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NOVEMBER 22, 2013

CHRISTMAS EVENTS

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VOL. 4 NO. 8A

Giving back to the community

Arrest warrant issued

Willis fails to appear for status hearing

Holiday events & celebrations Special Section INSIDE

BHP contributes $400,000 to 44 local projects DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

A bench warrant was issued just before noon Nov. 21 for alleged racketeer Bobby Willis. Magistrate Mark Hawkinson ordered Willis to appear in court for a status hearing in relation to multiple charges of embezzlement, racketeering and securities fraud against the former Kirtland businessman, who now reportedly lives in Branson, Mo. It has been more than a year since Willis was originally scheduled to appear before Hawkinson, who previously allowed the man to remain in Branson, wear an ankle monitor and provide weekly status reports to his criminal

* Willis A6

BHP Billiton continued its tradition of giving back to the community by awarding 44 local projects $400,000 in monetary contributions. The money was awarded during the annual Community Investment Fund Luncheon on Nov. 5 at the Courtyard by Marriott. “This event is always the highlight of the year for our business,” said Pat Risner, asset president for BHP Billiton’s New Mexico Coal Pat Risner, asset president for BHP New Mexico Coal, speaks to members of 44 non-profit organizations from the area that received money from the company’s Community Investment Awards presented Nov. 19 operations. “This is an incredibly throughout at the Courtyard by Marriott in Farmington. – Josh Bishop photo uplifting experience to see all you are doing in our community.” development to education and youth your efforts,” Risner said. Risner enjoys reading about the proj- development and helping the environBHP Billiton’s New Mexico Coal ects and learning what different organ- ment to dealing with health, human established a 50-year history of providing izations are doing for the community. services and providing for the elderly community support through financial “It is a humbling experience,” he said. contributions, employee volunteerism The projects range from community and disabled. “We are proud to support you in * charity A6

Crowded elementary schools

Stat Doctors

Master plan includes changes to Hermosa, Northeast

County discusses online medical services program

LAUREN SEIP Tri-City Tribune The amount of space in Farmington’s elementary school buildings is “significantly below” what the state of New Mexico recommends for adequate square footage based on the number of enrolled students. To prevent further overcrowding, the New Mexico Public School Facilities Authority, or PSFA, recommends the Farmington elementary schools should be 675,000 square feet; however, the schools add up to 572,906 square feet. “You have 100,000 square feet below adequacy but you are probably one of the most efficient districts in the state,” said Marilyn Strube, Greer Stafford SJCF facility planner, during a Nov. 14 school board meeting. The issue of overcrowded school buildings came up during a presentation of the school district’s 2014-2019 preliminary

DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

Capital projects included in the preliminary master plan include the renovation and replacement of Farmington High School, renovations and potential replacements at Hermosa Middle School and Northeast Elementary School. – File photo

facilities master plan, where Strube has been involved in the plan’s development process. The facilities master plan is updated every six years and determines capital projects the school district hopes to complete in the next six years. The capital projects listed in the preliminary master plan will

be funded by an anticipated $35 million of general obligation bonds that citizens will vote on during a Feb. 4, 2014, election. Because the overcrowded elementary schools have become obstacles, Strube said it is time for the district to evaluate the buildings’ capacity and whether

* schools A7

Art show

Inside

Football Scorpions host Valencia 7 p.m. Friday night

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Nosey Nellie .................................A4 Calendar.......................................A5 Obituary........................................A6 Birth Announcements .................A10 Teasyatwho Gallery....................A10

From the exam room to the chat room, Stat Doctors is providing online medical services for its clientele at a cost of $50 per visit. That was the message Dr. Alan Roga, founder of Stat Doctors, shared with the San Juan County Commission during its Nov. 19 meeting in Aztec. Roga developed Stat Doctors in 2009 as a type of telemedicine practice, using computers and smart phones to connect with patients. “We provide a virtual house call – anywhere, anytime access – as an alternative to an Emergency Room or urgent care setting,” Roga said. The business is based in Scottsdale, Ariz., and should be available in all 50 states by the end of next year. Its purpose is to ease

Pets of the Week ........................A11 Sports.........................................A12 Classifieds..................................A13 Games........................................A14 On The Radio.............................A15

Digital painting, jewelry, pottery and more at Feat of Clay

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the load on Emergency Room doctors by providing an alternative to sick people leaving their homes for treatment of such ailments as the flu or common cold. “We’ve developed a very simple, easy-to-use technology,” he explained. The patient logs on using the Internet, a smart phone or an electronic tablet, and then they meet with a doctor in real time, within six minutes. “We treat more than 90 percent of everyone who comes into our system.” The doctor visits with the patient about symptoms, provides a diagnosis and emails a prescription to one of the participating pharmacies. The doctors prescribe such medications as antibiotics, anti-inflammatory drugs, steroid creams and antihistamines. “No narcotics,” Roga said. A patient needs to see their primary care

* doctors

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Fridya, November 22, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE seven-day forecast FRIDAY

SATURDAY

43/28

44/30

Rain/Snow Showers

Rain/Wind Sun

Rise Set 6:59 a.m. 4:59 p.m.

To: You From: Me

SUNDAY

Rise Set 7:00 a.m. 4:59 p.m. Sun

Sun

45/26

Rain/Snow Showers

MONDAY

TUESDAY

49/25

51/24

Rise Set 7:02 a.m. 4:58 p.m. Sun

Rise Set 7:03 a.m. 4:58 p.m. Sun

AM Clouds/PM Sun

Rise Set 7:01 a.m. 4:58 p.m. Sun

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

52/30

Sunny

52/30

Partly Cloudy

Mostly Sunny

Rise Set 7:04 a.m. 4:57 p.m.

Sun

Rise Set 7:05 a.m. 4:57 p.m.

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Nosey Nellie is not an accountant. Or a bookkeeper. Or a math person. Or somebody who has any knowledge whatsoever regarding finances. Or somebody who actually cares about something called “balancing” a checkbook or “reconciling” a bank statement. Those are foreign words to NN and she has no desire – ever – to learn that language. So how does it happen that even when NN acknowledges math/finances/bookkeeping are not her strong suit (pantsuits are also not NN strength, although some influential women – like Hillary Clinton and Kim Kardashian have been known to wear them – although not always wear ’em well. Hillary’s would be better if they weren’t made of the polyester stuff from the ’70s and KK’s would be better if she remembered the “pant” part. Just sayin’. . . .) people keep putting her in charge of finances and financials and check books? How does that happen? Do people not read the warning scrolls NN is forced to give anybody who even suggests or hints at the fact that NN should/could be in charge of money of any kind? Those scrolls cost NN a lotta money (the courts refuse to pay for ’em on accounta the judges – who, if you don’t mind me mentioning here, wear “robes” that are almost as ugly as Hillary’s pantsuits and KK’s pantless suits. 'Scuse me, but NN knows for a fact, on accounta she knows people who know how to get information no one is s’posed to know about, that judges make enough money they could all purchase a coupla nice velour sweatsuits they could wear instead of those robes, which NN guesses are made of the same

kinda polyester stuff Hillary’s “suits” are made of ) – are pretty stern about the fact that NN must “pay” for her “sins” and “notify” potential “employers, fundraisers and bookies” that she tends to “lose” money or “invest” money in “questionable” projects. Most of those “questionable” projects weren’t questionable at the time NN “invested” money in ’em. NN’s “investment” manager had inside information that said Billy Beer was gonna become the Boones Farm of the next generation. Based on that information and the fact that NN, herownself, loved Boones Farm and considers it, still, the best wine ever produced for under 99 cents, NN “invested” the $3.332 million her then-friend Marker Maks, asked her to “store” for him until he ended his “vacation” of 23 years in the Big House. How was NN s’posed to know that Billy Beer would never reach the quality or consumption of the gazillions NN’s “investment” manager said it would or that said “investment” manager would suddenly become “unavailable” to NN or to Marker Maks, who managed to get out of the Big House in 18 months on accounta his “good behavior” and that MM would NOT be happy with NN for “investing” in Billy Beer or that he knew “friends” who took the “investment” manager on a long vacation from which he never returned. Whatever. And NN never, ever intended to “lose” anybody’s money. A coupla years ago, when NN was in charge of her “Ladies with Loose Change Received from Men Who Don’t Tip Well” Christmas Club account, NN did “borrow” the years’ worth of cash collected by the LWLCRFMWDTW when she had the “opportunity” to triple that money by giving it to Joe Briefs, who said he would take that $47.53 to an Off the Strip Casino,

where the slots were loose and bring back all the winnings in an armored truck. It wasn’t NN’s fault that the Vegas Code Compliance Officers would be trolling the Off the Strip Casino and would recognize JB as a “repeat offender” of not cleaning up the area at the rear of his property, outside his fence and almost to the center of the alley, and haul his skinny butt to jail – along with the LWLCRFMWDTW’s Christmas money. Whatever. Don’t mess with those CCO’s, NN’s tellin’ ya. Anyway, so NN’s resume now includes “financial adviser, investment broker and math whiz,” which, for some reason, makes people think NN can balance a checkbook, reconcile a bank statement and make correct deposits. Nowhere on that resume, however, does it state that NN is “fluent in bankese,” or that she is effective as a financial adviser, investment broker or math whiz. Not that most of the “positions” NN applies for require a financial adviser, investment broker or math whiz. NN’s talents lie in other areas, just so’s ya know. Whatever. So, if anyone wants to hire NN for a project, a position or as queen of their organization, please do not think NN will “do” your books or your bank or your financials. NN’s talents are many and far reaching (thanks to notes on the walls of men’s rooms across the country and to the law enforcement officials in almost every darned state in the union who are on the “lookout” for NN. “Capturing” NN and making her pay for alleged sins against code compliance and other minor misdemeanors seems to be a big deal in law enforcement circles. Whatever. While NN was attempting to “reconcile” a bank statement and “balance” her checkbook (NN’s “financial adviser” in the Big House thinks NN should make sure her “books” are in order in

TRI-CITY

case the Vegas Vigilantes come looking for her or some of the money she was s’posed to “take care of ” for Vegas Vince, a major “player” in the Vegas Sin Scene, who didn’t ask about NN’s ability to handle money, so she should not be held accountable for the fact that she “handed” the money off to needy people who offered her great deals on hooker heels and almost-designer

The Tri-City Tribune (USPS 5601) is published weekly by Majestic Media, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401. Periodicals postage paid at Farmington, NM 87401. COPYRIGHT: The entire contents of the Tri-City Tribune are copyright 2013 by Majestic Media. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part 100 W. Apache St. by any means including electronic retrieval systems without the written permisFarmington, NM 87401 sion of the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tri-City Trib505-516-1230 une, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401 Fax: 505-516-1231 Subscription Rates: IF YOUR PAPER IS LATE: The Tri-City Tribune should arrive by 9:00 a.m. each Friday. If it hasn’t, www.tricitytribuneusa.com 52 week subscription $27.85 please call our circulation department at 505-51626 week subscription $15 1230, ext. 205. Mail Subscriptions Rates: The publisher reserves the right to change sub52 week subscription $83.54 scription rates during the term of a subscription Printed on 100% Recycled Paper 26 week subscription $41.77 upon one month’s notice. This notice may be by with Soy-Based Ink. All subscriptions payable in advance. mail to the subscriber, by notice contained in the

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bags. Whatever), people were enjoying birthday celebrations. NN is certain her invitations got lost in the mail. For reals. Kymber Mordeki (who is just the funnest, cutest thing ever), Michael Kovacs (one of the very few law enforcement officials who actually waves at NN when he sees her – at least NN thinks it’s a wave. Whatever), Stephannie Hammons and Marilyn

PRESIDENT Don Vaughan 505-516-1230 ext. 204 don@majesticmediausa.com EDITOR/PUBLISHER Cindy Cowan Thiele 505-516-1230 ext. 202 editor@tricitytribuneusa.com REPORTER Debra Mayeux 505-320-6512 debra@tricitytribuneusa.com Lauren Seip 505-608-4400 lauren@tricitytribuneusa.com CIRCULATION Shelly Acosta 505-516-1230 ext. 211 circulation@tricitytribuneusa.com PRODUCTION 505-516-1230 ext.203 Suzanne Thurman suzanne@majesticmediausa.com 505-516-1230 ext.203

Anderson all blew out candles and prob’ly had some Boones Farm Fine Wine with their birthday celebrations. Other people out and about this week that NN saw – either personally or from that high-powered telescope Vegas Vince’s money paid for – NN needs to know when VV is in the area, just so’s ya know, so it

* Nellie A15

PRODUCTION Jennifer Hargrove jennifer@majesticmediausa.com Michael Billie michael@majesticmediausa.com ADVERTISING SALES Shelly Acosta shelly@majesticmediausa.com Deyan Valdez deyan@majesticmediausa.com Aimee Velasquez aimee@majesticmediausa.com LEGALS legals@tricitytribuneusa.com

505-215-4559 505-486-6046 505-947-7872


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Friday, November 22, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

calendar ONGOING EVENTS BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been noted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, lo-

cated in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for leisurely walk of 1-2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org

FRI NOV. 22 SAT NOV. 23 ANNUAL HOSPICE CHARITY BOWL SALE This event is at the San Juan College Henderson Fine Arts

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Performance Center lobby. The event benefits Northwest New Mexico Hospice. The hours for the sale are 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. each day. Information: 505.566.3464

SAT NOV. 23 SAN JUAN SYMPHONY – COME HEAR US NOW! THE MESSIAH Join the Durango Choral Society, Farmington’s Vicus Voces, two extraordinary vocal soloists and the San Juan Symphony for an early start to the holiday season, with our first performance of Handel’s cherished oratorio. We’ve selected the most popular numbers from Handel’s masterpiece to create a 90minute concert designed to lift your spirit and usher in the season of reverence and renewal. Enjoy this amazing

concert at 7:30 p.m. at the San Juan College Henderson Performance Hall. Information: 505.566.3430 SUNRISE COMET WALK A recently discovered comet should be visible just before sunrise this morning. Astronomers think Comet ISON may be the comet which was last visible in 1608, when it was noted by Spanish explorers in the Southwest and other viewers around the world. Join us at the Riverside Nature Center at 6 a.m. for coffee or hot chocolate before the two-mile walk. Information: 505.599.1422 TURKEY TROT & GOBBLE WOBBLE This event features a 5K Turkey Trot and a Two-Mile Gobble Wobble Walk at 9 a.m. in Historic Downtown Farmington. Registration deadline was Nov. 15. This family friendly event will include activities such as children’s carnival, games, face painting, a kids gobble contest, music and more. Participate in a Turkey Trot and Gobble Wobble costume contest! Enter individually or as a group. This is an all-weather event, plan to par-

ticipate rain or shine. Information: 505.599.1184

FRI NOV. 29 SAT NOV. 30 THE 29th ANNUAL CHAMPIONSHIP BULLRIDING EXTRAORDINAIRE This annual bull riding spectacular is at McGee Park Memorial Coliseum, between Farmington and Bloomfield on Hwy. 64, behind SunRay Park & Casino. Information: 505.287.9534 or www.casperbacarodeo.com

EVENTS FOR ADULTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, New Mexico 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building: 505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Activity Center/The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5 9:00am-10:00am Teddy Bear Tea* $5/person

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50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 - 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Nov.23 - Forever Young Nov.30 - NO DANCE, HOLIDAY WEEKEND Info: 505.599.1380

Each Child will receive a free Teddy Bear 10:30am-11:30amTeddy Bear Tea* $5/person Each Child will receive a free Teddy Bear

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PMS Holiday Health Fair Free admission

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Festival Open to the Public Free Admission - Purchase Raffle Tickets Tea with the Trees* $15/person Family Night - Free Admission

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10:00am-9:00pm Festival Open to the Public 1:00pm-3:00pm 5:00pm-9:00pm

Purchase Raffle tickets - Free Admission Senior Social Time - Free Admission “Holiday Happy Hour� $10/person Food, Drinks, & Dancing to Jose Villarreal

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7 8:30am-12:00pm Festival Open to the Public Purchase Raffle tickets Free Admission

12:00pm 12:15pm 12:15pm-1:00pm 1:00pm 1:00pm-2:30pm

Ticket Sales Cease Exhibit Hall Doors Close Entertainment in Auditorium Festival Raffle in Auditorium Festival Raffle Item Pickup

ALL EVENTS HELD AT THE FARMINGTON CIVIC CENTER * LIMITED SEATING - ADVANCE TICKET PURCHASE FOR THIS EVENT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

200 W. Arrington, Farmington NM, 87401 - 505-599-1148

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DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 - 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Info: 505.599.1380 MEDICARE PART D BENEFITS COUNSELING BY APPOINTMENT Mondays, Nov.4 - December 2, by appointment only Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. S.H.I.P. (State Health Insurance Program Volunteers) will be available and ready to help you analyze your current plan and compare it to 2014 plans, so you can more easily make a decision to stay, or switch plans. If you need help and can't get to one of these appointments, call the Medicare Help Desk at 1 (800) 6334227 for assistance from your home. Make sure you have your Medicare card and your prescriptions, or a list in front of you so they can be entered into the plan finder. Bring the Medicare card and a list or your prescriptions to the Senior Center if you make an appointment with us. Call 505.599.1390 for more information or to make an appointment. CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE (COPD) 10 - 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov.27 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. This course will teach preventative measures and treatments for COPD. Topics include risk factors, ways to reduce the possibilities of developing COPD, what questions to ask your physician, and how to discuss your concerns. Handouts and refreshments will be available. Presented by San Juan Regional Medical Centers Cardiopulmonary Rehab: Carol Cherrey, RN. For more information call 505.566.2287

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 22, 2013

Willis defense attorneys, John Day and Mark Donatelli. The attorneys previously shared information about Willis’ health, saying he suffered from multiple strokes and was unable to travel here and would not receive the appropriate medical treatment if incarcerated. The story changed a bit on Nov. 21, when the attorneys stated Willis was not allowed to board a plane heading for New Mexico. “I’m told he tried to board a plane and was not able to,� Prosecutor Ken Stalter said, adding the San Juan County District Attorney’s Office received a letter from a doctor, but the letter could not be verified and the phone number went straight to voicemail.

“Mr. Willis tried to board an American Airlines flight, but airline personnel believed he was ill and did not allow him to board,� Day said. Donatelli added that he had a number that he “believed� would reach Willis, in a hospital in Springfield, Mo. “We have information about why he might not be here,� Donatelli said, adding it was from a third party. When Willis failed to appear for this hearing, Hawkinson moved quickly to seek the warrant. “We will issue the warrant today and set a $500,000 cash-only bond,� Hawkinson said at the end of the Nov. 21 hearing. Willis allegedly bilked area residents out of money

and property and embezzled funds from Mike Atchison and Quentin Smith in a plan to build a Veteran’s Hospital in Kirtland. Atchison reportedly gave Willis $1.5 million as an investment in the hospital, but it is alleged Willis used the funds to pay for box seats at Bronco Stadium in Denver, as well as to purchase a home for his former attorneys. Willis was charged with embezzlement, racketeering and securities fraud in this case. Smith reportedly gave Willis $5.056 million in precious gemstones and jewelry for safekeeping. When he asked for the items back, Willis allegedly refused. Willis has been the focus of a local, state and federal investigation since his busi-

ness, New Mexico Title, closed in January 2012. The company’s abrupt closing was investigated by the New Mexico Financial Institutions Division as well as the insurance arm of the Public Regulation Commissions, because it was a property title and insurance company. It is alleged the business was greatly mismanaged and that money coming into the business was not being used to pay liens on properties or to pay title insurance premiums, but reportedly to pay for Willis’ lavish lifestyle. The feds also began investigating Willis for similar crimes related to the title company, and other allegations. Atchison has since filed

a civil case against Willis, along with a case brought by the state Financial Institutions Division. The attorney that case Michael Comeau withdrew as Willis’ attorney and is now suing Willis for unpaid legal bills. Day and Donatelli continue to provide legal services to Willis and asked the District Attorney’s Office to allow them an opportunity to contact Willis and give him an opportunity to turn himself in. “We will attempt to reach him and advise him ‌ to avoid unnecessary utilization of law enforcement resources,â€? Donatelli said. The authorities in Branson should be notified once the warrant is issued in the National Crime Information Center database.

Norman Benally, of BHP-Billiton, said the idea of “Crossing the Street� came about because the company has a strong focus on safety. When you are crossing the street you have to look both ways and make sure it is safe enough to get to the other side. Sometimes people hold hands while crossing the street, because there is safety in numbers. When you arrive at the other side of the street there might be a new experience or new beginning. “We look at you as community stakeholders. We

coordinate with one another and cross the street together,� Benally said. “We we get there, it will be a much more stable future.� Risner shared a little bit about the future of BHP Billiton in the Four Corners region. He pointed out that the sale of Navajo Mine to the Navajo Nation will probably be completed within the next couple of weeks. Without that sale the mine most likely would have closed its doors in 2016, he said. “That was an unacceptable outcome to us,� he said. “There are a lot of en-

tities that depend on the mine. ‌ This (sale) was absolutely necessary to see the plant run beyond 2016.� The sale should keep the mine operational through 2031, thus continuing to provide jobs for its 800 employees. Despite the sale, Arizona Public Service Four Corners Power Plant still plans to decrease the amount of coal it purchases from the mine by approximately 30 percent, which will have some impact on operations. The tribe is attempting to find other buyers for the coal it will be mining once the

sale is complete. BHP Billiton also faces a reduction of output from San Juan Mine, which provides power to PNM San Juan Generating Station. “Our customer there is looking at shutting two units and decreasing output by 50 percent,� Risner said, “but we will always do what we can to sustain San Juan Mine. Our objective is to continue to have events like this.� The luncheon not only helps the organizations, Benally said it boosts his and other BHP Billiton employees’ spirits. “We get re-energized by people who say ‘Thank you BHP Billiton. We appreciate you being in our community,’� he said. “That really gives us a boost. It means a lot.�

charity and in-kind donations and services. The company has increased its giving throughout the years, and this year gave more than it has in the past 50 years of giving. This came about because BHP Billiton values the communities in which it operates, Risner said. “We believe it is important to invest in our community,� he said. By doing just that, the company is partnering with non-profit agencies to create a better San Juan County. The luncheon’s theme of “Crossing the Street� came from that belief in investment.

transitions

engagements, weddings, anniversaries, obituaries

obituary

Roland Andrew Torres Sr. 83 Roland Andrew Torres Sr. (Red), born Aug. 4, 1930 in, Welcome, La., died peacefully surrounded by his loving family on Nov. 19, 2013. He was 83. Red honorably served his country during the Korean War. He was a member of The U.S. Army, 3rd Battalion, 7th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division Company also

known as The Cotton Bailers. Red was extremely proud of his war veteran status and loved to share stories of his Army experiences. After the war, Red worked as a sheet metal fabricator. Employed by University Mechanical, he worked on many projects throughout the country. By far the most significant was his work on Navajo Dam located in Northwestern New Mexico. The significance was not the work on the dam, but rather the location. It was here that he met a local Farmington girl who later became the love of his life. Red was one of ten children born to the late Helen and Otis Torres. He is survived by his children Brett, Mandy and husband Tito, Aimee and partner Don, Andrew and wife Trish, treasured grandchildren Charles, Sam, Devyn, Ernesto, Zachery, Caesar and Saige. He is also survived by siblings Herman (Tip), Cesaire, Mildred, Clara and Helen. In addition, Red will be forever

remembered by numerous family members and countless friends. He was preceded in death by his loving wife and best friend of 44 years, Sharron Torres, parents, Helen and Otis Torres, brothers Roy and Joseph (Nick), and sisters Hilda and Pearl. Red grew up on a South Louisiana sugar cane plantation located on the banks

of the Mississippi River. Red was Cajun to the core. I guarantee 63 years out of the Bayou had little effect on his strong accent or love of LSU Football. Friends and family are invited to attend a celebration of his life from 12 p.m. (noon) to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013, at 1245 N. Chaco Ave., Farmington, NM 87401.

LEGALS STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SAN JUAN COUNTY ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT JULIE ROBERTS and TERRY ROBERTS, Plaintiffs, v. HELEN BETSELIE and RELINDA SINGER, Defendants. D-1116-CV-201000907 NOTICE OF PLAINTIFFS’ MOTION TO APPOINT SPECIAL MASTER COMES NOW the Plaintiffs, Julie Roberts and Terry Roberts, by and through their attorneys of record, GERDING & O’LOUGHLIN, P.C. (T. Ryan Lane), and, pursuant to Rule 1004(J), (K), NMRA, hereby provides Notice to the following named Defendants by name, if living; if deceased, their unknown heirs: Defendants Helen Betselie and Relinda Singer, of Plaintiffs’ Motion to Appoint Special Master in the above titled and numbered cause of action. The name, address, and telephone number of Plaintiffs’ attorney is as follows: T. Ryan Lane, P.O. Box 1020, Farmington, New Mexico, 87499, (505) 325-1804. Plaintiffs’ Motion to Appoint Special Master involves the following real property: #16 CR 3935, Farmington, New Mexico, 87401. Respectfully Submitted, ___________________ T. Ryan Lane P.O. Box 1020 Farmington, New Mexico 87499 505-325-1804 Legal No.143 Dates 11/22, 12/6/2013

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Friday, November 22, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

schools certain schools should eventually be added to the plan’s capital projects list. “Are you concerned about the elementary schools?” School Board Member Kyle Rhodes asked Superintendent Janel Ryan. Ryan responded that the large size of this school year’s kindergarten class was unexpected. “With the huge size of kindergarten – that was not anticipated. So you know that number will move to first grade so you will have additional teachers there. If you have enrollment coming in at the same number as your

kindergarten (class) this year, think about the numbers that will be at PV and Farmington High.” The number of enrolled elementary school students has continued to grow. There are 5,374 elementary students enrolled this school year. By 2015, that number is expected to exceed to 5,569 elementary students, according to Strube. Also, 42 portable classrooms have been added to the elementary schools for additional classroom space. A facilities master plan advisory committee – made up of school staff, city of Farmington em-

ployees, and PSFA representatives – suggested to school board members that a thorough study of the elementary school buildings’ capacity and condition should be completed before spending bond money to alleviate the problem. “Before you spend money at each elementary school, really study what is happening at the elementary level,” Strube said. “I think it is time to take a close look at them.” The capital projects that have been included in the preliminary master plan include the renovation and replacement of Farmington High School, renova-

tions and potential replacements at Hermosa Middle School and Northeast Elementary School, and upgrading the heating and air conditioning systems, roof and playground equipment at all elementary schools. The implementation of the safety recommendations from Safe Havens International, a nonprofit safety firm that toured the district’s facilities in August and September, was a project also included in the master plan. The elementary schools are not the only crowded buildings in the district; Piedra Vista High School also is “starting to feel

the crunch,” Strube said. Piedra Vista is at 67 percent capacity and is requesting a portable. “With the new FHS and PV, the district needs to keep an eye on that,” Strube explained. The advisory committee also recommended that the district complete a high school capacity study upon the completion of the new FHS. “PV is on the bubble of being crowded. Is that what the district wants? You should wait for FHS to be completed to determine if something needs to happen to PV, like should there be more buildings or should a

portable be added,” Strube said. Ted Lasiewicz, chief of operations for the school district, said the new FHS is designed for 1,600 students. Currently, there are 1,347 students enrolled at the high school. “We need to look at both high schools so we can see where the high school students are going,” said Lasiewicz, adding staff already has conducted a design analysis on the new high school to “supply the required space” for students. The final facilities master plan must be adopted by the school board during the Dec. 12 regular meeting.

real opportunities in the detention center,” Roga said “There are many areas at the detention center that would lend themselves to a telemedicine visit.” The company currently has no correctional facilities as clients, and County CEO Kim Carpenter said he finds it to be an “interesting” opportunity. “I think there is some merit and benefit to this,” he said.

Roga added that his intention is not to compete with primary care doctors, but to help them. “We refer everyone back to the primary care doctor. We have to preserve that limited care and keep them strong,” he explained. The service basically offers another access-tocare option for county employees and inmates. Without having to visit the hospital’s emergency

room or a local urgent care facility, the patient typically is seen in six minutes, receives a diagnosis in 15 minutes and essentially could be receiving prescription medication in 30 minutes. And all of this comes from board-certified medical providers who are licensed in New Mexico. “Everything is state specific. New Mexico gets only New Mexico doctors, because it is physically

impossible to grab a patient from a state you are not licensed in,” Roga said. These doctors are able to provide care to everyone from age 3 on up. “We replicated a doctor-patient interaction electronically. There is a virtual exam room,” Roga said. “Services are available in English and Spanish. Everyone gets a call back in 72 hours to make sure they are OK.”

If someone is too sick for care, the StatDoctors service will refer them to an Emergency Room and then call ahead to let the ER know the patient is coming. StatDoctors also encourages patients to follow up with their primary care doctor after the initial visit. County Commissioner Keith Johns wanted to know how the doctor

doctors doctor for that type of problem. His purpose of visiting with the Commission was to set up a plan that would allow county employees access to StatDoctors’ services, while also possibly setting a up a Stat Doctors system at the San Juan County Detention Center to save the county money by providing inmates with healthcare via the Web. “I think there are some

* doctors A8


A8

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 22, 2013

calendar

THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. & 1 - 3:30 p.m. Monday - Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. EXERCISE CLASS - WITH JEAN ELISE 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. or 1 - 2 p.m.

Monday/Wednesday/Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: 50 cents per session. Are you losing flexibility and want more energy to do the things you enjoy? If so, this class is what you need to get back into a good exercise program. Work at your own level and build up to where you want to be. Call 505.599.1390 for more information.

Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Achieve total muscle conditioning and flexibility with light weights. Strengthen your muscles and improve your core, with emphasis on stretching and breathing techniques. There are modifications for various fitness levels, so everyone can participate. Class is taught by Patti Glover

DRAWING & CALLIGRAPHY 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bring your own materials and learn some new techniques! Call 505.599.1380 for more information.

TAI CHI 9:30 a.m. Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Tai Chi is a series of fluid movements that can help with balance, flexibility, and muscle tone. These gentle exercises will leave you feeling refreshed. Free to anyone 50+. Info:

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seen in a comparison between Stat Doctors’ $50 fee and the typical cost of an ER visit, which is $1,300. Urgent care services can cost anywhere from $150 to $300 per visit, while a primary care physician is about $110. StatDoctors recoups some of the cost for services through an annual provider fee that would be paid by the county. The fee is estimated to cost the county between $1 to $3 per employee. “Your team has negotiated very good rates,” Roga said. “We are not making much on this. We want to see this work.” Roga added that StatDoctors would not take the place the county’s health insurance plan; it would just be an additional option for employees. Carpenter explained that this was simply a presentation, but that county staff might return to the Commission and request its approval for a contract with StatDoctors.

READING IN NAVAJO 10 - 11:30 a.m. Fridays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bible reading in the Navajo Language, taught by Dorothy Tewangoitewa. Info: 505.599.1380

Party on the floor with Latin dance music that will make you smile. This exhilarating exercise class will get you moving to the beat. Cost is $2.50 per session. Info: 505.566.2288

ZUMBA GOLD 50+ 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave.

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doctors might diagnose strep throat. “What do you do if you need to look in someone’s throat,” he said. “If they are using a Webcam or a smart phone app, we can see their throat,” Roga said. Commissioner GloJean Todacheene wanted to know if a person could be treated without a Webcam. Roga said that would depend on the state, but in New Mexico the state requires a doctor to have a “face-to-face encounter” with a patient, so a Webcam or smart phone camera would have to be used. The patient, after seeing the doctor, receives education material, “very simple but sophisticated,” it is written for a fourth-grade reading level, and Roga said the company has a 98 percent satisfaction rate. “We have good client data to validate our claim that we have saved them money,” he said. The cost savings can be

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 22, 2013

DEC. 2, 2013 – JAN. 3, 2014

BLOOMFIELD CHRISTMAS PARADE AND CELEBRATION OF LIGHTS Bloomfield hosts the annual lighted Christmas parade beginning at 6:30 p.m. Route starts at the Bloomfield High School. Official lighting of the Celebration of Lights displays follows the Bloomfield Christmas parade and will remain in the park through the Holidays. Creating a wonderful winter wonderland at Salmon Park, 501 N. 5th St., in Bloomfield, N.M. Information: 505.632.0880

DEC. 4 – DEC. 7

FESTIVAL OF TREES Hours are 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Wednesday, 9:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursday & Friday, and 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday. Don’t miss this traditional favorite event at the Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington St. in Exhibit Halls 1 and 3, and the Miriam M. Taylor Theater. Entry to see the trees is free. Get tickets NOW for the Teddy Bear Tea, 9 to 10 a.m. or 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. on Thursday, Dec. 5. For more information call 505.599.1148.

DEC. 5

FARMINGTON CHRISTMAS PARADE The annual lighted Christmas parade starts at 5:45 p.m. Parade route runs through Historic Downtown Farmington along Main Street. For parade applications and theme, call the Farmington Chamber of Commerce. Information: 505.325.0279

DEC. 6

CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY DELIGHT Come to Sycamore Park Community Center, 1051 Sycamore St., from 5 to 8 p.m., and get into the spirit of the season with us. Join us for hot chocolate and cookies. Lexi’s dance classes will have their dance recital beginning at 6 p.m. Don’t miss this FREE event. Info: 505.566.2480 or www.fmtn.org/spcc.

DEC. 6

BAR D WRANGLERS CHRISTMAS JUBILEE Presented at 7 p.m., at the Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington St. Call 505.599.1148 or 877.599.3331 for ticket information or go to www.fmtn.org/civiccenter.

DEC. 6

RIVERGLO Luminarias light up the river’s bank and the evening sky. Celebrate the holiday season with a stroll along the river’s edge with carolers and bell choirs as well as hot chocolate and food at Berg Park from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Information: 505.326.7602 or 1.800.448.1240

DEC. 7

HOLIDAY FAMILY CRAFT WORKSHOP The Holidays are coming! Bring yourself or your whole family to the Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road, from 9 to 11:30 a.m., and spend the morning creating fun and simple Christmas holiday cards, decorations, and gifts! Refreshments will be served and special door prizes will be given. Register no later than Thursday, Dec. 5. Cost is $5. For more information call the Recreation Center at 505.599.1184, or www.fmtn.org/recreation

DEC. 7

SAN JUAN COLLEGE LUMINARIAS Display illuminates the campus of San Juan College with thousands of candlelit bags. This is the largest luminaria display of a non-profit entity in New Mexico. San Juan College is located at 4601 College Blvd. in Farmington. Information: 505.566.3403

DEC. 10

THE MOSCOW BALLET’S NUTCRACKER Treat your family to this seasonal favorite performance. Get your tickets now for the Moscow Ballet’s Nutcracker at the Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington St., at 7:30 p.m. Get online at

www.fmtn.org/civiccenter, or call 505.599.1148.

DEC. 11

SKATEWAY USA FIELD TRIP Join us at Sycamore Park Community Center, 1051 Sycamore St., for a trip to Skateway USA from 6 to 8 p.m. Fees are $5 to get in and skate rental is $2 for quads or $3 for blades. Personal skates are allowed

at Skateway USA. All participants must have a signed permission slip to attend. Info: 505.566.2480. MARIACHI CHRISTMAS Presented at 7:30 p.m. at the Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington St. All Seats $30. For Civic Center information call 505.599.1148 or go to

www.fmtn.org/civiccenter.

DEC. 13

HOLIDAY ART WALK Come walk through Historic Downtown Farmington, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., and celebrate the season with art receptions and open houses at many downtown locations. A wide variety of art from regional artists will be show-

cased throughout many of the downtown shops, galleries and restaurants. Art Walk maps will be available at participating locations. The Art Walk is coordinated by the Farmington Downtown Association and sponsored by Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs. Information: 505.599.1419

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DEC. 14

JINGLEBELL JAMBOREE Join the Recreation Center, Aquatic Center, and Sycamore Park Community Center from 10 a.m. to noon as we celebrate the holidays. Come to our Jingle Bell Jamboree at the Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road, to visit Santa and tell him what you want for Christmas! We will have a special holiday craft to make, games to play, and wonderful holiday goodies to eat. This is a Recreation Division/PRCA Department Event. For more information call the

Recreation Center at 505.599.1184, the Aquatic Center at 505.599.1167, or Sycamore Park Community Center at 505.566.2480. SANTA’S CANDY CANE CHRISTMAS Join the Farmington Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road, from 9:30 a.m. to noon to celebrate the holidays. Drop in to visit Santa and tell him the wants for Christmas, make a special holiday craft, play a game, hear a story and drink some hot chocolate. All ages invited. Information: 505.599. 1184


4

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 22, 2013

SATURDAY NIGHT FUN! It’s back this fall! Come to the Farmington Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road, 5:30 to 10 p.m. the 2nd Saturday of each month through January, for an evening full of jolly activities! Dodgeball, basketball, wallyball, four square, music, movies, board games, good eats, and more are on the agenda! This is a great place to hang out with your friends! Event is planned and supervised by Recreation Center staff, with entry sign-in and sign-out. The Recreation Center is closed to the public during this event. Don’t miss the party! Registration is limited, so sign up now at webtrac.fmtn.org. Cost is $8. Info: 505.599.1184. FAMILY ASTRONOMY NIGHT Celebrate the winter skies and learn about our universe at the Farmington Museum’s First Astronomy Night at 3041 E. Main St. from 5 to 8 p.m. There will be star legends from many cultures featured in the Stardome planetarium, and a chance to observe the sky through a telescope on the terrace, weather permitting of course. Join us for many entertaining stations set up through out the Farmington Museum, such as Spectroscopes, survival in a vacuum – Peeps in Peril!, What is a Serving Size-Space Food, Pop Rockets, measuring hand strength with our Vernier Probes, and much, much more!!! This is a FREE event, so pack up the family and get to the Farmington Museum!! Info: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org/museums. ANNUAL AUDUBON CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT The Riverside Nature Center will take part in this nationwide project which has been carried out for over 100 years. From 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., come spend part or all of the day counting all the birds, common and rare, in their wintering grounds throughout the Farmington area. Information: 505.599.1422

DEC. 17

CHACO CANYON CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT Join volunteers from the Four Corners Bird Club and the Riverside Nature Center for the winter census of the

birds at Chaco Culture National Historic Park. Participants should be experienced birders and able to hike in back country areas in winter weather. Information: 505.599.1422

DEC. 20

WINTER SOLSTICE CELEBRATION Come mark the Winter Solstice at the Farmington Public Library and enjoy a “natural light” event at noon, along with activities that brighten up the winter. Information: 505.599.1270 or www.infoway.org

DEC. 21

REINDEER ROMP Christmas is coming! Join the Downtown Association and the Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs Department for a little holiday cheer. Join us for the Reindeer Romp or the North Pole Stroll! The event will be held at Orchard Plaza in downtown Farmington from 4 to 6 p.m. and will feature a 5K Reindeer Romp (chip timed) and a 2 Mile North Pole Stroll. Registration is $15 and includes a shirt. The 5k will start promptly at 4 p.m., walkers will follow. This is a family friendly event with children’s winter carnival games, live holiday music, hot chocolate, hot apple cider, holiday cookies, and a chance to see Santa! For more information call the Farmington Recreation Center at 505.599.1184. SIMPLE BIRD FEEDERS Come to the Riverside Nature Center, in Animas Park, off Browning Parkway, from 1 to 3 p.m., for this annual activity. Learn about feeding birds and make tree ornaments, which birds can eat, to decorate a tree at the nature center or to take home. Find out what birds eat and how to attract them, and learn the common winter birds in this area. Watch and learn the birds outside the Nature Center as you work. This is a family activity for all ages. Info: 505.599.1422

DEC. 28

Holiday Glam Night

STARS AND STORIES Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Learn the winter stars, constellations, and the myths which help remember them on a short walk through Animas Park. If there is snow on the ground, it will be especially beautiful. Dress for the weather, and bring a flashlight. Binoculars are helpful. Children should be old enough to understand listening quietly. No pets, please. Info: 505.599.1422

DEC. 23 – JAN. 4

FARMINGTON AQUATIC CENTER HOLIDAY BREAK HOURS The Farmington Aquatic Center, 1151 N. Sullivan Ave., will have public swim from 1 to 4 p.m. and 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. for Christmas Break. Please call the Farmington Aquatic Center at 505.599.1167 or go online at www.fmtn.org/aquatics for more information.

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FARMINGTON AQUATICS HOLIDAY HOURS The Farmington Aquatic Center, 1151 N. Sullivan Ave., will be closed all day for the Christmas Holiday. Please call the Farmington Aquatic Center, 1151 N. Sullivan Ave., at 505.599.1167 for more information. Lions Pool, 405 N. Wall Ave., will be closed all day for the Christmas Holiday. Please call Lions Pool at 505.599.1187 for more information or log on to www.fmtn.org/aquatics.

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DEC. 23

LIVE NAVAJO NATIVITY This annual live nativity uses traditional Navajo clothing and live animals. The Nativity scene is presented entirely by children at the Four Corners Home for Children, at 2103 W. Main St., in Farmington, from 6 to 8 p.m. Information: 505.325.0255, 888.325.0255 or www.navajoministries.org

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College display lights up the Holiday Season on Dec. 7 Enjoy a glistening beginning to the holiday season when San Juan College provides its gift to the community with the 35th annual Luminarias display, Saturday, Dec. 7. A glimmering array of luminarias will shine from rooftops, along sidewalks, in courtyards and select campus parking lots throughout the evening. The community can choose to drive or walk through. Walkers can begin enjoying

the display at 5 p.m., while the driving route will open at 6 p.m. Others will want to take advantage of the Park n’ Ride Red Apple Luminaria Trolley from Piedra Vista High School. The Trolley is free and will run from 6 to 8 p.m. Piedra Vista High School students will have hot chocolate available for sale, adding a tasty touch to the evening. Only two entrances will be open during the event. Walkers may park in the Quality Center for Business, the School of Technology and Trades, and the north Child and Family Development Center lots, which are accessible by traveling south on College Boulevard from Piñon Hills Boulevard. Drivers will enter the

college from Butler Avenue traveling north on Sunrise Parkway. They will then follow the marked route through the campus and exit at College Boulevard, where traffic will be required to turn south to 30th Street. Please note that the Piñon Hills Boulevard entrance to the college will be closed during the Luminaria display. As a courtesy, all drivers are asked to turn their lights off as they drive through the display. Mary’s Kitchen will have snacks and beverages available for sale from 5 to 8:30 p.m. The sounds of the season will ring campus wide as San Juan College’s radio station KSJE 90.9-FM will broadcast Christmas carols. Walkers can warm up with

a free cup of hot chocolate, provided by SJC Associated Students in the Sun’s Room. The San Juan College Latter-day Saint Student Association will enhance the evening by singing Christmas and holiday favorites during a mini-performance (15 to 20 minutes), at 7:30 p.m., in the Learning Commons Plaza. Weather permitting, the Planetarium will host its annual Star Gaze from 6 to 9:30 p.m., in the inner courtyard. A telescope will be set up to view the night sky. The Office of Student Activities coordinates the event with help from students, staff and community volunteers who set up and light the candles. Candle lighting begins at 3 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 7, and volunteers can pick up their supplies in the Sun’s room at San Juan College. The week prior, hundreds of area school children help fill paper bags with sand and candles, which are then set out by the College students and staff. For further information about the event, contact the San Juan College Office of Student Activities at 505.566.3403.

Bring the entire family and celebrate the season at the

Christmas Jubliee Friday December 7 Farmington Civic Center Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Show Starts at 7 p.m. Tickets $17/adult $9/children, 10 & under Available at the box office Join the Bar D Wranglers for an evening of Christmas songs, stories, and family fun!


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 22, 2013

The annual lighted Christmas parade starts at 5:45 p.m. Parade route runs through Historic Downtown Farmington along Main Street. For parade applications and theme, call the Farmington Chamber of Commerce. Information: 505.325.0279.

Kathy’s Discount Party Store Your Holiday Party Headquarters! Wedding Happy New Year!

Donate Ornaments to Festival of Trees! Donate Christmas, new or like new, ornaments.

Baby Shower Sports Parties Anniversary

Birthday Star Plaza 3836-B East Main Street • 505-324-1080 Monday-Friday 10am-6 pm Saturday 9am-6pm www.KathysDiscountPartyStore.com IF WE DONʼT HAVE WHAT YOU NEED, WEʼLL HELP YOU FIND IT!

Ornaments will be displayed on a Christmas Tree and may be purchased for $1.

To donate ornaments call Mary Lou 326-1934 or hand deliver ornaments to PMS, 608 Reilly Ave, Farmington thru Wed Dec 4 Civic Center on Mon, Dec 2 thru Wed Dec 4 All proceeds benefit Presbyterian Medical Services (PMS)


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Friday, November 22, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Festival of Trees

Kick off the holidays for a good cause LAUREN SEIP Tri-City Tribune The annual Festival of Trees in Farmington is the perfect way to kick off the holiday cheer. The festival will be from Wednesday, Dec. 4, through Saturday, Dec. 7, at the Farmington Civic Center. During the four-day festival – sponsored by Merrion Oil & Gas – guests may enjoy various Christmas activities such as a

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Teddy Bear Tea, where children receive a free Teddy Bear; Coffee Break with the Trees, where people can come enjoy a fresh cup of coffee and homemade bread while looking at the decorated Christmas trees that were donated by area residents; and Senior Social Time. One new activity is Tea with the Trees at 2 p.m. on Dec. 5. “Instead of having

a fashion show and lunch, we are changing that and doing a high tea,” said Melissa Sharpe, Festival of Trees co-chair. Then at 5 p.m. on Dec. 6, guests may attend a Holiday Happy Hour featuring live entertainment by Jose Villarreal. Tickets are $10 per person. “The Festival also will remain open to

* festival 8

Arts and crafts

Roadrunners 4-H Club host annual Christmas event

Walk or drive through the Farmington campus to view a glimmering aray of luminarias. You can also choose to ttake the Park n’ Ride Red Apple Luminaria Trolley from P Piedra Vista High School. The Trolley is free and will run ffrom 6 to 8 p.m. Information: 566-3403

Photo by Tony Bennett Photography

Experience the true meaning of Christmas with unique local handmade arts and crafts. Enjoy food and crafts from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the 3rd Annual Roadrunners 4-H Club Arts and Crafts Fair in the McGee Park Multi-Use Building. More than 50 vendors will be on hand to help you fill your Christmas list. Admission is free. For information call Linann Easley at 505.320.6635.

Jewelry & Accessories • Lotions & Candles Men & Women’s Clothing • Shoes • Handbags & more.

Christmas Gifts Galore! 4301 Largo, Suite H 327-2215 Between Citizen’s Bank and Dad’s Diner


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 22, 2013

festival the public on Friday evening,� Sharpe said. On the last day of the festival, the donated Christmas trees will be raffled off in a drawing. The raffle items must be retrieved by the winners between 1 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. on Dec. 7. Festival tickets may be purchased in advance or on the day of the event at the Civic Center ticket office. For more information contact the Civic Center at 505.599.1148 or go to www.pmsfestivaloftrees.com. The proceeds collected at the festival will benefit Presbyterian Medical Services, a non-profit organization.

Festival of Trees Schedule Wednesday, Dec. 4 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tree Purchase Opportunity 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Festival Open to the Public (Free Admission) 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PMS Holiday Health Fair (Free Admission)

Thursday, Dec. 5 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. Teddy Bear Tea ($5 per person) 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Teddy Bear Tea ($5 per person) 11:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Festival Open to the Public (Free Admission) 2 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tea with the Trees ($15 per person) 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Family Night (Free Admission)

Friday, Dec. 6 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Coffee Break with the Trees ($6 per person) 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Festival Open to the Public (Free Admission) 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Senior Social Time (Free Admission) 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Holiday Happy Hour ($10 per person) Food, drinks, and dancing to musician Jose Villareal

Saturday, Dec. 7 8:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. Festival Open to the Public (Free Admission) Noon Ticket sales cease 12:15 p.m. – Doors to exhibit halls closed 12:15 p.m. to 1 p.m. Entertainment in auditorium 1 p.m. Raffle in auditorium 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Raffle item pick-up

Christmas fun

Holiday Paper Crafting Workshops for adults The Farmington Museum invites you to Adult Holiday Paper Crafting Workshops from 6 to 8:30 p.m. beginning Dec. 2, through Dec. 6. Handmade paper crafts are an inexpensive and creative way to

make beautiful gifts and decorations for the holidays! Learn a wide range of paper crafting techniques. On Monday make Curly Kusudama Star Ornaments, on Tuesday create Paper Cone Christmas Trees, on

Wednesday put together Paper Poinsettia Wreaths, on Thursday string Lacy Paper Winter Garlands, and on Friday have fun with Exploding Holiday Photo Boxes. The Farmington Museum is lo-

cated at 3041 E. Main St. The workshops are for ages 18+, $7 each and supplies are provided. Space is limited, register by coming into the Museum or calling 505.599.1174.


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MM LIFE LEISURE

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2013

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Digital painting, jewelry, pottery and more Feat of Clay hosts three local artist in mixed media show Feat of Clay Gallery will host local artists Elaine Frink, photographer and digital artist; Lou Mancel, jeweler and metal artist; and Toni Trosky, professional potter, for their Nov. 22 to Dec. 14 show. There will be a reception from 5 to 7 p.m. on Nov. 22 at Feat of Clay Gallery, 107 S. Main Ave. in Aztec. Frink’s art includes photography and digital painting. She creates art because she can’t stop. “I would create even if I were the only one seeing them,” she said. Digital painting is a relatively new medium and Frink started near its beginning of the genre using Adobe Photoshop. Fink said when she realized she could paint on the computer she was thrilled and tried everything she could find. “I still, many years later, love every aspect of it. I love thinking, ‘I wonder what would happen if – ? ‘ It is so much fun to be able to try so many different kinds of art – oil, watercolor, pastels, pen and ink, impressionism, portraits and anything you can imagine you can try, and if you hate it you can delete it,” Fink said. She also restores old and/or damaged photos for people. “It is such a challenge and so uplifting to fix a photograph of someone’s life that they thought was ruined forever,” she said. As a teenager, Mancel learned the basics of Navajo style silver-smithing. In 2000, she put aside her oil painting when she realized that silver and gemstones are the media that allow her to “get the ideas in my head out in a form that is right for me.” She uses both faceted and cabochon stones as colors on her pallet. Her jewelry is described as a nature-based subject matter

with a focus on geometric designs emphasizing her Celtic background. Being a voracious learner, her jewelry continues to evolve as new techniques and ideas emerge. Mancel expanded the horizons of her jewelry in 2011 by taking the fine techniques of jewelry making to larger designer wall art. She uses stones, intricate saw work, stamping, riveting and many types of metals and stones, to push the envelope into bas-relief sculpture designs. Many of the ideas portray her Celtic background. “The ability to use other

metals beside silver has allowed me to explore the wonders of patina – the coloring of metal using heat and chemicals,” she said. In 2012, she started exploring how to add even more colors on metal with the addition of enamels. Her patience in the creation and use of multiple types of chain work from European 4 in 1 chainmaille, Byzantine, to Japanese style chain, accents many of her pieces.

Mancel was a member of Feat of Clay from September 2006 to January 2013. You can see more of her work at www.designbylou.com, on Facebook at www.facebook.com/pages/Designb y Lou/147719545314790?r ef=ts or contact her at Lmancel@aol.com for more

information. Trosky began working as a professional potter 18 years ago. Raised in Andalucía, Spain, where hand painted, brightly decorated pottery is made, this pottery was part of her family’s daily rituals and the colorful pots also decorated their patios and homes. “My inspiration came from God’s creation and my childhood’s recollection of places and things. I do a lot of functional pottery,

wheel thrown. I also love to work with slabs and coils, integrating many types of clay using different methods of firing – keeping life interesting,” Trosky said. She has exhibited pottery in juried shows in our region, as well as in national and international shows. Feat of Clay Gallery features local artists. The hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday. For more information, call Feat of Clay at 505.334.4335.


A10

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 22, 2013

“Rejoice And Be Glad,” by Doug Miller.

Teasyatwho Gallery re-opening

Seven artists present diverse talent just in time for Christmas The Teasyatwho Gallery in Aztec will be featuring seven artists for the holi-

day season this year. Owner, Ambrose Teasyatwho, has invited some of his

favorite artists to participate in this festive holiday opening.

“Seemingly Similar and Yet So Different,” by Beth McClure.

Featured artists include Elnora Teasyatwho, weaver; Doug Miller, gourds and paintings; Beth McClure, mixed media and recycled art; Betty Mauldin, recycled art; Lorenzo Hogue, metal sculptor; Amos Trujillo, paintings and Ambrose Teasyatwho, carver. Ambrose has featured local artists as well as artists out of the area, and he said this show will feature quite a diversity of

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talent. “The Teasyatwho Gallery is a wonderful example of visitor friendly ambiance encompassing traditional and experimental art forms,” she said. The Holiday Show will

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open with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 22. The show will run through the holiday season with the special inclusion of “gifts of art” by all the artists.

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birth announcements Mercy Medical Center Oct. 1, 2013 Katherine & Damian Costello, Shiprock, Davin James Shea, 8 lbs. 5 oz, 8 p.m. Oct. 3, 2013 Lisa Aragon & Cameron Cribbs, Farmington, Uriah Joseph Cameron, 6 lbs. 11 oz, 6:26 p.m. Oct. 11, 2013 Jessica Martinez & Joey Alcon, Bloomfield, Dominik Rylee, 6 lbs. 5 oz, 2:31 a.m., Oct. 13, 2013 Natasha & Steven

Meador, Aztec, Jase Steven, 7 lbs. 9 oz, 11:41 p.m. Oct. 15, 2013 Sarah & Ryan Clark, Aztec, Jaxxon West, 7 lbs. 2 oz, 1:08 p.m. Oct. 17, 2013 Valerie Martinez & Felton Smith, Aztec, Wednesday Lucille, 8 lbs. 14 oz, 10:05 p.m. Oct. 26, 2013 Kathryn & Joshua Swanson, Aztec, Cerelia Jayne, 5 lbs. 8 oz, 3:25 p.m. Oct. 29, 2013 Whitney & Eric Louive, Aztec, Brylend Hunter, 7 lbs. 11 oz, 9 p.m.

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HEAD START/EARLY HEAD START NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS! We offer High Quality Programs which are available at no cost for children 6 weeks -5 years old in the Farmington, Aztec Bloomfield, and Kirtland areas Children with special needs or in foster care are welcome Services offered include: • Quality Early Childhood Education • Developmental,Vision, and Hearing Screenings • Community Referrals and Resources • Parent Involvement • Nutritious Meals • Safe, Licensed Facilities and ...much more!

For more information please call:

®

505-326-6434 ®

or visit 608 Reilly Ave, Farmington


A11

Friday, November 22, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

prca tracks

Sunrise Comet Walk On Saturday, Nov. 23, from 6 to 7:30 a.m., meet at the Riverside Nature Center in Animas Park off Browning Parkway. A recently-discovered comet, Comet ISON, should be visible just before sunrise this morning. Astronomers think Comet ISON may be the comet which was last visible in 1608, when it was noted by Spanish explorers in the Southwest and by other viewers around the world. Hope for clear weather, and come for the Nature Center’s first-ever Sunrise Walk to see it. Of course, in any weather, we will also see

the animals which are active at sunrise, and perhaps even an owl. Come at 6 a.m. for coffee or hot chocolate before we start our walk of about 2 miles. Bring binoculars if you have them. For more information, call 505.599.1422 Thanksgiving Holiday Hours and more On Monday, Nov. 25, through Wednesday, Nov. 27, the Farmington Aquatic Center, 1151 N. Sullivan Ave., will have two public swim sessions, 1 to 4 p.m. and 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 28, the Farmington Aquatic Center and Lions Pool at 405 N. Wall Ave., will be closed all day. Friday, Nov. 29, the Farmington Aquatic Center will be closed in the morning and open for public

and lap swim from 1 to 4 p.m. and 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Lions Pool will be closed all day. On Saturday, Nov. 30, Lions Pool will be closed all day. While you are at the Aquatic Center, ask how you can get Free Swimming Lessons for classes that start on Jan. 6. Space is limited, so find out NOW how to qualify for this special funding. For more information go to www.fmtn.org/aquatics, call the Farmington Aquatic Center at 505.599.1167, or Lions Pool at 505.599.1187

Be healthy and well Come to the Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex at 208 N. Wall Ave. on Wednesday, Nov. 27, from 10 to 11 a.m., for a presentation on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, or COPD. This course will teach preventive measures and treatments for COPD. Topics include risk factors, ways to reduce the possibilities of developing COPD, what questions to ask your physician, and how to discuss your concerns. Handouts and refreshments will be available.

Presented by the San Juan Regional Medical Center Cardiopulmonary Rehab: Carol Cherrey, RN. Don’t miss the next class in this Health & Wellness series on Wednesday, Dec. 11, where the presentation will be Old School vs. New School, Part 2. For more information call 505.566.2287 or go to www.fmtn.org/bdsc. Engage, Farmington! As part of the Farmington’s Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Affairs development of a Master Plan, MindMixer

& PRCA will launch a fourmonth Engage Farmington social media website, asking community members to give us “your piece of the puzzle.” We want to hear what your vision is for the community to help us create a PRCA Plan 4 Life. Topics will change monthly and if you have a “big” idea, let’s hear it! Sign up, contribute, share, and win rewards at prcaplan4life.mindmixer.com. Engage and be a part of the decision making process for Farmington’s future! For more information call 505.599.1484.

farmington pets of the week The Farmington Animal Shelter Hours are Mon. - Fri. 10 a.m. to 5:30p.m.; Sat. and Sun. noon to 3p.m. Also on Sundays at PETCO from noon to 3 p.m.

Benny is a 1-year-old domestic short-hair. She is very soft and cuddly. She likes to be scratched behind her ears.

Max is a 1-year-old male Labrador Retriever cross. He is very friendly and is good with other dogs and with children.

Adoption Prices (Dogs): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $100; 6 mo. to 6 yrs. $80; Over 6 yrs. $50 Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the dog must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) Adoption Prices (Cats): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $70; 6 mo. to a 6 yrs $60; Over 6 yrs. $50. Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the cat must be over the age or 6

Riley is 6-month-old male chocolate Labrador Retriever cross. She is full of energy and loves to run and play. Mary is 2-year-old white and orange calico. She likes to chase balls and is very playful.

yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) If you are interested in any of these animals, please give us a call at 505.599.1098. We have a large variety from which to choose, and we want to take the opportunity to thank everyone who chooses to save a life and adopt a local shelter animal. The Farmington Animal Shelter will host an Adopt-A-Thon, starting Tuesday, Oct. 29, through Wednesday, Nov. 13. All animals will be $39 regardless of size, breed, or type.

The Farmington Animal Shelter is moving soon to its new home at the Farmington Regional Animal Shelter on Browning Parkway. The AdoptA-Thon will help facilitate the move, and situate as many animals as possible into their forever homes. At the Farmington Animal Shelter, each cat and dog up for adoption, will be spayed or neutered, vaccinated, de-wormed, microchipped, and treated with a flea and tick preventive. The Farmington Animal Shelter Adopt-A-Thon, now underway, will be extended an additional week, through Wednesday, Nov. 20. All animals will be $39 regardless of size, breed, or type.

Farmington public library Please note that the Farmington Public Library will be closed Thursday, Nov. 28 through Sunday, Dec. 1, for the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. Online resources are available at www.infoway.org. Starting on Nov. 22, log the books you’ve read dur-

Industrial Cooling Exchange – I.C.E. Chris Jaquez Jr & Chris Jaquez Sr "We are appreciative of Four Corners Community Bank taking the inherent risk that comes with all new start up businesses. Our bank believed that we could and would offer products and services that would make I.C.E. and the bank successful partners. FCCB stood behind our vision and also gave us the foothold we needed to start the race set before us. We are glad that our bank provides much needed assistance and faith in local economic ventures, keeping jobs and money local.”

It Just Makes Sense.

www.thebankforme.com 505-327-3222

ing the holidays, as part of the Farmington Public Library’s Warm Up with a Good Book reading program. Information and registration at www.infoway.org. Thursday, Nov. 21 – 5 p.m. Reel Readers at the Farmington Public Library, featuring The Social Network, based on the book by Ben Mezrich. Bring your dinner, and enjoy the film, then participate in a discussion. For more information, and a complete schedule of this season’s Reel Readers selections, log on to www.infoway.org. Monday, Nov. 25 2 p.m. Get a “sneak peek” of the upcoming Youth Maker Fair at the Farmington Public Library. Learn how to make a “Bristlebot” and get ideas for more projects that you can present! For more information about the Make. Do. programs at the Farmington Public Library, please log on to www.infoway.org.

Tuesday, Nov. 26 9:45 a.m. Take a free computer class at the Farmington Public Library. Today’s class will focus on an Intro to Google Documents. To register for this class and for a complete schedule of free computer classes at the Farmington Public Library, please log on to www.infoway.org. Wednesday, Nov. 27 9 a.m. – 8 p.m. No School Day at the Farmington Public Library! All day superhero movie marathon for Teens in the Teen Zone, starting at 9 a.m. For younger students, join us for Story Time at 10 a.m., crafts at 10:30 and a movie at 1 p.m. For more information and for the library’s “Unattended Children Policy” please log on to www.infoway.org or call 505.599.1273. Save your best landscape pictures! The Farmington Public Library’s annual photo contest for 2014 is coming soon!


MM SPORTS

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FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Concussions sideline players

Gautsche, Carrier will miss last two Lobo games

Wolf Creek Wolf Creek Ski Area opened Nov. 9. As of midday on Thursday, Nov. 20, Wolf Creek had received a total 66 inches of snow since opening, including 16 inches last weekend. By mid-day Wednesday, Nov. 20, the snow depth at the summit at Wolf Creek and halfway down the mountain was 38 inches. Snow was falling at Wolf Creek on Wednesday with more snow predicted through the weekend. “The weather forecast is for snow until Monday,” said Sarah Stephens, snow reporter for Wolf Creek Ski Area. “It looks like this weekend is going to be great.” Taos Ski Area Taos Ski Area is scheduled to open on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 28. Taos Ski Area has received 60 inches of snow since October, said Adriana Blake, marketing director for Taos Ski Area. On Wednesday snow at the summit totaled 25 inches. Blake said on Wednesday that Taos Ski Area had received nine inches in the previous five days. The National Weather Service is predicting snow through the weekend for Taos Ski Area. Blake said both sides of the mountain at Taos Ski Area are scheduled to open next week. Purgatory at Durango Mountain Resort Purgatory at Durango Mountain Resort is scheduled to open on Friday, Nov. 29. Purgatory will begin its opening with a weekend schedule – 9 a.m. Friday through 4 p.m. Sunday – until mid-December when Purgatory is scheduled to be open seven days a week. As of mid-morning on Thursday, Purgatory had received 41 inches of snow since October, said Kim Oyler, director of communications for Purgatory at Durango Mountain Resort. Snow was falling Wednesday morning at Purgatory. Oyler said Wednesday morning that the mid-mountain base depth at Purgatory was 26 inches. The National Weather Service is predicting as much as two feet of snow through this weekend at Purgatory.

UNM football coach Bob Davie announced quarterback Cole Gautsche and running back Kasey Carrier will miss the final two games of the season because of concussion symptoms. For Gautsche, this is at least the third time in 13 months he has missed action because of concussion symptoms. “We are going to go back and research through high school to find out exactly what happened in high school and all his incidents here,” said a concerned Bob Davie. “We are going to pull out all stops to diagnose what the problem is and how severe the problem is.” Davie also indicated there’s a chance the team could redshirt Gautsche next season. The sophomore quarterback is second on the team in rushing with 777 yards and 8 touchdowns. He’s also thrown for another 7 scores. Carrier has rushed for 1,122 yards and 9 touchMoving toward the beginning of December means another factor that fantasy owners have to consider before setting their lineups: the weather. This past weekend weather from the Midwest to the east coast had influence on games and fantasy teams. The weather is a factor for defenses in traditional cold weather cities and can put a crushing end to the scores of wide receivers and quarterbacks. So the time of year has begun where checking the weather becomes just as important as checking the inactives. Each week the Fantasy Geek will give you some unsolicited advice on playing NFL Fantasy Football. Realizing that the Thursday night game is already over, players from Thursday’s game will not be in consideration, The Farmington and Navajo Prep football teams are the lone survivors in what’s left of the fall season. After Thanksgiving break this week, the basketball season gets going full speed and wrestling is just around the corner. Time to consider all that we are thankful for as the school year is a third of the way over. I am thankful for a full week off !! Last Week… The volleyball state championships were last weekend with the local volleyball teams beginning pool play on Thursday with

THIS WEEK IN SPORTS JP Murrieta downs this season. The senior also has one touchdown catch this year. Say What?! There’s coach speak, and then there’s crazy talk. I think Davie may have suffered a concussion of his own on Saturday. Following UNM’s 6642 loss to Colorado State, Davie said he can “appreciate the effort on defense.” In the words of ESPN broadcasters, “Come on, Man!” Did he see the 66 on the scoreboard next to Colorado State’s name? Colorado State racked up 649 yards of offense on 77 plays. UNM gave up 8.4 yards every snap. CSU running back Kapri Bibbs finished with 291 yards and 6 touchdowns. Maybe Davie meant to

say he can appreciate his team’s effort on “offense.” The Lobos did score 42 points of their own on 527 yards, including a 101-yard kick return for a touchdown. Colorado State couldn’t stop UNM either. Davie has been honest with the media since he arrived. I’ve always seen him as a straight shooter, a welcome change from the previous coaching staff, but let’s be honest. The defense is young and inexperienced and can’t stop anybody right now. This defense is giving up almost 40 points a game. Following his comment about his team’s effort on defense, Davie went on to say, “People may certainly have the right to be cynical when I say that, and they certainly can. I understand

THE FANTASY GEEK Rick Hoerner

and since most leagues let you change players that haven’t played yet, every other squad is fair game. Each week we’ll look at the players that led to victory or disaster in Love Them and Loathe Them, followed by a section on Studs and Duds, who you may look at starting and sitting this week. Finally, there will be a quick section on pick-ups on the waiver wire for some players that may be available in your league. Last Week with The Geek… Week No. 11 Record – 6-4 60% Overall Record – 74-36 67% Love Them … Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger – 367 Yards, 4 TDs, 12 Yards Rush-

ing Cardinals QB Carson Palmer – 419 Yards, 2 TDs Buccaneers RB Bobby Rainey – 167 Total Yards, 2 Catches, 3 TDs Eagles RB LeSean McCoy –150 Total Yards, 4 catches, 2 TDs Lions WR Calvin Johnson – 6 Catches, 179 Yards, 2 TDs – All in the first half Steelers WR Antonio Brown – 7 Catches, 147 Yards, 2 TDs Titans TE Delanie Walker – 10 Catches, 91 Yards, TD Texans TE Garrett Graham – 7 Catches, 163 Yards, TD Bengals DST – 4 Sacks, 3 Ints, 2 TDs, Blocked Kick, 14 Points Allowed Loathe Them… Bengals QB Andy Dalton – 93 Yards, 3 TDs, 2 Ints 49ers QB Colin Kaepernick Ryan – 127 Yards, 2 TDs, Int, 25 Yards Rushing Vikings RB Adrian Peterson – 65

RICK’S PICKS

Rick Hoerner the brackets set up for Thursday night and Friday. No. 1 Piedra Vista was the lone survivor on Friday night with a 3-0 sweep over Espanola. The Panthers followed up that win with a 3-1 victory over Centennial on Friday night to put the Panthers in the state championship game for the second year in a row. Sat-

urday heartbreak followed for the second time as the Panthers fell to Goddard 3-1 in the finals. Aztec lost to Los Alamos on Thursday night 3-0, as did Farmington, who lost to Espanola 3-1 with another shot at PV on the line. Ramah, 30, eliminated Navajo Prep. The Round of 12 football playoffs began on Fri-

Cole Gautsche

that, when you give up 66 points and 600 yards. But, you know it is going to take time.” Yes, it will be a while before Lobo fans will see a stout defense like the one they used to watch under Rocky Long. I’m not saying it will happen overnight. I think this coaching staff did miracles last season based on the hand they were dealt. Offensively, this team can move the ball. They are nearly unstoppable on the ground and UNM is becoming moderately more efficient through the air.

But when it comes to defense, “appreciate the effort” after giving up 66 points and 600 yards is not the phrase I would use. I would more likely steal a quote from former coach John McKay when asked what he thinks of his team’s execution. “I’m in favor of it.” Mo’ Money On Monday, ESPN announced the Nov. 30 football game between the University of New Mexico and Boise State in Boise, Idaho, will be broadcast on ESPN2.

* Murrieta A15

Total Yards Bills RB CJ Spiller – 16 Total Yards, 2 Catches Bears WR Brandon Marshall – 4 catches, 42 Yards Dolphins WR Mike Wallace – 4 Catches, 49 Yards Redskins TE Jordan Reed – 1 Catch, 12 Yards Chiefs DST – 1 Fumble recovery Studs… Lions QB Matthew Stafford – Host Tampa Bay and need a win after blowing it in Pittsburgh Patriots QB Tom Brady – Lives for Primetime matchups with Peyton Manning Bears RB Matt Forte – Forte is the offense with Cutler out 49ers RB Frank Gore – 49ers win when Gore carries the load and they need a win Giants WR Victor Cruz – Everyone has had good passing day against Dallas Steelers WR Antonio Bryant – Best option on Steelers and has been a Top 10 receiver most of the year Cowboys TE Jason Witten – Should have good numbers against the Giants, usually does Chiefs DST – No. 1 DST rebounds against Chargers at home Duds… Chargers QB Philip Rivers – Chiefs

should be fired up returning home, if not they were never a legitimate 9-0 team Dolphins QB Ryan Tannehill – Panthers DST on a roll and Dolphins are a mess Saints RB Darren Sproles – Pierre Thomas taking the catches and Mark Ingram taking his carries Colts RB Trent Richardson – Cardinals DST tough at home and Richardson has been a disappointment Packers WR Jordy Nelson – Minnesota bad against the run; expect a big day from Eddie Lacy Browns TE Jordan Cameron – Targets dropping with Campbell at QB and the rise of Josh Gordon Patriot and Broncos DST – Neither team may stop the other Waiver Wire… Time to start thinking playoffs and looking to fill some holes. These may be some players to look at Buccaneers RB Bobby Rainey – May be a nice gamble after a couple of good weeks Titans TE Delanie Walker – Should have another solid week against Raiders Titans DST – Hooks up with Jacksonville on Championship Weekend

day night with No. 10 Piedra Vista travelling to No. 7 Valencia. Big plays were the order of the day as PV pushed out to a 3114 lead early in the 3rd quarter only to watch the lead disappear on a series of long runs and a punt return. Valencia allowed PV to return the favor and regain the lead with a kickoff return of their own leading to a 38-34 lead late in the fourth. The Jaguars marched it down for a go ahead score only to have the Panthers run it right back down the field,

but on a fourth and one, the Panthers jumped and the ensuing fourth and sixth turned into a pick six the other way sending the Jaguars to Farmington this week with a 48-37 win. Navajo Prep continued their offensive onslaught putting up 63 points in an 18 point win over NMMI sending the Eagles to a matchup with 3-time state champ Santa Rosa. This Week… Friday, Nov. 22 Football Schedule No. 2 Farmington hosts

Good luck this week !!

* Hoerner A15


Friday, November 22, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

FURNISHED/ UTILITIES PAID

A13

CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE BY OWNER

OPEN HOUSE NOVEMBER 24 12 NOON TO 5 PM

Weekly/Monthly Rates Studios, 1 & 2 BR Mobile Homes Monday-Friday 9am-5pm

505-326-1617 CHILD CARE

USED CARS

BGHKCB@QD HM Bgqhrsh`m gnld- 5ol sn 5`l- H sd`bg rhfm k`mft`fd+ Ro`mhrg+ oqdrbgnnk+ jhmcdqf`qsdmLd`kr+ rm`bjr- @bqnrr eqnl E`qlhmfsnm Onrs Neehbd- $1 odq gntqRs`sd khbdmrdc- 4/4, 682,5713-

1/01 GXTMC@H Rnm`s`+ entq cnnq+ FKRY215636V`r $07+256+ mnv $05+276+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

USED CARS 1//1 ATHBJ Bdmstqx+ entq cnnq+ btrsnlY174674- V`r $5+876+ mnv $3+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Fqd`s rbgnnk b`q- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//2 LHMH Bnnodq+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $5+880 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX36822@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 RBHNM WA+ ehud cnnq+ `tsnl`shbY/4/455Mnv $05+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Kn`cdc vhsg $7/// ne `cchshnm`k rsdqdn `mc su dptholdmsGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 JH@ Rodbsq`+ entq cnnq- Y325/81- V`r $7+876+ mnv $5+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//7 @UDN KR+ entq cnnq- H/888/@- V`r $5+884+ mnv $4+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 JH@ Noshl` DW+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $1/+880 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Rnqdmsn+ 22+084 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $11+576 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G114277- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ 20+164 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G087128- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $05+876 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 SNXNS@ X`qhr+ 2/+837 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd $03+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GI/02584- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

USED TRUCKS

1/01 BNQNKK@ KD+ $04+882 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X0036//@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1//0 ENQC E,14/ Rtodq B`a+ svn vgddk cqhud+ Onvdqrsqnjd chdrdk+ 103+350 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $6+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38/16@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 EH@S 4// svn cnnq+ GA RonqsY015268V`r $06+876+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- 'Knv lhkdr(Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1//5 CNCFD Q`l 14// 3w3 Pt`c B`a+ Btllhmr chdrdk+ 032+165 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+8// oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38615@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 ENQC E,04/ WKS+ bqdv b`a+ kn`cdc- Oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

Great horse property! #17 CR 1740 Four stalls, corral, bordering BLM. Ranch style, 3500+ square feet, four bedrooms, three baths, large kitchen with pantry, living, dining, family, sunroom, hot tub room, two car garage, & more. Three acres. Asking $369,682.

505-325-4307 USED TRUCKS

USED TRUCKS

1//6 CNCFD Q`l 04// Pt`b b`a 3w3Y30527@V`r $06+884+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 BGDUQNKDS Bnknq`cn+ bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $12+888 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X07543@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1//6 ENQC E,04/ 1w1+ 6/+510 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G42/50`- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//8 FLB B`mxnm Bqdv B@a+ entq vgddk cqhud- Y325574@- V`r $10+456+ mnv $08+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 ENQC E,04/ 3w3 Rtodq Bqdv+ 38+04/ lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $16+276 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GC57253- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// qdftk`q b`a 3w3+ 21+082 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07+876- Rsnbj #9 G36582@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// svn vgddk cqhud+ dwsdmcdc b`a+ 05+668 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G40276@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BGDUQNKDS 04// bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $17+130 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX20015@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 ENQC E,04/ Rtodq Bqdv svn vgddk cqhud+ 47+388 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G244/2@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

SUVS/VANS 1//6 BGQXRKDQ @rodm Khlhsdc+ entq vgddk cqhud- H32734@- V`r $01+876+ mnv $7+884+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 IDDO Khadqsx+ entq vgddk cqhud+ ronqsY455/7/V`r $0/+876+ mnv $8+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//7 IDDO Vq`mfkdq W+ 3w3+ $10+541 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X36152@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/0/ BGDUQNKDS Sq`udqrd KS+ kn`cdc+ $07+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX13657@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

SUVS/VANS

MISC.

LEGALS

1/00 IDDO Bnlo`rr+ 21+511 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07-876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G123680- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

GNKHC@X BQ@ES E`hq ed`stqhmf g`mcl`cd bq`esr `s sgd @ysdb Rdmhnq Bnlltmhsx Bdmsdq+ 0/0 R- O`qj @udmtdCdbdladq 03sg+ 1/02+ 7`l sn 1ol- Bnld d`s `s ntq xtllx bnmbdrrhnm rs`mcIdvdkqx+ pthkshmf+ o`odq eknvdqr+ ok`rshb b`mu`r+ ankn shdr+ mn rdv ak`mjdsr+ kd`sgdq bq`esr+ bqnbgds.rdvhmf+ annjr+ onkhrgdc rsnmdr+ g`s a`mcr+ qnbj b`mckdr+ snxr+ b`mcx+ g`mc vnudm qtfr+ `mc rnes a`ax annjrEnq hmenql`shnm+ b`kk Cnmm` `s 4/4,223, 6441-

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SAN JUAN IN THE PROBATE COURT

1/00 IDDO Khadqsx+ 40+8/7 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $05+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G468477- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ATHBJ Dmbk`ud+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $20+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX232574- GH,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ENQC Drb`od WKS+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $1/+488 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddXB27500Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Rntk+ 20+574 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $04+884 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G264046- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M Lhq`mn+ 11+856 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $13+676 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G102406- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

MISC. GDKO @LDQHB@M Fdmdq`k Ldch` stqm `m dlosx atr hmsn ` atr kn`c etkk ne ennc nm R`stqc`x+ Mnudladq 12qc+ 1/02 eqnl 0/`l, 3ol enq sgd ³Rstee Sgd Atr½ `mmt`k ennc cqhud `s R`lºr Bkta hm E`qlhmfsnm- Ennc vhkk ad chrsqhatsdc ax DBGN Ennc A`mj `mc sgdx mddc mnm,odqhrg`akdr hmbktchmf l`b & bgddrd+ qhbd+ bdqd`k+ ithbdr+ ekntq+ `mc rtf`q: b`mmdc hsdlr khjd udfds`akdr+ eqthsr+ ad`mr+ rntor+ ld`s+ `mc lhkj: `mc gnkhc`x ld`k hsdlr sn gdko `qd` e`lhkhdr hm mddc nudq sgd vhmsdq- Mn fk`rr bnms`hmdqr+ okd`rd- Cqno nee ennc cnm`shnmr `mc ldds xntq e`unqhsd CIºr eqnl JHRY Bntmsqx+ JOQS Ohq`sd Q`chn+ JDMM S`kj Q`chn `mc JQVM Qnbj rs`shnmr- Enq lnqd hmenql`shnm `ants gnv xnt b`m gdko admdehs xntq bnlltmhsx+ bnms`bs DBGN Ennc A`mj `s 4/4,214,7111 nq S`m` LbB`kk `s 4/4,214, 2430 `mc rdd gnv xnt b`m l`jd ` cheedqdmbd hm sgd khudr ne knb`k mdhfganqr hm mddc-

LEGALS CUBBY MINI STORAGE P.O. Box 227 4340 US Hwy 64 Kirtland, NM 87417 TO: Rebecca Benally PO Box 3916 Kayenta AZ 86033 Christian Shorty 1 Road 6212 Kirtland NM 87417 Thomas Wilson PO Box 1432 Kirtland NM 87417 Tonia Lewis PO Box 1938 Shiprock NM 87420 Charmaine Dee PO Box 1927 Farmington NM 87499 Emerson Reed PO Box 1441 Kirtland NM 87417 Notice is hereby given that a sale of miscellaneous household and personal items will be held to satisfy debt of back rent. The sale will be held on or after December 7, 2013 @ 10:00am at Cubby Mini Storage 4340 US Hwy 64 Kirtland, NM 87417. Legal No.141 Dates 11/22, 11/29/2013

LEGALS NOTICE OF CANCELLATION OF REGULAR CITY COUNCIL MEETING CITY OF FARMINGTON, NEW MEXICO NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the regular City Council meeting scheduled to be held on Tuesday, November 26, 2013 at the hour of 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber at the Municipal Building, 800 Municipal Drive, Farmington, New Mexico has been canceled. Dianne Smylie, City Clerk Legal No.140 Date 11/22/2013

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CECIL STANLEY MCKENZIE, deceased. Probate No.5545 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that GLORIA ALDRICH has been appointed Personal Representative of this Estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned Personal Representative at the following address: Gloria Aldrich 514 E 3rd St Hastings, NE 68901 Or filed with the Probate Court, P.O. Box 550, Aztec, New Mexico, 87410. DATED this 1st day of November, 2013. GLORIA ALDRICH, Personal Representative 514 E 3rd St Hastings, NE 68901 Legal No. 136 Dates 11/15, 11/22/2013

LEGALS STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SAN JUAN ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

No.:PB-2013-5536 In the Matter of the Estate of: Jacquelyn Kelley, NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of this estate. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned Personal Representative’s attorney, Russell A. Frost, FROST & BELL LLC, 116 N. Wall, FARMINGTON, NM 87401, or filed with the 11th Judicial District Court of San Juan County, 103 S. Oliver, Aztec, NM 87410. Date: October --, 2013. /s/Robyn Self ROBYN SELF Personal Representative of the Estate of Jacquelyn Kelley, Deceased. Frost & Bell, LLC /s/Russell A. Frost Attorney for Personal Representative 116 N. Wall Farmington, NM 87401 (505)327-3525 Legal No.137 Dates 11/22, 11/29/2013

LEGALS

No.:PB-2013-5529

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SAN JUAN IN THE PROBATE COURT

In the Matter of the Estate of: Teddy Mack Hammonds,

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTSTE OF Stacy Marc Griffith, Deceased.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of this estate. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned Personal Representative’s attorney, Russell A. Frost, FROST & BELL LLC, 116 N. Wall, FARMINGTON, NM 87401, or filed with the 11th Judicial District Court of San Juan County, 103 S. Oliver, Aztec, NM 87410. Date: October --, 2013. /s/Ted Hammonds Ted Hammonds Personal Representative of the Estate of Teddy Mack Hammonds, Deceased Frost & Bell, LLC

PROBATE NO. 5469

/s/Russell A. Frost Attorney for Personal Representative 116 N. Wall Farmington, NM 87401 (505) 327-3525

You may be surprised to learn that clams can live to be 200 years old.

LEGALS

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SAN JUAN ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

Legal No. 139 Dates 11/22, 11/29/2013

NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of this estate. All persons having claims against the estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned Personal Representative’s attorney, Russell A. Frost, FROST & BELL LLC, 116 N. Wall Ave., FARMINGTON, NM 87401, or filed with the Probate Court of San Juan County, PO Box 550, Aztec, NM 87410. Date; August--, 2013. /s/Stacie Marc Griffith Jr. Personal Representative of the Estate of Stacie Marc Griffith Sr.. Frost & Bell, LLC /s/Russell A. Frost Attorney for Personal Representative 116 N. Wall Ave Farmington, NM 87401 (505)327-3525 Legal No.138 Dates 11/22, 11/29/2013


A14

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 22, 2013

game page

New York Times Crossword Puzzle BYE-LINES By Alan Olschwang / Edited by Will Shortz

Brought to you by Tucker, Burns, Yoder & Hatfield

Law Firm 505-325-7755 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

20

53 Opportunities, metaphorically

102 Dry: Prefix

14 Defames 15 One of the von Trapp girls 16 Do some banking, say

54 Hands (out)

103 Home of Banff National Park

7 Just says no

55 Trig ratio

104 Animal house

14 Cremona craftwork

59 Old camera settings, for short

105 2004 Chevy debut

61 Add (up)

108 Beefeaters, e.g. 109 Red Skelton

22 Wise guy

62 François Truffaut’s field

23 The Lone Ranger

63 Sweet-talk

25 Phillip, e.g., in Disney’s “Sleeping Beauty”

64 Porky Pig

112 Record of the Year Grammy nominee for “Lose Yourself”

69 Fixes up, as a rundown house

113 Primary pigment for printers

31 Shallot, e.g.

26 Carrier inits.

70 Cato’s man

114 Rays’ div.

34 Mosey along

27 Kemo ___ (the Lone Ranger)

71 When doubled, one of the Teletubbies

115 Luna’s counterpart

36 “Beowulf” quaff

28 Move a muscle?

72 “Now!”

116 Auto steering system components

38 Jesse and Leo of TV sitcoms

29 No longer in enemy hands

73 “August: ___ County” (2008 Pulitzer winner for Drama)

117 Potential sweethearts

41 Poky sorts

74 “S.N.L.” alum Cheri

1 Downhill run

76 Mimicry

1 Former Belgian national airline

20 Origami staples 21 1993 5x platinum Nirvana album

30 Kind of appeal 32 Base, e.g. 34 Infusing with a soda maker

107 “___ can’t”

Down

35 Hospital supply

78 July third?

37 ___ Fáil, Ireland’s coronation stone

79 George Burns

3 Bears’ home in Texas

83 Genus of small rodents

4 2005 Drama Pulitzer finalist Will

86 Items sometimes sniffed at a supermarket

5 Costner role

39 Massachusetts motto starter 40 Dietary claim 44 Deeply rooted 46 Toothpaste type 47 Roger Ebert 52 84-Down writer ’s monogram

For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 each minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800814-5554.

40 48

42

15

16

17

18

19

57

58

94

95

34 38

43

39

44

45

46

50 53

51

54

55

56

24 CNBC news item 29 Mag proofs

59

60

64

61

62

65

63

66

67

70

71

68

33 Keyes and King

42 Order to go?

69 73

74 79

83

84

85

88

75

77

78

81

86 89

72

76

80

82

87 90

6 Like the origin of the food in many fusion restaurants

44 Sees through

96

91

45 Latte option

103

97

92

93

98

99

104

100 101

105

102 106

107

47 Ópera venue 48 Chops up 49 S. ___ Merkerson, four-time N.A.A.C.P. Image Award-winning actress

108

109

112

113

114

115

116

117

8 Compass dir.

51 Judo gyms

67 Dominant

56 Ancient Mexican

68 Church group

57 Base

74 Black Hills native

91 Other side

9 Nickname for Huntington Beach, Calif.

75 Sweetie

92 Volleyball venue

10 Bologna’s place

58 Company that owns Gerber

96 Hair extensions?

11 Clinched, with “up”

60 Layered coifs

77 Vittles

98 Something you want to come down from quickly

33

49

7 Pulled apart

90 Fill

14

29

37 41

65 Letter-shaped bridge support

88 Mille ___ (part of Québec with a rhyming name)

28 32

50 Oscar-winning Forest Whitaker role

87 Highlights

13

25

36

17 Going down in the rankings, say

52

12

43 Onward

2 Massenet opera based on Greek myth

38 Strike callers

31

35

19 First Mets manager

11

22

27

30

47

10

24

26

18 Holy smoke

9

21

23

Across

8

66 Mr. Right

76 Lace’s end

12 “Time ___” (bygone sci-fi series)

62 Groups of strings, maybe

80 Possible answer to “Is that you?”

13 ___-based

63 Sword fight sounds

81 Apple product

82 Extreme point 83 Sights not to be believed 84 Poem that ends,

110

111

91 Thomas Jefferson or Jimmy Carter, once 93 Virgil hero

“This ghoul-

94 Bit of field sport equipment

haunted woodland

95 Lifts

of Weir”

97 Where to find “books in the running brooks,” per Shakespeare

85 What a judge might do during a hearing 89 “A Sentimental Journey” author

98 Star, maybe 99 Indian melodies

100 Nobelist writer Andric 101 Go by bike 104 Beginning of some temple names 106 Preceder of “di” or “da” in a Beatles song 109 Invoice fig. 110 Since 1/1 111 “___ Sylphides” (ballet)

thought for the week “I can be changed by what happens to me. But I refuse to be reduced by it.”

— Maya Angelou

Answers to this week’s puzzles are on page A15


Friday, November 22, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Nellie was a business expense – were Lisa Martin, Amanda Aragon, Richard Cheney, the beautiful Gwen Clouthier and Jeff Howle (who were enjoying lunch and laughter together. Not that Richard and Jeff aren’t beautiful theirownselves, but when they’re in the presence of someone as wonderful as Gwen, their “beauty” dims slightly. Just sayin’. . . .), Tom Taylor, Tom Mullins, James Strickler, David Waggoner, Linda

A15

Thompson, Jim Dumont, T. Greg Merrion, Ken Hare, John Byrom, John Thompson, Dr. James Henderson, Bill Clark and some ’nother very important people who were talking energy and not the kind of energy NN gets from a bottle or two of Boones Farms, just so’s ya know. NN also spent some quality time with Kara Wood and D’Ann Waters of Kirtland Real Estate (two amazing ladies who were very nice to NN and shared lots of information and laughs with her, too), Vicki Thille (who invited NN to

Thanksgiving dinner and for whom NN is forever grateful to have as one of the best friends EVER!), Travis and Natalie Spruell, and all of the nice ladies at the Dusty Attic, one of NN’s most favorite places in the whole entire world to shop. ’Nother nice people NN is thankful for (it is the season to be thankful, although NN believes that “season” should last all year long. . . .) include Michael Necaise (one of the nicest young men on the planet and a young man NN still

calls a grandson because he brings much joy to her life), the crazy and wonderful Ryan Woodard, Carmen Martinez, Heather Fortner, Brenda Blevins, Barbara Rodrigue, Nancy Sisson, Julie and Joe Rasor, Cindy Cowan Thiele (who has bailed NN out of trouble so many times NN will never ever be able to pay her back – not that NN really truly intends to “pay her back,” but if she had a lotta money she would. For reals), Suzanne Thurman, Nate Duckett, Adam Kinney, DeeAnn Durbin, Roger

Sheak, Karen Ellsbury and Patrick Hazen, Dedi Switzer, Carmen Henry, Jamie Church, Connie Dinning, Brenda Shepherd, JoAnn Culpepper, Krazy Kit Doerfert, Sherry Curry, Mike Ziems, Di McClellan, Teri Woolery, Teia Camacho, the always wonderful and inspiring Randy Akins, Barry Digman (who is without a doubt one of the nicest men on the planet and prob’ly ’nother planets too, just so’s ya know) and Rick Quevedo. NN, herownself, is going to the JA Jewelers Business

After Hours tonight (Friday) and taking coats for kids who need them. This BAH is one of the most fun ever and Adam Kinney is one of NN’s most fun friends ever, and NN wouldn’t miss it for anything (well, maybe a court date or a weekend of “community service” but that’s all). Oh, and did NN mention that the Denver Broncos and her very own loveable and wonderful Peyton Manning beat the ustabe unbeaten Kansas City Chiefs last week? Just sayin’. ...

networks – ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox, ESPN and ESPN2. There is an additional $200,000 payment for Saturday games on those networks. The Lobos are scheduled to play Fresno State this Saturday on ESPNews. Island Hoppers The UNM men’s basketball team is spending the

weekend in Charleston, S.C., and they are already making travel plans for next year. The Lobos announced this week they will play in the Puerto Rico Tip-Off in November of 2014. UNM is in the field with Boston College, College of Charleston, Connecticut, Dayton, George Mason, Texas A&M and West Vir-

ginia. The Lobos will also play at the Diamond Head Classic in 2015 and the 76 Anaheim Classic in 2016. Kick It The University of New Mexico men’s soccer team earned a No. 7 seed in the NCAA Tournament and will host either William & Mary or George Mason at 5 p.m.

on Sunday, Nov. 24, at the UNM Soccer Complex. The seven seed is the secondhighest tournament ranking in program history. The Lobos won the Conference USA regular season title, but lost to Tulsa last week in the conference tournament semifinals. The Lobos (11-5-2) have had at least ten wins in eight of

their last nine seasons. UNM’s seeding is the result of playing in a tougher conference this season. “We didn’t have the same number of wins we’ve had the last couple of years, but it was a great schedule and that’s the advantage of being in a top conference,” said head coach Jeremy Fishbein.

No. 8 Navajo Prep Football travels to No. 1 Santa Rosa in the 2A quarterfinals Farmington and PV swimming at Gobbler Invitational Swim Meet in Los Alamos Piedra Vista Girls’ Basketball home opener against Pojoaque at 4 p.m. Kirtland Central Basketball

travels to Los Alamos Tuesday, Nov. 26 Farmington Girls’ Basketball hosts Gallup Farmington Basketball heads to Gallup Winter Sports Preview Boys’ Basketball Farmington is the defend-

ing district champs, but lost the bulk of its scoring in Matt Huffines and Josh Castillo Miller to graduation. Kyle Reynolds is really the only returning player with varsity experience, leaving Coach Corley to rely heavily on young, inexperienced players The early favorite should be the Kirtland Central Broncos, who have the most dominant player in the district in big man Christian Mackey. If the Broncos can improve their guard play from last season, they could be a force to deal with come March. Piedra Vista, like Farmington, lost the bulk of its scoring from Tyler Jaquez and Jacob Armijo to graduation and will depend on a young team led by Troy Dixon and will need solid play from new varsity players Orion Kaminky and Alonso Ariza, and inside presence from Dillon Mason. The Aztec Tigers will have a new head coach yet again as they look to get some program consistency as veteran head coach Tony Dinallo takes over the reins. Dinallo coached Bloomfield in 1980s, Hot Springs in the 1990s and opened Piedra Vista as the boys head coach in 1998. Troy Choman and Alvin Harvey will have to lead what is another young

inexperienced district squad. Wrestling With the three-time defending state champs in the district everyone else may be playing catch-up. Piedra Vista has been dominant over the past three seasons and looks to be the team to beat again this season. The Panthers will be especially strong in the lower weights where they return state champs Anthony Jukes, Jacob Palmgren and Ryan Rino. Despite the loss of state champion Aaron Lucero and state runner-up Brad Hardin, the Aztec Tigers will continue to be a solid squad. Farmington has a new head coach and Kirtland Central will continue to be a little overmatched. Girls’ Basketball Kirtland girls’ basketball coach Kevin Holman must feel like the Grand Old Man of the district. In only his fourth year at the helm, he is the only returning head coach in District 1AAAA. Holman’s Broncos have been the only school to win the district in going on a decade and will be the favorite until someone proves otherwise. Piedra Vista begins a new era under former assistant Joe Reed with eight of their first ten players returning from last year’s team. Kaleigh Graham should be the dom-

inant inside force of the district. If the Panthers can find some outside guard play, they could be very solid. Aztec will also be taking a new direction with Robert McCaskill taking over the Tigers. Aztec should have a very athletic team led by Morgan Smith and Autumn Sutherland who have been three-year starters. Danny Secrest takes over last year’s 3-20 squad at Farmington that was incredibly young playing five freshmen on the varsity squad. Secrest played for Scorpion legend Marv Sanders, so expect a little more defensive pressure and more offensive motion,

Murrieta As part of the new television agreement with the Mountain West Conference, UNM will receive $500,000 for appearing on the network. The new TV contract between the MWC and ESPN states the league will pay $300,000 for conference-controlled games that air on designated national

Hoerner No. 7 Valencia at 7 p.m. on the Friday Night Experience on Fox Sports 1340AM/93.9FM No. 4 Bloomfield hosts No. 5 Taos in the 3A Quarterfinals Aztec Girls’ Basketball hosts Thoreau Saturday, Nov. 23

Answers to this week’s puzzles S C H U S S

A R I A N E

B A Y L O R

T E A T R O

H A S H E S

E P A T H A

M I R A G E S

U L A L U M E

S E T B A I L

E N A N E S O S I L S A B B N O U M L E S S B A L C D O O S T O H T H T A B S G E O S A Y G M E L S S A T A I L E R T A R D S N E M E N E

R I V E N F O R T H T O O T S A M T

E S I S N U T E E R A W F L E A C I D L I A A T I N Y I S S D O C I N T H A T H O M O E R I O D N I N S P E F O B A D B A R N N D M A A G E N I E R O

T S R O A Y X R A E U M P N B R C L O L E S E S A L L A A P I G H T L A Y E T R I A V Y G O T A D S

A S P E R S E S

M A R T A

D E C C A L F A N G G R S U B P E O D B A L L A

A V I A T E

T A N K I N G

I N C E N S E

S T E N G E L

T O L T E A C P E A X E N L E E A S S

A L K A L I

N E S T L E

C R O S S E

H O I S T S

D O J O S

Puzzles on page A14

7:55 a.m.: Monday Reboot: Tech News

522 E. Broadway

TUESDAY – NOV. 26 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Bloomfield Schools 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: San Jon: What happens to a town when the main highway bypasses it 7:55 a.m.: Adopt-A-Pet Tuesday

327-6271

Resist the temptation! “We Sell the Best and Service the Rest!”

MONDAY – NOV. 25 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Jane Voss & Hoyle Osborne: Making music from a different time and different place

WEDNESDAY – NOV. 27 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Best of Program 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Star Wars: Translated into Navajo 7:55 a.m.: San Juan Smart Talk

Sports on Fox Sports New Mexico AM 1340 & 93.9 FM College Football: Oklahoma vs. Kansas State, Saturday at 9:30 a.m. College Football: UCLA vs. Arizona State, Saturday at 5 p.m. NFL Football: San Diego Charger vs. Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday at 11 a.m. NFL Football: Denver Broncos vs. New England Patriots, Sunday at 6 p.m. NFL Football: Washington vs. San Francisco 49ers, Monday at 6 p.m. NFL Football: Green Bay Packers vs. Detroit Lions, Thanksgiving at 10 a.m. NFL Football: Pittsburgh Steelers vs. Baltimore Ravens, Thanksgiving at 6 p.m. First Sports with Steve Bortstein weekday mornings from 7 to 10 a.m. The Fast Track sponsored by SunRay Park and Casino, Saturday and Sunday at 9 a.m.

THURSDAY – NOV. 28 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning: Happy Thanksgiving: Best of program 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Thanksgiving: America's really first celebration 7:55 a.m.: Save-A-Buck Thursday: Weekly economic & investing news Noon: A Review Too Far: local movie reviews FRIDAY – NOV. 29 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Best of program 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Loose Ladies: They're not what you think, but painters Noon: Book Buzz: Best of program


A16

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 22, 2013

11/22/13-11/26/13

ALL SHOWTIMES GOOD FROM

Prices: Adult (after 6:00 pm) $8.50 | Child $6.50 | Senior $6.50 Matinee (before 6:00 pm) $6.50 | *3D Movie Surcharge $2.00

Online ticket sales available at

www.allentheatresinc.com

ALLEN 8

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available | We installed new seats!

1819 E. 20TH STREET

No Passes or Discounts PG-13

No Passes or Discounts PG-13

11:30 2:45 6:05 9:15

11:50 2:20 4:50 7:20 9:55 PG-13

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13 7:00 9:35

PG

12:50 3:35 6:40 9:25

11:35 1:50 4:05 6:30 8:45

PG-13

R

12 YEARS A SLAVE

No Passes or Discounts R

R Online ticket sales available at

No Passes or Discounts

No Passes or Discounts 12:20 3:30 6:50 10:00

www.allentheatresinc.com 11:10 1:45 4:20

12:10 3:05 6:00 9:00

12:00 2:15 4:30 6:50 9:05

Movie Gift Passes can be purchased at any location. Allen Theatres Gift Ticket Good for ANY movie, any time. Not good for special events. Cost: Normal adult evening price. Good for 3D film with additional cash upcharge.

Allen Theatres Discount Ticket Not good for 3D films or special events. Good for movies before 6:00 pm and nonrestricted movies after 6:00 pm for adults. Cost: Normal adult matinee price

ANIMAS 10

ANIMAS VALLEY MALL 4601 East Main Street

No Passes or Discounts PG-13 3D*

No Passes or Discounts PG-13

PG-13

PG-13

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG

No Passes or Discounts PG-13

2:00 6:40 8:55

12:10 2:35 5:00 7:25 9:50

2:00 7:20

11:45 3:00 6:20 9:45

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available

PG-13

R 12:15 2:30 4:50 7:10 9:30

PG

PG-13 3D*

No Passes or Discounts

No Passes or Discounts 12:25 3:40 7:00 10:10

11:20 4:40 10:00 PG

11:10 1:50 4:25 7:05 9:40 PG

R

3D*

No Passes or Discounts

COMING SOON

2:15 6:50

November 27

11:50 4:35 9:05

November 27

November 27

12:50 3:30 6:30 9:10

November 27

December 6

11:40 4:15

12:30 2:45 4:55 7:05 9:20

Online ticket sales available at

www.allentheatresinc.com

December 13

December 13

December 20

December 25

Tri-City Tribune 11222013  

Weekly newspaper in Farmington, New Mexico