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OCTOBER 4, 2013

BMB Fest big success

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BMB Festival brings more than 750 people to Lions Wilderness Park Amphitheater

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Halverson House

VOL. 4 NO. 1

Signal policy debate continues

Council wants solutions Council talks in closed session to Pinon Hills traffic issue DEBRA MAYEUX about gift Tri-City Tribune DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune San Juan County made a gesture of kindness – to give the city of Farmington the building where the city’s Crouch Mesa Community Center is operating. This gesture led the City Council to enter a closed executive session during its Oct. 1 meeting to discuss the gift, despite Councilor Mary Fischer requesting it be addressed in a public session. When the rest of the Council did not agree and closed the meeting under the auspices of discussing an “acquisition of real property,” Fischer walked out of the meeting, saying she believed the move to be a violation of the Open Meetings Act. Fischer stated that the property was a gift, and with no money changing hands the closed session was not needed. Government entities can enter into a closed executive session to discuss pending litigation, contract negotiations and employee concerns in private. Real estate transactions fall under the contract negotiations category. “The Open Meetings Act does allow a public body to meet in closed session to discuss the purchase, acquisition or disposal of

* gift A2

The Farmington City Council tabled indefinitely a traffic signalization policy, but opted to move forward with the installation of a traffic light at the intersection of Pinon Hills Boulevard and North Dustin Avenue. Traffic engineering consultant Nevin Harwick admitted to the Council during the Oct. 1 meeting that should Farmington adopt a signalization policy it would be the only city in the entire state of New Mexico to set specific mandates for traffic The intersection on Pinon Hills Boulevard and North Dustin Avenue often is busy with traffic from lights. people entering and leaving Pinon Hills Community Church for services and other activities throughout the week. – Josh Bishop photo

* traffic A7

Informing adults

FMS, local agencies set meeting to discuss new drug, alcohol trends DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune From Boozy Bears to Mollies, the Farmington Municipal School District wants to inform local adults of new drug and alcohol trends by area youth. The school district, in cooperation with the Farmington Police Department, Juvenile Probation, Child Protective Service, San Juan Regional Medical Center and San Juan County, will present Empowering and Informing Adults from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8, in the Turano-Chrisman Theater at Piedra Vista High School. Seven presenters will share information about everything from drug and alcohol abuse to bullying and what your children might be watching on YouTube. “Some of this information is very shocking and eye opening – it’s things parents have no clue about,” said Traci Neff, director of San Juan County Juvenile Services. Empowering and Informing Adults started three years ago through a grant from Safe School Healthy Students. It was an informational

* trends A2

Land Use Code tabled

Commission will evaluate feedback from public meeting LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune San Juan County Commissioners agreed to table the adoption of the Land Use Development Code and will revisit it during a Dec. 3 regular meeting. The proposed code would create zoning regulations within the county, excluding the municipalities and tribal land. Commissioners agreed to delay the adoption of the code during an Oct. 1 regular meeting because they would like to hear more feedback from the public. As of October 2012, the

county has received 39 written comments regarding the code and recently has held a public meeting, on Sept. 11, to hear input from the citizens. “As a result of that meeting we are working on the feedback we received, and some modifications were suggested,” County Operations Officer Mike Stark said. Under this code, the unincorporated areas would be divided into several land use districts: residential neighborhood protection, industrial, commercial highway, and multiple-use. A

* land A15

What are we pinking?

All of San Juan County to raise funds to fight cancer LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Fall is here, which can only mean one thing, it’s time for the 3rd annual Get Pinked San Juan County celebration. Get Pinked is a month-long campaign each October that encourages the community to paint the county pink and raise awareness for cancer and the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Fund. This fund benefits women in the county who are underinsured or

Road Apple Rally Saturday at Lions Wilderness Park

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50

¢

uninsured and cannot afford cancer-related tests, treatments, or prescriptions. Cathy Lincoln was a nurse at San Juan Regional Medical Center. During her career, she cared for many patients and affected many lives. When she was 39 years old, Lincoln died from breast cancer. As a way to continue her legacy, in October of 2001 Lincoln’s family and the hospital formed the Cathy Lincoln Fund. The money raised during the Get Pinked campaign is donated to the Cathy

Lincoln Fund. Lincoln’s daughter, Jamie Lujan, said it is overwhelming to see the tremendous amount of support from the community every year during Get Get Pinked Pinked. “Just seeing how the section inside community comes together to take care of their own, that is the

* Get Pinked A15

Aztec Highland Games

Inside Calendar.......................................A4 Editorial ........................................A6 Fine Arts Invitational...................A10 Pets of the Week ........................A11 Sports.........................................A13 Real Estate.................................A17

best part,” said Lujan, who is a paramedic at San Juan Regional Medical Center. Get Pinked was developed by Majestic Media President Don Vaughan and Jane Kolesnik, the former San Juan Medical Foundation executive director. The sponsors of the campaign are Majestic Media, San Juan Medical Foundation, and San Juan County. “With all of the funds raised benefitting the local Cathy Lincoln Memorial Cancer

SCJ housing...............................A18 Business.....................................A19 Classifieds..................................A20 Nosie Nellie ................................A21 Games ........................................A22 Movies........................................A23

Celtic Festival this weekend For more informtion: www.aztechighlandgames.com


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE seven-day forecast FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

MONDAY

57/30

60/33

66/40

73/42

Rise Set 7:12 a.m. 6:49 p.m. Sun

Rise Set 7:13 a.m. 6:47 p.m. Sun

Rise Set 7:14 a.m. 6:46 p.m. Sun

Sunny/Wind Sun

Sunny

Rise Set 7:11 a.m. 6:50 p.m.

Sun

Sunny

Sunny

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

75/45

THURSDAY

70/42

Mostly Sunny

68/41

Mostly Sunny

Rise Set 7:15 a.m. 6:45 p.m. Sun

Mostly Sunny

Rise Set 7:15 a.m. 6:43 p.m.

Sun

Rise Set 7:16 a.m. 6:42 p.m.

gift real property,� said Erin Mufoletto, of the New Mexico Foundation for Open Government. This “is intended to allow the government body to consider an acquisition without the risk of alerting those who could take action that would result in lost opportunities or greater cost to the public.� It also keeps the property owner from knowing an offer is being made and essentially bumping up the price of the property. In this instance there were no negotiations or

money set to change hands, because the county was making a gift of the building with no strings attached, according to San Juan County CEO Kim Carpenter. Farmington City Manager Rob Mayes, however, told the Council there were “terms� attached to the gift. Carpenter said the only “terms� he could think of would be that the city must continue to use the facility as a community center, because the building was constructed using Community Development Block Grant

Funds. “Why are we closing?â€? Fischer asked during the meeting. “It is my understanding, reading the paper, that this is a gift the county wants to give us. ‌ If there is no money exchanged, why can’t this be done in public?â€? Mayes said the city had every right to discuss the “giftâ€? in a closed session, as it has in the past with the “purchaseâ€? of other properties. Deputy City Attorney Jennifer Breakell agreed with Mayes, saying “The

city has closed to discuss acquisition of real property. It is an exception where we can close to discuss it.� While the city did have a right to discuss the gift in closed session, because a technical reading of the Open Meetings Act allows the government body to discuss an acquisition which encompasses the word “gift� in a closed session, the Foundation for Open Government, or FOG, said the preferred action would be to discuss something of this nature in a public setting.

his staff earlier this week to request a possible purchase or gift of a few acres of land adjacent to the existing community center. County Chief Operating Officer Mike Stark said he told the city if the land was an “important� part of the gift building, then the city could bring that up to the county and it would be discussed by the San Juan County Commission. The city of Farmington has yet to make a decision on whether it will accept the gift building or not.

We have money to lend.

trends presentation for parents of children in the school district with regard to crime, bullying, drug and alcohol abuse and other student-related topics. This year the focus has changed, and the presentations are open to every adult in San Juan County. “We want adults to come because it’s great information,� Assistant Superintendent Frank Stimac said. “We want adults to be aware of what is going on in our community – the latest drug and alcohol trends and the data.� The focus will be on local, statewide and national trends. “As we talk about big city trends, we want people to know that if it’s in Albuquerque, it’s getting closer,� Neff said.

The purpose is to touch on all of the trends and give parents enough information to know what to watch for in student activities, on their phones and on their computers. “We’re also going to address what parents have a right to do,� Neff said. Parents can search a child’s room, pull their schoolissued laptops and look at them and review their phone texts and emails. “Search their phones. Search their bedrooms. Search their cars – everything,� said Det. Michelle Delese, a school resource officer with the Farmington Police Department. Adults also will be given slang terms, so the texts and emails make sense. “Skittles is not just a bag

2013 NISSAN

of candy,� Neff said, and Boozy Bears are gummy bears soaked in alcohol – with the recipe available on YouTube. These are the types of candid pieces of information that will be shared, along with a table showing drugs confiscated in the area. These drugs include Ecstasy, Mollies and Spice. “We felt it was time to put the facts out there for parents, and this is a good way to get information out and be honest,� Stimac said, adding that drug use and abuse leads to other crimes and behavioral problems such as theft, bullying and mental health issues throughout San Juan County. This is the first of two programs offered this

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“FOG would urge the public body to be more transparent than a literal reading of the Open Meetings Act might require it to be and discuss this during an open session. Or, provide additional explanation for why it feels it should not do so,� Mufoletto said in an email to the Tri-City Tribune. San Juan County discussed the gift in a public setting and will continue to do so, according to Carpenter, who also pointed out that the city contacted

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Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

calendar ONGOING EVENTS THREE WATERS TRADING POST EXHIBIT The Three Waters Trading Post exhibit features a walk-through replica of a 1930’s trading post, including a bull pen stocked with period goods and artifacts, pawn room and an office showcasing jewelry and rugs. The exhibit is on display at the Farmington Museum in the Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St. in Farmington. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org

OCT. WEEKENDS PUMPKIN FESTIVAL WEEKENDS Sutherland Farms, located 7.5 miles north of Aztec Ruin, celebrates fall with Pumpkin Festival Weekends every Saturday and Sunday in October! Enjoy train rides, hayrides to the pumpkin patch, a corn pit, corn maze, face painting, great food and much more! October hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Information: 505.334.3578 or www.sutherlandfarms.net

FRI OCT. 4 HARVEST PARTY From 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. the Sycamore Park Community Center will host this FREE party. Join us for games and fun to include bobbing for apples, hay bale hop, musical chairs, ring toss, a corn dig and more. The San Juan County Extension program will be serving hearthealthy popcorn balls to get everyone in the mood for fall treats. Information: 505.566.2480

REEL ROCK FILM FESTIVAL The Reel Rock Film Festival is a collection of films that revolve around the world of climbing. Films may include bouldering, big wall climbing, ice climbing, and mountaineering. Most festivals include four to six short films. Some films are PG-13 due to language. This is a free event, open to the public. Join us from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the San Juan College Henderson Fine Arts Auditorium. Information: 505.566.3487

SAT OCT. 5 ROAD APPLE RALLY Annual Mountain Bike Race and tour offers pro/experts, veterans and beginners a test of skill on a 30-mile single-loop course through canyons and arroyos near San Juan College in Farmington, N.M. Information: 505.599.1140, 800.448.1240 or www.roadapplerally.com CHILI COOKOFF From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. the Farmington Chamber of Commerce will host their annual Chili Cookoff and Salsa Competition at Berg Park. Information: 505.325.0279 or www.gofarmington.com JAMES & ERNIE COMEDY SHOW Ernie Tsosie and James Junes have been entertaining audiences for 10 years! Don’t miss this performance, featuring Tatanka Means, at 7 p.m. at the Farmington Civic Center Information: 505.599.1148, 877.599.3331 or www.fmtn..org/civiccenter

SAT OCT. 5 SUN OCT. 6 AZTEC HIGHLAND GAMES AND CELTIC MUSIC FESTIVAL Celebrate the culture of the

Scottish Highlands at Riverside Park in Aztec, N.M. Enjoy live Celtic music and physical competitions by professional – Caber Toss, Hammer Throw, Braemar Stone, etc. There will be Scottish and Irish dance exhibitions, bagpipe band exhibitions, clan tents, rugby exhibitions, traditional food and more! Information: 505.334.7646 or www.aztechighlandgames.com

TUES OCT. 8 TAYLOR MASON See comedian, ventriloquist, entertainer, musician, and actor Taylor Mason perform at the Farmington Civic Center. Tickets: $15 per person, $25 per couple, available at the Civic Center, KNMI Vertical Radio, KPCL Passion Radio or iTicket.com Information: www.FCCMF.org or 505.599.1148

FRI OCT. 11 FALL ART WALK Come walk through Historic Downtown Farmington, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., and enjoy a crisp fall evening with art receptions and open houses at many downtown locations. A wide variety of art from regional artists will be showcased throughout many of the downtown shops, galleries and restaurants. Art Walk maps will be available at participating locations. The Art Walk is coordinated by the Farmington Downtown Association, and sponsored by Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs. Information: 505.599.1419 UNHOOKED - THE DECORATED BRA SHOW VIII, ART SHOW AND RECEPTION During the Fall Art Walk, stop

in at Artifacts Gallery and enjoy the seventh annual “UNHOOKED VIII” in conjunction with San Juan Regional Medical Center for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. A reception of the creative and unusual will be from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The show will continue through Oct. 27. Information: 505.327.2907 or www.artifacts-gallery.com ASTROFRIDAY “Rocket to the Stars” will be shown at 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in the San Juan College Planetarium. Stargaze follows last showing, weather permitting, at 8:30 p.m. The Planetarium reserves the right to substitute shows. This is a free event, but seating is limited. Information: 505.566.3361 or www.sanjuancollege.edu/Planetarium/index.htm DOLLEY MADISON Dolley Madison was a survivor of wars, intrigue, and challenges beyond the call of duty. Dolley Payne Todd was a grieving Quaker widow when she married James Madison, the Father of the U.S Constitution, a future president, and the dearest love of her life. Dolley began her political career as the confidante of Mar tha Washington. From 1809 through 1817 she was one of the most brilliant first

ladies. Dolley Madison is presented by VanAnn Moore, performance begins at 7 p.m. in the San Juan College Little Theatre. This free event is a part of the Chautauqua Learning Series. Information: 505.334.9325 CROWNPOINT RUG AUCTION Hand-woven Navajo rugs, 300 to 400, are auctioned off each month at the Crownpoint Elementary School, 72 miles south of Farmington on Hwy. 371. American Indian art and craft vendors also onsite. Auction sponsored by Crownpoint Rug Weavers Association. Rug viewing is from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and auction begins at 7 p.m. Information: 505.785.7386, 505.610.6797 and Christinae2011@Live.com

Art Walk from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday’s hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Information: 505.598.5672 or sjqgquiltshow@gmail.com FOUR CORNERS STORYTELLING FESTIVAL National and local storytellers of all ages will be featured in the two-day celebration of an almost lost art – Storytelling. Slow down the pace, kick back and listen to traditional tales told by some of the very best national and local storytellers. The festival will feature stories of all varieties – scary ghost stories, family stories, folklore and myths! Festival events are held at Berg Park and The Totah Theatre. Information: 505.599.1270 or www.infoway.org

SAT OCT. 12

FRI OCT. 11 SAT OCT. 12 2013 SAN JUAN QUILTER QUILD SHOW Come to the San Juan Quilters Guild’s quilt show. This fabulous show includes a wide variety of quilts plus a raffle quilt, small quilt silent auction, demonstrations and other events. It is held at the Farmington Civic Center and is included in the Downtown Fall

RACE 2 EDUCATE The Foundation for Educational Excellence sponsors this 5K run/walk, 10K run and halfmarathon. Course begins at Farmington High School. Proceeds go towards Farmington Municipal Schools Red Apple Teacher Awards and small grants for various projects. Information: race2educate2013.eventbrite.com

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go to sanjuancollege.edu/zombierun for all the gory details The Tri-City Tribune (USPS 5601) is published weekly by Majestic Media, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401. Periodicals postage paid at Farmington, NM 87401. COPYRIGHT: The entire contents of the Tri-City Tribune are copyright 2013 by Majestic Media. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part 100 W. Apache St. by any means including electronic retrieval systems without the written permisFarmington, NM 87401 sion of the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tri-City Trib505-516-1230 une, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401 Fax: 505-516-1231 Subscription Rates: IF YOUR PAPER IS LATE: The Tri-City Tribune should arrive by 9:00 a.m. each Friday. If it hasn’t, www.tricitytribuneusa.com 52 week subscription $27.85 please call our circulation department at 505-51626 week subscription $15 1230, ext. 205. Mail Subscriptions Rates: The publisher reserves the right to change sub52 week subscription $83.54 scription rates during the term of a subscription Printed on 100% Recycled Paper 26 week subscription $41.77 upon one month’s notice. This notice may be by with Soy-Based Ink. All subscriptions payable in advance. mail to the subscriber, by notice contained in the

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Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

calendar consists of rock climbers attempting to climb specific routes. Each time a climber completes a route without making a mistake they earn points. The climber to acquire the most points with the least amount of mistakes wins. Prizes will be awarded for best costume, and also in the Men, Women, and Children categories. Cost is free to enter, must sign a waiver to participate, anyone under 18 needs a parent or guardian signature on the waiver, anyone under 14 must be accompanied by an adult. Information: 505.566.3487

BLOOMFIELD FIRE DEPARTMENT GET PINKED RUN Compete as an individual or as a team in this 5K Mud Run. Complete with obstacles, this 5K is sure to be fun! A 5K No Mud Run/Walk is also offered for those that prefer to stay clean, as is a 1-mile Fun Walk. The fun will all begin at the Bloomfield Multicultural Center. Information: www.active.com

FRI OCT. 18 THE HUNTS The Hunts are an indie-folk band made up of seven brothers and sisters from the southlands of Chesapeake, Va. Their songs are meticulously driven by violin, acoustic and electric guitar, banjo, mandolin, accordion, ukulele and piano, and rounded out with crisp harmonies. Performance at the San Juan College Performance Hall at 7 p.m., this is a Silhouette Performing Arts Series performance. Tickets are $15 adults, $12 students and seniors. Information: 505.566.3430

FRI OCT. 25 SAN JUAN COLLEGE CHOIR CONCERT Enjoy the smooth melodies and crisp harmonies of the San Juan College Choir Concert. This is the choir’s first show of the season and is sure to delight audiences. Performance at the San Juan College Performance Hall at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8 adults, $6 students and seniors. Information: 505.566.3430

THURS OCT. 24

FRIGHTY NIGHT The Farmington Aquatic Center, 1151 N. Sullivan Ave., will be having the Annual Fright Nite Halloween celebration from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Come join the fun with deck games, water games, candy and a lot of prizes. Tons of fun and even a hay ride to and from the Farm-

HALLOWEEN ‘BOO’OULDERING COMPETITION Come join us at the San Juan College Health and Human Performance Center for a bouldering competition – Children ages 5 through 12 - 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Teens and Adults - 6:45 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Competition

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ington Recreation Center. Cost: $4 per person for swimming and activities or $1 per person for non-swimming activities. Information: 505.599.1167

SAT OCT. 26 PINKALICIOUS THE MUSICAL Come see this hilarious production of Pinkalicious who can’t stop eating pink cupcakes despite warnings from her parents. Her pink indulgence lands her at the doctor’s office with Pinkititis, an affliction that turns her pink from head to toe – a dream come true for this pink loving enthusiast. But when her hue goes too far, only Pinkalicious can figure out a way to get out of this predicament. Tickets: $15 for adults, $10 for children. VIP Party Tickets also available for an additional $5 per person, join us for the VIP treatment including pink cupcakes and punch. The show will be at the Farmington Civic Center and starts at 7 p.m. Information: 505.599.1148, 877.599.3331 or www.fmtn.org/civiccenter ZOMBIE 5K RUN – FOR YOUR LIFE! Race begins and ends at the San Juan College Fire Tower Training Facility on campus and starts at 4 p.m. This race will be mostly on dirt and sand trails. Racers will be given flags to wear around their waist and will attempt to run the entire course while dodging ZOMBIES that are reaching for the flags. Racers will also have to navigate through a series of obstacles along the way. The first 100 racers to register are guaranteed a Swag Bag, all racers get a Tshirt, and refreshments and prizes will be awarded in the Men’s, Women’s, and Children’s categories. Cost is $35 for 18 and older, $25 for 17 and under. Anyone under 18 needs a parent

or guardian signature on a waiver to participate, anyone under 14 must be accompanied by an adult. Zombie Family Fun Walk will follow race starting at 5:30 p.m. Information: 505.566.3487

Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Oct. 5 - Grant & Randy Oct. 12 - Off the Interstate Oct. 19 - International Country Oct. 26 - Vintage People Info: 505.599.1380

Class will be taught by Mellissa Souers, B.A. in Theater from Fort Lewis College, who has instructed people of all ages in acting, theater and film. For more information call San Juan College at 505.566.3121.

SAN JUAN COLLEGE HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL Student organization of San Juan College coordinates this fantastic annual Halloween Carnival! Complete with frights, games and candy at the San Juan College HHPC Gym from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Information: 505.566.3403

50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Oct. 9 – Forever Young Oct. 16 – Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380

50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. – noonp.m. Friday, Oct. 4 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: $14 - $12 for card carrying AARP Members. Pre-registration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Pay cash or check to the instructor on day of class. Discount on your insurance can be good for 2 to 3 years, check your policy.

THURS OCT. 31 FARMINGTON SAFE TREATS The merchants on Main Street in Historic Downtown Farmington invite the community to Trick or Treat along Main Street from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Coordinated by the Farmington Downtown Association and sponsored by Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Affairs. Information: 505.599.1419

EVENTS FOR ADULTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, NM 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building: 505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Center Activity Center: 505.566.2288 The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287 50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 – 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity

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50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. – Noon Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: $14, $12 for card carrying AARP Members. Pre-registration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Pay cash or check to the instructor on day of class. A discount on your insurance can be good for 2 to 3 years, check your policy. ENCORE CLASS – ACTING 101 9:30 -11:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Are you a character? Would you like to be? Join us for an exciting and creative time in Acting 101 – a beginner class for 50+ adults looking to create through acting. Discover the basics of acting through improvisation, games, monologues, and scene work. Have fun crafting new scenes and making new friends. Plan to attend Bottom of the Barrel’s Production of Robin Hood on Oct. 19; cost no more than $10, details were discussed on the first day of class. Performance from a showcase of scenes worked on in the final class.

BOO BOO BINGO 1 – 2 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Play to win fabulous prizes furnished by the Senior Center. To play blackout at the end, you must have been present and seated by 1 p.m. to get in the game. Cost is $2 a card and we provide refreshments. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. HALLOWEEN DINNER & DANCE 10:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 31 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Dinner and Dance with live music provided by Grant Groblebe. Lunch is a $3 donation for anyone 60+ and a $6 fee for anyone younger. Wear your Halloween gear to win a prize in the costume contest. Call 505.599.1390 for more information.


TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Editorial

Friday, October 4, 2013

A6

E-Mail: editor@tricitytribuneusa.com

Phone: 505-516-1230

Fax: 505-516-1231

Shutdown could wreak unintended economic consequences In the safety of their mountain caves, or maybe in concrete-walled suburban sanctuaries near the capital of one of our nominal allies, terrorist leaders are surely plotting their next attack on the United States of America. But those leaders of global terror lack the power to pull off the most menacing deeds of their vile fantasies: They can’t hit the United States government so hard it grinds to a paralytic halt. They can’t undermine the foundation of the entire global economy by weakening the mighty U.S. dollar. And they can’t transform the world’s economic superpower into a deadbeat nation that defaults on its debts for the first time ever. Meanwhile, in the safe sanctuaries of their congressional offices, leaders of the small but fractious Republican faction known as the Tea Party have been plotting at-

tacks upon the same target: the U.S. government. Frighteningly, they unintentionally may accomplish what the terrorists cannot. Already, they have transformed House Republican leaders into their personal hand puppets, manipulating them into shutting down the federal government on Tuesday. Now they’re planning to block, in a couple of weeks, the once-routine raising of the debt ceiling, which has always allowed the United States to pay its bills. Let us be clear: In their hearts, the Tea Party’s congressional leaders and their many followers are true patriots. They would be the first to battle any miscreant who launched attacks that would harm Americans. Yet, by their actions, misguided Tea Party patriots may trigger damage and dysfunction that terrorist evildoers would love to claim credit for causing.

MARTIN SCHRAM SCRIPPS HOWARD Intoxicated by their suddenly supersized clout, Tea Party leaders ignored urgent warnings from wiser conservatives. We are not talking here about sound bites from politicians playing partisan politics. The U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the American Bankers Association warned Tea Party leaders that their hopeless effort to defund the Affordable Care Act – commonly called “Obamacare” – would have negative consequences for ordinary Americans. “It is not in the best interest of the employers, employees or the American people to risk a government shutdown that will be economically disruptive and cre-

ate even more uncertainties for the U.S. economy,” the U.S. Chamber of Commerce warned in a Sept. 27 letter signed by 236 business organizations and trade associations. “Likewise, we respectfully urge the Congress to raise the debt ceiling in a timely manner and remove any threat to the full faith and credit of the United States government.” American Bankers Association President and CEO Frank Keating, former Republican governor of Oklahoma, was more blunt. He warned in a Washington Post commentary: “The respect and admiration that the United States and its institutions inspire around the

world are based on the certainty that when our nation makes a promise, we keep it. Unfortunately, Congress seems poised to undermine U.S. credibility at home and abroad by taking the extraordinary step of reneging on bills that our nation has racked up. Ordinary Americans will bear the brunt of the damage if our leaders don’t prevent the United States from defaulting on its debt for the first time in history. ... If our nation defaults on its nearly $17 trillion in debt, the harm is likely to be measured in hundreds of billions of dollars.” How much? The nonpartisan Government Accountability Office estimated that when Republicans merely delayed raising the debt limit in 2011, the uncertainty cost U.S. taxpayers $1.3 billion in increased interest costs that year alone. Then there are the costs

we pay in jobs – either cut or never created. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office estimated 750,000 jobs have been lost since the sequester and its federal budget cuts began March 1. But the actual number is likely higher. During the 2012 battle over the sequester, federal agencies stopped hiring and contracting. And contractors, anticipating the cuts, canceled planned hirings a year before the sequester began. That is why the tea party puppeteers should rethink their knee-jerk rejection of warnings from savvy, sane fellow conservatives. Beware and be wary: Unintended consequences can wreck America’s still-fragile economic recovery. Martin Schram writes political analysis for Scripps Howard News Service. Email martin. schram@gmail.com.

Do online reader comments help, harm public discourse? Let’s talk about trolls: The rise of digital media over the last 20 years has given birth to a new phenomenon, online reader comments. Usually found at the end of newspaper or magazine stories online – perhaps on this very column you’re reading – comments often drive journalists and their readers crazy with misinformation, ugly vitriol and out-of-left-field accusations. This week, Popular Science magazine said it would no long allow comments, calling them a “grotesque reflection” of the media culture. Do reader comments damage democracy? Even if they do, is it possible to put them aside? Joel Mathis and Ben Boychuk, the RedBlueAmerica columnists, debate the issue. MATHIS: Here’s how the 21st century differs from its predecessors: The audience gets to talk back. That can be enormously frustrating for writers, reporters and editors who still aspire to be gatekeepers to public discourse. Many of

RED & BLUE STATES Joel Mathis & Ben Boychuk

those professionals still long for a time when the public’s voice was largely limited to a few well-selected letters each day on a newspaper’s op-ed page. It was a less anarchic time, certainly, and the contents of those letters were much less mean than one will normally find under your average newspaper opinion column. In truth, the best comments sections – like society itself – offer both a large degree of freedom, as well as a guiding hand to sort out the racists, trolls, jerks, and other riff-raff who desire less to debate issues and exchange ideas and more to cause as big a mess as possible. They are vandals and bomb throwers – metaphorically speaking, of course. In real life, such folks are usually removed from polite company with

great haste. Such a strategy has helped The New York Times cultivate ever-better online comments, while blogger Ta-Nehisi Coates has found his writing and thinking sharpened by the daily conversation with his readers. The very worst – such as Philly.com, in Philadelphia where I live – appear to be untouched by any editor most days, except when editors there turn off comments on a story rather than have the vitriol go public. “Guiding hands” are also known as editors, though, and in this day of tighttighter-tightest belt-tightening among media companies, paying a person to help create a great comments section is an expense most publishers and editors won’t shoulder – which is why so many comments sections

appear to be rude and lawless places. Popular Science is shutting off comments because, at heart, it doesn’t want to see its reporting challenged. Even in a science setting, that’s not wise. There are ways to cultivate the best conversations with the best participants. It’s not a free-for-all or nothing. But you do have to let the audience talk back. BOYCHUK: Popular Science made the right decision to end comments, but for the strangest of reasons. If the editors said anonymous commenters debased the quality of discourse at the site with their silly snark, many readers would have grumbled, but they likely would have understood. Besides, people have no shortage of online outlets where they may snark freely. Instead, Suzanne LaBarre, PopSci’s online content editor, explained that readers were trying to change public opinion with malicious aforethought. And that sort of behavior simply could not be tolerated.

“A politically motivated, decades-long war on expertise has eroded the popular consensus on a wide variety of scientifically validated topics,” Labarre wrote. “Everything, from evolution to the origins of climate change, is mistakenly up for grabs again.” It should go without saying that experts don’t know everything, and that “popular consensus” has no place in science. Alas, so much of the obvious needs repeating these days. Our discourse is a mess and most online comments are probably a waste of time. But the consensus on both of those propositions – and much else – is far from clear. A century ago, the consensus among reputable scientists held that the theory of continental drift was “utter damned rot” and anyone who “valued his reputation for scientific sanity” would reject the idea. Today, continental drift is taught as basic geography. Today, we’re also told that 97.1 percent of scientists agree on the causes of global

climate change. Well, the latest report from the United Nations’ Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is out, and the forces of “consensus” have a problem. Turns out, the global warming that so many computer models predicted hasn’t occurred in the past 15 years. Scientists disagree why, though many still insist man-made carbon emissions are likely to cause catastrophic problems. If the evidence doesn’t bear out the models, then the models are wrong. Maybe the hypothesis is wrong, too. And if the hypothesis is wrong, maybe we should think twice before letting experts reshape the way we live. Maybe the consensus is “utter damned rot” – and more people should say so. Ben Boychuk is associate editor of the Manhattan Institute’s City Journal. Joel Mathis is a contributing editor to Philadelphia Magazine. Reach them at bboychuk@city-journal.org, joelmmathis@gmail.com or www.facebook.com/benandjoel.


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Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

traffic “I think that is quite telling that communities our size and communities in the state of New Mexico are not going through this process,” City Councilor Jason Sandel said, questioning city Manager Rob Mayes’ and Mayor Tommy Roberts’ motivation for a policy mandating traffic signals. “Why are we hiding behind a policy and guidelines to hide behind a vote for signalization at an intersection,” Sandel asked. “To me, let’s have the political discussion. Let’s sit down have it out and be done with it. Now we have 15 pages of more regulations and more loopholes for people to jump through to have something happen inside of their community.” Sandel alleged that the city did not need a policy or guidelines unless Mayes and Roberts were “trying to avoid the real issue.” He asked the Council to

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table the adoption of the policy and instead discuss the installation of a traffic light at Pinon Hills Boulevard and North Dustin Avenue. Councilor Gayla McCulloch agreed to table the policy’s adoption and the Council unanimously agreed. Mayor Roberts then made a motion to table the discussion about providing a signal at the aforementioned intersection. “It seems to me the action just taken on tabling the policy dictates that we table the signalization at this intersection. That policy if adopted should govern the intersection at Dustin and Pinon Hills,” Roberts said. The Council did not agree and the motion died. Roberts, however, pushed on in support of the policy, saying it would help the Council to determine whether the signal would be appropriate. “I find it odd that a member of an elected body

would call a proposed policy something to hide behind, when its motivation is to help staff deal with the political aspects of the issue,” Roberts said, adding that a poll of 54 area residents makes it appear that 66 percent of the population supports the signal. “If we were really interested in what people want who drive that intersection we would have a better feel for what people in this community would like to have.” City staff was asked to contact residents and businesses in the area of Pinon Hills Boulevard and North Dustin Avenue. Assistant City Manager Bob Campbell sent out a letter to 54 separate people and entities. The city received 32 responses of which 22 were in favor of light and 10 were opposed to it. The letter, dated Aug. 16, 2013, stated that while city staff was exploring the possibility of a lighted intersection, the intersection “does not meet the minimum

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standards for a lighted signal, based on Federal Highway Administration guidelines.” It went on to say that those guidelines are used to “justify the need and expense for signalization.” Campbell stated that the cost for the signal would be approximately $350,000, which was an increase from the previous estimate of $250,000 for a signal at that intersection. The letter also asked if residents and businesses in the area would be willing to share the cost of installation. Campbell reported to the Council that Piñon Hills Community Church offered to pay $40,000, while some area residents also offered to contribute. They are Jerry Sandel, father of Councilor Jason Sandel, who told Campbell he would pay thousands; Deputy District Attorney Dustin O’Brien said he would contribute $100 and former Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs Director Jeff Bowman also offered to pay $100. San Juan Regional Medical Center CEO Rick Wallace offered to pay $500, according to Campbell. Roberts commented on “money being interjected into this discussion,” adding that Sandel found someone to donate money to fund the entire signal’s cost. “This begins to make my case for the need for a policy.” Roberts pointed out that the residents off of Hood Mesa Trail, where his home is located, might want to take up a collection to install a traffic light at the intersection of Hood Mesa Trail and Pinon Hills Boulevard, but that would not mean the light is warranted. “There should be a minimum objective threshold that gets us beyond that initial consideration – the question of why we are considering a policy – that is why we are,” Roberts said. “I don’t have objection to

any signalization at Pinon Hills Bypass. As a policy making body we need to have some guidelines – minimum thresholds that should be met before we move further.” McCulloch said the past procedure worked and asked if the policy were passed would it change how city staff perform their job. Public Works Director Jeff Smaka said it would not. “Staff has operated consistently based on the federal standards. I would speak in favor of having a policy,” Mayes said. He believes the Pinon Hills Boulevard corridor has been studied and does not meet the warrants for a traffic signal at the intersection of Dustin Avenue or Butler Avenue. “If Council wants to do something different, then of course you can,” Mayes said. “Staff will continue studies of regular intersections.” Harwick was asked whether he believed the intersection warranted a traffic signal and he said it did not, but he would study it further. “Watching the operation is different than the numbers.” He would look at it on Wednesday afternoon and evening to see how the intersection operates. Councilor Dan Darnell, however, pointed out that the real problem is on Saturday evenings and Sunday mornings when there are church services at Pinon Hills Community Church and at First Assembly of God. “Sunday mornings, it’s incredibly crazy. Sunday evening, there is a tremendous amount of traffic,” Darnell said. “I look at those times when things are busy. … I look at that and I think something needs to be done.” He asked if a roundabout would be sufficient.

Harwick said that while he likes roundabouts, the entire corridor would have to have roundabouts to make one work. Harwick added that he fears putting a traffic signal at this intersection would lead to people just running the red light when traffic in the area is not heavy. He also believes the use of police officers directing traffic on Sunday mornings would still be needed to keep traffic flowing at Pinon Hills Boulevard and Dustin Avenue. “I went out and watched how we’re moving traffic on Sundays,” Sandel said in response to this. “While police officers are hired by a third party at this intersection, what I noticed is we move all of the church traffic, and others have to sit and wait for 10 to 15 minutes in most cases.” Sandel made a motion that Harwick study the intersection and come back with a recommendation to solve the problems there. “The last thing I want to see is a crash there. The church contacts me. My father contacts me. This to me is what is right for this community,” Sandel said. “What we ought to do at a very minimum – give direction today to ask for some type of a solution. … Let’s look for innovative solutions and ways to say yes instead of excuses to say no.” Councilors Darnell and Mary Fischer agreed with Sandel that something had to be done, but Councilor McCulloch said she could not vote with them if they “mandated” that Harwick come back with something, if his opinion was nothing could be done. The motion passed on a 3-to-1 vote, so the process to improve the Pinon Hills Boulevard and North Dustin Avenue intersection is moving forward.

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Yxáà|ätÄ Distil, Majestic Media brings brew, bands and barbecue to Lions Wilderness Park LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune The aroma of barbecued ribs and the sounds of clinking beer glasses filled Lions Wilderness Park and Amphitheater in Farmington on Sept. 28 during the first-ever Brews Meats Bands Festival. The festival was a partnership between Majestic Media and Distil and it

was a huge success, according to Majestic Media President Don Vaughan. “It was absolutely amazing. We heard comments from people saying, ‘This is the best event Farmington has put on in decades,’” said Vaughan, adding the reason the BMB Festival was so successful was a combination of the venue, the popularity of microbreweries and barbecue,

The six barbeque teams that competed in the BMB festival were cooking their ribs in the early morning, hours before the festival even begun.

and the “community ’s hunger for entertainment that is more engaging.” There were 14 microbreweries participating in the festival including Sierra Nevada, O’Dell Brewing Co. from Fort Collins, Colo., Alaskan Brewing Co., and the local 3 Rivers Brewery. Vaughan pointed out Distil Owner Jake Foust’s knowledge for microbreweries was a huge contribution to the festival. “Distil has the most micro-brew sales in the area. (Foust) is the best in the business in that sense, ” Vaughan said. To accompany the brews, there were six different teams cooking up delicious barbecued ribs and handing them out to the wide-smiling guests. The team that won the “People’s Choice” for best barbecue was Sean McAtasney and John Gillen from Farmington. “This has been fun. I love doing this and seeing the people smile,” Gillen explained. “For us, this was our first competition, but we have been smoking barbecue for a long time,” McAtasney added. The team won a $500 prize with $250 being donated to the LIVESTRONG Foundation and Catholic Charities in Farmington. Most of the cooks at the festival have mastered

Sean McAtasney from Farmington gives two thumbs up at the BMB Festival on Sept. 28. McAtasney and his teammate, John Gillen, won the “People’s Choice” award for best barbeque ribs.

A9 smoking barbecue. “I have been doing this for 10 years,” said Carl Dallas, a local resident who represented team Big Country BBQ. “I just love this. I love the location and being outside.” Dallas’s teammate was Jenny Rogers from Farmington. While people wiped barbecue away from their faces and chatted with their friends, they also could listen to several local bands play throughout the day. These bands included Little Miss Chevious, Jose Villarreal, Boomtown, and Those Devils. The headline band that took the stage in the evening was Hello Dollface, a Durango, Colo.based band that has played 400 venues in nearly every Western state from Texas to the West Coast. “These are amazing local bands that have no venues to play in for the public to go see,” Vaughan said. “The venue made this event successful. The city of Farmington was instrumental in helping that happen. They know (Lions Wilderness Park) is a great venue and it is not utilized and they want it to be utilized.” The festival was a huge hit, according to the guests. Kevin O’Neill from Farmington said he enjoyed the beer sampling and listening to the bands. “This is a fantastic venue and I hope they have it again next year.” Amber Aasen-Frakes from Farmington echoed that, saying, “This is something that is different and new to Farmington. We would like to see this every year in Farmington.” The BMB Festival will be an annual event with the 2014 festival occurring on Oct. 11 at Lions Wilderness Park. Vaughan said he also is considering organizing a BMB Festival in the springtime.

There were more than 700 people who sampled beer and barbeque ribs and listened to live music at the BMB Festival at Lions Wilderness Park.


A10

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

Fine Arts Invitational

John Grow’s oil paintings on display at Henderson Center The 2013 San Juan College Fine Arts Committee Invitational will feature Durango artist John Grow and his collection of oil paintings titled flora before, at the San Juan College Henderson Fine Arts Center Gallery, Oct. 11 through Nov. 8. The exhibit will open with a reception

from 6 to 8 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 11. Durango artist John Grow portrays nontraditional subjects with classic realism. The award winning scholar and filmmaker has won eight Best of Show Awards for his symbolic/whimsical paintings of people. Other subjects include archaeological re-

constructions, historic Colorado railroads, and contemporary small town life. Grow studied art at Northwestern University. His studio has been in the Four Corners region of the southwestern Colorado since 1978. “I paint the things that I enjoy, as clearly as I can,” says Grow.

The San Juan College Art Gallery is open from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Fridays. For further information about this exhibit or other Gallery events, contact Cindy McNealy at 505.566.3464 or mcnealyc@sanjuancollege.edu.

History comes alive

VanAnn Moore portrays Dolley Madison Oct. 12 at SJC Experience history as it comes to life when VanAnn Moore portrays Dolley Madison, at 7 p.m., Friday, Oct. 11, at the Henderson Fine Arts Center. Dolley Madison was a survivor of wars, intrigue, and challenges beyond the call of duty. Dolley Payne Todd was a grieving

Quaker widow when she married James Madison – the Father of the U.S. Constitution and a future President. Dolley began her political career as the confidante and best friend of Martha Washington, Aaron Burr and many others. She acted as hostess for eight years for President Thomas Jefferson,

and became one of the most brilliant of First Ladies from 1809-1817. She would become an adviser of every President from Washington to Polk. VanAnn Moore is a Chautauqua performer and researcher who has brought a dozen historical characters alive for the New Mexico Humanities

ation Center. For additional information call 505.599.1184.

Tickets are available at the Civic Center, KNMI Vertical Radio, KPCL Passion Radio or iTicket.com. Tickets also are available for both shows at www.fmtn.org/civiccenter or 505.599.1148.

Council for more than 15 years. She has performed nationally and internationally. The Chautauqua performances are free and sponsored by the New Mexico Humanities Council; San Juan College School of Humanities and

SJC Encore Program; and the Teaching American History Program, administered by the Educator Support Center of Farmington. For further information, contact the San Juan College Box Office, at 505.566.3430.

prca tracks Craft Workshop for Adults Have you ever made a basic Ojo de Dios with two popsicle sticks and some yarn? On Friday, Oct. 4, join us at the Farmington Museum, 3041 E. Main St., and learn how to make a creative and fairly complex Ojo de Dios (Eye of God) weaving. The workshop is from 2 to 4 p.m., is geared to anyone 16 or over, and it’s only $2 per person! Engage your creative side! Register at the Farmington Museum, or call 505.599.1169 Make it your fall tradition Celebrate the arrival of autumn at the Sycamore Park Community Center, 1051 Sycamore St. Join us from 5 to 7 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 4, for a Harvest Party extravaganza. There will be games, apple bobbing, hay bale hop-

ping, musical chairs, ring tossing, a corn dig, and more. Don’t miss this even, free for the whole family. For more information, call 505.566.2480. Last chance to register! Don’t miss the 7th Annual Kickball To u r n a m e n t . Registration deadline is 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7. Get your team together now for Friday evening and Saturday, Oct.11 and 12. All players must be 18 years of age or older. Teams should consist of five men and five women on the field with a maximum of 15 players on the roster. There is a $40 team entry fee, which includes prizes for 1st and 2nd place. Register at the Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road. The tournament will take place at the Fairgrounds Road Softball Fields, behind the Recre-

LIGHT Meditative Worship 8:15 am BREAD Traditional Worship 10 am SALT Contemporary Worship 11:30 am

Plenty of laughs! Get your tickets NOW for James & Ernie, featuring Tatanka Means on Saturday, Oct. 5. They’ll bring you plenty of laughs! Ten years ago, Ernie Tsosie and James Junes met backstage at a native comedy competition in Farmington. They’ve been entertaining audiences ever since. Grab a good seat, and watch the show. The fun starts 7 p.m. at the Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington St. Tickets are $15 for adults, $10 for kids. Also coming to the Civic Center is An Evening of Comedy with Taylor Mason at 7p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 8. See this terrific comedian, ventriloquist, entertainer, musician, and actor perform! Tickets are $15 per person, $25 per couple. Get more information about Taylor Mason at www.FCCMF.org.

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Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

aztec pets of the week

(Left) Oh “Happy Days” are here again. Our names are Joanie and Chachi. These 2-year-old Pits are wonderful to have for companions! Perfect running partners. Chachi is already neutered and ready to go home. Both would do well with other dogs and kids. They are Fonzie approved. Don’t be a “Potsie.” Bring ’em home with ya today. (Right) These two are simply precious. Their names are Tallulah and Quill. Tallulah is a 1-year-old female Beagle/Lab mix. She is petite, gentle and loving. Quill – named for his porcupine encounter – is a young male Shepherd/Heeler. He is funny, outgoing and playful. Both are excellent with other dogs and kids. Please adopt today.

(Left) We are Outlaw and Justice. Outlaw is a 1-year-old brindle colored Blue Tick Hound mix. Justice is an 8-monthold Heeler/Shepherd mix. These boys can watch, play with and round up your kids while out playing. Bail out these two boys and give them the chance they deserve with an active, loving and attention giving family. Please adopt them today. (Right) Angels on earth? You bet. These little ones are Fluffy and Zeus. Fluffy is a 2-year-old female Queensland Heeler. Zeus is a 1-year-old neutered Lab Retriever. Both are great with kids and other dogs. Let them spread their wings at your heavenly home. They can sprinkle angel dust on your hearts and make you so happy. Please adopt today.

The Aztec Animal Shelter, 825 Sabena, is open from noon to 4 p.m. daily.

farmington pets of the week

ical Center 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Trading Posts: How they got started and what value they brought to reservations 7:55 a.m.: San Juan Smart Talk

Nips is a 3-month-old female orange and brown domestic short hair. She loves to chase toys and is very playful.

Henrietta is a 3-month-old female hound mix, spayed and ready to go home today. She is full of energy and loves to play.

The Farmington Animal Shelter Hours are Mon. - Fri. 10 a.m. to 5:30p.m.; Sat. and Sun.

Leia is a 1-year-old black and white Collie mix. She loves to have her belly rubbed and curl up at your feet. She is great with kids and other dogs.

noon to 3p.m. Also on Sundays at PETCO from noon to 3 p.m. Adoption Prices (Dogs): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $100; 6 mo. to 6 yrs. $80; Over 6 yrs. $50 Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the dog must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) Adoption Prices (Cats): $10 is refundable when the Rabies

Kisses is a gray and black tabby who lives up to his name. He loves to give kisses. He is 5 months old and would make a great addition to your family.

shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $70; 6 mo. to a 6 yrs $60; Over 6 yrs. $50. Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the cat must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) If you are interested in any of these animals, please give us a call at 505.599.1098. We have a large variety from which to choose, and we want to take the opportunity to thank everyone who chooses to save a life and adopt a local shelter animal.

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THURSDAY – OCT. 10 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning: Four Corners Storytelling Festival 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Zaldívar and the Lipan Apaches: A good beginning in relations among peoples 7:55 a.m.: Save-A-Buck Thursday: Weekly economic & investing news Noon: A Review Too Far: local movie reviews

MONDAY – OCT. 7 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: San Juan College Theater Department 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Farmington's Storytelling Festival: Keeping the art alive 7:30 a.m.: Drug Free San Juan County 7:55 a.m.: Monday Reboot: Tech News

Monday – Friday 5 – 5:30 a.m.: Focus on the Family 5:30 – 6 a.m.: Adventures in Odyssey 6 – 9:30 a.m.: "The Morning Show" with Devin and Rachel 9:30 – 10 a.m.: "Four Corners Spotlight" with Jim Baker Oct. 7: Bottom of the Barrel Production – Hood and Leigh Irwin Oct. 8: Cancer Awareness – Robinson Oct. 9: Start Up Weekend – Catleberry Oct. 10: Rewind- 9/18 – Council – Dan Darnell Oct. 11: Peaches Neet Feet – Steiner 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.: "The Lunch Crunch" with Leah 3 – 8 p.m.: "The Drive" with Donnie

FRIDAY – OCT. 11 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Four Corners Storytelling Festival 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Bottomless Lakes State Park: They're not bottomless but are home to endangered species. Noon: Book Buzz: A Best Of episode

TUESDAY – OCT. 8 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Farmington Chamber of Commerce 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Numa Reynold: Showed New Mexicans how to succeed in business 7:55 a.m.: Adopt-A-Pet Tuesday

SATURDAY Noon – 2 p.m.: The Weekend 22 10 – midnight : The Hype- Christian Hip Hop Show

WEDNESDAY – OCT. 9 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: San Juan Regional Med-

SUNDAY 5 – 6 a.m.: Focus on the Family's Weekend Magazine 10 a.m. – noon: The Weekend 22

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A12

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

How serious is it? I found lumps and bumps on my pet Your pet seems fine, and then all of a sudden, a new lumpy, bumpy mass pops up on his body, seemingly overnight. Sometimes these lumps and bumps can be caused by wounds, but other times they can be warts or other types of growths. Whatever the reason for them, they’re among the top ten reasons owners head to the veterinary hospital. And that’s a good thing, since sometimes a simple swelling can be a sign of a dangerous but treatable disease. The only way to be sure is by going to your vet and letting them assess the new development. Veterinarians often refer to superficial lumps and bumps as “masses.” Strictly speaking, they might also be legitimately called tumors or growths, even if they’re not cancerous. These words simply describe enlargements under or within the skin. Most of the time the lumpy, bumpy mass is in or just under the skin, or sometimes even in the mouth. Your veterinarian will be able to differentiate these lumps from other masses, such as bony swellings and abdominal distention, which are a different sort of thing. Most superficial lumps and bumps are caused by one of the following: 1. Puncture wounds: These injuries – usually the result of bites from other animal – fester beneath the skin’s surface to form an abscess, swelling (sometimes tremendously) before eventually breaking open. 2. Benign masses: Warts, skin tags, fluid-filled cysts, fatty tumors (lipomas), and histiocytomas are all examples of benign (non-cancerous) masses that may or may not need to be removed. 3. Cancerous tumors: These are the scariest of the three culprits, because simple removal may not solve the problem. Cancerous tumors can spread – sometimes locally (to skin, fat, bone, or muscle next to the original lump) and sometimes to distant parts of the body. Here are some simple actions you can take to help your pet heal: 1. Assess your pet: If he appears to be feeling well and if the mass isn’t red, painful, or giving off a strong odor, you’re likely not dealing with an emergency, but you should go ahead and make an appointment with the vet. If the pet is lethargic, has a poor appetite, or shows any other signs of illness, then you may be dealing with a more urgent situation. 2. Mark the mass: If the mass is small and hard to find, mark the hair immediately adjacent to it with an indelible marker or a tiny bit of nail polish to make it easy to find at the veterinary hospital. Smaller masses get “lost” every day.

It’s your veterinarian’s job to figure out the origin of the mass. To do so, he may take several of the following steps: 1. Ask about your pet’s history. Your pet’s doctor will probably ask evaluation questions such as, “When was the lump first noticed? How

PAWSITIVELY PETS Darren Woodson has it changed? How has your pet been otherwise?” and other questions to help determine the severity of the problem.

2. Perform a physical examination. The look and feel of a mass can offer a veterinarian plenty of information. But examining your pet from

head to tail can be similarly beneficial and is therefore considered an essential step, even when investigating a seemingly simple skin tag. 3. Fine needle aspirate the lump. Inserting a needle into the mass is a very common practice. It’s done with the hope of extracting a few telltale cells that can be identified under the microscope.

In the case of an abscess, the fine needle aspirate would typically identify the presence of a large “pocket” of pus. Sometimes, the microscope slides are sent to a diagnostic laboratory for further examination. Unfortunately, aspirating a lump only tells you what the cells looks like in

* Woodson A23

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MM SPORTS

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 2013

A13

Road Apple Rally 33rd annual bike race is Saturday at Lions Wilderness Park The city of Farmington Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs department will host the 33rd Annual Road Apple Rally at the Lions Wilderness Park Amphitheater at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 5. The Road Apple Rally is the longest running annual mountain bike race in the country and this year we celebrate the 33rd Anniversary of this event which started in 1981. The Road Apple Rally offers classes for everyone. Beginners will do a 15-mile loop; all others will do the 30-mile Road Apple Loop. Climbing on the course is minimal, making it fast and fun. There will be numerous top pro riders and racers in attendance. For additional information on the 33rd Annual Road Apple Rally, contact Shawn Lyle at 505.599.1140.

Should the Lobos expect to beat the Aggies? Bob Davie says no. I say yes. The University of New Mexico will host New Mexico State Saturday night at University Stadium. For Lobo and Aggie fans, it’s the game of the year. Win this one and you have bragging rights for the next 365 days. Davie this week was asked if this was a tough game to prepare for because, “if you win, you’re expected to win,” by the District soccer begins this week as the non-district season winds down in football and volleyball. Cross country teams hit the road this weekend as district and state tournaments are just a month away. Time flies, so get out and enjoy the weather and some great high school sports matchups.

Week No. 4 in the books and the bye weeks begin as the season hits the first quarter mark. Bye weeks are always tricky. Some people draft to avoid having multiple players on the same bye week. Others try to get players with the same bye week and take a oneweek hit in the standings. Still others don’t really care and muddle through. Put me in the last category. Looks like I’ll be paying the price week No. 8. Each week the Fantasy Geek will give you some unsolicited advice on playing NFL Fantasy Football. Realizing that the Thursday night game is past history,

THIS WEEK IN SPORTS JP Murrieta reporter from the Santa Fe New Mexican newspaper. The question caught Davie off guard. “Wait a minute,” Davie responded. “If we win, we’re expected to win it because it’s New Mexico State? I thought we lost three straight times to New

Mexico State before we won down there last year.” “I look at New Mexico State just like us. It’s a huge rivalry game. It’s two programs that have bright futures that are rebuilding. I don’t see it as a game you’re ‘expected to win.’ I must

* Murrieta A14

RICK’S PICKS

Rick Hoerner Last Week … October means Homecoming games with a pair coming up this week and a couple of games last

week as Aztec took the untraditional route of playing 5A power Manzano.

* Hoerner A14

THE FANTASY GEEK

What an exciting week it was for participant Patrick Gregoire of The First Tee of San Juan County, NM. Gregoire spent last week on the Monterey Peninsula playing golf at Pebble Beach Golf Links, meeting past PGA professional golfers such as Fred Couples and Bernhard Langer, and spending time with other participants at the Nature Valley First Tee Open at Pebble Beach Golf Links. Gregoire was one of 81 participants who were selected out of more than 150 nation-wide applicants based on his golf résumé, life skills knowledge, philanthropic community work and essay answers. Arriving into Monterey on Monday, Gregoire played practice rounds at Del Monte Golf Course and Pebble Beach Golf Links, leading up to the tournament on Friday. On Wednesday evening, Gregoire found out he would be paired

FIRST TEE Tom Yost up with Dan Forsman of the PGA Champions Tour in the professional-junior best ball golf tournament. With his older brother Taylor as his caddy, Gregoire teed off on Friday morning with Forsman and shot a 5-under par round of 67. Gregoire struggled a bit with club selection, as the ball was not traveling as far as usual at sea level as compared to the thin air of the Rocky Mountains. With the top 23 projunior teams getting to play in the final round on Sunday at Pebble Beach, Gregoire and Forsman shot a 4-under par round of 68. Their total of 9 under par was good enough to make the cut and ensure that they would play in the final round together.

Rick Hoerner

players from Thursday’s game will not be in consideration, and since most leagues let you change players that haven’t played yet, every other squad is fair game. Each week we’ll look at the players that led to victory or disaster in Love Them’ and Loathe Them followed by a section on Studs and Duds, who you may look at starting and sitting this week. Finally, there will be a quick section

on pick-ups on the waiver wire for some players that may be available in your league. Last Week with The Geek… Week No. 4 Record – 9-1 90 percent Overall Record – 30-10 75 percent Love Them … Saints QB Drew Brees – Paying rent on this line

* geek A16

Patrick Gregoire at Pebble Beach Golf Links. – Courtesy photo

On Sunday at Pebble Beach, Gregoire and Forsman tied for the low round of the day with a 5-under par round of 67. Their score of -14 was good for a tie for 6th place with the winning score coming in at -18. Forsman also finished in second place in the professional side of the golf tournament with a score of -9. “Pebble was extremely tough,” explained Gregoire. “The greens were so hard and fast. Even (Bernhard) Langer said that it was the toughest he had ever seen the golf course play.” “This has been an unbelievable experience,” said Gregoire. “Mr. Forsman was an incredible partner. It is tough to put into words what this has meant to me.”


A14

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

Murrieta be looking at a different tape and standing on that field last year. I must have been looking at a different group of guys in those maroon shirts. Expected to win? I don’t think so. We’re scratching for everything we can get.” Davie might have been using typical “coach speak,” or maybe he really believes that. But in reality, Lobo fans DO expect to beat the Aggies every year in football. They have history on their side. UNM doesn’t have a lot to brag about in recent years. Prior to Davie’s arrival, the

team won three games total in a three-year period. But over the course of this rivalry, UNM has dominated the series. UNM has beaten NMSU twice as many times over the course of the century-long series. NMSU hasn’t won four in a row against UNM since the ’60s. When Rocky Long was head coach at UNM, he lost to NMSU only three times – and trust me, those three losses still stick with him. He made it a priority every year – UNM doesn’t lose to NMSU. The last coach in Albuquerque, Mike Locksley, was never able to

beat the Aggies and he was run out of town. Now, I’m not going to say losing to NMSU was the reason Locksley was fired, but it didn’t help his cause. Even when UNM was terrible in the Locksley era, it was a shock when the Aggies came into Albuquerque in 2011 and pounded the Lobos 42-28. The Aggies scored on their first three possessions, it was 21-0 in the first quarter and everyone at University Stadium wearing cherry and silver was asking, “What just happened?” Even most recruits will

tell you the Lobos are expected to beat the Aggies every year. New Mexico State recruited current UNM quarterback Cole Gautsche. He actually committed to play for the Aggies – that is until Bob Davie arrived in town. Davie convinced Gautsche to change allegiances and play for the Lobos. That’s just what Gautsche did. UNM has better facilities, they’re in an established conference and located in a city with more options. NMSU isn’t easily accessible for recruits, the Aggies are an independent football

team without a conference, and is a program with a losing tradition. Even in other sports, the Lobos have dominated the Aggies this year. New Mexico State has yet to beat UNM this year in women’s soccer or volleyball and in men’s golf. The Aggies have a new head coach in Doug Martin. It seems as though he is trying to change the culture in Las Cruces, establish a winning tradition and getting the fans in the stadium. In reality, NMSU is winless without much signs of life right now, playing in front

of empty benches, and there isn’t a conference that will welcome their football program. Let me be clear, I’m not a UNM alum. I didn’t break down in Las Cruces and harbor some sort of ill will toward the Aggies. I have no dog in this fight. I’m just a realist. If the Aggies beat the Lobos on Saturday, it would be a huge boost for their program and an even more devastating loss for UNM. So should Bob Davie expect to beat the Aggies each year? Yes. Will they? Talk to me Saturday night.

tional then came back to defeat Española 3-0 and swept Bloomfield as well on Tuesday. In other volleyball action this past week, Shiprock took Kirtland in five games and Navajo Prep fell to Newcomb 3-1. Soccer tournaments wrapped up the pre-district season with Piedra Vista’s girls splitting a pair of games at the Sandia Prep tournament blowing out Moriarty 10-0 and losing a match to Sandia Prep in the ridiculous shootout. The PV boys lost yet another close one at the Sandia tournament, falling to St. Michaels 2-1. The Bloomfield boys’ team had a solid week going 3-0 with wins over Pojoaque, Robertson and Questa. The Bobcat girls also defeated Pojoaque, 2-0. The Farmington boys’ soccer team lost a 1-0 contest to Cleveland while the Scorpion girls split a pair of games, losing to Hope Christian 2-1 and defeating Academy 2-1.

Friday, Oct. 4 Football Schedule Farmington hosts St. Pius for Homecoming Miyamura comes to Bloomfield for Homecoming Aztec heads to Del Norte Piedra Vista is at Bernalillo Kirtland travels to Gallup Navajo Prep welcomes Tohatchi Piedra Vista Cross Country runs at the Desert Twilight Cross Country Festival in Mesa, Ariz. Bloomfield Soccer hosts Questa Farmington Girls Soccer entertains Sandia Prep

Zuni Piedra Vista Volleyball travels to Monument Valley Bloomfield Volleyball hosts Thoreau Aztec Volleyball plays Ignacio

Spartans vs. Iowa Hawkeyes Saturday at 9:30 a.m. College Football: Stanford Cardinal vs. Washington Huskies Saturday at 8 p.m. NFL Football: Denver Broncos vs. Dallas Cowboys Sunday at 2 p.m. NFL Football: Atlanta Falcons vs. New York Jets Monday at 6 p.m.

NFL Football: New York Giants vs. Chicago Bears Thursday at 6 p.m. First Sports with Steve Bortstein weekday mornings from 7-10 a.m. The Fast Track sponsored by SunRay Park and Casino Saturday and Sunday at 9 a.m.

Hoerner Aztec’s offense struggled with only the defense putting up a score in a 25-7 loss. Farmington got back in the win column with a road win over Valencia 33-12. Kirtland continued to roll on district 2AAAA with a blowout 48-0 win over Española. Piedra Vista’s road woes continued as again they turned the ball over in a 34-17 loss to Moriarty. Bloomfield hammered Hope Christian 55-8 and Navajo Prep continued rolling up big offensive numbers with a 52-0 win over Santa Fe Indian In cross country, the Farmington Totah Invitational was this past weekend with both the Shiprock boys and girls taking the titles. Piedra Vista headed down to the highly competitive Academy Invitational where their boys came in sixth while the girls placed 11th. The Piedra Vista volleyball team suffered their first loss of the season, getting swept by Artesia at the Rio Rancho Invita-

IT’S FOOT BALL SEASON A ND I LOVE TAILGATIN G!

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Saturday, Oct. 5 Farmington Volleyball is at Bernalillo Aztec Soccer hosts Desert Academy Aztec Girls Soccer travels to St. Pius Aztec and Bloomfield Cross Country head to Cuba Farmington Cross Country is at Ancient Trails in Cortez Kirtland and Navajo Prep Cross Country run at the Gallup Invite Bloomfield Girls Soccer hosts Santa Fe Indian Navajo Prep Soccer welcomes Sandia Prep Aztec Girls Soccer is at St. Pius Tuesday, Oct. 8 District soccer begins Farmington Girls Soccer at Aztec Farmington Soccer hosts Aztec Piedra Vista Girls Soccer welcomes Kirtland Navajo Prep Volleyball goes to

Thursday, Oct. 10 Piedra Vista Girls Soccer at Aztec Piedra Vista Soccer hosts Aztec Piedra Vista Volleyball welcomes Bayfield Aztec Volleyball heads to Pagosa Springs Bloomfield Volleyball travels to Shiprock Navajo Prep Volleyball goes to Navajo Pine Kirtland Girls Soccer at Farmington Sports on Fox Sports New Mexico A.M. 1340 and 93.9 FM College Football: Michigan State

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A15

Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Lost in an elevator Last week we recounted the story of the time New York Yankees principal owner George Steinbrenner was accosted in an elevator by two hooligans in a Los Angeles hotel. Legend has Steinbrenner emerging victorious and expecting a lawsuit that never happened. Seeing as how Mr. Steinbrenner has slipped this vale of tears, I wondered if the muggers would come clean all of these years later if asked. Enlisting the help of my favorite insider source for anything New York, the talented and pretty "Yankee

SPORTING VIEW Mark Vasto girl," we began our search with a few Craigslist postings and a few calls to the hotel where we thought the Yankee owner might have been staying. The incident happened in 1981, so we knew the trail was going to be pretty cold. These days you're lucky to get a hotel room if you talk to someone at the front desk, so you can

imagine the challenge we had when a research assistant with a Brooklyn accent called to ask if anybody from housekeeping remembered cleaning blood and teeth out of an elevator more than a quarter century ago. "I don't know," she persisted, ignoring my orders to cajole information out of him with sweet dulcet tones. Instead she bludgeoned him with a loud mouth full of ham. "Got any old people working there? Or sumthin', Mistah?" Meanwhile my part of

the investigation into the case of the real Steinbrenner muggers wasn't going so well either, the least of those reasons being that I was in Philadelphia. The beat reporters at the time say they were skeptical the event ever occurred, but Yankee trainers said that the injuries he received were consistent with those usually received in a fight. In other words, he didn't appear to scrape his knuckles on a stucco wall in the lobby. Either way, consensus is that Steinbrenner ginned up the story a bit in order to look like a

hero in an attempt to spur his Yankee team to a championship. I did get some leads from guys who had an uncle who knew a guy that knew the Yankee trainer's assistant type stuff, though. "No! Listen! I swear ‘dis is true! Swear it! OK? My dad was on an elevator with Reggie Jackson in LA, and these two women came on, and Reggie Jackson was walking his dog, right? So he tells the dog to 'sit!' and the women are so afraid of him that they sat!" I also learned that the

same thing happened to Walt Frazier, Julius Erving, Wilt Chamberlain and Eddie Murphy in an elevator, too. Sometimes Reggie buys them dinner, sometimes they go to bed with Chamberlain and sometimes they get tickets to Eddie's show at the Apollo the next night. I also learned that Hall and Oates met on an elevator in Philadelphia. Some mysteries are best left unsolved.

county-wide campaign.” The county certainly gets involved during the month of October, from the city of Farmington throwing a carnival to the “Pink Glove Dance,” which involved filming groups of people and local businesses performing the

same dance while wearing pink gloves. This was a nationwide competition and in 2011, San Juan County placed 8th overall out of the 142 videos involved. As a way to spread the message about the breast cancer awareness campaign, the Get Pinked chairs visit businesses and speak with organizations. Last year, Aztec Mayor Sally Burbridge; Cindy Roberts, Farmington Mayor Tommy Robert’s wife; and Tanya Eckstein, Bloomfield Mayor Scott Eckstein’s wife, were the Get Pinked co-chairs. Eckstein said it is an honor for her to be a Get

Pinked chair once again this year because it is a rewarding experience. “My favorite part is probably the people I meet and just seeing how the community comes together. I love my town of Bloomfield and they do so much for the size that they are – they really come out.” Eckstein is an ER nurse at San Juan Regional Medical Center. She worked with Cathy Lincoln at the hospital and now she works with Lujan. “I didn’t know (Lincoln) that well but we worked on the medical floor together. She got sick shortly after I started as a nurse. She was someone who was an

influence to me and was respected by her coworkers. It was sad for everyone when she got sick.” Roberts also will act as a Get Pinked co-chair this year. “I am happy to do it. It is a good thing for our community, and it gets us all together,” she said. More awareness about what the Cathy Lincoln Fund does for uninsured or underinsured community members is what Eckstein hopes to accomplish this October. “The more we get the name out there the more people they can help stop the cancer before it gets to a point that can’t be helped.”

considering making agriculture a separate district. “They are working on a finished document and we will have another public hearing to hear more feedback.” The land use code has become somewhat of a controversial topic because people’s land uses could change if the zoning regulations are implemented. At the September public meeting, protestors spoke to commissioners on how the code could infringe on their rights. “At the last public hearing there was a group of vocal individuals. Has there been any attempt to talk with them? Maybe they have legitimate concerns,” Commissioner GloJean Todacheene said. “I have reached out to those individuals and tried to get them to provide us with constructive feedback,” Stark explained. He added one purpose of the code is to “bring together” the various county ordinances in place, such as for subdivisions and RV parks. “It is a scattered process and we have had engineers bring this all

into one document so it is easy to read and find.” Todacheene answered that it is important for citizens to provide input so they don’t become disgruntled about the proposed code. “You have people who are proactive and other citizens can sometimes be negative and look at it in a way where they are the hurt party. I think they need to provide their input, because I wouldn’t want them to become angry.” The county’s “ears are open,” Stark explained. “If you are completely against zoning, let us know and we will put those comments into written form so we can take action on that. We are open to constructive feedback; that is what we want to hear.” County staff is planning to have another public meeting. Stark said the date has not yet been set because it depends on when the consulting company completes a revised land use code. To view the Land Use Development Code, visit the county website at www.sjcounty.net

Mark Vasto is a veteran sportswriter who lives in Kansas City.

Get Pinked Fund, the county is proud to support these efforts again as the 2013 Get Pinked campaign sponsor. We hope everyone is able to do their part in ’painting’ our county pink this October,” said County Commission Chairman Scott Eckstein. The county

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donated $15,000 to the Get Pinked campaign. “(The county’s) support allows us to make this a county event,” Vaughan explained. He emphasized Get Pinked is also “an opportunity for businesses to get involved with fundraising efforts. It is a

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modification to the code that was suggested by several citizens during the September meeting was to include an agriculture district. “The code currently proposed does allow for general agriculture uses, but a lot of folks think it should be a separate district,” explained Stark, adding that the consulting company, Duncan Associates, which created the code for the county, is


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

Outdoor film at SJC

Extreme rock climbing film set for 8 p.m. tonight Experience the ultimate thrill of extreme climbing adventures when San Juan College’s Outdoor Leadership Education and Recreation, or OLER, program presents the REEL ROCK 8 Film Tour, from 8 to 10 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4, on the lawn located outside of the Henderson Fine Arts Center. Four documentary films will be presented that are sure to have you sitting on the edge of your seat as the climbers scale some

of the toughest, most intimidating mountains ever. While films are not rated, some content may be considered to be for a mature audience. Films include: The Sensei, the story of 43-year-old legend climber Yuji Hirayama, who is nearing retirement and plans to climb Mount Kinabalu on the island of Borneo. He teams up with a young American boulderer and relatively inexperienced mountaineer

geek with another massive game, 413 Yards, 4 TDs Broncos QB Peyton Manning – Another great outing, 327 Yards and 4TDs Saints RB Darren Sproles - 142 Total Yards, 7 Catches, 2 TDs Texans RB Arian Foster – Finally pays off 171 Total Yards, 6 catches, TD Ravens WR Torrey Smith – 5 Catches, 166 Yards, 2 TDs Giants WR Victor Cruz – 10 Catches, 164 Yards, 1 TD Falcons TE Tony Gonzalez – 12 Catches 149 Yards, 2 TDs Chargers TE Antonio Gates – 10 Catches, 136 Yards, TD Colts DST – 4 Sacks, 3 Ints, TD, Only 205 Yards Against Loathe Them… Bengals QB Andy Dalton – Only 206 Yards and an Int, 13 Yards Rushing Bills QB EJ Manuel –167 Passing Yards, TD, 2 Int Titans RB Chris Johnson – 31 Total Yards, 2 catches Jaguars RB Maurice JonesDrew – Only 28 Total Yards, catch Bills WR Steve Johnson – 1 catch, -1 Yard Eagles WR DeSean Jackson – 2 catches, 34 Yards Vikings TE Kyle Rudolph – 2 Catches 6 Yards, Steelers DST – 34 Points allowed, 1 Sack Studs… Cowboys QB Tony Romo – Will likely be behind the whole night and be forced to throw a bunch Giants QB Eli Manning – May be the only time he plays a bad enough defense to make his offense look good Eagles RB LeSean McCoy– Giants DST keep giving up big points Lions RB Reggie Bush – Looks like the Heisman winner of old Packers WR Randall Cobb – Expect a shootout with

the Lions Bears WR Brandon Marshall – Bears will need to score to keep up with the Saints Falcons TE Tony Gonzalez – Ryan rediscovered his tight end Rams DST – Bet on anyone that is up against the Jags Duds… Ravens QB Joe Flacco – He’s been brutal on the road Texans QB Matt Schaub – Goes from Seahawks to road game with the 49ers Cardinal RB Rashard Mendenhall – Panther run defense has been pretty good and Cardinal offense pretty bad Titans RB Chris Johnson– Struggled last week and now faces Kansas City DST Colts WR Reggie Wayne – Locked up all day with Richard Sherman Titans TE Delanie Walker – Chiefs LBs and Eric Berry cover the middle of the field Cowboys DST – Don’t play anyone that has the Broncos Waiver Wire… With the byes kicking in, here are a few players to take a look at that may still be available in your league Titans QB Ryan Fitzpatrick – Locker may be out a while and Fitzpatrick is an experienced QB with decent options Browns QB Brian Hoyer – Doesn’t look like he’s giving up the job Titans WR Nate Washington – Impressive backto-back weeks, worth a chance Raiders RB Rashad Jennings– The fragile glass that is McFadden’s hamstring has him out again Chiefs TE Sean McGrath Miller – The bearded one has been a favorite Alex Smith target Good luck this week!!

Daniel Woods for the expedition of a lifetime. High Tension: Ueli Steck and The Clash on Everest features the story of Ueli Steck and Simone Moro, who were climbing on Mount Everest when they were attacked by a crowd of angry sherpas. Fearing for their lives, the climbers fled the mountain, and the incident sparked a flurry of gasps and angry recrimination. REEL ROCK was embedded with the climbing team and given an exclusive look at what happened that day and why. Spice Girl tells the adventures of Hazel Findlay, the first woman to climb the British grade of E9

(super hard, super sketchy). Having mastered the scrappy sea cliffs at home, she teams up with Emily Harrington to tackle the massive, untamed bigwalls of Taghia Gorge, Morocco. The StoneMasters is a feature documentary about the counterculture climb-

ing scene in Yosemite over the last 50 years. The film brings all the legends to life: from Royal Robbins’ epic battle with Warren Harding to the fabled drug plane crash of 1977 and escalating tensions between climbers and national park rangers.

The REEL ROCK Film Tour brings the best climbing and adventure films of the year to live audiences throughout the world. Founded in 2006 by groundbreaking filmmakers Josh Lowell (Big UP Productions) and Peter Mortimer (Sender Films), REEL ROCK has grown to over 400 events per year, reaching more than 100,000 audience members. Watch the trailer www.realrocktour.com. Admission to the REEL ROCK film tour is free. Prize Drawings will be held during the intermission. For more information, contact San Juan College OLER program at 505.566.3487.

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Spacious comfort

A17

style This exceptional custom home, at 4761 Westwind Ave., offers many extras, including Saltillo tile and hardwood floors throughout. When you enter this impressive home the first thing you see is the huge stairway leading to the second floor. This 3-bedroom, 2 ½-bath home features more than 2,500 square feet of living space. The main level offers formal dining/living room, kitchen, family room, master bedroom, breakfast nook and laundry room. Two bedrooms and a family room are located upstairs. The high ceilings and huge custom windows accentuate the fireplace in the

living room. The kitchen has a breakfast nook and sliding glass doors leading to the beautifully landscape backyard. The backyard is perfect for relaxing and also for entertaining guests, featuring a hot tub and in-ground swimming pool. The spacious master suite features a walk-in closet and master bath. Other extras include a deck, large laundry room, sprinkler systems in both the front and backyards, attached garage and storage building. This home is priced at $282,500. For more information or to set up an appointment to view this impressive property call Sam Todd at RE/MAX of Farmington at 505.327.4777.


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

Fall means fertilize

Work now stores nutrients, creates stronger root system in spring As temperatures begin to drop, leaves begin to change color; plants start the process preparing to survive another winter. Fall is the most important time of year to fertilize lawns, trees, shrubs, roses and perennials. This might seem weird to some, but you have to realize the process that plants go through during a season. During the spring and summer plants are going through the most active growing stage. Plants are growing leaves and pushing new growth because of the long days and warm temperatures. With these conditions in play, the plants are going through photosynthesis, and striving for the ultimate goal of cre-

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ating food. This food is then transferred into the stems, branch-

es, leaves and flowers. The ultimate goal of plants this time of year is to produce a

viable seed or fruit with the purpose of reproduction. Fall, however, is a different story. As days shorten and temperatures cool, plants begin a different process to prepare for winter. With the realization that freezing temperatures are on the way, top growth ceases and the goal now is to store up energy to survive a long winter. This stored energy is important for the plants ability not only to make it through the winter, but to push new

growth in the spring, thus starting the process all over again. With cooling temperatures outside, top growth slows and eventually ceases completely; however, underground roots begin to grow. It is this unseen process that is the most important process of all. Plants are only as strong as their root systems. Roots are vital in the uptake of nutrients and water to feed the vegetative growth we all see. Without a good root system, plants will be weak and insect- and diseaseprone. This is why fall fertilizing is the most important fertilization of the year. It adds

in the growth of a bigger, stronger root system and provides the stored nutrients for next spring’s growth. Apply winterizing fertilizer to lawns and all plants now to insure survival and increased health next season. For people who continually deal with alkalinity problems (high pH), now is a great time to add a granular soil acidifier to problem areas. The granular acidifiers will be worked into the soil with fall rains and winter snows, helping adjust the pH and creating better growing conditions next spring. Alkalinity problems normally cause leaves to yellow and burn around the edges.

On campus housing

San Juan College studies plans to build more than 400 units DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune San Juan College is considering the construction of residential housing on the northwest corner of the campus in an undeveloped area. This was the message Vice President for Student Services David Eppich brought to the Farmington City Council during its Oct. 1 work session at city hall. The college initiated a study for residential housing on campus and realized there might be a need to offer housing facilities to maintain a steadily growing student population. When students were polled about needs on the campus, Eppich said, 95 percent of students were interested in campus housing and 91 percent believed housing important to attract future students. The college has experienced little growth in student population in the past few years and has considered marketing itself to students in Colorado, where the graduation rate is expected to increase by 20 percent in coming years.

The current population already travels more than 40 minutes to get to and from San Juan College, and students have complained that there is a lack of “student-friendly leases” in Farmington, Eppich said. “We’ve heard some stories of what our students are living in, in Farmington, and they are not conducive to retaining students at the college,” he explained, adding that while the college is researching the possibility of student housing, it has not made a commitment to build any units at this time. “We are in a process to see whether we are going to do it or not, and this presentation doesn’t mean the college will build residential housing,” Eppich told the Council. If the college did decide to move forward with residential housing it would concentrate on building single student housing communities that would consist of 326 beds in four-bedroom apartments or 224 beds in four-person units and 102 beds in six-person units. The prices would range

from $350 per month for a shared bedroom to $425 per month for a private bedroom. The rent would include utilities, Internet, cable television and furnishings. This complex would cost approximately $30 million to construct and there would be additional campus services needed for on-campus students, Eppich said. “There are a number of things we have to consider as we move forward with this. It is not just a build them and fill them. It is not an easy task. There is some complexity to residential housing if you do it correctly.” The school would have to consider additional staffing and service hours for its library and gym. There would be additional services such as food services, health and counseling, student activities, judicial affairs and multicultural affairs. There also would be a need for additional security. “We’ve had a brief conversation with the chief of police, where there could be a contract issue for public safety with the city of Farm-

ington,” Eppich said. The other issue is how to finance construction. It could be built using revenue bonds, bank financing or using an independent management group that would come in to build and manage the facility. Mayor Tommy Roberts asked whether “outsourcing” the residential housing might be the best idea. That is possible, but with a two-year college the stakes are higher than with a fouryear university that offers doctoral programs. “There’s a lot of opportunity at less risk on campuses other than San Juan College,” Eppich said. Roberts also asked if the college would consider moving forward with residential housing because of the School of Energy and its international student draw. The student housing

could be used for international students as well as those coming in for multiple weeks to take part in training exercises at the School of Energy. In the absence of residential housing, the college rents blocks of hotel rooms to accommodate the students. “The best option is residential housing, so you can guarantee X number of beds for trainees coming in for a week or two,” Eppich said. Councilor Mary Fischer

suggested the college also consider rooms for the disabled and senior citizens as well as other non-traditional students. “As the population is aging we should be rethinking traditional students,” she said. Eppich said the college will continue to discuss the possibility of residential housing. “We will continue to gather more information,” he said. “We will continue in discussions with our board.”

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Business

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

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Improvements unveiled Staff has input into SJRMC Rehabilitation Hospital upgrades LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune A ribbon-cutting ceremony took place at San Juan Regional Medical Center’s Rehabilitation Hospital to reveal the improvements made to the facility’s interior. The facility was constructed in 1989, so it was time to make several upgrades, said Sue Clay, program director of the Rehabilitation Hospital. “We were living in an aging facility so – as with any facility – you want to maintain your premises and update the look and make it more comfortable for the patients.” Many of the improvements resulted from staff input. The upgrades include new flooring, cabinets, and paint throughout the facility. The amount of visiting space also was increased for patients’ families, and a new kitchen area was added. An old, four-bed room was converted into a large private room and sinks were lowered to accommodate those in wheelchairs. “Everything was updated and we gave more attention to making it more comfortable for people who use wheelchairs,” Clay explained. “We did that by changing the angles and giving

The Chamber of Commerce Red Coats and San Juan Regional Medical Center administrators were on hand for the ribbon cutting at the newly renovated San Juan Regional Medical Center’s Rehabilitation Hospital. – Josh Bishop photos

people in wheelchairs more leg room.” Other upgrades include a new nurses’ station and an additional covered ambulance entrance was constructed at the rear entrance. “We have quality players here and one element of that is the

Equipment that is used to help patients through the rehabilitation process.

staff, and families,” said Jamie Church, a board member who has spearheaded the landscape project. “Once a patient leaves here, they are not just inside, but they are outside walking on different surfaces, whether it is grass, flagstone, or gravel. So we hope to incorporate those elements out here so patients, through their rehab process, can work outside and gain those skills for when they leave here.” Church added the project will begin this winter with the help of donations from community members. The Rehabilitation Hospital helps 90 percent of its patients get “back into the community,” Clay said. “I was fortunate to be here when we opened this facility and ever since that time, I find it such a joy to come to work every day with a great team of people we have. They are all dedicated to helping our patients improve their lives so, instead of just being alive, they can go out in the community and live, work, and play.”

Rehabilitation Hospital, which hospital has created and bring is essential,” said Rick Wallace, that over here for the patients, the hospital’s CEO. “This is just the beginning of the Rehabilitation Hospital. It is beginning to show its true colors.” Dewey Scholten is a former patient of the Rehabilitation Hospital. In 2012, he experienced an accident and broke several bones. “This couldn’t be any better than what it was,” Scholten said about the renovations. “I can’t say enough about the care they give you here.” Along with the interior renovations, the hospital’s board also is looking to improve the landscape. At the ribbon cutting ceremony, a rendering of the landscaping plans was available for people to view. “What we are looking to do is follow the lead with the beau- Barbara Cole, Rehabilitation Hospital’s board chairman, speaks to guests at a ribbon cuttiful outside spaces that the ting ceremony for the hospital on Oct. 2.

Investigative reporting, education writing

Tri-City Tribune wins awards at state newspaper contest The Tri-City Tribune was honored by the New Mexico Press Association during its 105th annual convention Sept. 28 at the Tamaya Resort and Spa in Bernalillo. Tribune writers Debra Mayeux and Margaret Cheasebro won awards in the Weekly Division One category for weekly newspapers across the state of New Mexico. The Tri-City Tribune was up against a large number of weekly newspapers including the Valencia County News Bulletin, the Las Vegas Optic and the Las Cruces Bulletin, among others. The contest is merged

between the New Mexico Press Association and the New Mexico Associated Press Managing Editors, and it received 1,777 entries, making it the highest turnout in contest history. The Wyoming Press Association judged the entries. Mayeux earned a first place award in the Investigative Reporting category for Deep Dark Secret: Convention and Visitors Bureau embezzlement.

This was a collection of stories that spanned a oneyear time frame during which Mayeux delved into the criminal records and multiple boxes and notebooks of evidence in the embezzlement of nearly a half million dollars from the Farmington Convention and Visitors Bureau. During the investigation, Mayeux worked with the Farmington Police Department to gain access to evidence of the crime

as well as evidence in the suicide death of the prime suspect, Debbie Dusenbery. “I would like to thank the community that supported my efforts in finding the truth in this case,” Mayeux said. “I also thank the city of Farmington Police Department for taking its time to share the evidence and public records with our office.” The judge commented on the fact that Mayeux used multiple sources in her reports and they said that made for better reporting of the facts. “It was very exciting to hear the judges’ compli-

ments of my reporting, and it was honor to know that they appreciated my hard work on this subject,” Mayeux said. This was Mayeux’s fifth investigative reporting award from the New Mexico Press Association and the Associated Press. She has won for looking into such issues as access to public records, the rate of child sex crimes in San Juan County, the state’s criminal libel law, the New Mexico Title and Escrow closing and the CVB embezzlement. Cheasebro, an awardwinning feature writer, earned a second place

award in the Education Writing category for her story Back Where It all Began: Pendergrass Returns to San Juan County as President of San Juan College. Cheasebor enjoyed interviewing Dr. Toni Pendergrass. “It was a real pleasure. I enjoyed that interview a lot and it was fun to do,” she said. “It’s an honor to win second place in the New Mexico Press Association contest, because there are so many people who compete,” Cheasebro said. “It’s nice to know I can be successfully competitive on that kind of level.”


A20

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USED CARS 1//1 ATHBJ Bdmstqx+ entq cnnq+ btrsnlY174674- V`r $5+876+ mnv $3+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Fqd`s rbgnnk b`q- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//2 LHMH Bnnodq+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $5+880 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX36822@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 RBHNM WA+ ehud cnnq+ `tsnl`shbY/4/455Mnv $05+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Kn`cdc vhsg $7/// ne `cchshnm`k rsdqdn `mc su dptholdmsGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 JH@ Rodbsq`+ entq cnnq- Y325/81- V`r $7+876+ mnv $5+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//7 @UDN KR+ entq cnnq- H/888/@- V`r $5+884+ mnv $4+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 EH@S 4// svn cnnq+ GA RonqsY015268V`r $06+876+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- 'Knv lhkdr(Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 GXTMC@H Rnm`s`+ entq cnnq+ FKRY215636V`r $07+256+ mnv $05+276+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Noshl` DW+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $1/+880 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Rnqdmsn+ 22+084 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $11+576 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G114277- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ 20+164 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G087128- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $05+876 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 SNXNS@ X`qhr+ 2/+837 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd $03+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GI/02584- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

USED TRUCKS 1//0 ENQC E,14/ Rtodq B`a+ svn vgddk cqhud+ Onvdqrsqnjd chdrdk+ 103+350 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $6+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38/16@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

USED TRUCKS

1//5 CNCFD Q`l 14// 3w3 Pt`c B`a+ Btllhmr chdrdk+ 032+165 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+8// oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38615@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 ENQC E,04/ WKS+ bqdv b`a+ kn`cdc- Oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 CNCFD Q`l 04// Pt`b b`a 3w3Y30527@V`r $06+884+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 ENQC E,04/ 1w1+ 6/+510 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G42/50`- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//8 FLB B`mxnm Bqdv B@a+ entq vgddk cqhud- Y325574@- V`r $10+456+ mnv $08+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 ENQC E,04/ 3w3 Rtodq Bqdv+ 38+04/ lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $16+276 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GC57253- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// qdftk`q b`a 3w3+ 21+082 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07+876- Rsnbj #9 G36582@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// svn vgddk cqhud+ dwsdmcdc b`a+ 05+668 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G40276@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BGDUQNKDS 04// bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $17+130 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX20015@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BGDUQNKDS Bnknq`cn+ bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $12+888 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X07543@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ENQC E,04/ Rtodq Bqdv svn vgddk cqhud+ 47+388 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G244/2@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

SUVS/VANS

1//6 BGQXRKDQ @rodm Khlhsdc+ entq vgddk cqhud- H32734@- V`r $01+876+ mnv $7+884+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 IDDO Khadqsx+ entq vgddk cqhud+ ronqsY455/7/V`r $0/+876+ mnv $8+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//7 IDDO Vq`mfkdq W+ 3w3+ $10+541 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X36152@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/0/ BGDUQNKDS Sq`udqrd KS+ kn`cdc+ $07+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX13657@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Bnlo`rr+ 21+511 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07-876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G123680- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Khadqsx+ 40+8/7 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $05+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G468477- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ATHBJ Dmbk`ud+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $20+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX232574- GH,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ENQC Drb`od WKS+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $1/+488 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddXB27500Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Rntk+ 20+574 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $04+884 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G264046- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M Lhq`mn+ 11+856 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $13+676 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G102406- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

LEGALS

MISC.

R@M IT@M @mhl`k Kd`ftd hr g`uhmf sgdhq mdws Q`ahdr U`bbhm`shnm Bkhmhb nm Rtmc`x+ Nbsnadq 5sg+ 01ol,3ol+ `s sgd A k n n l e h d k c Ltkshbtkstq`k Bdmsdq+ 222 Rntsg Ehqrs Rsqdds+ Aknnlehdkc- Ptdrshnmr> B`kk 4/4,214,2255Vdºqd nm E`bdannjv v v , r`mit`m`mhl`kkd`ftd-, vdar-bnlRg`mm` A`hqc+ RI@K Bkhmhb Bnnqchm`snq+ 4/4,216, 17/1SGD 4SG @mmt`k I O`s Kxmbg Ldlnqh`k G n q r d r g n d Sntqm`ldms vhkk ad gdkc R`stqc`x+ Nbs- 4+ 1/02 `s 2// Pthmbd @ud- hm E`qlhmfsnm+ ML- @kk oqnbddcr ne sghr dudms fn sn sgd E`qlhmfsnm Anxr & Fhqkr Bkta- Qdfhrsq`shnm hr $1/ `mc hmbktcdr ktmbg- Ktmbg sn mnm, o`qshbho`msr hr ` cnm`shnm ne $4- Ltrhb vhkk ad oqnuhcdc ax Bg`qkhd Kxmbg ne ³Kxmbghmf Bg`qkhd Kxmbg½ e`ld+ Ind Q`bgdee eqnl sgd A`q,C Vq`mfkdqr+ Nshr `mc sgd Qgxsgl+ `mc F`ad Ktbdqn ³F`aqhdk½- Q`eekd hmbktcdr rodbh`k hsdlr cnm`sdc ax knb`k ldqbg`msr- Aqhmf ` bg`hq `mc inhm hm sgd etm! Dudqxnmd vdkbnld- Enq lnqd hmen b`kk Anchmd Inmdr+ 4/4,3/1,3/47 nq d l ` h k anchmdinmdr?gnsl`hk-, bnl-

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SAN JUAN ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF DIANE F. ELLISON FOR CHANGE OF NAME No.D-1116-CV-201301166 NOTICE OF PETITION TO CHANGE NAME NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Diane F. Ellison filed a Petition to Change Name in the Eleventh Judicial District Court in San Juan County,New Mexico, at 103 So. Oliver Drive, Aztec, on the 16th day of September, 2013. The Petitioner seeks to change the Petitioner’s current name from Diane F. Ellison to the name of Diane Lena Francisco. GERDING & O’LOUGHLIN, P.C. P.O. Box 1020 Farmington, New Mexico 87499 (505)325-1804 By Michael T. O’Loughlin Attorney for Petitioner Legal No.122 Dates 9/20, 10/4/2013

LEGALS COUNTY OF SAN JUAN STATE OF NEW MEXICO ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT

LEGALS CATCH-ALL STORAGE 5848 US HWY 64 FARMINGTON, NM 87401 (505) 632-2132 Notice is hereby given that a sale or donation of miscellaneous household and personal items will be held to satisfy debt of back rent ON OR AFTER Friday, October 18, 2013 at CatchAll Storage, 5848 US HWY 64, Farmington, NM 87401. BILL CARTER 5150 CR 17 BLOOMFIELD, 87401

NM

TYRELL GONZALES 28 CR 3494 FLORA VISTA, NM 87415 Legal No. 126 Dates 10/4, 10/11/2013 CUBBY MINI STORAGE P.O. BOX 227 4340 US HWY 64 KIRTLAND, NM 87417 TO: Sharon Jensen PO Box 1131 Kirtland, NM 87417 Johnson Poyer 1400 N Well Street Apt 1204 Edna, TX 77597 Notice is hereby given that a sale of miscellaneous household and personal items will be held to satisfy debt of back rent. The sale will be held on or after October 19, 2013 at Cubby Mini Storage 4340 US Hwy 64 Kirtland, NM 87417. Legal No.127 Dates 10/4, 10/11/2013

9/27,

MARVIN MCVICKER, Plaintiff, v. MARK K. ALBRIGHT and LINDA K. ALBRIGHT, Defendants. No.D-1116-CV-20131138 NOTICE OF COMPLAINT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Marvin McVicker filed a Complaint against Mark K. Albright and Linda K. Albright in the Eleventh Judicial Court in San Juan County, New Mexico at 103 S. Oliver, Aztec, NM 87410 on the 5th day of September, 2013. The Plaintiff seeks to Quiet Title. You are notified that, unless you so serve and file a responsive pleading or motion, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for a Default Judgment. /s/Tyson K.Gobble TYSON K. GOBBLE, Esq. 2021 E. 20th Street Farmington, NM 87401 (505) 326-6503 Legal No.124 Dates 10/4,10/11,10/18/2013

LEGALS FINAL NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND TERMINATION OF CEMETERY BURIAL PLOT PURCHASE CONTRACTS FROM: GREENLAWN CEMETERY ASSOCIATION New Mexico Domestic Nonprofit Association 1606 North Dustin Avenue Farmington, New Mexico 87401 TO:

All Of The Following Named Cemetery Burial Plot Contract Purchasers And Their Heirs, Assigns Agents And Representatives:

Apadaca, Clara Battese, Erma M. Diswood Bearden, Joyce Begay, Cecelia Bruce, Larry Cabrales, Mr. & Mrs. Carpenter, Samuel & Emolene Casazza, Russell Castillo, Orena Charley, Lita Chavez, Manuela Chavez, Max Coffey, Brenda Collins, John & Brenda Delgado, Tony Duke, David & Gail Duran, Gloria Duran, Valerie Eagle, Durinda Erwin, Linda Ford, Maggie Frank, Robert Gonzales, Mary Ann Harmon, Dawn & Norman Harris, Mansfield Jr. Hasenbalg, Rita Hayes, Anita Hoskie, Amy Hufford, Nannabah Jaramilla, Alice Lee, Calvin Lewis, Leona & Cheryl Nash, Lee Nez, Clarissa Kemp, Catherine Thomas Keith, Teddy Laney, Jewell Lara, Ruby Lee, Betty Looney, Don Lucero, Lorraine Martin Marez, Mary Mason, Dorothy Murphy, Debbie L. Palmer, Andrew Perez, Steve & Janice Peter, Lorenda Puggie, Inez Powell, Mona Redhouse, Ethel Reeves, Bill Reyes, Cheryl Samora, Tim Charles Sanchez, Cecelia & Ramon Slim, Jackie Sloan, Jacaranda Smallwood, Charlotte Southern, Nikki Sowells, Flora Standifer, David & Pam Starnes, Jean Trotter, William Valdez, Janie Veretto, Sharon Vendetti, Debbie Velasquez, Robert Victor, Bruce & Arlene Waldroup, Geri C. Webster, Victoria Westbrook, Joleen Wright, Jane Yazzie, Carole Pioche FINAL NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the above named Contract Purchasers of cemetery burial plots in the Greenlawn Cemetery, located at the above stated address in Farmington, New Mexico, that they have defaulted under said Purchase Contracts by failing to make periodic payments as required thereunder, and that Greenlawn Cemetery Association has exercised its right under New Mexico law to accelerate the Contract payments and declare the entire Contract balances due and payable and, upon the Purchasers’ failure to fully pay same, to terminate said Contracts, resulting in the Purchasers’ forfeiture of all payments heretofore made on said Contracts and all rights in and to the said cemetery burial plots. FINAL NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that, in order to avoid the termination of such Contracts and the forfeiture of all payments made and all rights in and to the said cemetery burial plots, payment in full of the entire balance due under such Contracts must be made within thirty (30) days of the date of the first publications of this Notice on October 4th, 2013. Payment in full must be made to: Greenlawn Cemetery Association 1606 North Dustin Avenue Farmington, New Mexico 87401 FAILURE to make full payment within the time set out above will result in the Purchasers’ loss and forfeiture of all Contract payments heretofore made and all rights of any kind in and to the said cemetery burial plots. THIS NOTICE is executed on this 30th day of September, 2013 at Farmington, New Mexico. GREENLAWN CEMETERY ASSOCIATION By:_____________________________ J.W. Easley President Legal No.125 Dates 10/4, 10/11, 10/18, 10/25/2013


A21

Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Nosey Nellie thinks the President and Congress should be the ones in the “time out” corner, not the rest of the whole entire country. NN is not a political activist (although one time, she did stay at a Holiday Inn Express and participated in a protest to give the Coffee Party the same political clout as the Tea Party, just so’s ya know. NN was handcuffed during that protest but mostly on accounta her hooker heels got caught in the hem of some nice law enforcement officer’s pants,

which caused the pants to fall down, which made the ’nother law enforcement officers decide NN was trying to “defame,” “disrespect” and “depants” the officer, which, apparently somewhere, is a violation of someone’s code. Whatever.) and NN is a consistent voter. NN prefers to vote absentee on accounta there are certain laws that prevent NN from voting under her own name, so she is forced to “borrow” the names of others and that’s easier to do when they can’t see your face or ask your age, take your fingerprints, or ask how many lives you think you have. Just sayin’. . . . NN believes in our political system and respects those who are elected to

Jesus. Emmanuel

Baptist Church

emmanuelfarmington.com

serve, believing those elected to serve know how to play nice on the playground and share their toys in the toy room. Unfortunately, this week, NN has been disillusioned by our elected officials and has decided they should all be suspended without pay and must forfeit the rest of their terms and can never run for any political office again, ever, ever, ever. NN also believes those elected officials were prob’ly nice, reasonable people at one point in time. She believes that when they were first elected to public office, they really meant to do good things and stay above the fray and not get caught up in egos, poor judgment and really, really bad common sense. NN isn’t sure when/how that determination to be the flame that beckons and encourages great civic duty was snuffed out, but NN thinks it’s time those people get called home (if they haven’t forgotten where “home” is – that being the state they were elected to serve, even though most of ’em don’t actually live in that home anymore) and be

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forced to live the lives of the people who are out of work on accounta they and their “colleagues” can’t play nice. They should have to live without that almost $200,000 annual salary, the free lunches, dinners, adult beverages and “business trips,” health care, retirement and the up to $1.32 they receive for “mileage.” (The last time NN checked, those of us who are not elected officials get 44 cents a mile.) Not only that, but members of Congress also get a Members’ Representational Allowance (MRA) that provides them an average of $1.35 million each year to pay for “personal expenses” that they use to pay their staff, who can make up to $168,411 each year. NN would think she’d died and gone to Hooker Heel Heaven if she made 168 thou a year. But the staff people who make that kind of money do it the hard way – they havta analyze stuff, research stuff, schedule stuff and write stuff – sorta like the rest of us do on a fraction of 168 thou a year. Just sayin’. . . . Not that NN begrudges the staff salaries. After all NN has read about members of Congress this past week, those staff people havta put up with those elected officials, who have forgotten what it’s like to live paycheck to paycheck. ... So, NN thinks every single member of Congress should be suspended without pay, go into the Dale Carnegie Rehabilitation Center, and never, ever again get a free lunch or dinner or adult beverage or $1.32 mileage. NN thinks they all need to check their egos at the door when they leave their Washington offices and have to fly coach to get home, where they will have to find their own baggage, have someone other than a chauffeur pick ’em up, and have Three Buck Chuck and a Happy Meal for dinner. They need a reality check, a smack on the back of the head and a talkin’ to. They need to go to their room and not have

October Oct cttober 17 7 p.m. Performance Pe rfo rf forrmanc ce Hall Tickets: Ti cke ketts: ts $15, $12

dessert for a year and have to write “I’m sorry I was not a reasonable, responsible and compassionate elected official” for as many hours as the combined pay will be for those who can’t work because said elected officials refuse to do their jobs. So there. NN has spoken. Too bad no one will listen. Story of NN’s life. Whatever. On a much happier note, NN enjoyed the Brews, Meats and Bands event held at Lions Wilderness Park last weekend. Lotsa people packed the amphitheater and the picnic area, enjoying great music, great ribs and great beer. NN is not much of a beer drinker, but the nice servers at the Distil beer booth suggested an apple cider beer that took NN about 12 glasses to determine if it was good or not. It was good and NN has now decided that, in addition to her wine crawl space, she needs a beer bunker, too. NN is nothing if not resourceful and open to suggestions of good adult beverages. NN likes to think of herself as a free soul, although those protests NN “watched” during the ’60s don’t necessarily refer to her as a “free” anything, based on the number of hours she spent in handcuffs and solitary confinement. Whatever. NN was “working” the BMB, so wasn’t out and about getting to see everybody, but she did note Jimmy Davis, Melissa Sharpe, Richard Gurry, Mason Warren, Meghan Sandbothe, Terri Acosta, Carol Carson, Gerald Snodgrass, Allen Kruse, Justin Durrett, Michael Grinnell, Marci Lunt, Errol Boode, Sherry Curry and Matt Graves, Kelly Townsend (NN wondered where Kelly’s beautiful wife, Eleanor, was. . . ), Gayle Dean, Natalie Nygren, Sheri Rogers, Hannah Davis, Bruce Milton, Greg Eckstein, Robb Farrow, Catherine Nelson, Scott Thiele, Connie Dinning, Elaine Harder, Mario and Sonia de la Cruz, Nichole and Chad Triplett, Ken and Whitney Stevens, Josh Bishop (taking photos and doing a heckofa job), and Suzanne Thurman’s uncle,Mark Dunster came from Tacoma, Washington, (who loved the hospitality and the fun BMB provided!). NN was disappointed that Michael Douglas wasn’t there, since there have been so many MD sightings in town lately. NN wrote MD a fan letter once that was confiscated by the Hollywood Mafia Group, who “informed” NN that you can’t say or write lewd or lascivious things to MD on accounta he’s not “that kind.” NN has always believed she would be the perfect arm candy for MD, but he met Catherine Zeta-Jones, who pretty much put the sprinkles on arm candy, so NN lost out. Whatever. NN received a special bracelet from a member of

Those Devils, who played at BMB. NN is pretty sure that bracelet means she’s a for reals groupie of Those Devils, although the nice young man who gave it to her didn’t really indicate that. NN thinks TD are the bomb and even though NN is a coupla years older than most of ’em, she enjoys their music and thinks that nice young man is attracted to NN, but didn’t want to admit it in front of a crowd. NN is a dude magnet, just so’s ya know, and men of all ages are drawn to her but are afraid NN is such a catch they’ll never have a chance, so they never ever approach NN again. That’s prob’ly why the nice young man from TD ran like a man possessed when NN suggested they get together and “sing a few songs” later. Whatever. People had birthdays this week, including Bradley Huish (who LOVES Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Elliott Sadler and the Lennon Sisters, just so’s ya know) who turned 15; Peyton Stock (the cutest little girl ever!) turned 1; Jack Thompson, Brian Chapman, Richard Mahan and the beautiful Tonya Eckstein all celebrated with friends and fam. NN just wasn’t one of ’em. Just sayin’. . . . Amy Riley was a beautiful bride as she married the handsome Wilbo Harrell, and her amazing and equally beautiful mother, Anna, and her equally handsome father, George, were all smiles and full of love and happiness. NN loves love and happiness. Just so’s ya know. Carmen Martinez was honored recently as the 2013 State Star of the New Mexico Small Business Development Center. Carmen is one of NN’s besties and does a heckofa job at the SBDC. Carmen is one of those truly amazing people who doesn’t seek the limelight, but does an exceptional job and really truly does shine like the star she is! Congratulations, Carmen! NN gives a shout out to buddies Dedi Switzer, Ken Johnson, Judy Hare, Kit Doerfert, Vicki Thille, Brenda Shepherd, Carrie Olson, Cheryl Sitton, Cherry Church, Connie Shulz, Walt Taylor, Lynn Scott, Marj Steffen, Sherrie Large, Anne Almquist, Shelly Acosta and Debbie Israel – all amazing and wonderful people who NN is proud to call “friends!” Oh, and NN MUST mention that her beloved Peyton Manning (who would love her back if he ever took a minute or two to read the love emails she sends, just sayin’. . . .) took her equally beloved Denver Broncos to another recordbreaking win. NN bleeds blue and orange, and once had a Bronco bathroom that only Bronco fans could use. Everyone else hadda use the tree out back. NN is nothing if not loyal. . . . .


A22

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

game page

New York Times Crossword Puzzle

Brought to you by Tucker, Burns, Yoder & Hatfield

Law Firm 505-325-7755

LETTERBOXES By Mike Selinker / Edited by Will Shortz

1 16

In this special crossword, the completed solution conceals a familiar three-word phrase related to the puzzle’s theme. 70-Across provides a hint on how to find it. Across 1 Crew’s colleagues 5 Dojo needs 9 Classic sci-fi film billed as “a horror horde of crawland-crush giants” 13 “La-La” lead-in in a 1974 Al Green hit 16 Iberian wine city 18 “Vincent & ___” (film about the van Gogh brothers) 19 Rings of angels 21 What X-O-X lacks? 22 “Macbeth” king 23 Words on a fragile package 26 Irascible 27 “Mona Lisa,” e.g. 28 Thumbs-up 29 Harridan 30 Orchestra section 31 Mouthpiece for the head? 34 Jiffy 35 Not post37 Old piece 38 Little dog, for short 39 ___ Aviv 40 Strawberry blond sister of Barbie 43 Hindu “Mr.” 44 “Swans Reflecting Elephants” and others 46 1960s-’70s series starring Efrem Zimbalist Jr. 49 Oscar winner Hathaway

For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 each minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800814-5554.

51 Material beyond the terrestrial plane, in medieval science 55 Hello or goodbye, maybe 57 PC key 59 First word in 104Across 61 Cum ___ 62 ___ engr. 63 Like hit shows, often 67 Pitchfork-wielding groups 69 Boo-boo 70 How to get a message out of the boxes 74 Van Morrison song “___ the Mystic” 75 Numerical prefix 76 “Only the Lonely” singer 77 Part of a wriggly field? 78 Foreordained 80 Understands 82 Maker of the Sorento 83 Gallivants, with “about” 85 Boo-boos 87 Pale 89 Like citrus fruits 92 Like video games, nowadays 94 ___ Lingus 96 Round Table assignments 99 Old PC monitor feature 102 Ernie’s instrument on “Sesame Street,” informally 103 Italy’s main broadcasting co.

104 TV channel with lots of bells and whistles 105 Take up, as a skirt 107 Rotary alternative 112 Covent Garden performance 114 Newspaper columnist, humorously 115 Grampa Simpson 116 Snockered 117 Anders Celsius and Greta Garbo, for two 118 DDT and others 121 “Is Anybody Goin’ to San ___” (#1 Charley Pride song) 122 Bullet, in poker 123 Cartoonist Wilson 124 Help illicitly 125 Alley flanker 126 Hide/hair link 127 Looking up 128 Chant at a bullfight 129 Satirical 1974 espionage film Down 1 With 97-Down, classic puzzle type 2 Like eyebrows 3 Ones getting the redcarpet treatment, say 4 “The Spiderwick Chronicles” coauthor DiTerlizzi 5 Antarctic summit between peaks named for faith and charity 6 Words after “win by” or “hang by” 7 What lobsters and crabs have 8 Nursery purchase

9 Baltimore club, for short 10 Ethan of “Before Sunrise” 11 Giant Manning 12 Company that pioneered walkietalkies 13 “___ Mater” (hymn) 14 African capital 15 Organic chemistry group 16 Lilac and lavender 17 Turns into mush 20 Oaf 24 Not ephemeral 25 All ChiSox home games are played on it 32 ___ Lee 33 Pro with books, for short 35 Slapstick prop 36 Play watcher 41 Motocross entry, for short 42 Pirate’s cargo 44 Frenzied as if possessed 45 East German secret police 47 Where a mattress goes 48 Shapes like squares 50 Country that has two oryxes on its coat of arms 52 Like much processed wheat 53 Roman magistrates 54 Push off 55 Food item named after an Austrian city 56 Film set on Pandora 58 Snarly dog 60 Recedes 62 Blackmail, e.g.

2

3

4

5

17

7

8

9

18 23

24

26

27

28

30

31 35 40

41

55

42

57

62

63

70

64

85

80

92

81 87

93

60 67

68

77

88

119 123

“Well, now!” Beat Uncle Pedro, e.g. Sign of a successful show 71 One with a name on a plaque, maybe 72 Nickname for baseball’s Dwight Gooden 73 Rolling Stones #1 hit with the lyric “You’re beautiful, but ain’t it time we said goodbye?”

127

91

96

97 105

111 116

112

121

124

125

128

129

84 Ones providing cold comfort, briefly 86 Big wheel’s wheels 88 “You betcha” 90 Dim bulbs have low ones 91 Horse hue 93 Prefix with skeleton

98 106

113

117

120

81 Wrinkly dog

97 See 1-Down

84

104

79 Hefty thing

95 1970 John Wayne western

90

95

115

126

83 89

109 110

118

69 73

103

108

54

61

82

94

102

114

122

59

52

76

86

100 101

51

72

79

53

39 45

50

66

75

78

107

49

65

15

33

44

58

14

21

38

71

74

99

48

13

29

43

56

12

25

37

47

11

20

32

36

46

10

19

22

34

64 65 66 68

6

98 Placid 99 Self-image? 100 Like the Palace of Versailles 101 English landscapist famous for “The Burning of the Houses of Lords and Commons” 104 Irritates 106 Electromagnetic device 108 Op. ___ (footnote phrase)

109 Some West Coast wines 110 Magazine to which Obama gave his first postelection interview in 2008 111 N.F.C. West player 112 Admit 113 Trifling 117 Wilts 119 “___ my destiny be Fustian” (Dickinson poem) 120 Was idle

thought for the week “The real things haven’t changed. It is still best to be honest and truthful; to make the most of what we have; to be happy with simple pleasures; and have courage when things go wrong.”

— Laura Ingalls Wilder

Answers to this week’s puzzles are on page A23


A23

Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

at the movies GRAVITY

RUNNER RUNNER

Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: GRAVITY, directed by Oscar (R) nominee Alfonso Cuaron, stars Oscar (R) winners Sandra Bullock and George Clooney in a heart-pounding thriller that pulls you into the infinite and unforgiving realm of deep space. Bullock plays Dr. Ryan Stone, a brilliant medical engineer on her first shuttle mission, with veteran astronaut Matt Kowalsky (Clooney). But on a seemingly routine spacewalk, disaster strikes. The shuttle is destroyed, leaving Stone and Kowalsky completely alone.

Rating: R Synopsis: Richie, a Princeton college student who pays for school with on-line gambling, bottoms out and travels to Costa Rica to confront the on-line mastermind, Ivan, whom he believes has swindled him. Ivan sees a kindred spirit in Richie and brings the younger man into his operation. When the stakes get incredibly high and dangerous, and Richie comes to fully understand the deviousness of his new boss, he tries to turn the tables on him.

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 Rating: PG Synopsis: Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 picks up where Sony Pictures Animation's hit comedy left off. Inventor Flint Lockwood's genius is finally being recognized as he's invited by his idol Chester V to join The Live Corp Company, where the best and brightest inventors in the world create technologies for the betterment of mankind. Chester's right-hand-gal - and one of his greatest inventions - is Barb (a highly evolved orangutan with a human brain, who is also devious, manipulative and likes to wear lipstick).

PRISONERS Rating: R Synopsis: PPRISONERS, from Oscar (R)-nominated director Denis Villeneuve, stars Oscar (R) nominees Hugh Jackman and Jake Gyllenhaal in a story that poses the question: How far would you go to protect your child? Keller Dover (Jackman) is facing every parent's worst nightmare. His six-yearold daughter, Anna, is missing, together with her young friend, Joy, and as minutes turn to hours, panic sets in. The only lead is a dilapidated RV that had earlier been parked on their street. Heading the investigation, Detective Loki (Gyllenhaal) arrests its driver, Alex Jones (Paul Dano), but a lack of evidence forces the only suspect's release.

DON JON Rating: R Synopsis: Jon Martello (Joseph Gordon-Levitt) is a strong, handsome, good old fashioned guy. His buddies call him Don Jon due to his ability to "pull" a different woman every weekend, but even the finest fling doesn't compare to the bliss he finds alone in front of the computer watching pornography. Barbara Sugarman (Scarlett Johansson) is a bright, beautiful, good old fashioned girl. Raised on romantic Hollywood movies, she's determined to find her Prince Charming and ride off into the sunset. Wrestling with good old fashioned expectations of the opposite sex, Jon and Barbara struggle against a media culture full of false fantasies to try and find true intimacy in this unexpected comedy written and directed by Joseph Gordon-Levitt.

BAGGAGE CLAIM Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Determined to get engaged before her youngest sister's wedding, flight attendant Montana Moore (Paula Patton) finds herself with only 30 days to find Mr. Right. Using her airline connections to "accidentally" meet up with eligible ex-boyfriends and scour for potential candidates, she racks up more than 30,000 miles and countless comedic encounters, all the while searching for the perfect guy.

Answers to this week’s puzzles O D O R S

P U R E E S

C O N N E C T

C R I M E

W I E N E R

A V A T A R

C T S C A N

R O C O C O

T U R N E R

A R C E D

S T A R S

T O N Y

P A C I T H E V E S O D T H O O N T O R S R A T S A C H T I B E T A C G A R

M T H O P R E E F B E L D I S C T K E A E D X O N A T P H A O S

A H A I R

I S O G O N S

T E N L E G S C U R

S H A R E P B E O I N Y

S O D L A S S A T R I A N G T I D O R K Y E R A I H O L S O A B T O

T H E O S

H A W K E

N A M I B I A

D E M O N I A C

N I N E R

G E T S T O

E M L O S I T H C O L D C R E T P O M A L I S A E T E L A B S S B R A I S O N G A I D I C Q U E S S N O P S W E A N T G U T S P Y

S T A B A T

H A R A R E

A C E T Y L

H U L L E D

E D I L E S

R E P E L

T H E D O T S

S E R E N E

METALLICA THROUGH THE NEVER Rating: R Synopsis: Award-winning filmmaker Nimród Antal (Predators, Kontroll) creates a groundbreaking 3-D motion picture event, Metallica Through the Never. The music-driven feature film combines a bold narrative and spectacular live-performance footage of one of the most popular and influential rock bands in history to produce a bracing, raw andvisceral cinematic experience. Emerging young star Dane DeHaan (The Place Beyond the Pines, Kill Your Darlings, The Amazing Spider-Man 2) portrays Trip, a young roadie sent on an urgent mission during Metallica's roaring live set in front of a sold-out arena.

WE’RE THE MILLERS Rating: R Synopsis: David Burke (Jason Sudeikis) is a small-time pot dealer whose clientele includes chefs and soccer moms, but no kids-after all, he has his scruples. So what could go wrong? Plenty. Preferring to keep a low profile for obvious reasons, he learns the hard way that no good deed goes unpunished when he tries to help out some local teens and winds up getting jumped by a trio of gutter punks. Stealing his stash and his cash, they leave him in major debt to his supplier, Brad (Ed Helms).

THE FAMILY Rating: R Synopsis: In the off-beat action comedy "The Family," a mafia boss and his family are relocated to a sleepy town in France under the witness protection program after snitching on the mob. Despite the best efforts of Agent Stansfield (Tommy Lee Jones) to keep them in line, Fred Manzoni (Robert DeNiro), his wife Maggie (Michelle Pfeiffer) and their children Belle (Dianna Agron) and Warren (John D'Leo) can't help but revert to old habits and blow their cover by handling their problems the "family" way, enabling their former mafia cronies to track them down.

RUSH Rating: R Synopsis: Ron Howard teams once again with writer Peter Morgan on Rush, a spectacular big-screen re-creation of the merciless 1970s rivalry between James Hunt and Niki Lauda. The epic action-drama stars Chris Hemsworth (The Avengers) as the charismatic Englishman James Hunt and Daniel Brühl (Inglourious Basterds) as the disciplined Austrian perfectionist Niki Lauda, whose clashes on the Grand Prix racetrack epitomized the contrast between these two extraordinary characters, a distinction reflected in their private lives.

GROWN UPS 2 Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: The all-star comedy cast from Grown Ups returns (with some exciting new additions) for more summertime laughs. Lenny (Adam Sandler) has relocated his family back to the small town where he and his friends grew up. This time around, the grown ups are the ones learning lessons from their kids on a day notoriously full of surprises: the last day of school.

RIDDICK Rating: R Synopsis: Riddick, the latest chapter of the groundbreaking saga that began with 2000's hit sci-fi film Pitch Black and 2004's The Chronicles of Riddick reunites writer/director David Twohy (A Perfect Getaway, The Fugitive) and star Vin Diesel (the Fast and Furious franchise, xXx). Diesel reprises his role as the antihero Riddick, a dangerous, escaped convict wanted by every bounty hunter in the known galaxy.

PERCY JACKSON Rating: PG Synopsis: Percy Jackson, the son of Poseidon, continues his epic journey to fulfill his destiny, as he teams with his demigod friends to retrieve the Golden Fleece, which has the power to save their home and training ground, Camp Half-Blood.

M A S E R

INSIDIOUS 2 Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: The famed horror team of director James Wan and writer Leigh Whannell reunite with the original cast of Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, Lin Shaye and Ty Simpkins in INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2, a terrifying sequel to the acclaimed horror film, which follows the haunted Lambert family as they seek to uncover the mysterious childhood secret that has left them dangerously connected to the spirit world. Movie information and ratings are from Rotten Tomatoes. Ratings are based on 0 - 100%; each star represents a 20% rating.

Puzzles on page A22

522 E. Broadway

Resist the temptation!

327-6271

“We Sell the Best and Service the Rest!”

Woodson the spots accessed by a small needle. It can’t be 100 percent representative of every cell within the mass’s confines. That’s why your veterinarian may also recommend an incisional biopsy. 4. Perform an incisional biopsy. In this procedure, a small bit of the mass is sampled. The tissue sample is then submitted to a diagnostic laboratory for examination. Your veterinarian will choose one of several methods for obtaining the tissue sample, but your pets will likely need to be sedated or anesthetized briefly for this approach. 5. Perform an excisional biopsy. This method increases the chances of making a definitive diagnosis, because it involves removing the entire lump (at least what the veterinarian can see and feel) and submitting the tissue

to a diagnostic laboratory for examination. If a diagnosis can be confirmed, your veterinarian can give you the most accurate information about prognosis – what to expect long-term for your pet – and treatment. Treatment depends on the underlying cause and will range from no intervention to minor surgery to something much more involved if the lumps or bumps are caused by a serious medical condition such as cancer. A side note on inflammation: Dogs, as they age, get many lumps and bumps and, in general, possibly 90 percent are benign! Cats, on the other hand, rarely get tumors and when they do, 90 percent of the time they are malignant!


A24

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

ALL SHOWTIMES GOOD FROM

10/04/13-10/10/13

Prices: Adult (after 6:00 pm) $8.50 | Child $6.50 | Senior $6.50 Matinee (before 6:00 pm) $6.50 | *3D Movie Surcharge $2.00

Online ticket sales available at

www.allentheatresinc.com

ALLEN 8

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available

1819 E. 20TH STREET

No Passes or Discounts R

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13 4:10 6:30 9:10 11:40 SAT & SUN

2:40 5:10 7:30 9:55 12:20 SAT & SUN

4:20 9:00

PG-13

R

No Passes or Discounts 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30 11:30 SAT & SUN

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG

No Passes or Discounts PG-13

No Passes or Discounts R

2:20 4:50 7:10 9:45 11:55 SAT & SUN

2:50 5:20 7:40 9:50 12:30 SAT & SUN R

PG

No Passes or Discounts 1:50 6:35 11:20 SAT & SUN

1:55

3:40 6:40 9:25 12:50 SAT & SUN

R

1:30 4:10 6:45 9:35 11:00 SAT & SUN

Movie Gift Passes can be purchased at any location. Allen Theatres Gift Ticket Good for ANY movie, any time. Not good for special events. Cost: Normal adult evening price. Good for 3D film with additional cash upcharge.

Allen Theatres Discount Ticket Not good for 3D films or special events. Good for movies before 6:00 pm and nonrestricted movies after 6:00 pm for adults. Cost: Normal adult matinee price

ANIMAS 10

No Passes or Discounts 3D* R

ANIMAS VALLEY MALL 4601 East Main Street

No Passes or Discounts R

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13 2:45 4:55 7:05 9:20 12:30 FRI - SUN

2:20 4:30 6:45 9:00 12:10 FRI - SUN

4:20 6:55 9:10 11:45 FRI - SUN R

Metallica: Through the Never No Passes or Discounts

No Passes or Discounts

2:00

2:05 7:15

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available

PG

PG-13

3D*

3D*

No Passes or Discounts 1:45 6:05 8:20 11:30 FRI - SUN

COMING SOON

October 11

October 11

4:40 9:45 11:30 FRI-SUN

October 18

3:55

October 18

October 18

R

PG

No Passes or Discounts 4:35 9:05 11:50 SAT & SUN

No Passes or Discounts 3:25 6:20 9:15 12:30 FRI - SUN

PG-13

Online ticket sales available at

No Passes or Discounts 2:30 5:00 7:25 9:55 12:05 FRI-SUN

R 2:40 6:00 9:25 11:20 FRI - SUN

2:15 6:50

PG-13

PG

PG-13

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG

2:35 5:05 7:35 10:00 12:00 FRI - SUN

October 25

November 1

www.allentheatresinc.com

November 1

November 1


y o b cow

Girl Scouts enter Artifacts’ decorated bra show this year The eighth annual Unhooked: A Decorated Bra Show opened Oct. 1 at Artifacts Gallery in Historic Downtown Farmington. It features hand-decorated bras that will be voted on and then sold, with all proceeds benefitting the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Cancer Fund. The show began in 2005, when gallery owner Bev Taylor

and local artist Ardis Jacobson got together and borrowed the idea from another community. The pair began planning and founded the Unhooked show, making it unique to Farmington by naming the Cathy Lincoln Fund as the beneficiary. “All artwork is donated,” Taylor said. This year’s participating artists are Fran Mayfield,

Maria Kompare, Tabatha Rhodes, Julane Jensen and Evelyn James, and the Girl Scouts. “The whole troop did 20 bras,” Taylor said. Taylor puts a price tag on the artwork, and then the public has an opportunity to buy a decorated art bra. If the bras do not sell, they are donated to San Juan Regional Medical

Center. “The bras are very often used in outreach programs to teach women about preventive health care.” In addition to the bras there is photography and some decorated art pieces. There also is a show of paintings featuring women by Kyle Ragsdale, the curator of the Harris Center for the Arts in Indianapolis,

Ind. Taylor titled this show, Variations on a Theme. The show runs through Oct. 19 at Artifacts Gallery, 302 E. Main St. The gallery is open from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For more information call Artifacts at 505.327.2907.

Ladies in Training II -Girl Scouts troop New Mexico Trails Service Unit 101 Junior & Cadette Girl Scouts

Mardi-Bra – Maria Kompare

Buccaneers Bra – Julane Jensen


2

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

Renowned landscape painter

Curt Walters official Get Pinked artwork DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Curt Walters is known as the Grand Canyon artist. Throughout his career he has found multiple ways to capture the canyon on canvas. He is a renowned landscape painter, and one of his original works has been donated to the San Juan Medical Foundation as the official Get Pinked artwork for the 2013 fundraising campaign. Sargent Point is an original painting based on an earlier work titled September at Lake O’Hara. In addition to this piece, Walters, a native of Farmington, is allowing the San Juan Medical Foundation to make posters of his painting Mom’s La Plata Gar-

den, which will be available for sale. Walters grew up in Farmington and often visits his home in La Plata, which inspired the poster artwork. He is a graduate of Farmington High School and has been the friend and mentor to many of Farmington’s local artists, including Rod Hubble, another landscape painter. Walters resides in Sedona, Ariz., where he is surrounded by Southwestern beauty and is close to the Grand Canyon – his great inspiration as an artist. He first visited the canyon when he was 19 – and fell in love. “I get the same feeling today as I did that first time, 35 years ago,” he said in his biography. Walter had only been

Mom’s La Plata Garden

Curt Walters

Sargent Point

painting for about four years when he first visited the canyon. He sold his first painting at the age of 15, after stealing his sister’s art set. Since that time, he has received national and international recognition. He focused much of his early career on the Grand Canyon and became involved in the 1990s with the Grand Canyon Trust to fight pollution over the gorge. By 1997, he was named the “Greatest Living Grand Canyon Artist” by Art of the West magazine, and he also was honored to be named the Official Artist of the Grand Canyon Trust. It was in 2007 that Walters entered a 36-by-28inch study of his home – Mom’s La Plata Garden – in the 2004 Prix de West

Art Exhibition. He also enjoys painting other beautiful landscapes such as a second Prix de West entry titled Trinchera Summer, which is of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of Southern Colorado as seen from the Forbes’ Trinchera Ranch. He is a top American Western Artist who captures scenes from across the west,

but Walters also enjoys painting abroad, including in such places as Italy, France, the Czech Republic, Hungary and in Jordan. Each year, his artwork can be seen at many of America's top Western Art shows and he has been extensively honored with awards including the Nona Jean Hulsey Buyers' Choice Award; the Frederic Rem-

ington Award and the Prix de West Purchase Award. His work is collected by a number of public and private individuals and foundations, including the Forbes Magazine Galleries of New York and California, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, astronaut Frank Borman, Frank and Kathie Lee Gifford and Grand Canyon National Park.

Powder Puff Football

Bloomfield High game proceeds go to Cathy Lincoln Memorial fund LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune The public can support breast cancer awareness during the Bloomfield High School Powder Puff Football Game at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 17, at the high school’s Bobcat Stadium. For the past three years, the Powder Puff game has raised money for the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Cancer Fund, a local fund that benefits underinsured or uninsured women. Half the proceeds collected at the game will be donated to the fund, which raised more than $4,000 last year. Tickets cost $5 and can be purchased at the game. “I think this is a positive community-oriented event. I think it is important for teenagers to be aware of breast cancer and it is our job to educate

them on it. Hopefully this event will continue to bring more awareness and provide money to women who are in need,” said Nicole Burns, a teacher at BHS who also organizes the Powder Puff game. The football game will consist of a team of senior girls and junior girls competing against one another. “The students didn’t have to be affiliated with a sport,” Burns explained. The coaches are BHS football players and during half-time, several male students will perform a dance. “This is a big deal and we treat it like an actual football game,” Burns added. At the game, the audience also has an opportunity to win prizes during a raffle drawing. The prizes include Tshirts and gift certificates to restaurants. “We encourage everyone to come out. It is a fun time,” Burns said.

Be In The Pink This Year. Schedule your Mammogram Today! www.thebankforme.com

505-327-3222

Providing comfort and care since 1979

Call (505)327-0301 608 Reilly Ave. Northwest New Mexico Hospice & Home Care

Farmington

www.pms-inc.org


3

Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Rockin’ country music

Little Texas will perform at Get Pinked Cowboy Soiree Little Texas is hot off its summer touring season and will head to Farmington for an Oct. 18 performance at the Get Pinked Cowboy Soiree. The band is celebrating its 25th anniversary and will share in the Get Pinked festivities at the Farmington Civic Center, performing its signature rockin’ country music. Little Texas was started in Nashville, Tenn., in 1988 by musicians who spent three years performing in every bar and honky-tonk from Myrtle Beach, S.C., to Los Angeles, Calif. They were known as the “hardest-working band in country music,” performing more than 300 shows a year before earning a recording contract. They received acclaim and a Top-10 hit with their first radio release Some Guys Have All the Love. From there, Little Texas just kept growing in popularity. Their first five singles topped the Country charts, and their second CD has sold more than 3 million copies. In those early years the band toured with such headliners as Clint Black, Travis Tritt and Trisha Yearwood, and by 1994 Little Texas received the Vocal Group of the Year award from the Academy of Country Music. The next year brought more recording and endless touring. The band also received two Grammy nominations. Their hard work paid off and Little Texas was a well-known rockin’ country band, but the years of traveling and performing led the group to take a break and go their separate ways. “At that point it was time for our loved ones to have us back for a while,” said Duane Propes, bassist and vocalist. Popes and Little Texas, however, are back together

and stronger than ever, with Porter Howell on lead vocals and lead guitar, Dwayne O’Brien on vocals and rhythm guitar, and Del Gray

on the drums. The band’s website states that these men have “rebuilt the franchise with a completely new sound.”

Little Texas released a new album in 2007 and received a good deal of radio play, and the band promises to continue creating

new music for their public in between tour dates. They will be performing in Farmington during the Get Pinked Cowboy Soiree

on Oct. 18 at the Farmington Civic Center. Tickets for the event are $125 per person or $225 per couple.

We support

Breast Cancer Awareness Charles Schumacher, DDS Gene Hilton, DDS

Welcoming New Patients A Farmington Tradition of Trusted Care for Over 35 Years!

2525 E. 30th Street • 505-327-4863 www.deserthillsdental.com

cowboy

Friday, October 18

Saturday, October 26 • 7pm Farmington Civic Center

Farmington Civic Center

Performance by Little Texas

www.getpinkedgala.com For additional information contact the San Juan Medical Foundation, 505-609-2272

Benefiting the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Cancer Fund

Proudly Supporting

Breast Cancer Awareness Month! 505-324-2008 825 N. Sullivan Each franchise is independently owned & operated

Adult Tickets • $15 Children’s Tickets • $10 TICKETS ON SALE NOW (505) 599-1148 or (877) 599-3331 www.fmtn.org/civic center

Ticket proceeds will benefit the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Cancer Fund.

Where's Pinkalicious?

Pinkalicious is hidden in this week's issue of the Tri-City Tribune. First person to find her and call 505-599-1148 wins a pair of show tickets, plus entrance to the VIP reception!


4

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

Get Pinked Fundraisers San Juan County Communications 911

The Head Shops Salon & Day Spa

Joyful Being

Sackpacks

Fashion Show & Silent Auction on Oct. 11

Zumbathon on Oct. 19

Sam’s Club

Alco

Aspen Leaf Yogurt

Grill Hot Dogs & Hamburgers every weekend Donation Splats

Canister at registers

Purchase a pink spoon $1

Farmers Insurance/Cheryl Buser

Teacup Bakery

KDs Video

$100 Donation

Week 1 $1 from each cinnamon roll sale. Week 2 $.75 from each Strudel Sale. Week 3 $1 from each doz. Cookie sale. Week 4 $.50 from each cherry,apple or blue berry bar. $5 off any cake all month

Container on counter

Citizens Bank - Bloomfield

Village Cleaners

Farmers Markets

Jars at teller windows

$100 Donation

Containers at registers. Selling PINK items.

Bloomfield Florist

Hairtage Family Hair Design

Sammy Lou Scents

$100 Donation

Head shaving and pink stripes on Oct. 5

25% Off sales all month

Cruz for the Boobs

7 - 11 stores

Denny’s

$1 and $5 Donation Splats

Pink Pancakes $1 and $5 Donation Splats & Get Pinked T-shirts

NBHA “Run for Life”

Pointe of Grace Dance Academy

Si Senor Restaurant

4D Barrel Race/Silent Auction/ Popcorn Sales on Oct. 19 & 20

Selling pink tutus, hair fluff and pink cupcakes on Oct. 19

Selling Pink Lemonade all month

Bloomfield Fire Department

Aztec Speedway

5k and 1 mile Walk/Run on Oct. 12

Get Pinked Race and Auction on Oct. 5

Cactus

Furst Contracting

$1 donation from dinner plate of owners choice

$100 Donation and purchased poster

Jar in business will donate money from easy haircuts

DJs Pizza

Kare Drug

Uniform Kingdom

Jar in business

$100 Donation and purchased poster

Any donation of $5 or more, customer will receive an extra 5% off their entire purchase

Kathy’s Discount Party Store

Mystical Goddess

Southwest Ink

Selling Pink Ribbon merchandise

Portion of services to toward Get Pinked plus misc. items being sold

$35 - $50 ribbon tattoos and any piercing proceeds

Bike Poker Run on Oct. 19

Paradise Salon & Spa Painting Fingers and Toes Pink

Ruben’s

Tri-City Tribune $ 5 will donate to the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Fund for every new subscription started in October.

DON’T MISS OUT ON LOCAL NEWS!

MM

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GET PINKED

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Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Civic Center will host show to support Get Pinked LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune As San Juan County celebrates the color pink during the Get Pinked campaign. The Farmington Civic Center also will join the cause by bringing Pinkalicious The Musical to the venue. Pinkalicious The Musical will appear at the Farmington Civic Center at 7 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26. Adult tickets are $15 and children’s tickets are $10. To buy tickets, visit www.fmtn.org/civiccenter. The one-hour musical, produced by the award-winning Vital Theatre Company, is based on the popular children’s book Pinkalicious by Elizabeth Kann and Victoria Kann. The musical is about a character named Pinkalicious who can’t stop eating pink cupcakes despite warnings from her parents. Her pink

indulgence lands her at the doctor’s office with Pinkititis, an affliction that turns her pink from head to toe. “This show is all about being pink so we thought it would correspond with the community’s Get Pinked campaign,” said Lisa Hutchens, Civic Center supervisor. “Pinkalicious is popular among children, and the community can support a good cause.” Local sponsors are paying for the musical to come to the area, so the proceeds collected from ticket sales will be donated to the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Cancer Fund, which benefits underinsured or uninsured women within the community who cannot afford cancer-related treatments, tests, or prescriptions. The Farmington Civic Center is located at 200 (L to R) Amber Dickerson and Travis Nunes in a scene from Vital Theatre Company's Production of Pinkalicious, The Musical. - courtesy photo W. Arrington St.

Bloomfield’s ready

City plans a host of events for October

The city of Bloomfield is ready to Get Pinked with fundraising activities at various Bloomfield businesses and a few events that will be fun for the entire family. The Bloomfield Fire Department is once again sponsoring the third annual Get Pinked Walk and Run on Oct. 12. There will be multiple events this time, including a one-mile

Mud Run will start at 10 a.m. With all runners taking off from the Bloomfield Cultural Center, 333 S. First St., Bloomfield. Participants can register online at active.com, or from 1 to 7 p.m. Oct. 11 at the Bloomfield Fire Department, 911 N. First St. There also will be a registration the morning of the event, beginning at 7 a.m. Registration fees are

Fun Walk and a 5K Run, but then there is a new event this year – the 5K Mud Run. “We like to get dirty, and we had a lot of people ask to do that,” Fire Chief George Duncan said of the Mud Run, which will consist of a lot of obstacles and, of course, mud. The event will begin at 9 a.m. Oct. 12 for the regular walk and run, and the

$25 for the Walk, $30 for the 5K Run and $35 for the 5K Mud Run. All proceeds will benefit the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Cancer Fund. Bloomfield’s Wooden Nickel is sponsoring an event – the Cruise for Boobs, a motorcycle poker run that begins with registration at 11 a.m. Oct. 19 at Four Corners HarleyDavidson, 6520 E. Main

St. in Farmington. The registration fee is $25 and the last bike out will be at 12:30 p.m. This contest is open to motorcyclists 21 years of age and older, because it not only stops at various bars and alcohol sales establishments, but also ends at a bar. Motorcyclists will travel to a variety of stops, including Zebra’s, The Highway Grill and Wines of

the San Juan, with the event ending at the Wooden Nickel. They will be able to buy Get Pinked items at each stop for chances to win prizes. The poker run winner will receive two tickets to one of Carlos Santana’s performances at the House of Blues in Las Vegas, Nev., where he is giving multiple shows November through January.

Get Pinked Fundraisers

Get a Taco Box T-shirt For the month of October Taco Box, 777 W. Broadway, is selling Think Pink T-shirts for $15. All proceeds go to the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Fund. Sizes are small - 3X. For more information call 505. 325.0109

AutoMax

Helpful Heroes Junior Civitans

For each vehicle purchased from Oct. 17-26 $100 will be donated

Head Shaving and Pink Stripes Oct. 5

Bloomfield High School

SFW/FCBH

Powder Puff Football Juniors vs. Seniors Oct. 17

Get Pinked Bow Shoot Oct. 26

We support Breast Cancer Awareness month

Get Pinked San Juan County Home of the “Heep” & the “Two Car Pile Up” 119 E. Main Street 5:30am Mon-Fri• Open 6am Sat A Downtown Tradition Since 1952

supporting

Breast Cancer Awareness Month 2420 E. MAIN •  FARMINGTON, NM 87401 •  505.325.2333

www.swconcretesupply.com


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

Pink Glove Dance and Rally

Vote for the video; come dance at the rally LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune San Juan County community members have snapped on the pink gloves once again and are dancing to raise awareness for breast cancer through a Pink Glove Dance video. The Pink Glove Dance is an initiative of Get Pinked San Juan County, a breast cancer awareness campaign to raise money for the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Cancer Fund, which benefits uninsured or underinsured women residing in San Juan County who cannot afford cancer-related treatments, tests, or prescriptions In 2011, San Juan County’s Pink Glove Dance came in 8th place out of the 142 videos from other states and Canada. “What makes our video unique is how community oriented it is. I think 95 percent of the other videos take place in a hospital. Ours is more about the community” and involves local businesses and organizations, said Sheila Mobley, who organizes the Pink Glove Dance in San Juan County. For about a year now, Mobley and videographer Josh Bishop have visited

to tag it and pass it along. That is what we will need, is for people to share it and get their friends to vote,” Mobley explained. To vote, visit the website pinkglovedance.com. A $25,000 prize will be awarded to the video with the most votes. Then, the community has one last chance to wear the pink gloves during the Get Pinked Rally. Last year, the rally set a Guinness World Record after citizens performed the largest hustle dance with 444 dancers. This year, Mobley is determined to set another record by doing the largest Gangnam Style, a popular dance that was created by Psy, a pop icon from South Korea. Mobley said in order to set a record, there needs to be more than 1,000 people performing the dance. The Get Pinked Rally will begin at 5 p.m. on Oct. 30 at Farmington High School’s Hutchison Field. To learn the dance before the event, Mobley said she will post a video of the dance to the San Juan County Get Pinked Facebook page this Monday. In order to receive the video link, “like” the Facebook page.

countless events and businesses filming groups of people performing the same dance while wearing pink gloves. The events they have filmed at include last year’s Get Pinked Gala organized by Majestic Media, the city of Farmington’s Get Pinked Carnival, and at the Fireball Run in Bloomfield. The video will be uploaded in the next couple of weeks and then the voting begins on Oct. 25 and ends Nov. 8. “It is about the voting. What we ask is once the video comes out, make sure

Helpful Heroes Junior Civitans

Get your head shaved to support cancer awareness LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune The public can show their support for breast cancer awareness by shaving their heads during a Helpful Heroes Junior Civitan event. The event will be from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 5, at the Connelly Hospitality House,

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710 S. Lake St. It will cost $10 to have your head shaved, and for a donation, pink stripes can be added. Shaye Stallings from Heritage Salon will shave the heads. “Our members wanted to bring recognition to those who are fighting cancer and to raise money for the (San Juan Regional Medical Foundation),” said Latisha Furtado,

Junior Civitan chapter adviser. “They really like the whole concept of giving to others.” At this event, employees from the San Juan Regional Medical Center’s general surgery and operating room clinic will perform several dances to encourage women to do self-breast exams every month. “They want to make sure everyone is aware,” Furtado explained.

Support Breast Cancer Awarness Month

GET PINKED! PARTS & SERVICE

Farmington Community Health Center Most insurance accepted including Medicaid & Medicare A sliding fee based on income is available to uninsured patients.

5700 East Main Farmington

505-325-8826


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Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

City’s participation keeps growing

Buy Fire Department T-shirts; have fun at Get Pinked Carnival DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune The city of Farmington has been the top money raiser in the past two Get Pinked celebrations during the month of October. This year it will be in the running again with a month filled with activities involving city staff from each department and fun for families throughout San Juan County. Farmington’s tradition of raising money for breast cancer awareness and treatment began several years ago, when the Farmington Fire Department decided to purchase and wear pink Tshirts throughout the entire month of October. The Tshirts became so popular people in the community wanted to buy them, and the department began selling pink T-shirts each October. “A lot of us had important people in our lives affected by breast cancer, so we jumped on the pink bandwagon,” Fire Chief Terry Page said. “We’re happy to play our part.” When the Get Pinked campaign began in 2011, the firefighters once again donned their pink tees and also offered them for sale, promising the proceeds to

Available at: Fire Station 1, 301 N. Auburn Ave., or City Hall, 850 Municipal Drive.

the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Cancer Fund through the San Juan Medical Foundation. The department sells the T-shirts for $20 and hats for $15 and they are available at Fire Station 1, 301 N. Auburn Ave., or at City Hall, 850 Municipal Drive. Something changed in 2011, however, because now the entire city had a chance to participate and each department embraced the cause and had fun with

it. Each department decorated its office with a pink theme in October. City Councilors chose to wear pink wigs during a Council meeting, and the staff put on a carnival that provided fun for the entire community. The activities grew in 2012, and the city of Farmington’s participation keeps getting greater each year. “It keeps growing, which is pretty exciting,” said Lisa Hutchens, executive director of the Farmington Civic Center and event coordinator for Farmington’s Get Pinked activities. The events began on the first of October, when fire-

fighters began wearing their pink uniforms and T-shirts. Other city staff started decorating their offices and will continue to tweak those decorations until they are judged on Oct. 24. Also on Oct. 24, there will be a Navajo Taco sale at the city. Food is a big part of the fundraising activities, so there will be a build your own burrito bar from 7 to 10 a.m. Oct. 10 at the Municipal Operations Center on Browning Parkway. There also will be all types of food from barbecue to a bake sale and root beer during the third annual city of Farmington Get Pinked Carnival.

Big Belly Barbecue is donating food for the event and 3 Rivers Brewery is donating root beer. These food items will be sold with all proceeds going to the Cathy Lincoln Fund. The carnival is a big event that typically has been scheduled when school is out. There will be no school on Oct. 18, so city hall will be abuzz with carnival activities from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. These activities include carnival games, face painting, static displays of police and fire vehicles, the Get Pinked ambulance and a city electric utility bucket trucks with which children can take photos.

There also will be a new event – Treasure Your Chest – during the carnival. “We will have a treasure chest and kids can dig in it, while wearing a blindfold and pull out cool prizes,” Hutchens said. Also at the carnival, there will be firefighters selling pink T-shirts and police officers selling pink pig key chains. Hutchens said the community should expect a good time from the city during Get Pinked. “All of the employees together do a really good job of pooling their own resources, and putting on a great event,” she said.

Bow shoot

Hunting organizations team up raise money for cancer fund LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune The New Mexico Sportsmen for Fish and Wildlife and the Four Corners Bow Hunters Association are organizing a bow shooting event to raise money for the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Cancer Fund. The event will begin at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 26, behind the

Farmers Market in Flora Vista, or off of County Road 3535. There is a $20 entry fee and the shoot will consist of two courses. “All the entry fees that we collect that day will go to the Cathy Lincoln fund,” said Latisha Furtado, who is organizing the bow shoot. On each shooting course, 3-D animals of all shapes and sizes will

be available as shooting targets. Furtado said people must bring their own bows because bows will not be provided. This is a familyfriendly event and people participating in the shoot are encouraged to bring friends and family members. Pink camo shirts that say “Shoot for the Cause” will be sold for $10 at the event.

F IGHT Fashion Show like a girl! & Luncheon featuring breast cancer survivors In honor of all breast cancer survivors and those still fighting

October 23rd • 11 am to 1pm at Courtyard Marriott Tickets available at San Juan Medical Foundation 609-6813. Don’t wait! Seating limited.

4301 Largo, Suite H • 327-2215 Between Citizen’s Bank and Dad’s Diner


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013


OCTOBER 4, 2013

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED • SERVING THE SAN JUAN BASIN

AZTEC RUINS

T R I - C I T Y

National monument makes improvements

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Girl Scouts enter Artifacts’ decorated bra show this year The eighth annual Unhooked: A Decorated Bra Show opened Oct. 1 at Artifacts Gallery in Historic Downtown Farmington. It features hand-decorated bras that will be voted on and then sold, with all proceeds benefitting the Cathy Lincoln Memorial Cancer Fund. The show began in 2005, when gallery owner Bev TayShow Girls - Evelym James lor and local artist Ardis Jacobson got together and borrowed the idea from another community. Rhodes, Julane Jensen and Evelyn James, The pair began planning and founded and the Girl Scouts. “The whole troop did 20 bras,” Taylor the Unhooked show, making it unique said. to Farmington by naming the Cathy Taylor puts a price tag on the artwork, Lincoln Fund as the beneficiary. and then the public has an opportunity “All artwork is donated,” Taylor said. to buy a decorated art bra. If the bras do This year’s participating artists are Fran Mayfield, Maria Kompare, Tabatha * Get Pinked 4

Ladies in Training II -Girl Scouts troop New Mexico Trails Service Unit 101 Junior & Cadette Girl Scouts

National Honor Choir

Devonne Blackhorse chosen to sing at national event LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune A Farmington High School senior is one of two students in New Mexico who was selected to sing in the National Association for Music Education’s National Honor Choir this October. Devonne Blackhorse will travel to Nashville, Tenn., from Oct. 27 to Oct. 30, where she will sing with 350 students from other states. “I’m happy and excited,” Blackhorse explained. “I’m also a little nervous because this is such a big event for music.” Blackhorse has participated in the FHS choir for four years. She became in-

Farmington High School Senior Devonne Blackhorse was selected to sing in the National Association for Music Education’s National Honor Choir from Oct. 27 to Oct. 30 in Nashville, Tenn.

terested in singing during her fifth grade year at Bluffview Elementary School.

We want your stories Send press releases, events and story ideas to editor@tricitytribuneusa.com fax to 505-516-1231 or mail 100 W. Apache St, Farmington, NM 87401

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Last school year, she auditioned and was selected to sing in the New Mexico All-State Treble Choir. “She

was the only FHS representative” in the state choir, said FHS Choir Director Laura Argotsinger.

President Ben Shirley

While being selected to sing in the state choir was an honor, Blackhorse wanted to take it one step further and audition for the national choir. Blackhorse’s audition was filmed and then sent to the National Association for Music Education. “This is a big opportunity and I’m happy for her. She is going after her dreams,” said Elverna Tsinnajinnie, Blackhorse’s mother. Tsinnajinnie will travel to Nashville with Blackhorse to watch the choir performance. The national choir will be a mixed choir with sopranos, altos, tenors, and basses. Blackhorse said she looks forward to singing with women and men be-

cause she is only used to singing in an all-women’s choir. “This will be a huge experience to figure out how it is singing with tenors and basses. I’ve always wanted to try it out and now it’s happening. I’m looking forward to singing with them.” While in Nashville, Blackhorse will practice with the choir for six hours a day. However, she also will have time to experience the city. Students will attend a performance at the Grand Ole Opry and a Broadway Musical and also sit in on a songwriters’ session to get a taste of the industry. “I think it is pretty exciting,” Argotsinger said. “It will be a great opportunity.”

BMB Festival

Navajo Nation FY 2014 budget

Local business brings event to Lions Widerness Park

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

Improvements Aztec ROTC helps with improvements at ruins

Aztec Ruins heritage garden is an improvement project that began a couple of years ago. The crops in the garden include sunflowers, corn, squash, and beans.

LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Aztec Ruins National Monument underwent several improvement proj-

ects this year and the public was invited to view these improvements during a September Business After Hours hosted by Aztec Ruins, Friends of

the Aztec Ruins, and the Aztec Chamber of Commerce. Aztec High School Junior ROTC cadets volunteered to help with the

projects from February until July. “I think (the improvements) are wonderful and will help not only draw tourists into the park, but I think it

These shade structures were constructed by the Aztec High School JROTC cadets during the summertime. The roofs of the structures resemble prehistoric roofs that are seen in the ruins.

Aztec Ruins Park Ranger Dana Hawkins talks with guests about the process of planting the heritage garden.

should also pique interest with local people,” said Sandi Harber, President, Friends of the Aztec Ruins, a non-profit organization that works in partnership with Aztec Ruins to raise funds for special projects. These improvement projects included building a fence along part of Aztec Ruin’s border, painting the visitor center, and building shade structures in the picnic area. “They actually create some good shade, and the roof on here resembles the way the prehistoric roofs looked like inside the (ruins),” said Larry Turk, park superintendent. Cadets also removed a dilapidated orchard and chopped it into firewood, which was sold to the public by Friends of the Aztec Ruins. Cattycorner to the picnic area sits the heritage garden, a project that began two years ago. Inside the garden, vibrant colored sunflowers, cottonwood seeds, squash, beans, corn, and amaranth were planted by the Junior ROTC cadets and park rangers. “I grow all these crops based on the varieties that likely would have been here, but I also try to replicate how people would have farmed here in the Southwest and in Aztec,” said Dana Hawkins, park ranger. The crops planted in the heritage garden have been adapted and grown in the American Southwest for up to 1,000 years, according to Hawkins.

“This is a fabulous result,” she said of the garden. Another project Aztec Ruins and the city of Aztec are working on is a trail system that will connect historic downtown to the ruins. “To get from downtown to the ruins, you have to get in your car and it is kind of out of the way,” Aztec Mayor Sally Burbridge said. “So by putting in trails and a bridge we can connect them and we will bring the ruins closer to downtown.” There will also be interpretative kiosks along the trails that will tell the community’s history. As a way to raise awareness of this project, the United States Department of the Interior recognized it as an America’s Great Outdoor Project. Only two projects in every state are recognized each year, according to Burbridge, and the trail system project is one of two recognized projects within New Mexico. “The whole concept is connecting folks to the outdoors,” she said. The trail system project is still in the design stages, but the bridge across the Animas River will be constructed this fall and the trails will be built beginning next spring. Aztec Ruins completes improvement projects every year, and next year JROTC cadets will help with the trail system, build additional shade structures, and relocate underground the power lines that are now above-ground.


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Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

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$8.7M in appropriations vetoed

Navajo President signs Navajo Nation FY 2014 budget WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. – Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly signed the 2014 fiscal year comprehensive budget into law and line item vetoed at least $8.7 million in supplemental appropriations passed by the Navajo Nation Council earlier this month, which would have left $107 in the Undesignated Unreserved Fund Balance. “As leaders, we have an obligation to act fiscally responsible,” President Shelly said. “When the Shelly/ Jim administration took office, the Navajo Nation was more than $20 million in the red. I took the strong position that the UUFB should maintain $20 million above the minimum UUFB balance mandated by Navajo law, which could be used for emergencies and other unforeseen budget cutbacks.”

As part of the comprehensive budget, all general funded Navajo Nation employees are scheduled for a 3 percent wage increase; the Navajo Nation Area Agency on Aging budget will minimize layoffs; decentralization planning to bring more services to local communities

was funded at $3 million and $2.9 million was budgeted for the Land Department to establish a registry of land records on the Navajo Nation. “It is important to weigh and thoroughly consider all appropriations that utilize the Navajo People’s money. Especially with the current environment in Washington, D.C., it is important for us to make these wise decisions,” President Shelly said. President Shelly line item vetoed about $5 million in proposed spending from the UUFB and about $994,000 from the Personnel Savings Fund. “The Personnel Savings Fund and the UUFB are sources that depend on external conditions for funding. Those conditions can fluctuate each year and change

the amount of money we have in those accounts. Therefore, we must exercise great caution when budgeting money from these sources and follow all applicable Navajo laws regarding spending of the Navajo People’s money, ” said President Shelly. Most of the line items were vetoed because of failures to comply with budgetary processes outline by an executive order or the Appropriations Act, or the budget instruction manual. The following supplemental requests were line item vetoed: • $3 million from proposed infrastructure spending for the former Bennett Freeze area in the Western portion of the Navajo Nation. • $3 million for Public Employment Funds for the 110 chapters.

• $1.2 million for chapter improvements. • A $500,000 fuel cost supplemental appropriation. • $550,000 for General Activity Fund Balance to be split with all 110 chapters. “The total amount returned to the UUFB is about $8.7 million,” said President Shelly. “It is important that the budget supplement requests comply with the Navajo Nation Appropriations Act, all policies and procedures created by FY 2014 Budget Instructions and Policies Manual and other pertinent Navajo laws,” President Shelly wrote. The Navajo Council cannot override the line item vetoes exercised by the Navajo Nation president.

Professional development

San Juan College to host Four Corners Conference The 29th annual Four Corners Conference for Professional Development will be held from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, Oct.10, at San Juan College. This conference offers a keynote address, three workshops from a choice of 24 sessions, a luncheon speaker and a

chance to win a beautiful white gold diamond ring provided by Freytag and Farrar Jewelers, valued at $6,000. This year’s keynote speaker is Dr. Joseph Michelli, an international speaker, No. 1 New York Times bestselling business author and

organizational consultant who transfers his knowledge of exceptional business practices in ways that develop joyful and productive workplaces. His insights encourage leaders and frontline workers to grow and invest passionately in all aspects of their lives. Borrowing from his

work with and books about companies like the RitzCarlton Hotel Company, Zappos, Starbucks, UCLA Health System and the Pike Place Fish Market, Dr. Michelli will offer a “Prescription for Excellence” rich with insights and practical tools for you to deliver both

operational quality and emotional value. Those attending also can apply for professional development scholarships that allow them to use their award money after the conference to attend future college classes, trainings or professional conferences some-

time within the next year. For detailed information on the keynote address, workshops and registration, visit www.fourcornerspro .com. Registration fees are listed on the website as well. For more information, call Nancy Shepherd at 505.566.3264.

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Willis attorney wants out

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

Comeau files motion to withdraw DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Santa Fe Attorney Michael Comeau filed an order on behalf of his legal firm asking to be removed as legal counsel for Bobby Willis in a case the state’ Financial Institutions Division filed against Willis as the owner of New Mexico Title and Escrow. Comeau cited “irreconcilable differences” in his Sept. 17 motion to withdraw his appearance as Willis’ counsel. Those “differences,” he wrote, “make it impossible for Comeau, Maldegen, Templeman & Indall, LLP to continue to effectively represent the Willis Respondents in this litigation.” The Willis Respondents include all of Willis’ companies and business part-

Willis

ners including New Mexico Title Escrow, Bobby Willis, Carrie Willis, Chad Cox, Kyle Luncy Finch, Jennifer Olson, JJ Bond Investments, Golden Rule and Willis Asset Management. The motion states these businesses and individuals “object to” Comeau’s motion. Comeau has represented Willis and the “respondents” since Feb. 3, 2012, when the Financial Insti-

tutions Division brought a complaint against them with regard to the poor management of New Mexico Title and Escrow. The business unexpectedly closed its doors Jan. 31, 2012, leaving customers without access to accounts dealing with their properties. A few days later the Public Regulation Commission’s Insurance Division opened an investigation and then the court case was filed. Through the court case, a receivership was appointed to organize the title and escrow company accounts and to go through and seize Willis’ assets. By August 2012, Willis, formerly of Kirtland, was being investigated by the Farmington Police Department, and his former business associate Mike Atchi-

son had brought on Aug. 10, 2012, a civil suit against Willis. Comeau also represents Willis in this case. The Farmington Police Department filed criminal charges that same day, alleging Willis embezzled funds from Atchison. Willis was charged with racketeering, embezzlement and securities fraud in this case. Then, on Aug. 29, the FPD brought more charges against Willis in a case where Quentin Smith was the alleged victim. He reportedly gave Willis $5.056 million in precious gemstones and jewelry for safekeeping. When Smith asked for the items back, Willis allegedly refused. The police charged him with embezzlement of more than

$20,000. Despite criminal charges being brought against Willis he has not set foot in a San Juan County Courtroom. His defense attorney, John Day, offered the court medical records that allegedly state Willis is in poor health and had suffered from multiple strokes while living in Branson, Mo. San Juan County Magistrate Mark Hawkinson allowed Willis to remain in Branson and wear an ankle monitor, so long as he regularly checks in with his attorneys. Willis was supposed to be in San Juan County for a preliminary hearing in early September, but a joint motion, agreed to by both the defense and prosecution, was filed Aug. 29 by Assistant District

Attorney Ken Stalter, to continue the hearing. Stalter stated that both parties were in the process of conducting witness interviews and gathering discovery in the case. “Through the fault of neither party, the reproduction of voluminous documents is taking longer than expected,” Stalter wrote. “Necessary witness statements and depositions cannot be conducted until after the defense has had adequate opportunity to review document discovery.” Stalter wrote that the process could not “reasonably be completed” in time for the September hearing. Hawkinson granted the motion on Aug. 30, and reset the hearing in November.

Gifts from home

Blue Star Mothers need our help to send care packages to soldiers LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune The Four Corners Blue Star Mothers is collecting names and information of local soldiers who are serving overseas as a way to send them gift packages with items that are from their hometown. Every two months, the chapter sends gift packages to men and women from the Four Corners area who currently serve in the military. Each package contains toiletries, snacks and, of course, green chile, do-

nated by local businesses and citizens.

“We try to treat them like gold,” said Cindy Castle, Four Corners Blue Star Mothers president. The chapter needs names of local soldiers to add to the list. They will be on the list to receive gift packages until the Blue Star Mothers is notified that they are being deployed or out of the service. In order to add a soldier to the list, the information that is required is the soldier’s name, birthday, country of deployment, address, branch of service, estimated date of return to the United States, and the name

and telephone number of the person requesting the soldier’s name be added to the list. Families who are not involved with the Blue Star Mothers chapter can still sign their child up to receive gift packages. “It is for all warriors here, whether their parents are active members or not,” Castle said. She added it is important for families or friends to directly provide the soldiers’ information in order for them to receive the packages. “We are chartered by the U.S. Congress and I think people think we are automatically given those (sol-

diers’) addresses, and we are not. The addresses must be submitted to us for us to send the packages,” Castle said. If a soldier’s information is submitted by Oct. 3, they will receive a gift package in October and if their information is submitted by Nov. 22, the will receive a gift package for Christmas. To sign up a soldier, visit the Four Corners Blue Star Mothers Facebook page, email Susan Pierce with the Blue Star Mothers, at sus_pierce@msn.com, or contact Castle at 505.320.6119.

Get Pinked not sell, they are donated to San Juan Regional Medical Center. “The bras are very often used in outreach programs to teach women about preventive health care.” In addition to the bras there is photography and some decorated art pieces. There also is a show of paintings featuring women by Kyle Ragsdale, the cu-

Peep Show – Fran Mayfield

rator of the Harris Center for the Arts in Indianapolis, Ind. Taylor titled this show, Variations on a Theme. The show runs through Oct. 19 at Artifacts Gallery, 302 E. Main St. The gallery is open from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday. For more information call Artifacts at 505.327.2907.

Maraville - Tabatha Rhodes

Buccaneers Bra – Julane Jensen

A Tribute to the Mother of all Girl Scouts - Girl Scouts troop New Mexico Trails Service Unit 101 Junior & Cadette Girl Scouts


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Friday, October 4, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Yxáà|ätÄ Distil, Majestic Media brings brew, bands and barbecue to Lions Wilderness Park LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune The aroma of barbecued ribs and the sounds of clinking beer glasses filled Lions Wilderness Park and Amphitheater in Farmington on Sept. 28 during the first-ever Brews Meats Bands Festival. The festival was a partnership between Majestic Media and Distil and it

was a huge success, according to Majestic Media President Don Vaughan. “It was absolutely amazing. We heard comments from people saying, ‘This is the best event Farmington has put on in decades,’” said Vaughan, adding the reason the BMB Festival was so successful was a combination of the venue, the popularity of microbreweries and barbecue,

The six barbeque teams that competed in the BMB festival were cooking their ribs in the early morning, hours before the festival even begun.

and the “community ’s hunger for entertainment that is more engaging.” There were 14 microbreweries participating in the festival including Sierra Nevada, O’Dell Brewing Co. from Fort Collins, Colo., Alaskan Brewing Co., and the local 3 Rivers Brewery. Vaughan pointed out Distil Owner Jake Foust’s knowledge for microbreweries was a huge contribution to the festival. “Distil has the most micro-brew sales in the area. (Foust) is the best in the business in that sense, ” Vaughan said. To accompany the brews, there were six different teams cooking up delicious barbecued ribs and handing them out to the wide-smiling guests. The team that won the “People’s Choice” for best barbecue was Sean McAtasney and John Gillen from Farmington. “This has been fun. I love doing this and seeing the people smile,” Gillen explained. “For us, this was our first competition, but we have been smoking barbecue for a long time,” McAtasney added. The team won a $500 prize with $250 being donated to the LIVESTRONG Foundation and Catholic Charities in Farmington. Most of the cooks at the festival have mastered smoking barbecue. “I have

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been doing this for 10 years,” said Carl Dallas, a local resident who represented team Big Country BBQ. “I just love this. I love the location and being outside.” Dallas’s teammate was Jenny Rogers from Farmington. While people wiped barbecue away from their faces and chatted with their friends, they also could listen to several local bands play throughout the day. These bands included Little Miss Chevious, Jose Villarreal, Boomtown, and Those Devils. The headline band that took the stage in the evening was Hello Dollface, a Durango, Colo.based band that has played 400 venues in nearly every Western state from Texas to the West Coast. “These are amazing local bands that have no venues to play in for the public to go see,” Vaughan said. “The venue made this event successful. The city of Farmington was instrumental in helping that happen. They know (Lions Wilderness Park) is a great venue and it is not utilized and they want it to be utilized.” The festival was a huge hit, according to the guests. Kevin O’Neill from Farmington said he enjoyed the beer sampling and listening to the bands. “This is a fantastic venue and I hope they have it again next year.” Amber Aasen-Frakes from Farmington echoed that, saying, “This is something that is different and new to Farmington. We would like to see this every year in Farmington.” The BMB Festival will be an annual event with the 2014 festival occurring on Oct. 11 at Lions Wilderness Park. Vaughan said he also is considering organizing a BMB Festival in the springtime. (Left) Sean McAtasney from Farmington gives two thumbs up at the BMB Festival on Sept. 28. McAtasney and his teammate, John Gillen, won the “People’s Choice” award for best barbeque ribs.

There were more than 700 people who sampled beer and barbeque ribs and listened to live music at the BMB Festival at Lions Wilderness Park.


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calendar ONGOING EVENTS THREE WATERS TRADING POST EXHIBIT The Three Waters Trading Post exhibit features a walk-through replica of a 1930’s trading post, including a bull pen stocked with period goods and artifacts, pawn room and an office showcasing jewelry and rugs. The exhibit is on display at the Farmington Museum in the Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St. in Farmington. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org

OCT. WEEKENDS PUMPKIN FESTIVAL WEEKENDS Sutherland Farms, located 7.5 miles north of Aztec Ruin, celebrates fall with Pumpkin Festival Weekends every Saturday and Sunday in October! Enjoy train rides, hayrides to the pumpkin patch, a corn pit, corn maze, face painting, great food and much more! October hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Information: 505.334.3578 or www.sutherlandfarms.net

FRI OCT. 4 HARVEST PARTY From 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. the Sycamore Park Community Center will host this FREE party. Join us for games and fun to include bobbing for apples, hay bale hop, musical chairs, ring toss, a corn dig and more. The San Juan County Extension program will be serving hearthealthy popcorn balls to get everyone in the mood for fall treats. Information: 505.566.2480 REEL ROCK FILM FESTIVAL The Reel Rock Film Festival is a collection of films that revolve around the world of climbing. Films may include bouldering, big wall climbing, ice climbing, and mountaineering. Most festivals include four to six short films. Some films are PG-13 due to language. This is a free event, open to the public. Join us from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the San Juan College Henderson Fine Arts Auditorium. Information: 505.566.3487

SAT OCT. 5 ROAD APPLE RALLY Annual Mountain Bike Race and tour offers pro/experts, veterans and beginners a test of skill on a 30-mile single-loop course through canyons and arroyos near San Juan College in Farmington, N.M. Information: 505.599.1140, 800.448.1240 or www.roadapplerally.com CHILI COOKOFF From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. the Farmington Chamber of Commerce will host their annual Chili Cookoff and Salsa Competition at Berg Park. Information: 505.325.0279 or www.gofarmington.com

JAMES & ERNIE COMEDY SHOW Ernie Tsosie and James Junes have been entertaining audiences for 10 years! Don’t miss this performance, featuring Tatanka Means, at 7 p.m. at the Farmington Civic Center Information: 505.599.1148, 877.599.3331 or www.fmtn..org/civiccenter

SAT OCT. 5 SUN OCT. 6 AZTEC HIGHLAND GAMES AND CELTIC MUSIC FESTIVAL Celebrate the culture of the Scottish Highlands at Riverside Park in Aztec, N.M. Enjoy live Celtic music and physical competitions by professional – Caber Toss, Hammer Throw, Braemar Stone, etc. There will be Scottish and Irish dance exhibitions, bagpipe band exhibitions, clan tents, rugby exhibitions, traditional food and more! Information: 505.334.7646 or www.aztechighlandgames.com

TUES OCT. 8 TAYLOR MASON See comedian, ventriloquist, entertainer, musician, and actor Taylor Mason perform at the Farmington Civic Center. Tickets: $15 per person, $25 per couple, available at the Civic Center, KNMI Vertical Radio, KPCL Passion Radio or iTicket.com Information: www.FCCMF.org or 505.599.1148

FRI OCT. 11 FALL ART WALK Come walk through Historic Downtown Farmington, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., and enjoy a crisp fall evening with art receptions and open houses at many downtown locations. A wide variety of art from regional artists will be showcased throughout many of the downtown shops, galleries and restaurants. Art Walk maps will be available at participating locations. The Art Walk is coordinated by the Farmington Downtown Association, and sponsored by Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs. Information: 505.599.1419 UNHOOKED - THE DECORATED BRA SHOW VIII, ART SHOW AND RECEPTION During the Fall Art Walk, stop in at Artifacts Gallery and enjoy the seventh annual “UNHOOKED VIII” in conjunction with San Juan Regional Medical Center for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. A reception of the creative and unusual will be from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. The show will continue through Oct. 27. Information: 505.327.2907 or www.artifacts-gallery.com ASTROFRIDAY “Rocket to the Stars” will be shown at 6:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. in the San Juan College Planetarium. Stargaze follows last showing, weather permitting, at 8:30 p.m. The Planetarium reserves the right to substitute shows. This is a free event, but seating is limited. Information: 505.566.3361 or

www.sanjuancollege.edu/Planetarium/index.htm DOLLEY MADISON Dolley Madison was a survivor of wars, intrigue, and challenges beyond the call of duty. Dolley Payne Todd was a grieving Quaker widow when she married James Madison, the Father of the U.S Constitution, a future president, and the dearest love of her life. Dolley began her political career as the confidante of Martha Washington. From 1809 through 1817 she was one of the most brilliant first ladies. Dolley Madison is presented by VanAnn Moore, performance begins at 7 p.m. in the San Juan College Little Theatre. This free event is a part of the Chautauqua Learning Series. Information: 505.334.9325 CROWNPOINT RUG AUCTION Hand-woven Navajo rugs, 300 to 400, are auctioned off each month at the Crownpoint Elementary School, 72 miles south of Farmington on Hwy. 371. American Indian art and craft vendors also onsite. Auction sponsored by Crownpoint Rug Weavers Association. Rug viewing is from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and auction begins at 7 p.m. Information: 505.785.7386, 505.610.6797 and Christinae2011@Live.com

FRI OCT. 11 SAT OCT. 12 2013 SAN JUAN QUILTER QUILD SHOW Come to the San Juan Quilters Guild’s quilt show. This fabulous show includes a wide variety of quilts plus a raffle quilt, small quilt silent auction, demonstrations and other events. It is held at the Farmington Civic Center and is included in the Downtown Fall Art Walk from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday’s hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Information: 505.598.5672 or sjqgquiltshow@gmail.com FOUR CORNERS STORYTELLING FESTIVAL National and local storytellers of all ages will be featured in the two-day celebration of an almost lost art – Storytelling. Slow down the pace, kick back and listen to traditional tales told by some of the very best national and local storytellers. The festival will feature stories of all varieties – scary ghost stories, family stories, folklore and myths! Festival events are held at Berg Park and The Totah Theatre. Information: 505.599.1270 or www.infoway.org

SAT OCT. 12 RACE 2 EDUCATE The Foundation for Educational Excellence sponsors this 5K run/walk, 10K run and halfmarathon. Course begins at Farmington High School. Proceeds go towards Farmington Municipal Schools Red Apple Teacher Awards and small grants for various projects. Information: race2educate2013.eventbrite.com

BLOOMFIELD FIRE DEPARTMENT GET PINKED RUN Compete as an individual or as a team in this 5K Mud Run. Complete with obstacles, this 5K is sure to be fun! A 5K No Mud Run/Walk is also offered for those that prefer to stay clean, as is a 1-mile Fun Walk. The fun will all begin at the Bloomfield Multicultural Center. Information: www.active.com

FRI OCT. 18 THE HUNTS The Hunts are an indie-folk band made up of seven brothers and sisters from the southlands of Chesapeake, Va. Their songs are meticulously driven by violin, acoustic and electric guitar, banjo, mandolin, accordion, ukulele and piano, and rounded out with crisp harmonies. Performance at the San Juan College Performance Hall at 7 p.m., this is a Silhouette Performing Arts Series performance. Tickets are $15 adults, $12 students and seniors. Information: 505.566.3430

THURS OCT. 24 HALLOWEEN ‘BOO’OULDERING COMPETITION Come join us at the San Juan College Health and Human Performance Center for a bouldering competition – Children ages 5 through 12 - 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Teens and Adults - 6:45 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Competition consists of rock climbers attempting to climb specific routes. Each time a climber completes a route without making a mistake they earn points. The climber to acquire the most points with the least amount of mistakes wins. Prizes will be awarded for best costume, and also in the Men, Women, and Children categories. Cost is free to enter, must sign a waiver to participate, anyone under 18 needs a parent or guardian signature on the waiver, anyone under 14 must be accompanied by an adult. Information: 505.566.3487

FRI OCT. 25 SAN JUAN COLLEGE CHOIR CONCERT Enjoy the smooth melodies and crisp harmonies of the San Juan College Choir Concert. This is the choir’s first show of the season and is sure to delight audiences. Performance at the San Juan College Performance Hall at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8 adults, $6 students and seniors. Information: 505.566.3430 FRIGHTY NIGHT The Farmington Aquatic Center, 1151 N. Sullivan Ave., will be having the Annual Fright Nite Halloween celebration from 4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Come join the fun with deck games, water games, candy and a lot of prizes. Tons of fun and even a hay ride to and from the Farmington Recreation Center. Cost: $4 per person for swimming and activities or $1 per person for non-swimming activities. Information: 505.599.1167

SAT OCT. 26 PINKALICIOUS THE MUSICAL Come see this hilarious production of Pinkalicious who can’t stop eating pink cupcakes despite warnings from her parents. Her pink indulgence lands her at the doctor’s office with Pinkititis, an affliction that turns her pink from head to toe – a dream come true for this pink loving enthusiast. But when her hue goes too far, only Pinkalicious can figure out a way to get out of this predicament. Tickets: $15 for adults, $10 for children. VIP Party Tickets also available for an additional $5 per person, join us for the VIP treatment including pink cupcakes and punch. The show will be at the Farmington Civic Center and starts at 7 p.m. Information: 505.599.1148, 877.599.3331 or www.fmtn.org/civiccenter ZOMBIE 5K RUN – FOR YOUR LIFE! Race begins and ends at the San Juan College Fire Tower Training Facility on campus and starts at 4 p.m. This race will be mostly on dirt and sand trails. Racers will be given flags to wear around their waist and will attempt to run the entire course while dodging ZOMBIES that are reaching for the flags. Racers will also have to navigate through a series of obstacles along the way. The first 100 racers to register are guaranteed a Swag Bag, all racers get a Tshirt, and refreshments and prizes will be awarded in the Men’s, Women’s, and Children’s categories. Cost is $35 for 18 and older, $25 for 17 and under. Anyone under 18 needs a parent or guardian signature on a waiver to participate, anyone under 14 must be accompanied by an adult. Zombie Family Fun Walk will follow race starting at 5:30 p.m. Information: 505.566.3487 SAN JUAN COLLEGE HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL Student organization of San Juan College coordinates this fantastic annual Halloween Carnival! Complete with frights, games and candy at the San Juan College HHPC Gym from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Information: 505.566.3403

THURS OCT. 31 FARMINGTON SAFE TREATS The merchants on Main Street in Historic Downtown Farmington invite the community to Trick or Treat along Main Street from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Coordinated by the Farmington Downtown Association and sponsored by Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Affairs. Information: 505.599.1419

EVENTS FOR ADULTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, NM 87401 Information Numbers:

Main Building: 505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Center Activity Center: 505.566.2288 The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287 50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 – 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Oct. 5 - Grant & Randy Oct. 12 - Off the Interstate Oct. 19 - International Country Oct. 26 - Vintage People Info: 505.599.1380 50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Oct. 9 – Forever Young Oct. 16 – Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380 50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. – Noon Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: $14, $12 for card carrying AARP Members. Pre-registration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Pay cash or check to the instructor on day of class. A discount on your insurance can be good for 2 to 3 years, check your policy. ENCORE CLASS – ACTING 101 9:30 -11:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Are you a character? Would you like to be? Join us for an exciting and creative time in Acting 101 – a beginner class for 50+ adults looking to create through acting. Discover the basics of acting through improvisation, games, monologues, and scene work. Have fun crafting new scenes and making new friends. Plan to attend Bottom of the Barrel’s Production of Robin Hood on Oct. 19; cost no more than $10, details were discussed on the first day of class. Performance from a showcase of scenes worked on in the final class. Class will be taught by Mellissa Souers, B.A. in Theater from Fort Lewis College, who has instructed people of all ages in acting, theater and film. For more information call San Juan College at 505.566.3121. 50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. – noonp.m. Friday, Oct. 4 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: $14 - $12 for card carrying AARP Members. Pre-registration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Pay cash or check to the instructor on day of class. Discount on your insurance can be good for 2 to 3 years, check your policy.


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calendar BOO BOO BINGO 1 – 2 p.m. Monday, Oct. 7 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Play to win fabulous prizes furnished by the Senior Center. To play blackout at the end, you must have been present and seated by 1 p.m. to get in the game. Cost is $2 a card and we provide refreshments. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. HALLOWEEN DINNER & DANCE 10:30 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 31 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Dinner and Dance with live music provided by Grant Groblebe. Lunch is a $3 donation for anyone 60+ and a $6 fee for anyone younger. Wear your Halloween gear to win a prize in the costume contest. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. ON-GOING CLASSES AT THE SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. & 1 - 3:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. EXERCISE CLASS – WITH JEAN ELISE 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. or 1 - 2 p.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: 50 cents per session. Are you losing flexibility and want more energy to do the things you enjoy? If so, this class is what you need to get back into a good exercise program. Work at your own level and build up to where you want to be. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. DRAWING & CALLIGRAPHY 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bring your own materials and learn some new techniques! Call 505.599.1380 for more information. TAI CHI 9:30 a.m. Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Tai Chi is a series of fluid

movements that can help with balance, flexibility, and muscle tone. These gentle exercises will leave you feeling refreshed. Free to anyone 50+. Info: 505.599.1390

MORNING SPLASHERCISE* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday

ZUMBA GOLD 50+ 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Party on the floor with Latin dance music that will make you smile. This exhilarating exercise class will get you moving to the beat. Cost is $2.50 per session. Info: 505.566.2288

CROSS POOL* 11:15 a.m. – Noon Monday – Friday

FARMINGTON RECREATION CENTER 1101 Fairgrounds Road Call 505.599.1184 for more information Monday through Friday, Noon to 1 p.m., no charge – Walk Laps in the Gym Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to Noon, no charge – Shuffleboard and Ping Pong

MORNING ARTHRITIS* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday

EVENING AQUACISE 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Aquacise classes, $2 a visit *All adult aquatic exercise classes, $1.50 a visit FARMINGTON AQUATIC CENTER 1151 N. Sullivan Road Call 505.599.1167 for more information EARLY BIRD SPLASH 8 – 8:45 a.m. Monday/Wednesday AQUA JOGGER 8 – 8:45 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday Classes are $2.50 a visit

ZUMBA Wednesday, 7 – 8 p.m. Saturday, 10 – 11 a.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with instructor Shirley Murphy, interval-training sessions where fast and slow rhythms and resistance training are combined to tone and sculpt the body while burning fat. Check out the website at www.far mingtonzumba.com. Info: 505.599.1184 JAZZERCISE Monday/Wednesday/Friday/S aturday, 8:30 a.m. Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Jazzercise Dancing Days are here! Come see us at the Farmington Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road (next to Ricketts Park). Start for $0 - plus get unlimited classes for only $33 per month – check or credit card. Cardio, Strength, Stretch, Fun! This is your hour – come try your first class free! Info: 505.320.5364, 505.599.1184, or visit www.jazzercise.com LIONS POOL 405 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.599.1187 for more information ADULT SWIMMING LESSONS 7 – 8:30 a.m., Noon – 1 p.m., 4 – 5:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Adult Swimming Lessons will be offered at Lions Pool during lap swim. Four 30-minute lessons are $20 or eight 30-minute lessons are $35. Info: 505.599.1167. MORNING AQUACISE 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Monday – Friday SENIOR LAP* 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Monday – Friday

SYCAMORE PARK COMMUNITY CENTER 1051 Sycamore St. Call 505.566.2480 for more information DO YOU SAVE BOX TOPS? Please save your box top labels that can be found on office supplies and all General Mills foods. Bring them to the Sycamore Park Community Center to help us earn free recreational supplies! Please call us at 505.566.2480 with any questions. SENIOR FITNESS 9 – 10 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays Senior Fitness is offered at Sycamore Park Community Center through the San Juan College ENCORE program. Info: 505.566.2481 COMMUNITY LINE DANCE CLASS 6 – 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays Floread Hodgson is teaching a free line dancing class each Tuesday from 6 – 7 p.m. at Sycamore Park Community Center. You will enjoy learning different line dances and have a lot of fun along the way. Info: 505.566.2480 FIT CLUB 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays Join Nexal Flores-Baez for the free community Fit Club fitness class at Sycamore Park Community Center. This is a great cardiovascular workout that is sure to get your heart pumping! Info: 505.566.2480 Ext. 8111 SAN JUAN COUNTY VICTIM IMPACT PANEL Doors open 6:30 p.m., presentation begins 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10

Sycamore Park Community Center, 1051 Sycamore St., is home of the San Juan County Impact Panel. Visitors are welcome at no cost. If you need additional information or have questions please contact Carol Kohler, coordinator at 505.334.8111 or 505.566.2480 THANKSGIVING POTLUCK 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 8 Join us at Sycamore Park Community Center for our annual Thanksgiving Potluck. The turkey, mashed potatoes and gravy will be provided, bring a side dish and enjoy a fun evening at the Community Center. Info: 505.566.2480 FARMINGTON MUSEUM 3041 E. Main St. Call 505.599.1174 for more information www.farmingtonmuseum.org FARMINGTON MUSEUM EXHIBIT TOURS By appointment Let an experienced docent at the Farmington Museum be your host for guided tours of the permanent and visiting exhibits. Tours are FREE and available to the public by appointment. Any size group is welcome! Call 505.599.1169 for more information about the Museum’s current exhibits or to schedule a guided tour. OJO DE DIOS (EYE OF GOD) ADULTS’ CRAFT WORKSHOP 2 – 4 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4 Have you ever made a basic Ojo de Dios with two popsicle sticks and some yarn? Join us at the Farmington Museum for a workshop on how to create a more complex Ojo de Dios weaving. This workshop is for anyone 16 years and older. Space is limited and the cost $2 per person. Registration is required and can be completed by registering online at fmtn.org/museums, under the quick links tab on the right, or by coming into the museum. For more infor mation call 505.599.1169. RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER In Animas Park off Browning Parkway Call 505.599.1422 for more information Hours: Tuesday-Saturday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday 1 – 4 p.m. Please note that Tuesday Birders begin at 9 a.m., October through March. BIRD WATCHING 8 – 10 a.m. Tuesdays Join Donna Thatcher, Education Specialist, and other birders for bird watching from the Riverside Nature Center and a leisurely walk of 1 to 2 miles in Animas and Berg par ks. Info: 505.599.1422 BROWN BAG BIRDING Noon – 1 p.m.

Thursdays Bring your lunch and join Riverside Nature Center staff and volunteers in the obser vation room to watch wildlife as we eat. Info: (505) 599-1422

FALL NAVAJO SONG & DANCE Oct. 12 Come to the Farmington Indian Center for a fun social event closing out the local Navajo Nation fair season. Info: 505.327.6296

BOTANICAL ART OF O.M. CLARK EXHIBIT Through Oct. 31 Original, colored, botanical illustrations of Ora M. Clark, from the Farmington Museum collection, will be on display at the Riverside Nature Center in Animas Park off Browning Parkway. Ora M. Clark was a teacher in Aztec during the 1940s and 1950s, and spent his summers studying and drawing the native plants of the Southwest. He started the plant collections and lists in several national monuments, and left a fine collection of plants and art to the University of New Mexico. Info: 505.599.1422

PIÑON HILLS GOLF COURSE 2101 Sunrise Parkway 505.326.6066 for more information

FRIENDS OF THE NATURE CENTER FALL GATHERING 6 - 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11 The Friends of the Nature Center support the programs, activities, and development of facilities at the Riverside Nature Center, and are kept abreast of all the new plans and developments. The fall gathering is a great time to join, or to renew your membership, as well as to enjoy food and fellowship with other members. New and renewing members get a coupon for a special discount at all Museum stores during the next week. Come find out what was accomplished during the summer, as well as future plans, and enjoy views of whatever wildlife comes in view outside our windows. Info: 505. 599.1422 GARDEN VOLUNTEERS DAY 8 a.m. – Noon Saturday, Oct. 12 Would you like to learn more about herbs, native plants, and xeriscape landscaping, or do you just enjoy gardening? Come to the Riverside Nature Center and help prepare the Nature Center Xeriscape Demonstration Gardens for fall as staff and volunteers groom the gardens, update the signs, and enjoy working together. There are tasks for everyone, whatever your skills or physical abilities. Info: 505.599.1422 FARMINGTON INDIAN CENTER 100 W. Elm St Call 505.327.6296 for more information FARMINGTON INDIAN CENTER RESTAURANT Breakfast – 8 – 10:15 a.m. Lunch – 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. Open Tuesday – Thursday Enjoy Navajo cuisine, meet new and old friends, and enjoy hot, fresh, meals. See our website for monthly menus! www.fmtn.org Info: 505.327.6296

PIÑON HILLS GOLF TOURNAMENT – MONSTER DAY 666 Saturday, Nov. 2 Info: 505.326.6066 or www.pinonhillsgolf.com HISTORIC DOWNTOWN FARMINGTON MAIN STREET FALL ART WALK 5 – 9 p.m. Oct. 11 In Historic Downtown Farmington, coordinated by the Farmington Downtown Association, and sponsored by Parks, Recreation, and Cultural Affairs. Come Downtown and enjoy the fall with art receptions and open houses at many Downtown locations. While you’re downtown to appreciate the art, take some time to enjoy all that Downtown Farmington has to offer. Art Walk maps will be available at any of the participating downtown locations. For more information, call 505.599.1419.

SPECIAL EVENTS DUMPSTER WEEKEND 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday & Sunday, Oct. 19 & 20 This event is for Farmington residents only and is brought to you by Farmington Clean & Beautiful. Proof of Farmington residency is required. This semi-annual event is located in Berg Park at the intersection of San Juan Boulevard and Scott Avenue. Bring your yard trimmings, metal, household non-hazardous trash, and yard waste from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Do not bring items such as motor oil, paint, liquids of any kind, air conditioning units, tires, batteries, cement, bricks, or Russian Olive and Pyracantha trimmings – they make the mulch unusable. Please keep your yard trimmings to 5 inches or less in diameter and free of any foreign objects. Info: 505.599.1426. ROAD APPLE RALLY 8 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 5 Annual Mountain Bike Race and tour offers pro/experts, veterans and beginners a test of skill on a 30-mile single- and double-loop course through canyons and arroyos near San Juan College in Farmington, N.M. Race registration deadline is Friday, Oct. 4. Info: 505.599.1140 or www.roadapplerally.com.


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, October 4, 2013

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*Offerappliesonlytosingle-receiptqualifyingpurchases.Nointerestwillbechargedonpromopurchaseandequalmonthlypa aymentsarerequiredequalto5.556%ofinitialpromopurchaseamountuntilpromoispaidinfull.Theequal monthlypa aymenttw willberoundedtothenexthighestdollarandmaybehigherthantheminimumpa aymentthattw wouldberequiredifthepurchasewasanon-promotionalpurchase.Regularaccounttermsapplytonon-promotionalpurchases. For new accounts: Purchase APR is 29.9 9%; Minimum Interest Charge is $2. E xisting cardholders should see their credit card agreement for their applicable terms. Subject to credit approval. †-NAREKQOLQN?D=OAOAT?HQ@A@ =JJKP>A?KI>EJA@SEPD=JUKPDANLNKIKPEKJKN@EO?KQJP!EO?KQJPKB BANOAT?HQ@A1AILQN-A@E? ÄŽ " T PNAIA3=HQA 0EIIKJO A=QP U/AOP=J@ODHAU0HAALI=P PNAOOOAPO ĹƒKKNIK@AHOKN?HA=N=J?AEPAIO O=HAOP = T BQNJEPQNALNKPA?PEKJLH=JO S=NN=JP U @AHERAN U KNOAN RE?A?D=NCAHPDKQCDARAN ULNA?=QPEKJEOP =GAJ ANNKNOEJLNE?A=J@KNOLA?EĹ‚?=PEKJI=UK??QNEJLNEJP4ANAOAN RAPDANECDPPK?KNNA?P=JUOQ?DANNKNO%KIA0PKNAO=NAEJ@ALAJ@AJPHUKSJA@=J@KLAN=PA@@ALKOEPAMQ=HPK=J@=J=IKQJPAMQ=HPK0=HAO1= T=J@@AHERAN U?D=NCAO=NA NAMQENA@BKN=HHĹ‚J=J?A@LQN?D=OAO=J@I=UJKP>AAHECE>HABKNPDEO?NA@EPLNKIKPEKJ0""01,/"#,/!" 1&)0ˆ!QN=>HAJ@HAJ@A@)A=PDANQLDKHOPAN ULNK@Q?POBA=PQNA=OA=PEJC=NA=I=@AQLKB=?KI>EJ=PEKJKB-KHUQNAPD=JA=J@ KN-3 -KHU?KP PKJ =J@=PHA=OP)A=PDAN0D=REJCOSEPD= OGEHHBQHHUI=P?DA@?KI>EJ=PEKJKB-KHU?KP PKJ=J@-KHUQNAPD=JA=J@ KN-3 ARAN U SDANAAHOAÄŞ ODHAU%KIA0PKNAO )P@" TLENAO


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