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Crestview Police Department Bi-Monthly Newsletter Volume 1, Issue 3

MARCH/April 2009

A Message from Chief Mitchell In this month's article, I will discuss the Police Departments primary mission. The Crestview Police Department consists of highly trained and motivated police professionals with a variety of experience and skills. The primary purpose of all Crestview police officials is to protect and serve the residents of Crestview as outlined in our mission statement. The specific purpose of the Crestview Police Department can be categorized into four different areas of purpose: 1) Emergency calls for service, 2) Non Emergency calls for service 3) Investigation 4) Community Policing-Problem Solving. Clearly, emergency calls for service remain paramount and are prioritized. Crestview Police officers are often first on the scene to render medical attention to sick or injured persons. Additionally, officers received 4,489 emergency 9-1-1 calls for service in 2008. The types of emergency calls vary and consist of domestic disturbances, assault and other property related crimes. Any immediate threat to persons or property receives an immediate police response. Although non-emergency calls for service do not pose an immediate threat to life or person, police officers must often expedite their response. A situation that poses no immediate threat could easily escalate to a heightened level of immediate danger. Officers often respond to verbal disputes that could easily develop into a physical confrontation. Suspicious activity may be an indicator of a potential residential burglary. Because of this concern, officers continue to evaluate and expedite their response to these calls. Non-Emergency calls exceeded 45,000 calls in 2008. Police investigation remains an integral part of the police department operations. The Police Department is involved in daily field and/or criminal investigations. Proactive police investigation can often enhance police effectiveness and deter future crime. Identity theft and internet sexual predators have added to officers investigative workloads. Today's officer must maintain specific investigative expertise and familiarity with court procedure. Community policing and problem oriented policing are contemporary policing strategies that allow the police department to proactively focus on issues affecting quality of life issues important to the community. Officers continue to deter speeding and burglary by targeting high traffic areas and potential accident locations. Clearly, a reduction in car accidents reduces the costs of human suffering and may also contribute to a reduction in car insurance premiums. (Continued on Page 5)

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 1

On behalf of Officer Hank Bass and his family the Crestview Police Department would like to thank the community for their outpouring of Support and Sympathy during their time of Tragedy. Inside this Issue 1

Message from Chief Mitchell

2

Child Safety Seat inspections

3

Unsolved Homicide M. Howard

3

Unit Focus – Patrol Division

4

Eddie Eagle GunSafe Program

5

CrimeStoppers accepts

6

Officer Recognition

6

Traffic Enforcement Detail

7

Sex Offenders in the City

9

April: Child Abuse Prev. Month

Anonymous Text Tips

10

Police Activity

10

Mission Statement

11

Chaplain’s Corner

12

Prevent Injuries – Spring Cleaning

12

Crime Prevention at the Gym

13

Upcoming Events

14

Thermal Camera grant

14

Suspicious Activity

15

WANTED PERSONS

16

Comments or Ideas

16

Missing: Kristy Rogers 1997

16

For Your Information

16

Important Phone Numbers


Child Safety Seat Inspections, Continued • •

Child Safety Seat Inspections The Crestview Police Department has three nationally certified Child Safety Seat Technicians on staff. We encourage all parents to have their child's safety seat inspected. TRAFFIC CRASHES ARE THE #1 KILLER OF CHILDREN! Why? In many cases, children are either not properly buckled into their safety seats or parents don’t realize that a booster seat is vital to ensuring children fit safely in their vehicle’s seat belt. Don’t take a chance. Have your child’s safety seat inspected! WHAT SHOULD YOU EXPECT DURING A CHILD SAFETY SEAT INSPECTION? A child safety seat inspection generally takes about 20 minutes, depending on the seat and the vehicle. The certified technician will: • Check the child safety seat to see that it has been properly installed; • Remove and inspect the child safety seat for damage; • Diagnose problems; • Ensure the child safety seat is not a recalled model; • Get information about children riders from the vehicle owner (size and weight of child, etc.); • Ensure the child safety seat is appropriate for the size and age of the child; • Teach the vehicle owner the correct procedure to properly and safely install  the child safety seat in his vehicle;

Show the parent or caregiver how to secure the child in the child safety seat; and Discuss other vehicles and child safety seats they own, and provide instructions to repeat the correct procedure with other seats or when installing the seat in other cars.

You will need to bring the child safety seat, the vehicle it is normally used in, the child, and the instructional manual or any information which came with the seat (if you have it). To schedule a child safety seat inspection, please contact one of the following certified technicians at (850) 682-2055: Lieutenant Andrew Schneider (Evenings) Officer Sam Kimmons (Weekdays) Officer Brian Muhlbach (Evenings, Weekends) Contact Information: Ofc. Brian Muhlbach Traffic Unit Crestview Police Department 850-682-2055 Voice Mail Ext. 326

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 2


Patrol Division The Patrol Division is the largest and most visible division of the Crestview Police Department.

Unsolved Homicide – Melissa Lynn Howard Do you know who killed this woman? On January 6, 2006, Melissa Lynn Howard, a 35 year old mother of two children was killed in her Crestview, Florida home at 222 Tiffott Court. As of this date, Melissa’s killer has not been brought to justice for this crime.

If you have any information concerning the death of Melissa Lynn Howard you are urged to contact the Crestview Police Department Criminal Investigation Division and speak with Investigator Richard Trent or Lieutenant Jamie Grant. (850) 682-4157 or (850) 682-4608 trentr@crestviewpd.org grantj@crestviewpd.org

The division is under the supervision of two Lieutenants. Lt. Lehneis is the day shift lieutenant and Lt. Schneider is the night shift lieutenant. The division is broken down into four squads working twelve hour shifts. Each squad is supervised by a Patrol Sergeant who is responsible for the overall duties of the officers assigned. Squads consist of five to six officers depending on manning and patrol three zones within the City. The division also has a full time traffic unit. During 2008, officers responded to: • 54166 calls for service, up from 42935 in 2007, • 729 crashes, which was down from 881 in 2007, • Officers issued 4369 traffic citations, 1619 of which were for speeding. • Average response time for calls for service is approximately 5 minutes.

Patrol officers are the first responders to all department calls for service. We pride ourselves in our core value system for officers which include:

D DU UTTY Y C CO OU UR RA AG GE E

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 3

H HO ON NO OR R IIN NTTE EG GR RIITTY Y


Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program The Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program teaches children in pre-K through third grade four important steps to take if they find a gun. These steps are presented by the program's mascot, Eddie Eagle®, in an easy-to-remember format consisting of the following simple rules:

If you see a gun: STOP! Don't Touch. Leave the Area. Tell an Adult. Begun in 1988, The Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program has reached more than 21 million children -- in all 50 states. This program was developed through the combined efforts of such qualified professionals as clinical psychologists, reading specialists, teachers, curriculum specialists, urban housing safety officials, and law enforcement personnel. Anyone may teach The Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program, and NRA membership is not required. The program may be readily incorporated into existing school curriculum, taught in a one- to five-day format, and used to reach both levels or simply one or two grades. Materials available through this program are: student workbooks, 7-minute animated video (available on DVD or VHS), instructor guides, brochures, and student reward stickers. Program materials are also available in Spanish.

The NRA is committed to helping keep America's young children safe. In efforts to do so, we offer our program at a nominal fee. Schools, law enforcement agencies, hospitals, daycare centers, and libraries may be eligible to receive grant funding to defray program costs. Grant funding is available in many states to these groups to cover the cost of all program curriculum materials. The purpose of the Eddie Eagle Program isn't to teach whether guns are good or bad, but rather to promote the protection and safety of children. The program makes no value judgments about firearms, and no firearms are ever used in the program. Like swimming pools, electrical outlets, matchbooks and household poison, they're treated simply as a fact of everyday life. With firearms found in about half of all American households, it's a stance that makes sense. Eddie Eagle is never shown touching a firearm, and he does not promote firearm ownership or use. The program prohibits the use of Eddie Eagle mascots anywhere that guns are present. The Eddie Eagle Program has no agenda other than accident prevention -- ensuring that children stay safe should they encounter a gun. The program never mentions the NRA. Nor does it encourage children to buy guns or to become NRA members. The NRA does not receive any appropriations from Congress, nor is it a trade organization. It is not affiliated with any firearm or ammunition manufacturers or with any businesses that deal in guns and ammunition.

Officer Sam Kimmons teaches the Eddie Eagle GunSafe® Program

For more information contact the Crestview Police Department Community Service Division at 6822055.

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 4


Chief’s Message Continued from Page 1 Other problem-oriented community policing strategies involve officers educating residents concerning the risks of property crimes, substance abuse, and domestic violence. Officers continue to dedicate time and resources to partner with a variety of criminal justice disciplines and social agencies in order to seek long term solutions. In addition officers, dedicate significant amounts of time and resources in developing criminal intelligence and implementing strategies to deter residential burglary. Officers continue to closely monitor the activities and behaviors of suspected burglars in order to deter crime. Although the Police Department's mission can be separated into four purpose areas, please continue to remember that our success in combating crime and enhancing quality of life concerns continues to remain contingent upon our partnership to work together. As a final note, the Police Department will continue to concentrate on speed related complaints during the next several months. We encourage drivers to remain aware of their speed and driving activity while in residential neighborhoods. Until next time!

Brian P. Mitchell Chief of Police

Crime Stoppers Accepts Anonymous Text Tips Emerald Coast Crime Stoppers is taking advantage of the latest communications technology with the goal of empowering those with information about crime to share it with law enforcement. Text messaging, also known as Short Message Service (SMS), has become a popular means of communication, with over 300,000 text messages being sent every minute in the United States. Anyone with information can now send an anonymous text message to Emerald Coast Crime Stoppers and still be eligible for a cash reward of up to $1,000 if the information helps solve a crime or locate a wanted fugitive. The process is very simple. To send a text message tip from a cell phone, the tipster must text “TIP214 plus the message� to CRIMES (274637). The key word TIP214 must appear on the first line of the text message in order for the tip to reach Emerald Coast Crime Stoppers. The tipster will then receive an automatic text message reply that will contain their confidential code number that will allow the tipster to provide follow up information to their tip if necessary. Crime Stoppers will be able to send text messages back to tipsters without knowing their cell phone numbers and advise them of the status of their tips and ask additional questions.

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 5


Traffic Enforcement Detail

Mayor Cadle Recognizes Officers On January 22, 2009 Mayor David Cadle recognized Lieutenant Joseph Floyd, Sergeant Matthew Purvines, Investigator Danny Crawford, Investigator Rachel Jordan and Officer Bryan Crawford for the recent arrest of individuals involved in a major drug operation in our city. Mayor Cadle recognized that the arrests were a culmination of intensive planning and coordination during the investigation. The mayor commended the officers for the diligence given to the effort and stated the arrests sent a message that the Crestview Police Department will seek out and apprehend the drug dealers who are a scourge on the community, no matter how long it takes. Mayor Cadle further stated that “the citizens of Crestview owe these officers a special debt of gratitude as they continue to rid our streets of drug dealers and the destruction that follows in their wake.”

SPEEDING FINES IN OKALOOSA COUNTY On City, County or State Roadway

In Active School Zone or Construction Zone with Workers Present

0-9 mph over limit $108.00 10-14 mph over limit $183.00 15-19 mph over limit 233.00 20-29 mph over limit 258.00 30 mph or more over limit MANDATORY COURT

0-9 mph over limit $133.00 10-14 mph over limit 283.00 15-19 mph over limit 383.00 20-29 mph over limit 433.00 30 mph or more over limit MANDATORY COURT

OTHER FINES IN OKALOOSA COUNTY Seat belt violations Handicap parking Careless driving Fail to stop at traffic signal Fail to stop for school bus

No Insurance

$93.00 $163.00 $143.00 $208.00 $183.00 CRIMINAL

After receiving numerous citizen complaints concerning speeding on Texas Parkway the Police Department concentrated traffic enforcement efforts in this area as call volume permitted. This enforcement detail concentrated in the area from February 6, 2009 until February 18, 2009. The Police Department made 75 traffic stops during the period resulting in: • 9 verbal warnings • 64 civil traffic citations • 2 criminal traffic citations • Citations totaled $8,662.00 • Average speed was 39 mph Most drivers stopped were travelling at a rate between 10 and 15 miles per hour over the posted speed limit of 25 mph. However, 28% of the drivers were travelling in excess of 20 mph over the posted speed. The Police Department is continuing to concentrate on traffic enforcement in the Texas Parkway area; however, the two week enforcement period has greatly reduced speed complaints and made drivers in the area more aware of their vehicle speed and driving habits.

Traffic enforcement units will be concentrating in the areas of Ridgelake Road, Adams Drive, Pandora Street and other areas where numerous traffic complaints are received. Remember, most residential streets are posted 25 miles per hour and if not posted the speed is 30 miles per hour. If you have a traffic complaint or concern call 682-2055 and speak with one of our traffic enforcement units.

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 6


Sex Offenders Residing in the City of Crestview Gregory Banks

James R. Barlow

Bobby M. Beene

Michael T. Benevides

819 W Walnut Ave CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

233 W Bowers Ave CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

494 BROCK AVE CRESTVIEW, FL 32539

122 LAKE ST CRESTVIEW, FL 32539

Leonard E. Blackwell

Kelvin D. Brooks

George C. Calkins

Buddy D. Causey

375 W WALNUT AVE CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

503 W GRIFFITH AVE CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

353 W James Lee Blvd CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

596 BROCK AVE CRESTVIEW, FL 32539

Roy A. Chamniss

Eric Clausell

Alyx T. Coffin

Charles W. Crites

353 W James Lee Blvd #158 CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

505 S WILSON ST CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

472 N SPRING ST CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

882 E Chestnut Ave Lot C CRESTVIEW, FL 32539

David Drake

Kenneth T. Grant

807 VALLEY RD CRESTVIEW, FL 32539

100 TERRELL DR CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

Diana Johnston

694 LEE AVE CRESTVIEW, FL 32539

Heather L. Hebert

Nethanial Holman

225 TRISH DR CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

Marc J. Lowe

Absconded Crestview, FL 32536 Ronald A. Lowitz

111 VILLACREST DR CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

598 HENDERSON ST CRESTVIEW, FL

544 N MAIN ST CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 7

Nicholas Mahan


Teresa M. Mason

107 JACOB DR CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

Darrell R. Mchenry

102 N BOOKER ST CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

Eric J. Merriweather

Christopher B. Mitchell

301 ALFORD ST CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

Dewayne Moore

David J. Nelson

Timothy R. Nelson

309 JOHN KING RD CRESTVIEW, FL 32539 Amy A. Neubauer

395 S BOOKER ST CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

151 W NORTH AVE CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

1249 S Ferdon Blvd Crestview, FL 32536

5300 S Ferdon Blvd Lot 20 CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

Tyrone Seals

Larry D. Thomas

104 LAKE ST CRESTVIEW, FL 32539

1001 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR AVE # F1 CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

Steven D. Villa

David L. Whitehead

Robert Williamson

904 MAPOLES ST CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

(PREDATOR) 360 BROCK AVE CRESTVIEW, FL 32539

104B Brentwood Ln Crestview, FL 32539

Terry L. Robinson

375 W WALNUT AVE CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 8

Clark A. Trivitt

1512 TEXAS PKWY CRESTVIEW, FL 32536

Todd K. Woods

997 WEBB ST CRESTVIEW, FL 32536


April is Child Abuse Prevention Month Help our community prevent child abuse and neglect. Here’s what you can do:

Remember

that children are the future

Children are our future and their early years have an enormous impact on their future health and success. Child abuse prevention is one result of a firm community commitment to supporting children and the families raising them.

Recognize

prevention is a shared responsibility Parenting is the toughest job any of us will ever undertake, and our most important civic contribution. As parents we have enormous responsibility to raise our children to be productive members of society, and as citizens we are responsible for ensuring that all parents and families have access to the support, information and services they need to succeed.

Raise

the issue of prevention

We all care about the issue of child abuse. But, we hear a lot more about the problem than we do about the solutions. Preventing child abuse means setting the stage for healthy, stable families who have the tools they need for nurturing their children. Help your community understand prevention. Ask your elected officials to support programs and services that help families and children. Contact your local school district and faith community to encourage them to sponsor classes and support programs for new parents.

Reach out

to kids & parents

Anything you do to support kids and parents in your family and extended community helps to reduce the likelihood of child abuse and neglect. Be a good neighbor. Offer to baby-sit. Donate your used children’s clothing, furniture and toys for use by another family. Be kind and supportive, particularly to new parents and children.

Recommend

ideas that your community can use

There are many programs, services and actions that support families and prevent child abuse. Facilitate friendships and support. Offer opportunities for parents in the neighborhood to get to know each other, develop support systems, and take leadership roles. Strategies may include sports teams, potlucks, classes, advisory groups, board leadership and volunteer opportunities. Strengthen parenting. Develop ways for parents to get support on parenting issues when they need it. Possibilities include classes, support groups, home visits, tip sheets in pediatricians' offices and resource libraries. Respond to family crises. Offer extra support to families when they need it, as in times of illness, job loss, housing problems and other stressors. Link families to services and opportunities. Make sure families know where to go for job training, education, health care, mental health and other essential services.

Ten Ways to Help Prevent Child Abuse Be a nurturing parent. Children need to know that they are special, loved and capable of following their dreams. Help a friend, neighbor or relative. Being a parent isn’t easy. Offer a helping hand take care of the children, so the parent(s) can rest or spend time together. Help yourself. When the big and little problems of your everyday life pile up to the point you feel overwhelmed and out of control – take time out. Don’t take it out on your kid. If your baby cries… It can be frustrating to hear your baby cry. Learn what to do if your baby won’t stop crying. Never shake a baby – shaking a child may result in severe injury or death. Get involved. Ask your community leaders, clergy, library and schools to develop services to meet the needs of healthy children and families. Help to develop parenting resources at your local library. Promote programs in school. Teaching children, parents and teachers prevention strategies can help to keep children safe. Monitor your child’s television and video viewing. Watching violent films and TV programs can harm young children. Volunteer at a local child abuse prevention program. Report suspected abuse or neglect. If you have reason to believe a child has been or may be harmed, call your local department of children and family services or you local police department.

HOTLINE 1-800-96-ABUSE MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 9


Police Activity by the Numbers A comparison of police activity - January 2008 and 2009.

  Calls for Service  Arrests  Juvenile Arrests  Total Incidents  Crime Related Incidents  Firearm Involved  DOMV Related  Alcohol/Drug Related  Citations  Speeding Citations  DUI Citations  Criminal Citations  Traffic Crashes  Ferdon Blvd. Crashes 

JAN  2008  4346  110  7  273  201  0  15  29  288  120  9  22  60  29 

JAN  2009  5293  93  6  286  192  2  11  23  352  98  8  37  73  43 

Change  947  ‐17  1  13  ‐9  2  ‐4  ‐6  64  ‐22  ‐1  15  13  14 

%  Change  18%  ‐18%  ‐16%  .04%  ‐.05%  200%  ‐36%  ‐26%  18%  ‐22%  ‐12%  40%  18%  33% 

REMEMBER: CRIME PREVENTION IS EVERYONE’S BUSINESS

What do the Numbers Mean? As you can see the department’s activity is increasing with an 18% increase in calls for service. Traffic citations are up 18%; however, traffic crashes are also up 18% for the month. The increase in traffic crashes can be attributed to the increased number of crashes on Ferdon Blvd. (33%). While the numbers only reflect activity for the month of January, the department is closely monitoring traffic crashes. As department vacancies are filled, increased enforcement efforts will be initiated.

Mission Statement The Crestview Police Department, being a subsidiary of city government is ethically and legally responsible to protect and serve all communities alike without partiality or prejudice. With community service as our foundation, we will address problems and seek solutions with honesty and integrity. We shall maintain public respect by holding ourselves to the highest standards of performance and ethics. Officers are taught from the onset of their careers that to serve Crestview is a privilege, not a right. They learn that their basic, fundamental duty is to serve the citizens of Crestview to the best of their ability. The citizen is the most important person in our department; not an interruption of our work, but the purpose of it. The goal of this department, as officers of the law, is that we may come together with the people in our communities to try and make an improvement in our environment through education and dedication of one and all. To fulfill our mission we will strive to attain the highest degree of ethical behavior and professional conduct at all times.

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 10


Chaplain’s Corner At the invitation of Chief Mitchell, it has been my privilege to serve as a volunteer Chaplain for the Crestview Police Department since July of 2008. People often ask what I do as a Chaplain. In a nutshell, it is covered in the Chaplaincy Mission Statement: “The Crestview Police Chaplaincy program exists to provide an ecumenical pastoral presence to the officers and staff of law enforcement, and to victims of crime and tragedy in the community.” This is the ministry I strive to provide. When meeting with officers, riding in their vehicles, responding to tragedies in the community (like deaths, automobile accidents, persons considering suicide, those who feel lost or confused, and the like) I try to provide a spiritual presence and comfort. I am an ordained Presbyterian minister of 29 years. In addition to my regular church responsibilities in Crestview and Laurel Hill, I have felt led to give something back to those who put their lives on the line every day for people like me. If I can help ease a burden, share a joke, offer a different perspective, or provide spiritual guidance, I am only too happy to do so. One service I provide for anyone interested is emailing a “Thought for the Day” Monday through Friday. You will find an example below. If you would like to be added to the list of recipients, simply send a brief note to broadheadm@crestviewpd.org. I’ll be happy to add you to the list. Sursum Corda, (Lift up your heart) Mark Broadhead Chaplain, CPD

“Make peace with your past, so it won’t mess up the present.” Too frequently we live in the past. How does this show itself? When we think, “If only I’d…” or “I should have…” or “I wonder what would have happened if…” We’ve all done it. And where does it get us? Not enjoying today – the present. We live in the past fantasizing about what could have been. When we do this, we don’t recognize what we’ve got right in front of us. What a shame! What a waste of time and energy! Today, let go of your past. Look at what God has placed right in front of you. Have you missed what has been there all along? “For surely you have a future ahead of you; your hope will not be disappointed.” Proverbs 23:18 Chaplain Mark Broadhead

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 11


Preventing Injuries during Spring Cleaning

Crime Prevention Tips at the Gym

During spring cleaning duties this year, home safety should be at the top of your “to-do” list. According to the Home Safety Council’s State of Home Safety in America™ report, unintentional injuries in the home result in nearly 21 million medical visits on average each year.

Lots of people will be going to the gym to fulfill those New Year’s resolutions. You don’t want to be a victim of a crime in 2009!

Cleaning and organizing your home are significant steps toward creating a safe home, but take care, because a good spring cleaning often means climbing, lifting heavy objects and using strong cleaning solutions – all potential safety hazards. The Crestview Police Department encourages everyone to follow simple safety steps during spring cleaning to reduce risks and uncover and remedy home safety hazards.

Theft is a crime of opportunity. Most thefts occur when valuables are left unattended. The thief normally seeks privacy to commit his/her act. Virtually any article left in plain view is subject to be stolen. Most property that is stolen is left unattended or unlocked.

Spring Cleaning the Safe Way Chores like re-organizing closets and tackling a thorough spring cleaning can put families at even greater risks for falls and poisonings – the two leading causes of home injury in America. We urge families to keep safe practices top priority while cleaning up and cleaning out your home, garage and yard. • Always keep stairs, steps, landings and all floors clear of toys and clutter. • When cleaning walls and ceilings, use the opportunity to replace burned out light bulbs with bright lights over stairs and steps. • Carry loads you can see over, and keep one hand free to hold banisters and railings. • Safely tuck telephone and electrical cords out of walkways. • Keep children away from anyone cleaning windows. Shut upper windows and promptly replace any removed window guards. • When washing window blinds, check that cords are stored up high, out of a child’s reach. • If you need to climb, always use a ladder. • When using a ladder, stand at or below the highest safe standing level. For a stepladder, the safe standing level is the second rung from the top, and for an extension ladder, it's the fourth rung from the top. • Before using a ladder, make sure the rungs are dry and the ladder is securely positioned on a flat surface. • Follow product label safety recommendations, like wearing gloves and masks, when using harsh products. • Do not mix household cleaning products together because their contents could react with dangerous results. • Carefully read the labels on all products and medications and separate those that say “Caution,” “Warning,” “Danger” or “Poison.” Lock these products up and out of sight and reach of young children. • Empty buckets after use. Store them turned over or upside down.

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 12

• •

• •

• • •

If you have personal items of value, leave them at home. If you have to bring personal items, get a fanny pack and keep them on you at all times. Do not leave your keys unattended anywhere. Use a lock on your gym locker. Never leave your bags, purses, wallets, or any other possessions unattended even for a moment. Know where your property is when you are working out. Be aware of your surroundings when you get to the parking lot and report any suspicious activity. Lock your vehicle and keep valuables out of view. Keep a written record of valuables, including descriptions and serial numbers. These are proof that the property is yours and will aid in the reporting process and recovery.


Upcoming Events – March, April 2009 MARCH Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

Friday

Saturday

1

2

4

5

6

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11

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15

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3 Sioux Circle NW 6:00 PM Agriculture Building 10 Covenant Hospice Safety Pres. 8:30 AM Crestview Ofc 17

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24

18 Coremo Dr. NW 2 PM Aplin Apts Office 25

14 BBB BBQ Child ID Booth 8 AM – 5PM Main Street 21 Walgreens Child ID 11AM-4PM

26

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28 Walgreens Child ID 11AM-4PM

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30

31

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

Friday

Saturday

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2

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11 ED Hill Neighborhood Clean-up 12:00 – 5:00 PM 18 Spanish Trail Cruisers Car Show – Child ID 1PM-6PM 25

APRIL

5

6

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10 Good Friday City Admin Offices Closed

12 EASTER SUNDAY

13

14 Amos Street NW 6:30PM

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15 Coremo Dr. NW 2PM Aplin Apts. Office 22

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23 Steeplechase Dr. NW 6:30PM 30

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 13


Thermal Camera Grant Award

Suspicious Activity?

In June 2008, the Crestview Police Department made application to the Department of Homeland Security through the Commercial Equipment Direct Assistance Program grant. We are pleased to report that in October 2008 we were awarded the grant to purchase a “ZISTOS� Thermal Detect, Search, and Surveillance System.

We often ask that you report suspicious activity to the Police Department. Strangely enough" suspicious activity "is defined differently by each individual person. In this article, we provide some suggestions as to what might constitute suspicious activity. Webster dictionary defines suspicious as: doubtful, adapted to raise suspicion, vague, mistrustful etc.

On February 9th 10th and 11th, Lt. Joseph Floyd attended a training seminar in Washington DC sponsored by the Department of Homeland Security after being awarded CEDAP grant for the thermal camera system. The classroom and field application method of instruction was conducted by members of the ZISTOS Corporation who manufacture this equipment for the US Military. The exact model of camera awarded to Crestview PD is currently in use by US ground forces deployed in combat theaters around the world. The cameras are being utilized for search & rescue as well as interdiction and international police missions.

One of the main benefits to having this equipment for Crestview Police Department is the search and rescue capabilities. The camera is fully equipt with night vision and thermal infrared detection, as well as a nine foot retractable fiberglass pole with submergeable color and black and white cameras with audio capabilities. There is also a two foot flexible pole that will allow officers to search confined areas as well as around corners. The entire unit is portable and self contained with two of its own battery sources that will last approximately five hours on a single charge. This unit also has interdiction capabilities allowing officers to search vehicles for contraband without dismantling the portion of the vehicle being searched. The applications listed here are only a couple of the hundreds of applications this unit will be utilized for over its lifetime. The ZISTOS Corperation has ensured the equipment is never outdated by making all of the new products compatible with this unit for the future use. The equipment, travel, training, and lodging were provided by the Department of Homeland Security free of charge as apart of the CEDAP grant. If anyone has any questions concerning this piece of equipment please feel free to contact Lt. Joseph Floyd.

For police purposes, suspicious activity is defined as any behavior that you find unusual and probable of criminal activity. Behaviors that might be considered suspicious are: 1. Vehicles parked on the roadway between houses for no apparent reason( possible burglary activity) 2. Unknown individuals walking through a neighborhood with no sense of belonging (possible burglary activity) 3. Vehicles seen repeatedly cruising a neighborhood (possible burglary activity) 4. Yelling or screaming coming from a residence or building (possible fight or assault) 5. Large unsupervised gatherings on forbidden property could be suggestive of illegal drug or alcohol consumption. 6. An unknown individual ringing the doorbell and asking peculiar questions 7. Individuals exchanging small articles either through the car or in person(possible drug activity) 8. Vehicles seen coming and going from remote wooded areas (trespassing with other possible criminal intent) 9. Subjects parked near street signs for no apparent reason (may be attempting to steal or vandalize signs or other public property) Although this list could be seen as indicative of both illegal and legal behavior, I hope it provides you with some ideas as to what behavior might be considered suspicious activity, warranting further police investigation. Some of the behaviors listed above may be antecedents to criminal activity. Your vigilance in reporting suspicious activity can truly make a difference towards reducing criminal opportunity. It is through working together that we can continue to deter crime.

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 14


Allen, Robert H.

Bacallao, Joelle J.

Highlander, Kara

Wanted for Sexual Battery B/M DOB: 02/13/1988 20 YOA

Wanted for Sexual Battery B/M DOB: 03/20/1988 20 YOA

Wanted for Grand Theft W/F DOB: 07/12/1982 26 YOA

Ader, Zachary Alan

Cooper, Jerel

Parker, Travis

Wanted for Burglary, Grand Theft W/M DOB: 06/17/1989 19 YOA

Wanted for Child Abuse B/M DOB: 10/4/1988 20 YOA

Wanted for Aggravated Assault B/M DOB: 07/16/1980 28 YOA

The Crestview Police Department has active warrants on the above pictured individuals as of the time of submission. If you have any information concerning the whereabouts of these individuals please contact the Crestview Police Department at (850) 682-2055.

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 15


Comments or Ideas?

MISSING SINCE 1997

If you have an idea, thought or comment about our newsletter please forward those to bundrickk@crestviewpd.org. If you have a topic you would like us to address, please send it on. It will provide valuable information and insight to the many who receive this newsletter.

KRISTY JEAN ROGERS DOB: Aug 23, 1980

*To subscribe to our newsletter please register on the Crestview Police Department website, http://www.crestviewpd.org.

Age Now: 28

Kristy Rogers disappeared on August 2, 1997 while walking to her home during the early morning hours. Photograph #2 is an age progression photograph to 24 yoa. Kristy is a W/F with brown hair and blue eyes. She had a pierced navel and a lazy right eye. If you have any information concerning the disappearance of Kristy Jean Rogers please contact the Crestview Police Department, Lt. Pitts at (850) 682-3544.

Past and present copies of this newsletter can also be obtained from our website.

For Your Information: The Crestview Police Department Records Section (police reports) is open Monday thru Friday 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. (850) 682-3603

CRESTVIEW POLICE DEPARTMENT 321 Woodruff Avenue, West Crestview, FL 32536

Brian P. Mitchell Chief of Police Kenneth E. Bundrick Major, Administration Richard Long Major, Operations

Important Phone Numbers: Crestview Police Department Emergency 911 Non-Emergency 850-682-2055 Administration 850-682-3544 Criminal Investigations 850-682-4157 City of Crestview Mayor David Cadle Office of the City Clerk Administrative Services Public Services Fire Department Code Enforcement Recreation Office

850-682-3812 850-682-1091 850-689-1619 850-682-6132 850-682-6121 850-683-0896 850-682-4715

Other Services Housing Authority County Health Dept. County Courthouse

850-682-2413 850-689-7855 850-689-5000

MARCH/APRIL 2009 Page 16


Newsletter Mar-Apr 2009