branding.

Blauvelt sees city branding as the direction to go. “I think you should be positioning cities because this is the global trend. Cities propel a certain level of influence… but this idea of regionalism within the state is another core component… How do you think about Rochester of the southern part of Minnesota? How do you think about the Twin Cities? How do you think about the northern part? They each have different attributes, right?” Whether you feel that branding regional identities or our metropolitan areas would be most effective, it is clear that our geography plays a big role in our cultural identity. Which brings us to the second aspect of branding Minnesota—the ones who make up the culture—the people.

II. Diverse identities. Who are we?

Minnesotans are urban Minneapolis clothing designers and Southern rural dairy farmers and North Shore nature nuts, and above all, part of a beautiful and diverse community.

this, the climate—it’s cold here; you have to work. We’ve got all this infrastructure, but we haven’t done a good job telling a new kind of narrative about ourselves.”

For the panel, this diversity and range is huge in attracting a forward-thinking individual. Fisher has a vision for the potential of Minnesota. He reveals, “We should be the mecca for talented, creative, innovative people. We’ve got the culture, the history to do

So, this is the issue, right? If innovative and creative and altruistic Millennials don’t know our story, we miss out on their talent and they miss out on an incredible quality of life. And this brings us to our third point—the depth of experience Minnesota has to offer.

III. The beauty of experience. What do we have to offer?

Minnesota has the ability to tie people together with collective experience. With access to nature, nationally recognized restaurants, cultural diversity, an excellent salary to housing cost ratio, and an all-encompassing climate, the potential for contentment here is boundless.

The vast possibilities for different experiences rely not only on the geographical range, but also the wonderful range of people who fill it. As more visionaries are drawn to this state, more authentic innovation can be born. Our past innovators have built businesses like 3M, Target, UnitedHealth Group, Land O’

Lakes, Red Wing Shoes, and Faribault Woolen Mills. As these examples reveal, through the prism of Minnesota a creative endeavor is made genuine, honest, and real. This idea of something genuine is a big part of why I chose Minnesota as my home. I came here with bright eyes and a budding love for this great state, and after this forum, I felt more at home than ever. A new narrative for our Northern state deserves an honest share so that everyone can witness the warmth of authenticity, the depth of perseverance, and the allure of the Minnesota life.

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by: MEGAN POEHLER

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t’s never too early to start shopping for the holidays. That’s what most shoppers were thinking when they came to the annual Minneapolis Craft’za. It features a unique collection of handmade goods from Minnesota and the surrounding areas. All the artists and creators are required to attend so the customer has a chance to ask questions about the product and make a personal connection.

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Light Reading, Savage

Dundry Hill, Minneapolis

Soup Hunter Guitars, Minneapolis

Earth Grown Crayons, Minnetonka

This craft show was started by Andy and Jenna Krueger three years ago, a spin-off of their spring craft show St. Paul Craftstravaganza, which is in its tenth year. They wanted to create an opportunity for artists to meet with their customers and other artists to create new partners and outlets for their work. Andy told us why he thinks it’s important to have events like these, “In an event like this, you can actually talk to the person and know that they are the one making it, and I’m actually helping them out. It’s nice to see that you’re supporting someone in the community and know where your money’s going.” For more information, go to www.craftstravaganza.com

Just Turned, Blaine

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Winter Art Fair 2015

A stunning event in the greenhouse at Sargent’s Nursery in Red Wing, MN

Lawrenz Jewelry

Bear Paw Paperworks

Reinardy Garden Art

Join Us Saturday, Jan. 24

Learn More:

www.facebook.com/redwingartfair

Saturday, January 24, 2015 10 AM to 4 PM FREE EVENT Location: 3352 N Service Dr., Red Wing, MN 55066 North Side of Hwy 61 - One Block West of Target 651-388-3847 For more information visit: Red Wing, MN

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www.sargentsnursery.com

Sculpture Photography Painting Textiles Jewelry Pottery And more!


Minnesota is host to a variety of businesses - large and small - that are dedicated to producing quality products close to home. Each business has a unique story to share, and in the following pages you’ll find six from across the state. Enjoy!

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by: KERI LANGHORST

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n 2007, Mark Herbert gave his wife Jan a necklace that he had made from a beautiful, perfectly round rock he’d found on the shore of Lake Superior. This sparked the idea for their business Naturally Unique. Mark and Jan began collecting Lake Superior rocks and creating one-of-a-kind home decorations. In our society, most objects are mass produced; Mark and Jane are dedicated to producing objects you can’t find in a big box store. Later that year, Mark attended his first craft show, the Harvest Moon Festival in Ely. Jan commented, “Mark was overwhelmed with the success of selling the products.” After being so well received, Mark and Jan knew they had a great product and potential for success. Mark and Jan have expanded their business to include a wide variety of products, including rain gauges, lamps, necklaces, wine stoppers, and many others. “We’re always open to suggestions and willing to work with customers to achieve the exact product they desire,” Jan shared. Some ideas from customers include bookends and bud vases. Bud vases were created after Mark and Jan discovered people were already using their rain gauges to hold flowers. Mark and Jan have also incorporated the Ely greenstone and taconite iron into their designs. Mark also sandblasts images into the products. In keeping with their choice of materials, Mark likes to keep the images close to Minnesota nature. The most common ones he creates are bears, loons, fish, and paw prints, as well as initials. The nature images are mostly found on the rain gauges, while initials tend to be used on necklaces and wine stoppers. A common theme in their product designs is cairn. Cairn is defined as “a mound of rough stones built as a memory or landmark.” One design consists of four or five rocks stacked together with a piece

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of driftwood in the middle. A second design is four or five rocks stacked without driftwood. Each design is 5-7 inches tall and able to be rearranged. Customers can use it as a trailmark, a sign of hospitality, and much more. This design is also found in their lamps and bud vases. One of their most memorable experiences working with customers was a request for a sandblasted rock. A customer from Sweden requested a rock to read “I love you, will you be my wife.” Mark and Jan produced the rock. The customer planted the rock in Greece, took his girlfriend for a hike, and there she discovered it! They were married soon after. Mark and Jan enjoy bringing happiness to their customers. Their business has also done work for MN Power and the Duluth Entertainment Convention Center in Duluth, MN. Their clientele has expanded simply by word of mouth. “People travel to multiple craft shows to buy our product. People come back to buy many of the same product for different family members,” Jan commented. Mark attributes much of their success to affordability. “Customers have complimented us over and over again that our product is well priced,” he said. With their average product selling for $10, customers are able to buy for multiple people.

Their products are one of a kind, personalized, and functional. With Christmas right around the corner, they make wonderful gifts. Jan commented, “My husband made my grandson a blessing rock, and he carried it around all day.” Naturally Unique is a hands-on business. Mark and Jan collect, wash, cut, drill, and design their product from start to finish. They ensure a one-of-a-kind product and work with customers to ensure quality and satisfaction.

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by: KERI LANGHORST literature department. The company is devoted to supplying the necessary materials for quality, stunning log homes.

Schroeder Log Home Supplies, Inc. was started in 1986 by Gary Schroeder. Gary has a degree in Forestry and started his career working with Finnish log builders in the Grand Rapids area. After 12 years, he started his own company mostly restoring old buildings. While working in the restoration field, he discovered a shortage of supplies. So in 1986, he and his wife Kathleen started their own supply company in Grand Rapids to meet those demands. According to Gary’s son John, the business started out with “Gary restoring, Kathleen answering phones, storing materials in a 13-foot trailer, and a 1-page catalog.” The company has grown from a one-man business to a world supplier, adding employees and warehouses. The catalog is now 52 pages. John joined the company working in customer service and marketing. His wife Stephanie works in the

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A log home is a work of art, a masterpiece of the construction world. It isn’t just another “cookie cutter” home in a suburb, but a building as unique as the owner. Schroeder Log Home Supplies helps customers build their dream house and preserve it. They have expanded by building distribution centers in other states at various times to meet the needs of the current building industry. The distribution centers allow customers to save time and money by cutting back on delivery costs. The current demand is strongest out of the Indiana warehouse, which also serves customers in Michigan and Ohio. The company also prepares and ships materials to customers in Eastern Europe, Australia, South America, and Asia. One of John Schroeder’s favorite experiences with serving customers from other countries is hearing their different speech patterns. John has a background in theater and said, “Hearing customers’ foreign speech is like speaking with real-life characters.” The Schroeder Log Home family provides information for customers who need technical support preserving their beautiful log homes. They encourage customers to ask questions, and they support customers with their knowledge and capability to discover new ideas. The extensive website is an information hub for contractors, materials, and tools, and provides a newsletter to share ideas.


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The company issues a full color catalog once a year. The catalog provides questions, answers, and a list of products. John commented, “Customers are known to keep the catalogs for several years and utilize it as a source of information.” The company also advertises through their website and Facebook page. John indicated that sun and weather cause the most problems for log home owners and people with cedar siding or decks. The sun fades the stain applied to wood materials and the rain and snow can cause rotting problems. Schroeder Log Homes is equipped with the knowledge and experience to supply their customers with strategies and products to alleviate these issues. Schroeder Log Home Supplies, Inc. is a Minnesota-based company that “strives to meet our customers’ expectations in quality products and services,” as indicated in their 2014 catalog. In short, they supply customers with the means to create and preserve their dream homes.

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by: KERI LANGHORST Hinkemeyer Tree Farm, nestled in central Minnesota, is a small business dedicated to providing a warm holiday experience as well as quality Christmas trees and wreaths to consumers. Randy and Cheryl Thiele are the owners, and they purchased the family business in 2013 from Cheryl’s parents. Last year was their first season as the owners. Cheryl shared, “It was a learning curve to be in charge of the farm instead of just helpers. It was also challenging because of the cold weather.” With a smile on her face she said, “We love what we do.” This holiday season will be a little less stressful because they know what to expect and also have excellent help

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from family and friends. Hopefully, it will be a warmer holiday season for customers to enjoy the outdoor experience of picking their tree. The farm sells fir trees, spruce trees, and pine trees. A full description of each tree can be found on the website- www.hinkemeyertreefarm.com. The farm offers a variety of trees as different as their customers. All trees are beautifully manicured to add warmth and joy to your house while the ground outside is frozen. Adding vibrant ornaments and the smell of the outdoors is an oasis from the cold air of winter.


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The most popular wreaths are the ones made from balsam fir, but they have many others from which to choose. The wreaths are lush green with a vibrant red bow. They are a beautiful welcoming symbol to your guests! Randy and Cheryl started a fund-raiser program focused on selling wreaths as an opportunity to give back to the community. It gives groups, such as scout troops, schools, etc., a chance to raise money. The business started selling Christmas trees in 1971 and has continued to provide customers with high quality greenery for decorating their homes and spreading cheer during the holiday season. Cheryl commented with pride that “children of their customers are now coming with their own families and keeping up traditions.” When customers stop at Hinkemeyer Tree Farm to purchase a Christmas tree, wreath, or other decorations, it’s not just another stop on their shopping list; it is a fun family event! It is the start of the holiday season. It’s an opportunity to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city and to be outdoors. Randy and Cheryl are passionate about ensuring that the farm provides lots of opportunities for families to enjoy picking their tree. Activities include horse drawn sleigh rides, runner sleds, campfires, and a heated gift shop. The gift shop provides a place where families can warm up and pick a new ornament for the tree.

are ready to be sold. “Growing trees is hard work and the average tree is 8-12 years old when it is ready!” Cheryl said. Though Hinkemeyer Tree Farm mostly serves families from the Little Falls, St. Cloud, and the Twin Cities areas, people traveling across the state for the holidays often make the farm a place to stop as well. Hinkemeyer Tree Farm also delivers to its customers! For Randy and Cheryl, the most important aspect of the endeavor is family. They’re a family business that provides customers with an opportunity to come together as a family in the outdoors. Families come back year after year because they not only leave the farm with a tree, but also with an experience they’ve shared and a joyful start to the Christmas season.

Randy and Cheryl’s farm opens November 23 and closes December 21. (Please check website for exact dates and times.) Although the farm is open to the public for only a few short weeks at the end of the year, it takes a lot of preparation throughout the year to ensure a successful season. January and February are the down months. Once the snow starts to melt in March or April, it’s time to start preparing for the next year. First, the fields are cleaned and stumps are cut. Next, after the frost is gone, the fields are fertilized and new trees are planted. In June, the trees are cut into the standard cone shape of a Christmas tree. The rest of the summer is spent maintaining the trees, which includes monitoring for pests like gophers and insects. In the fall, Randy and Cheryl walk through and tag trees that

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by: MEGAN POEHLER

For anything from soaps, lotions, and scrubs to washing gels and lip balm, Kiyi Kiyi uses a variety of ingredients, from beer and wine to pumpkins and goat milk, all made in Minnesota! Kiyi Kiyi was started by Carma Wood, a Minnesota native. All of her products are handmade and have received international recognition. Last year, her acai berry and banana leaf soap won the Saponifier Magazine design contest and was the only winner from the United States. Her soaps were also selected to be included in gift bags given out to celebrities at the 2014 MTV Movie Awards. Her products have been shipped to 42 out of 50 states and several foreign countries. Carma started Kiyi Kiyi after she started to develop her own recipes that wouldn’t harm her sensitive skin. She searched many years to find the perfect soap that wouldn’t irritate her skin. She made do with body washes and expensive cream washes. When she finally tried a high-quality handmade soap, she realized that she had been fooled by the beauty industry’s hype. Products are often labeled as soap when in reality they are a blend of petroleum products, chemicals and surfactants. True soap is a carefully balanced creation of oils and sodium hydroxide (lye). She had previously believed that lye soap would be irritating to her skin, however a properly made soap will not. The lye is completely changed in the magic of the soap making

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process. Carma has perfected her soap recipes, and they were just what she needed to prevent her dry or itchy skin. She makes her soaps in small batches which make six bars each. This allows for control of the quality of the products. It usually takes about three to four days for Carma to develop a soap idea. The soap is mixed up in about an hour and then poured into a mold for about 24 to 48 hours. It is then taken out of the mold and left to rest for another 12 to 24 hours. Then the soap is cut and stamped with her logo and placed on a curing rack for four to six weeks. After the soap is completely cured, she wraps each bar in a hand-folded paper wrapping. One of the first soap recipes she developed was a beer soap. The natural sugars and enzymes in the beer give the soap an amazingly bubbly lather that she loves. She first used an imported German beer before she started to research the unique breweries that we have right here in Minnesota. She thought that by using locally made beer, she would have the best products possible for her handmade soap. She now uses many types of beer from a variety of small breweries in Minnesota for her soaps and says, “I would love to find a Minnesota brewery to collaborate with and create soaps made just for them, from their beer.” Carma says that her most original product is her “Tipsy Hippy” soap. This is made with a combination of Minnesota brewed beer and hemp milk. It’s colored with clays from around the world and scented with a secret blend of essential oils and dark aged Indonesian patchouli. The clay colorants give it a naturally beautiful look. For her other ingredients, she grows all of the botanicals, herbs, vegetables, and seed exfoliants herself. Some of these ingredients include calendula, dandelions, mint, pumpkins, carrots, and raspberry and blueberry seeds. The water is drawn from a mineral-rich artesian well in Hibbing. She gets her goat milk from a small farm west of Willmar. The beeswax and honey come from her own beehives. She stresses the importance of using local ingredients. Carma believes that we have a wealth of wonderful ingredients in Minnesota. When researching soap, she found that jasmine rice facial scrubs were popular in Japan. She tried to translate that to a purely Minnesotamade product and came up with the wild rice scrub, which is now one of her best sellers.

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Another best seller is the lavender soap. Even with this classic scent, Carma manages to give her design a modern twist to appeal to the customer’s eyes and nose. The almond milk and honey lotion is also very popular. This one has a very light scent, but it still brings a sweet and delicious smell. The lotion is very silky and made of a combination of avocado oil, grapeseed oil, and mango butter. These ingredients combine to make a moisturizing lotion that doesn’t leave skin oily and greasy.

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She also has a soap-of-the-month club. Every month members receive a special soap, a handwritten note, and a few extra surprises. Carma tries to incorporate a Minnesota theme in every soap of the month. In each member’s note, she writes a little bit about the soap and how it was created. Past soaps have included a cherry pie soap and a coffee soap. There are people from all over the United States that are members of the soap of the month club, each wanting a little taste of Minnesota every month!


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Carma’s favorite product to make is the honey bee soap. She says, “I love the scent, and I think my bees are amazing, so any recipe where I use their beeswax and honey is very special to me. I know how hard they work to collect the pollen and make the wax and honey.” You can find Kiyi Kiyi products at crafts shows that Carma attends, including the Craft’za in Minneapolis and Craftstravaganza in St. Paul. Her products are also stocked at Amoure Cru in Shakopee, Time Bomb Vintage in Minneapolis, Bath and Body Connection in McGregor, Patina Marquet in Willmar, and available online at www.kiyikiyi.com.

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by: KERI LANGHORST Minnesota Sno Flakes, a small business based out of North Mankato, is the creation of the artist Jane Laven. Jane makes handmade, specialized sun catchers that she markets online and at local craft shows.

Jane creates her Sno Flakes first by soldering wire to fit her design. Her brother and other family members help her solder the wire at her brother’s farm. She then adds silver-lined, high quality, Czech glass beads. She orders the beads from a company in Washington that imports from the Czech Republic. She finishes them with dazzling Swarovski crystals. The end result is a beautiful, hand crafted, beaded sun catcher. Jane got started 11 years ago by simply assembling beaded kits for her sons’ teachers as gifts. From there her business has taken off ! Jane has orders she fulfills for Minnesota State University-Mankato, Gustavus Adolphus College, and Relay for Life. She has a map of the world hanging on her wall to tag where her Sno Flakes have been. They have been to France, Germany, and South America.

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Southeast

Jane is always dreaming of new patterns or color schemes of beads and is open to customers’ special requests too. She has incorporated some of her customers’ ideas in her product line, such as a smaller 3-inch Sno Flake. The Sno Flakes are as wholesome as the inventor. Her family is involved in the process of making the Sno Flakes, as well as being supportive. Jane would like her potential buyers to know that she enjoys the challenge of a special order. She has done nine years of her Holiday Series. This year the Holiday Sno Flake is purple. Jane also engraves every Sno Flake with the year it was made. So go ahead and browse the Minnesota Sno Flakes website (www.mnsnoflakes.com) if you’re looking for a special gift or a beautiful handcrafted ornament. If by chance you don’t see a pattern or color you’re looking for, contact Jane, and she’d be happy to take the challenge of fulfilling a new request.

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by: Leah Matzke & Megan Poehler

photo by Jennifer Simonson

The holiday season wouldn’t be complete without tasty holiday treats. Confectioners Robyn Dochterman and Deidre Pope at St. Croix Chocolate Company have whipped up an awardwinning collection of delectable chocolate recipes from locally grown ingredients. Paired with a designers touch, their culinary creations are truly bite-sized pieces of art.

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photo by Isabel Subtil

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They opened their shop four years ago with Robyn as the head chocolatier and Deidre as head of operations. Robyn had been a newspaper editor for twelve years before deciding she was ready for a change. She used to make chocolate at home for Christmas with her family, and knew she wanted to try something with food. Several culinary classes later Robyn found chocolate making to be the blend of art and science she was looking for. Deidre was a writer when she decided to start the business with Robyn.

photo by Jennifer Simonson

Their shop is located in Marine on St. Croix, north of the metro area. Robyn describes this sweet, little town as “what Mayberry was like to the Andy Griffith show”. The business is run out of an old townhouse. They use locally grown ingredients and get wild berries and herbs from their own backyard, dairy products from a local, organic dairy farm, and maple syrup and honey from local producers. Robyn describes their products as “hyper-local” and expressed how rewarding it is to “take something produced close to home and not only make it into something new locally but also give it back to the community in a new way.” The art on their chocolates is a combination of things. Some are hand-painted. For the more intricate designs, they use an edible, cocoa butter silk screen. Robyn said that she always wanted to be an artist as a kid. She never got to create in the way the she does now with her chocolates, and she loves it. “We don’t just mold hearts - we use European technique and pair that with local ingredients to create a uniquely American taste.”

photo by Jennifer Simonson

One of their biggest events is Caramelpalooza, which takes place around mid-October. It’s a one-day event that features entertainment, activities, and samples of their seasonal flavors and caramels. Robyn explains the inspiration for this type of event. “There are hundreds of annual events for craft beers on any given weekend - but for caramel where do you go? We sell lots of caramels in our store and I feel the caramel’s time has come.” Over 300 people came out this year to experience the event and sample a variety of caramels. We asked how they keep from eating chocolate all day. Robyn laughs, “We taste our chocolate for quality control, but our chocolates are very rich and satisfying, so one is usually enough”. The customer-favorites are the sea salt caramel, key lime pie, and the peanut butter. They have won many awards including “Best Chocolate 2013” in the Twin Cities by City Pages. Including their own shop, their products can be found at the Mill City and Kingfield farmers markets. For more information, visit www.stcroixchocolateco.com.

photo by Isabel Subtil 28 MAKE IT MINNESOTA


fdsjkl

By: Megan Poehler

Foley Food Mill:

My family and I have been making lefse together for the holidays for as long as I can remember. I’ve become the expert roller in my family, as I’m usually the one who can get it very thin without sticking or making holes. For those who don’t know what lefse is, it’s a traditional Scandinavian thin flatbread made from potatoes, usually served at Christmas time. I am one-quarter Swedish, so my family has many Swedish dishes during the holidays. Lefse can be expensive to buy, so it might be nice to learn how to make it yourself !

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1

Peel and boil the potatoes. It’s important to not let them get too mushy, just enough for you to stick a fork through. Drain them and then put them through the ricer.

2 3

Add the butter and sugar and mix well. Cool completely in fridge.

When the mixture is cool, mix in 3 cups of flour. Roll into golf-ball sized balls. When rolling the lefse, keep a portion of the balls in the fridge to make sure they’re cool to work with.

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Place the pastry cloth on a tabletop or board. Tape down the sides so that the cloth will stay tight while you’re working on it. Prepare the cloth and rolling pin with flour.

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Start by rolling out a potato ball very gently. Depending of the size of your rolling pin, you can usually just let the weight of the roller apply the pressure needed. This is important so that there is no residue left on the board or the roller, which can create holes in the lefse.

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Tip: Idaho Russet potatoes work the best for this recipe. Their texture creates the right consistency for rolling a perfect piece.

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When it’s all rolled out, slide a stick under and gently lift it to the hot griddle.

Let cook for about a minute, until small bumps begin to form. Flip it again with the stick. A perfect piece of lefse will have small brown spots.

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When done on both sides, use the stick again to set it on a dry towel to cool. Repeat the process with the rest of the mixture, keeping both the board and roller well floured.

When you’re ready to eat, spread some butter on a piece and roll it up. Lefse should be stored in a refrigerated air-tight container. To reheat, just microwave with some butter. Delicious!

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Need Something Printed? Make It Minnesota is here to help!

We are pleased to provide a wide variety of print materials - all printed in southern Minnesota!

Services Include: Book Marks

Envelopes

Letterheads

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Call us at 507-232-9902 or email sales@makeitminnesota.com to get started. WINTER 2014

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Is it cold? I don’t know Maybe I’m just getting old Getting old? You’re in your prime But cold gets colder It seems with time I don’t believe you its not true In a few years you’ll feel it too But yesterday you said how good it felt But today I wish the snow would melt You were smiling, laughing, looking spry Well, that may have been a lie So cold gets colder? I’m still not sure. Give it a few years you’ll say brr I know these things I really do Trust me - I’m four while you’re only two.

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Make It Minnesota - Winter 2014  

Promoting a vibrant, localized economy.

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