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JUNE 28, 2013

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VOL. 3 NO. 39

‘Spice’ crackdown

Local smoke shops closed after drug bust DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

hammed Asi, allegedly the owner of the shops. The local busts were part of a DEA nationwide crackdown on synthetic drugs, such as “spice,” which is what was allegedly found and removed from the smoke shops. “Spice” is a synthetic form of marijuana and is sold under a variety of different names. “These products contain dried, shredded plant material and chemical additives that are responsible for their psychoactive (mind-altering) effects,” according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Despite “spice” being marketed as a “safe” legal alternative to marijuana, it is not legal in New Mexico, and the DEA “has designated the five active

An 18-month investigation by the Region II Narcotics Task Force came to a head Wednesday, June 26, when agents from the DEA, U.S. Marshall and local police searched several smoke shops and shut them down. “This investigation started with us and ended with them,” Region II Agent Jeff Browning said. Search warrants were executed shortly after 7 a.m. at the Rollet Smoke Shop, 1010 Highway 516, the Rollet Smoke Shop 2, 4276 Highway 64, UPN Smoke, 5645 Highway 64, and VIP Smokeshop, 4225 Highway 64. The Farmington Police SWAT Team also executed a A DEA agent leaves the Rollet Smoke Shop 2, at 4276 U.S. 64 in Kirtland, with two bags of evidence from a June 26 search warrant at the home of Mo- * drugs A15 search of the building. It is believed the bags contain “spice.” – Photo by Debra Mayeux

Burn restrictions updated

Drought spurs more restrictions prior to July 4th holiday LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune The area is experiencing severe drought conditions, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. Because of this drought, the San Juan County, Farmington, Bloomfield, state and federal entities have adopted burn and fireworks restrictions to prevent wild fires. The State of New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Related Story Natural Resources Department, Forestry Division, A9 and the State Forester have placed a Stage 1 no-burn restriction on all non-municipal, non-federal, and non-tribal lands in the county. The Bureau of Land Management also has issued a Stage 1

* restrictions

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Campaign finance

Council agrees to follow state, federal guidelines DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

included limiting contributions, public financing and reporting of campaign contributions. The issue originally was raised by Councilor Jason Sandel who said he would like to see “open, fair and free elections,” where individuals and, more particularly, newcomers would have a chance to get elected. He thought the

A campaign finance ordinance has not been finalized or approved by the Farmington City Council despite it being on the June 25 agenda for adoption. There were a number of questions involving the ordinance, which was drafted by City Attorney Jay Burnham. The questions

* guidelines

Child found

Inside

Redwine remains recovered

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50¢

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Calendar.......................................A4 Editorial ........................................A6 Freedom Days..............................A9 Pawsitively Pets .........................A10 Pets of the Week ........................A11 PRCA Tracks..............................A12

New animal shelter

Council discusses cost overruns, additions to project budget DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune There really are no apples-toapples comparisons between the money spent to build a new animal shelter and the original project design in 2006, according to Farmington City Councilor Jason Sandel. Sandel said the Council was never given the opportunity to decide on how much money would be spent on the development of a shelter, nor were Councilors allowed to determine how a $500,000 donation would be used in the new facility. Sandel also pointed out that the building is $300,000 over budget. This came during a June 25 shelter presentation given to the Council by City Manager Rob Mayes, “I think we continue to show numbers in very deRelated Story ceptive kinds of ways,” Sandel said. A7 The presentation by Mayes showed the total amount of the building including an upgraded HVAC system and “Cadillac” cages for animals, paid for by The Pet Project, a non-profit organization

that raised money to assist with construction of a new shelter. The costs and payouts, according to Sandel, were manipulated to make it look like the building was on target. “There are a variety of shell games associated with these funds. At the end of the day I want it to be known that I take exception that when we knew this project was overbudget that this Council wasn’t consulted and we, unilaterally, as a city said we want The Pet Project to pay for cages,” he said, pointing out that the city is dipping into the contingency fund to pay for a $300,000 overage on

* shelter

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Red Cross Real Heroes Sports.........................................A13 Real Estate.................................A17 Business.....................................A19 Classifieds..................................A20 Games........................................A22 Movie Listings ............................A23

Cutler recognized for service to community

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE seven-day forecast FRIDAY

SATURDAY

99/61

101/62

Isolated T-Storms Rise Set 5:56 a.m. 8:35 p.m.

Sun

SUNDAY

97/59

Isolated T-Storms

96/60

Isolated T-Storms

Rise Set 5:57 a.m. 8:35 p.m. Sun

Sun

MONDAY

Partly Cloudy

Rise Set 5:57 a.m. 8:35 p.m. Sun

Rise Set 5:58 a.m. 8:35 p.m. Sun

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

94/58

Partly Cloudy Rise Set 5:58 a.m. 8:35 p.m. Sun

THURSDAY

92/56

90/55

Partly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

Rise Set 5:59 a.m. 8:35 p.m.

Sun

Rise Set 5:59 a.m. 8:35 p.m.

restrictions restriction. “Building, maintaining, attending or using fire, campfire, charcoal, coal, or wood stoves are prohibited except in the developed recreation areas,” said Bill Papich, BLM spokesman. Picnic areas at Angel Peak scenic area south of Bloomfield allow building fires in the metal ring fire pits. Other acts that are prohibited under the BLM and forestry fire restrictions include smoking, except within enclosed vehicles, buildings or at developed recreational sites, and the use of fireworks on federal public lands. ATVs and dirt bikes must have approved spark arresters, and driving off-road is prohibited. “We don’t want anyone driving around any flammable materials, including grass,” said Papich. “If you’re parked on the grass, it can ignite the grass because the (vehicle) is hot.”

Chainsaws and motorcycles also must have spark arresters. Welding or using a torch with an open flame is prohibited unless in an area that is cleared of flammable materials within a 20-foot diameter. As far as oil and gas operations, Papich said designated smoking areas must be approved by the crew supervisor or “you can only smoke in your vehicle.” Fire extinguishers must be at all worksites and in all vehicles, and one crew member must be the designated fireguard. “This person can be a general worker or an immediate supervisor on a job site who continuously looks out for fires,” Papich said. The BLM is testing the vegetation’s moisture levels every day to determine the effective fire restrictions. The city of Bloomfield

has issued very similar fire restrictions, because the city has “determined that extreme fire danger exists within the city.” according to a city ordinance Under a no-burn ordinance the city of Bloomfield has ordered the following burn restrictions on public and private property until further notice: • Open burning of any type • Sale and use of all fireworks • Use of barbecue grills and pits using charcoal or wood • Use of outdoor fire pits, fireplaces, and fire rings using wood fuel • Use of luminaries and candles outside of buildings • Use of any open flame or smoking on public property • Discarding of cigarettes from vehicles The ordinance also states



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“any individual or business conducting any welding and/or cutting operation outside a building on any public or private property shall have adequate fire extinguishers, water hoses, or other fire suppression appliances readily available. Unincorporated areas in San Juan County are also under strict burn and fireworks restrictions. “Smoking, fireworks, open burning, and open fires are prohibited,” according to a San Juan County notice. There are, however, exceptions to the restrictions, such as smoking within buildings or vehicles with ashtrays is permitted. Campfires are permitted only where cooking or heating devices use kerosene, white gas, or propane as a fuel in an improved camping area that is cleared of flammable vegetation for at least 30 feet or has a water

source, according to the county notice. The city of Farmington was one of the first areas to report a fireworks-caused fire, because of drought conditions, and the city had issued one citation for possession of illegal fireworks as of June 25. The fireworks-caused fire was started with legal fireworks, according to Fire Chief Terry Page. “The homeowner, after the fire, brought us his legal fireworks and asked us to take them away and dispose of them,” Page said. The city of Farmington is continuing to spread the word about the dry conditions and limits placed on use of fireworks. “We are on the campaign trail,” Page said. “We are trying to get the word out and will continue to do that. Patrols are still active and going out nightly.” In Farmington, only cer-

tain fireworks are legal. They are: • Ground and hand held sparkling and smoke devices • Cone fountains • Crackling devices • Cylindrical Fountains • Ground Spinners • Toy smoke devices • Illuminating torches These fireworks must be used in a safe area without vegetation and with a water source nearby. Anyone who is in violation of this or found to be using illegal fireworks will be found guilty of a misdemeanor and will be fined up to $500 or imprisoned for up to 90 days, according Farmington city ordinance. Although certain fireworks are banned within Farmington city limits, the public Fireworks Display at 9:25 p.m. on Wednesday, July 3 at Sullivan Hill is still scheduled to occur.


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

calendar ONGOING EVENTS BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been noted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, located in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for leisurely walk of 1to 2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org/museum GREASE, OUTDOOR SUMMER THEATER Come experience live local theater in a beautiful natural sandstone amphitheater. Performances are held Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., June 20 through Aug. 3, at Lions Wilderness Park. Concessions available onsite or bring a picnic and eat before the show. Information: 877.599.3331 or www.fmtn.org/sandstone SUMMER TERRACE SERIES The Farmington Museum hosts outdoor concerts Saturday nights throughout the summer. Concerts begin at 6 p.m. and are held at the Farmington Museum on the picturesque terrace next to the river at the Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St., through August. Call for performance schedule. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org/museum MUSIC IN THE WINERY’S COURTYARD Enjoy live music & great wine at Wines of the San Juan from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. ever y Sunday from May through September 22. Wines of the San Juan is located at 233 Hwy. 511 in Turley, N.M. Information: 505.632.0879 o r www.winesofthesanjuan.com TGIF Grab some lunch and listen to live music and relax on your lunch break, at Orchard Park in Downtown Farmington, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Friday after noon, June through July 29. Three Rivers Eatery & Brew House will sell burgers and hotdogs. TGIF is a Farmington Downtown Association and City of Farmington Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Affairs

event. Information: 505.599.1419

TUES JULY 2 – SUN JULY 7 THE 26TH ANNUAL FREEDOM DAYS CELEBRATION The Fourth of July is celebrated with a variety of special events throughout Farmington, N.M. Festivities include fireworks, Brass Band concert, nighttime parade and Party in the Park. Information: 505.326.7602 or 800.448.1240 or www.farmingtonnm.org.

THUR JULY 4 ANNUAL FREEDOM DAYS SKATEBOARD COMPETITION Come by the skate park at Brookside Park for a free skateboarding competition hosted by the Sycamore Park Community Center to benefit the Sycamore Skate Park. Registration star ts at 11 a.m. and competition is at noon. Information: 505.566.2480

SAT JULY 6 ANNUAL FREEDOM DAYS ICE CREAM SOCIAL From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., cool down at the E3 Children’s Museum & Science Center, 302 N. Orchard Ave., with family entertainment, ice cream sundaes, root beer floats, cold drinks, hot dogs, fun photos, temporary tattoos, wagon rides, a yo-yo contest, face painting and water rocket launching. Buy a raffle ticket to win amazing prizes. All proceeds benefit the Farmington Museum System. Information: 505.599.1425

FRI JULY 12 POETRY PICNIC Bring a picnic supper and eat in the garden at 6 p.m. There will be a program of poetry for about 20 minutes, and then stay to walk in the park and through the Riverside Nature Center Xeriscape Gardens. Information: 505.599.1422 CROWNPOINT RUG AUCTION 300 to 400 hand woven Navajo rugs are auctioned off each month at the Crownpoint Elementary School, 72 miles south of Farmington on Hwy. 371. American Indian arts and crafts vendors will also be onsite. Auction is sponsored by the Crownpoint Rug Weavers Associa-

tion. Rug viewing from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., auction begins at 7 p.m. Information: 505.785.7386, 505.610.6797 and Christinae2011@Live.com

SAT JULY 13 THE ANNUAL ANIMAS RIVER BLUES FESTIVAL Blues, Brews and BBQ at Riverside Park in Aztec from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Information: 505.330.4616 or www.animasriverblues.com

SAT JULY 20 31ST ANNUAL LAND OF ENCHANTMENT ROD RUN From 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., join the Nor thern New Mexico Street Rodders in Historic Downtown Farmington for their annual Rod Run block party. Hot cars under the stars, great entertainment and lots of food! Information: 505.599.1419

WED JULY 24 HEATHER MCGAUGHY CHILDREN’S SUMMER THEATER PRODUCTION Experience live theater performed by local children in the beautiful natural sandstone outdoor amphitheater at Lions Wilderness Park, 5800 College Blvd. Performance starts at 7 p.m. and is the culmination of a summer theater children’s workshop. Information: 505.599.3331 or www.fmtn.org/sandstone

FRI JULY 26 POETRY PICNIC Bring a picnic supper and eat in the garden at 6 p.m. There will be a program of poetry for about 20 minutes and then, stay to walk in the park and through the River side Nature Center Xeriscape Gardens. Information: 505.599.1422

CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, NM 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building: 505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Center Activity Center: 505.566.2288 The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287 50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 – 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. July 6 – Ramblin’ Fever July 13 - Off the Interstate July 20 - Grant & Randy July 27 - The Vintage People 50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. July 17 – Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380 HILLBILLY BAND ENTERTAINS 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. July 11 – Led by Bobbe Bluett Info: 505.599.1380 50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. – noon Friday, July 12 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Discount on your insurance can be good for two to three years, check your policy. Cost: $14; $12 for card carrying AARP Members. Preregistration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Payment is due to the instructor on the day of class.

FRI JULY 26 – SAT JULY 27 THE ANNUAL INDIAN MARKET & FESTIVAL This annual festival includes singing, dancing, food and arts & craft vendors, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. in Berg Park in Farmington. Information: 505.947.3332

ANFN

ON-GOING CLASSES AT THE SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. & 13:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. EXERCISE CLASS – WITH JEAN ELISE 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. or 1 - 2 p.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: 50 cents per session. Are you losing flexibility and want more energy to do the things you enjoy? If so, this class is what you need to get back into a good exercise program. Work at your own level and build up to where you want to be. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. DRAWING & CALLIGRAPHY 9:30 a.m.

Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bring your own materials and learn some new techniques. Call 505.599.1380 for more information. TAI CHI 9:30 a.m. Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Tai Chi is a series of fluid movements that can help with balance, flexibility, and muscle tone. These gentle exercises will leave you feeling refreshed. Free to anyone 50+. Info: 505.599.1390 ZUMBA GOLD 50+ 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Party on the floor with Latin dance music that will make you smile. This exhilarating exercise class will get you moving to the beat. Cost is $2.50 per session. Info: 505.566.2288

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The Tri-City Tribune (USPS 5601) is published weekly by Majestic Media, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401. Periodicals postage paid at Farmington, NM 87401. COPYRIGHT: The entire contents of the Tri-City Tribune are copyright 2013 by Majestic Media. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part 100 W. Apache St. by any means including electronic retrieval systems without the written permisFarmington, NM 87401 sion of the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tri-City Trib505-516-1230 une, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401 Fax: 505-516-1231 Subscription Rates: IF YOUR PAPER IS LATE: The Tri-City Tribune should arrive by 9:00 a.m. each Friday. If it hasn’t, www.tricitytribuneusa.com 52 week subscription $27.85 please call our circulation department at 505-51626 week subscription $15 1230, ext. 205. Mail Subscriptions Rates: The publisher reserves the right to change sub52 week subscription $83.54 scription rates during the term of a subscription Printed on 100% Recycled Paper 26 week subscription $41.77 upon one month’s notice. This notice may be by with Soy-Based Ink. All subscriptions payable in advance. mail to the subscriber, by notice contained in the

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PRESIDENT Don Vaughan 505-516-1230 ext. 204 don@majesticmediausa.com EDITOR/PUBLISHER Cindy Cowan Thiele 505-516-1230 ext. 202 editor@tricitytribuneusa.com REPORTER Debra Mayeux 505-320-6512 debra@tricitytribuneusa.com Lauren Duff 505-608-4400 lauren@tricitytribuneusa.com CIRCULATION Shelly Acosta 505-516-1230 ext. 211 circulation@tricitytribuneusa.com PRODUCTION 505-516-1230 ext.203 Suzanne Thurman suzanne@majesticmediausa.com 505-516-1230 ext.203

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505-215-4559 505-330-6279 505-486-6046 505-947-7872


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Friday, June 28, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

calendar FARMINGTON RECREATION CENTER 1101 Fairgrounds Road Call 505.599.1184 for more information Monday through Friday, noon to 1 p.m., no charge – Walk Laps in the Gym Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to Noon, no charge – Shuffleboard and Ping Pong ZUMBA Wednesday, 7 – 8 p.m. Saturday, 10 – 11 a.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with instructor Shirley Murphy, inter val-training sessions where fast and slow rhythms and resistance training are combined to tone and sculpt the body while burning fat. Check out the website at www.farmingtonzumba.com. Info: 505.599.1184 JAZZERCISE Monday/Wednesday/Friday/S aturday, 8:30 a.m.

Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday/Thursday, 5:30 p.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with Jazzercise, in just 60 minutes you’ll tighten and tone with dance, yoga, Pilates, and kickboxing movements choreographed to fun music. This is your hour. Come try it out – 1st class is free. For more info call 505.320.5364 or 505.599.1184, or visit www.jazzercise.com LIONS POOL 405 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.599.1187 for more information ADULT SWIMMING LESSONS 7 – 8:30 a.m., noon – 1 p.m., 4 – 5:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Adult Swimming Lessons will be offered at Lions Pool during lap swim. Four 30minute lessons are $20; eight 30-minute lessons are $35. Info: 505.599.1167.

MORNING AQUACISE 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Monday – Friday SENIOR LAP* 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Monday – Friday MORNING SPLASHERCISE* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday MORNING ARTHRITIS* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday CROSS POOL* 11:15 am – noon Monday – Friday EVENING AQUACISE 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Aquacise classes, $2 a visit *All adult aquatic exercise classes, $1.50 a visit FARMINGTON AQUATIC CENTER 1151 N. Sullivan Road Call 505.599.1167 for more

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information EARLY BIRD SPLASH 8 – 8:45 a.m. Monday/Wednesday AQUA JOGGER 8 – 8:45 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday Classes are $2.50 a visit SYCAMORE PARK COMMUNITY CENTER 1051 Sycamore St. Call 505.566.2480 for more information DO YOU SAVE BOX TOPS? Please save your box top labels which can be found on office supplies and all General Mills foods. Bring them to the Sycamore Park Community Center to help us earn free recreational supplies. Please call us with any questions at 505.566.2480. BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF SJC Want to help a “Little?” Sycamore Park Community Center is par tnering with Big Brothers Big Sisters. Find out more. Call 505.566.2481 SENIOR FITNESS 9 – 10 a.m. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays Senior Fitness is offered at Sycamore Park Community Center through the San Juan College ENCORE program. Info: 505.566.2481 COMMUNITY LINE DANCE CLASS 6 – 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays Floread Hodgson is teaching a free line dancing class each Tuesday from 6 – 7 p.m. at Sycamore Park Community Center. You will enjoy lear ning different line dances and have a lot of fun along the way. Info: 505.566.2480 FIT CLUB 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays Join Nexal Flores-Baez for the free community Fit Club fitness class at Sycamore Park Community Center. This

is a great cardiovascular workout that is sure to get your heart pumping! Info: 505.566.2480 -8111 SAN JUAN COUNTY VICTIM IMPACT PANEL Doors open 6:30 p.m., presentation begins 7 p.m. Thursday, July 18 Sycamore Park Community Center, 1051 Sycamore St., is home of the San Juan County Impact Panel. Visitors are welcome at no cost. If you need additional information or have questions, please contact Carol Kohler, coordinator at 505.334.8111 or 505.566.2480 COMMUNITY YARD SALE AND CRAFT FAIR 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Get a booth and mark your calendars for Saturday, Sept. 7 Join us for the Sycamore Park Community Yard Sale and Craft Fair. Booths are $10 per table for both the yard sale and craft fair. This will be an outdoor event. Bring the family and enjoy a fun day in the park. Info: 505.566.2480 FARMINGTON MUSEUM 3041 E. Main St. Call 505.599.1174 for more information www.farmingtonmuseum.org FARMINGTON MUSEUM EXHIBIT TOURS By appointment Let an experienced docent at the Farmington Museum be your host for guided tours of the permanent and visiting exhibits. Tours are FREE and available to the public by appointment. Any size group is welcome! Call 505.599.1169 for more information about the Museum’s current exhibits or to schedule a guided tour. SUMMER TERRACE MUSIC SERIES 6 – 7:30 p.m. Saturdays, June – August Join the Farmington Museum at Gateway Park each Saturday evening during the summer months for some live, local entertainment at

our 10th Annual Summer Terrace Music Series. Admission to this program is FREE. Don’t forget your folding chair and dancing shoes. Info: 505.599.1174 July 6 – The Porchlights July 13 – Grant & Randy July 20 – Gypsyfire July 27 – Donny Johnson HANDMADE FINE ART SHOW NOW – Saturday, Sept. 7 Come explore the ar tistic wealth of the Four Corners region at Handmade, the newest temporary art exhibit at the Farmington Museum, 3041 E. Main St. Admission to the exhibit is free. Please call 505.599.1174 for more information. FARMINGTON MUSEUM DOCENT TRAINING FOR AN ADVENTURE IN THE ARTS 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Tuesday, July 9 Current and new Farmington Museum System volunteers are invited to attend docent training for the upcoming An Adventure in the Arts visiting exhibit at the Farmington Museum, 3041 E. Main St. Attendees will learn about the history of modern art, artists featured in the show, and techniques on how to lead tour groups. Lunch will be provided. For more information about becoming a Farmington Museum System volunteer, please call Volunteer Coordinator, Kandy LeMoine at 505.599.1421. HISTORY HIKE – GEYSER SPRING 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Saturday, July 13 On the second Saturday of each month, through September, meet at the Farmington Museum, 3041 E. Main St., for a fun and informative hike that explores the cultural and natural history of the Four Corners region. In July participants will have the opportunity to see the only true geyser in the state of Colorado. Space is limited. Register online at webtrac.fmtn.org or come into the Museum. The cost is $10 per person and includes transpor tation and lunch. This is an adults-only program. Info: 505.599.1169


TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Editorial

Friday, June 28, 2013

A6

E-Mail: editor@tricitytribuneusa.com

Phone: 505-516-1230

Fax: 505-516-1231

SCOTUS decision on gay marriage won’t be last word The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision on the Defense of Marriage Act and California’s Proposition 8, which limited marriage to a man and a woman, will hardly represent the last word on the question. As more state legislatures consider extending marriage to gays and lesbians, opponents of such laws say the next step will be to force churches to recognize the unions and perhaps even perform gay wedding ceremonies. But supporters say the First Amendment would ensure that churches are never forced to perform marriages for gay couples. Will gay marriage undermine the freedom of religious people to recognize only traditional marriage? Can an expansive definition of marriage and the First Amendment coexist? Ben Boychuk and Joel Mathis, the RedBlueAmerica columnists, weigh in. BEN BOYCHUK: No, the First Amendment and same-sex marriage cannot coexist harmoniously. Some-

thing will have to give – and it will start with the freedom of conscience. Here’s why: If the law says there can be no “rational basis” for treating the union between a man and a woman as something unique – if a union between any two (or, perhaps someday, more) consenting adults is a “marriage” – then it really doesn’t matter what your conscience tells you. We don’t prosecute people for holding unpopular beliefs – yet – but the authorities do look askance at discrimination. That’s why we hear so much lately about caterers, photographers, and florists running afoul of several states’ civil rights laws for refusing to do business with gay couples. True, those aren’t churches. But states such as New Jersey and Vermont have already sanctioned church-affiliated organizations for refusing to host same-sex weddings or receptions at their facilities. Freedom of association is also in jeopardy. California’s state senate last month voted

RED & BLUE STATES Joel Mathis & Ben Boychuk

to strip the Boy Scouts of America of its tax-exempt status because the organization won’t allow homosexual leaders. The BSA isn’t a religious group, either, though in recent years churches have been the primary sponsors of scout troops. California’s Democrats don’t care about the Boy Scouts’ First Amendment right to define their membership. And they don’t have particularly high regard for the role the organization plays in shaping boys into responsible adults and good citizens. The Scouts simply don’t conform to the Democrats’ way of thinking, and so they must be punished. Does anyone seriously think churches won’t be punished, too? It’s only a matter of time before what we understand as “freedom of religion” is whittled

down to little more than the freedom to worship whatever deity you choose in a special building one day out of the week. But to actually apply your religious beliefs to the way you live or do business the other six days? Expect no sympathy from the law when it comes to same-sex unions. Such is the price of “equality.” JOEL MATHIS: Liberty is not zero-sum: Me having more doesn’t mean you have less. So it’s sad for anti-marriage conservatives that their cramped-yet-overactive imaginations lead them to panic about the freedoms they’ll lose just because Adam and Steve are finally free to tie the knot. It doesn’t work that way in this country. There’s more than 200 years of the government precedent generally

– but not always, admittedly – deferring to people’s religious beliefs, and letting them apply those beliefs in extreme circumstances. Put it this way: In 2011 the Supreme Court said that Fred Phelps’ Westboro Baptist Church could conduct its ugly anti-gay protests at the funerals of combat veterans. Put it this way: Scientology is tax exempt. Put it this way: Across the country, pharmacists very often use “conscience clauses” to refuse to dispense birth control to young women who wish to obtain it entirely legally. And within the last year, the entire Federal Government has bent over backward – among other contortions – to ensure that young women who work for Catholic charities can access birth control without requiring the church to pay for it. The list can go on, but you get the idea: We Americans work really hard – both in society and government – to allow people to

work and live according to the dictates of their conscience, even if it's a pain for everybody else. That’s not going to change simply because gay marriage is ascendant. Will it take a couple of years and a few lawsuits to suss that out? Probably. It was ever thus in this country. Gay marriage follows a long, beloved tradition in this country: Extending the freedom to enjoy life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, to ever more people. America has followed that path for more than two centuries without stepping on the freedoms of people who came before. This time will be no different. The sky is not falling. Ben Boychuk is associate editor of the Manhattan Institute’s City Journal. Joel Mathis is a contributing editor to The Philly Post. Reach them at bboychuk@city-journal.org, and joelmmathis@gmail.com, at www.facebook.com/benandjoel, or on Twitter: @joelmathis.

My favorite Fourth is coming right up I shouldn’t admit this. I might regret it later. But I have to tell you: The Fourth of July has never been my favorite holiday. There are several reasons, not one of which has anything to do with patriotism or the lack of it. Growing up in the ’50s, in the rural South, children were taught that we were blessed to be born in the greatest nation on Earth, and we should never take that gift for granted. I never took it for granted. I swear. I loved my country with my whole heart and wished it the happiest of birthdays, with many happy returns. But here’s the thing. I flat-out hated having to go to the annual Hatch Mill company picnic, a Fourth of July “Happy Birthday, God Bless America,” fried chicken

SHARON RANDALL SCRIPPS HOWARD and fireworks extravaganza. At least, I think that’s what it was called. Words to that effect. My stepfather worked for the mill. He was a weaver, and proud of it. The weavers ran the looms. When the looms broke down, the fixers fixed them. Then the weavers went back to weaving. It was a symbiotic arrangement, mostly amiable, except on the Fourth of July. On that date, the mill would host a picnic and the mill hands would gather with their families to eat fried chicken and cheer for the fireworks and pull with all their hearts for one side

or the other, weavers or fixers, in a do-or-die, noholds-barred, last-man-standing tug-of-war. That was fine. But it was hot, as my granddad would say, “Hotter than the devil’s toenails, or a firecracker in a feather bed on the Fourth of July.” And I didn’t know any of the other kids, so I had nobody to play with, except my brothers. I already had to play with them too much at home. So I’d keep to myself, swinging on the swings, watching the big boys throw chicken bones and firecrackers at each other. That was

mildly entertaining, until they’d get bored and start throwing them at me. I put up with it year after year for two reasons: One, I felt it was my patriotic duty; and two, my mother made me go. That changed the summer I was 10, when my stepfather, a big man in size and stature, lost his footing in the tugof-war and twisted his ankle so badly he was on crutches for six months. They gave his job to one of the fixers. That Christmas, Santa didn’t make it to our house. But at least we never had to go to that company picnic again. My children grew up on the fogbound coast of Northern California. Every Fourth of July we’d bundle up against the cold, build a bonfire on the beach, do a picnic and watch fireworks with

other shivering families. I’d spend most of the evening trying to keep the kids from catching on fire or getting washed out to sea. I liked it better than the Hatch Mill picnic, but it was still not my favorite holiday. Now my children are grown and we live miles apart. Like many families, it’s hard for us all to get together for holidays. Last summer, my youngest and his wife and their 2 year old came to Las Vegas to spend the Fourth with my husband and me. We barbecued and watched fireworks from our backyard. Then, while his mom and dad and Papa Mark swam in the pool, Randy buried his face in my neck and fell asleep. That was my favorite Fourth so far. This year, on the Fourth of July, my husband’s oldest

boy is getting married in California. We are taking the week off and renting a big house where our children and grandchildren will join us. We’ll sleep under the same roof, eat at the same table, celebrate the wedding of two beautiful people, and watch fireworks under the same sky. It will be absolutely my favorite holiday. And I might not even have to dodge chicken bones or firecrackers. Just when you think the best is past, life will tap you on the shoulder and say, “Watch this!” Here’s wishing you and yours a happy Fourth of July. It really is a great country, isn’t it? Sharon Randall can be contacted at P.O. Box 777394, Henderson NV 89077 or at www.sharonrandall.com.


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Friday, June 28, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

shelter the project. “The decision was made without me or anyone else on the Council in the loop.” Councilor Gayla McCulloch, who hosted a Pet Project fundraising event at her home, said she doesn’t believe the Council was left out of the loop. “This is no surprise to me. It was well-coordinated in many of these meetings,” she said. “I’m not surprised by this and I’m not upset by it. The way The Pet Project’s money is being spent does not surprise me.” Phil Morin, a spokesman for The Pet Project, stood up and said the organization raised $556,000 in donations and pledges for the project, and that staff worked with The Pet Project as a liaison of the community. The money, he said, would be earmarked to assist in cost overruns. “It was brought to our attention that there was a limit as to what could be spent from the city,” Morin said. “We wanted to make sure there would be sufficient funds – that we would have a facility that we could be just as proud of as with any of our other city projects.” Morin said the communication between The Pet Project and the city was “open,” and this allowed the non-profit to pay “for the

Crematory coming

City Council OKs addition to new shelter DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune There will be an animal crematory in Farmington’s Regional Animal Shelter when it opens later this year. The Farmington City Council unanimously approved a $75,000 expenditure to purchase a crematory and build it into the intake garage located at the back of the building. The Council received a presentation from City Manager Rob Mayes on the crematory during the June 25 Council meeting. Mayes said he has wanted a crematory in the shelter since 2006, when he was asked to look at the feasibility of building a new animal shelter. “The response was ‘We don’t want one.’ The animal advocates would never allow

it,” Mayes said. However, when asked by Councilor Jason Sandel, he could not recall who it was who told him that. Mayes said it was “former staff.” Mayes stated that Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs Director Cory Styron and Animal Shelter Consultant Marcy Eckhardt brought it to his attention recently. Eckhardt actually wrote the crematory proposal, and on April 1 gave it to Assistant City Manager Bob Campbell. In that proposal, she pointed out that when the public learned about animals being dumped in the landfill, there would be an outcry for an alternative plan. She proposed the crematory be included in the new shelter and outlined an annual cost savings of $25,000 – the amount the city pays Waste Manage-

ment for animal dumping fees. “It is a proposal that has the support of the animal advocates and the staff,” Mayes said. “It’s an absolute no brainer financially as well. It is a two-year pay back.” During the Council meeting, Councilor Mary Fischer asked about the cost of dumping ashes, which also are heavy. Styron said there would be a savings, despite the weight, because ashes are not classified as “special waste.” Also during the discussion, Mayes said The Pet Project would be willing to raise the funds to purchase the crematory. “We have commitments coming forward to help with the crematory,” said Phil Morin, spokesman for The Pet Project. Councilor Jason Sandel

stated that the city should pay for the crematory, and the rest of the Council agreed. Mayor Tommy Roberts wanted to know if there were any negatives to having a crematory. General Services Director Julie Baird said negative factors include exhaust coming out through the roof. “We want to keep the function as private as possible; it is not something people would see driving down Browning Parkway,” she said. Fischer pointed out that with the high volume of animals euthanized at the shelter, the crematory might have to run 24 hours a day. “I spoke with the owner of the pet crematory in existence now. His concerns were not being afraid of competition. He applauds the fact we are thinking in terms of cremation. He does

50 to 75 a month. We might be looking at 50 to 75 a day,” Fischer said, asking if someone would be kept on the premises 24 hours a day to run the crematory. While applauding the concept, Fischer said she wanted to know what the city would be buying – the model, its size and its capacity. “This is a little casual, ‘Give us $75,000 and we’ll get you a crematory.’ I want to know what we are buying,” she said. Mayes stated that staff needed to know now if they could plan for the “rough end.” The Council agreed to the proposal, but asked Mayes to come back with a model at a later date. He said the city would issue a request for proposal, which would later come before the Council.

upgrades.” Sandel thanked Morin for making a point the Councilor was trying to express – the point that the city put a $4 million cap on the project without asking the Council. “I for one would have liked to have the opportunity to

have the debate as to whether we should limit this project, and that has been my complaint for the past six month,” he said. Mayes said it really had to do with meeting the objective of functionality and quality. “You look at all your

resources at the time. The Pet Project said they could help out with $500,000. They said, ‘Let’s do cages.’ It’s easier to raise money for cages than for air conditioning,” Mayes said. Councilor Dan Darnell added he would not have supported a more expensive project, such as the $7.1 million shelter originally proposed at a site on Andrea Drive. “We are spending $3.6 million on a community center on the south side for kids. I could not in good conscience support a $7.1 million project. I think this has been a great process, an open process. I thought we were going to come in around $4 million.” A design developed by BDA Architects, a firm that designs veterinary hospitals, gave a cost estimate of anywhere between $3.5 million and $3.9 million. This estimate did not include the HVAC system or the upgraded cages, which General Services Director Julie Baird

said “were put into another category.” When the project was bid out, Jaynes Corporation came in with the low bid of a little more than $3.3 million. After the bid was awarded city staff discovered that the upgraded HVAC was needed at an additional cost of $871,911. Then there was a need to upgrade the cages at a cost of $432,000. There also was $100,000 in landscaping that was not included in the construction bid, and there was $21,000 needed to pay for upgrades to the water lines. Another cost not included in the bid was some $9,000 for fiber in the building. All of this brought the grand total of the project of $4.6 million, according to Mayes. Morin said The Pet Project would buy computers and furniture for the building as well. Sandel wanted to know why all of these additional numbers were not included in the project from the be-

ginning. “That is not usually part of the bid itself,” Baird said. Sandel asked if the building was more expensive. “We’re on budget in terms of the only real budget we have – the contract. The project is progessing beautifully for those who have seen it,” Mayes said. “Why is the building more expensive?” Sandel asked. “I don’t have an answer for that,” Mayes said. “The building is more expensive than what we anticipated it to be,” Sandel pressed. “We are still within an ability to hit that amount of money we funded, with The Pet Project’s help on cages,” Baird said. “Therein lies the linchpin,” Sandel responded. Roberts said the bid from Jaynes exceeded the estimates, and he wanted to know if the project was on budget and would remain on budget through completion. Mayes said it would.


A8

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

27TH ANNUAL

FREEDOM DAYS ✧ SCHEDULE July 2 - 7, 2013

TUESDAY, JULY 2 7pm – 8:30pm

Freedom Days Hi Yo, Silver….Away! Totah Theater Join us as we celebrate the imminent release of the Lone Ranger featuring Shiprock Pinnacle. Winners of the Kids’ Lone Ranger Movie Poster Contest announced, free popcorn, free Lone Ranger masks for kids and enjoy watching episodes of the original Lone Ranger TV series. Farmington Convention & Visitors Bureau, Shiprock Chapter & Navajo Nation Tourism Department – sponsors

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3 Food Fair and FREE Brass Band Concert Gateway Park Featuring Kissmah Brass Band plus a variety of other musical acts. Great food available for purchase from fantastic food vendors. Enjoy a festive concert and stay for the fireworks. Best view in town!

6pm - 9pm

Millennium Insurance Agency – sponsor

Citizens Bank, Dugan Productions in honor of Tom Dugan’s father, Sherman Dugan, Sr. born on July 4th & Northern Edge Navajo Casino – sponsors

simulcast on KWYK 94.9 fm

THURSDAY, JULY 4 11am - 5:30pm games

FRIDAY, JULY 5 10am - 6pm

Outdoor Summer Theater – “Grease” Lions Wilderness Park

8pm

SATURDAY, JULY 6 8am - Dusk

10am - 6pm

11am - 3pm

5pm – 7pm

Sycamore Park Community Center – sponsor

4pm

8pm

Community Patriotic Concert and Ice Cream Social First United Methodist Church 808 N. Monterey Ave First United Methodist Youth, Blue Moon Diner & Sonic – sponsors

Outdoor Summer Theater – “Grease” Lions Wilderness Park

Gem & Mineral Show Farmington Civic Center San Juan County Gem and Mineral Society sponsor

Ice Cream Social E3 Children’s Museum 302 N. Orchard Ice cream eating contest, musical entertainment, hay rides and more! Museum Foundation and Creamland Dairies – sponsors

History Makers Hall of Fame Farmington Civic Center Opening Reception 5 - 6pm, Induction of Honorees 6 - 7pm City of Farmington, Farmington Chamber of Commerce & Farmington Convention & Visitors Bureau– sponsors

Papa John’s Pizza - sponsor

Skateboard Competition Brookside Park at Party in the Park Registration 11am Competition begins at noon.

Freedom Fours Co-ed Volleyball Tournament Brookside Park Piedra Vista High School Volleyball Team – sponsor

Papa John’s Pizza Eating Contest Brookside Park at Party in the Park Registration 11am to 2pm Benefiting San Juan County Special Olympics.

11am

Gem & Mineral Show Farmington Civic Center San Juan County Gem and Mineral Society – sponsor

Party in the Park - Brookside Park Food, entertainment, vendors, live music, & activities for the entire family! KWYK 94.9fm & BHP Billiton– sponsors

3pm

CNJ Oilfield Service LLC, Farmington, Aztec, Bloomfield and Central Consolidated School Districts and San Juan College - sponsors

Fireworks Display – Sullivan Hill

9:25pm

✧✧

THURSDAY, JULY 4

Freedom Days Electric Light Parade Main Street, Downtown Farmington

9pm

8pm

Outdoor Summer Theater – “Grease” Lions Wilderness Park

10am - 5pm

Gem & Mineral Show Farmington Civic Center

SUNDAY, JULY 7 San Juan County Gem and Mineral Society sponsor

Friends of Freedom Days 2013 Farmington Municipal Schools San Juan County Commissioner Margaret McDaniel San Juan County Commissioner Jack Fortner San Juan County, Ziems Ford Corners, Los Hermanitos Washburns Accounting, San Juan College, Waste Management Flowing Water Navajo Casino, Octopus Car Washes

Information: Farmington Convention & Visitors Bureau 505-326-7602


AND

MM LIFE LEISURE FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

27th Celebration begins July 2 and runs through July 7 LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Barbecue, swimming, and watching fireworks displays are a few of the activities people associate with the Fourth of July. The public has a chance to participate in patriotic activities during the 27th Annual Freedom Days, organized by the Farmington Convention and Visitors Bureau. From ice cream socials to an Independence Day golf tournament, Freedom Days offers activities for everyone in the community. Fireworks Display For those interested in watching the dazzling fireworks display in the night sky, San Juan College is the perfect viewing place. The fireworks will be set off from Sullivan Hill and the show will begin at 9:25 p.m. on Wednesday, July 3. The Farmington Police Department will patrol the campus and the Farmington Fire Department will set up a command post. While the public is encouraged to come out and enjoy the display, the following list explains the restrictions for those viewing the fireworks on the college’s campus. • No alcoholic beverages • No personal fireworks • No outside vending • No barbecue grills or open fires • No motorized off-road vehicles • No bicycles, skateboards, rollerblades, etc., on sidewalks or internal walkways • No fundraising activities or organizations • No access to campus buildings Some roads and entrances into the campus will be closed, so pay attention to detour signs and obey officers directing traffic.

s y a Annual Freedom D

Portable toilets will be provided by the city of Farmington. To view a map of the campus that shows areas best for viewing, go to www.sanjuancollege.edu. Water balloon fight Water balloons will be soaring through the sky once again this Fourth of July. The Second Annual Fourth of July Water Balloon Fight was created as an alternative to shooting fireworks, because of the dry conditions affecting the area. The balloon launch will be at 2 p.m. at Brookside Park and everyone is welcome to attend. “It’s been a really dry year here, even more so than last year, and I’m really afraid of people being reckless with fireworks, and so this is a good way to spread the message of throwing water balloons rather than fireworks,” said American Classifieds Sales Manager Allen Elmore, who is one of the event coordinators. Last year, there were more than 7,000 water balloons thrown at the event. This year, Elmore said they are hoping to provide more than 10,000 balloons. Individuals who pick up the most balloon pieces after the water balloon fight will be awarded various waterrelated prizes. American Classifieds, Zebra’s Sports Grill, Defined Fitness, Sam’s Club, and the Farmington Convention and Visitors Bureau are sponsoring the event. Elmore said they are still looking for event volunteers. Anyone who wishes to volunteer, call Zebra’s at 505.599.9181. Skateboard Competition If interested in showing off skating tricks, the Sycamore Park Community Center is hosting the free Skate Park Showcase Skateboard Competition in Brook-

side Park on Thursday, July 4. Registration begins at 11 a.m. and the competition kicks off at noon. The competition will consist of three age divisions: Ages 10 and under, 11 years old through 14 years old, and 15 years old and up. Prizes will be awarded to the top three contestants in each age division. Contestants must sign a waiver to participate in the competition. For additional information on the skate competition, contact Sycamore Park Community Center at 505.566.2480. Firecracker Fun Festival To continue the patriotic spirit the day after the Fourth of July, the public is invited to attend the Firecracker Fun Festival from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, July 5, at Brookside Pool on Dustin Avenue. Outdoor swimming, relay water games, face painting, and T-shirt tie-dyeing will be available for children and their families. “It’s something we want to do for the kids during the holiday, and we want to bring the families out so everyone can have fun,” Farmington Aquatic Center Administrative Coordinator Shjan Sanisya- Spencer said. The event is organized

by the city of Farmington and entry cost is $3 per person. String Slingers and Ice Cream Children will have an opportunity to learn yo-yo tricks from Yo-Yo Man Extraordinaire Luke Renner. The yo-yo workshop will be from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Friday, July 5, at the E3 Children’s Museum & Science Center, 302 N. Orchard Ave. This workshop is in preparation for the 9th Annual Yo Down Show Down at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 6, at the children’s museum. “I’ve had some repeated contestants who competed in the first year and showed up and could only do a few tricks, but they have worked on it, and by practicing they were able to actually come back and win the contest. That is amazing,” said Renner, who became interested in playing with yo-yos in junior high school. “I have been performing for 20 years and it is just fun.” Registration will begin at 1 p.m. on July 6, and all ages and skill-levels are welcome to compete. Make sure to show up at the competition with a sweet tooth, because the children’s museum also will host an ice cream social as children show off their yo-yo skills. Renner said the museum will provide a few yo-yos to contestants, but he recommends they also bring their own yo-yos. The yo-yo competition is sponsored by Duncan Toys, Vulto Yo-Yos, YoYoFactory, Yomega, and MagicYoYo. Independence Day Golf Tournament Freedom Days activities also cater to golf lovers, who can play in the Independence Day Best Ball Golf Tournament at 8 a.m. on Saturday, July 6, at Piñon Hills Golf Course.

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27th ANNUAL FREEDOM DAYS SCHEDULE July 2 - July 7, 2013 Tuesday, July 2 7 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.: Freedom Days Hi Yo, Silver….Away! at Totah Theatre Join us as we celebrate the imminent release of The Lone Ranger featuring Shiprock Pinnacle. Winners of the Kids’ Lone Ranger Movie Poster Contest announced, free popcorn, free Lone Ranger masks for kids and enjoy watching episodes of the original Lone Ranger TV series. All movie poster contest entries will be on display. Wednesday, July 3 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.: Food Fair and FREE Brass Band Concert at Gateway Park and Museum Featuring Kissmah Brass Band plus a variety of other musical acts. Great food available for purchase from fantastic food vendors. Enjoy a festive concert and stay for the fireworks. Best view in town! 9:25 p.m.: Fireworks Display at Sullivan Hill Thursday, July 4 11 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.: Party in the Park at Brookside Park Food, entertainment, fun vendors, live music, games & activities for the entire family! 11 a.m.: Skateboard Competition at Brookside Park at Party in the Park Registration 11 a.m. Competition begins at noon. 2 p.m.: Water Balloon Fight at Brookside Park Separated into age divisions, open to all. 3 p.m.: Papa John’s Pizza Eating Contest at Brookside Park Registration 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Benefiting San Juan County Special Olympics. 4 p.m.: Community Patriotic Concert and Ice Cream So-

cial at First United Methodist Church, 808 N. Monterey Ave. 8 p.m.: Outdoor Summer Theater “Grease” at Lions Wilderness Park, 5700 College Blvd. Call 505.326.7602 for ticket information. Friday, July 5 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.: Gem & Mineral Show at the Farmington Civic Center 8 p.m.: Outdoor Summer Theater “Grease” at Lions Wilderness Park, 5700 College Blvd. Call 505.326.7602 for ticket information. Saturday, July 6 8 a.m. - Dusk: Freedom Fours Coed Volleyball Tournament at Brookside Park 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.: Gem & Mineral Show at the Farmington Civic Center 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.: Ice Cream Social at E3 Children’s Museum, 302 N. Orchard Ave. Ice cream eating contest, yo-yo contest, musical entertainment, hay rides, and more! 5 p.m. - 7 p.m.: History Makers Hall of Fame at the Farmington Civic Center. Opening reception is from 5 to 6 p.m. Induction of Honorees is from 6 to 7 p.m. 8 p.m.: Outdoor Summer TheaterGrease at Lions Wilderness Park, 5700 College Blvd. Call 505.326.7602 for ticket information. Sunday, July 7 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.: Gem & Mineral Show at the Farmington Civic Center

The entry fee is $30. There is a cart fee of $14 and a $25 tournament green fee for non-pass holders. For additional information on the Independence Day golf tournament or registration, contact the Piñon Hills Pro Shop at 505.326.6066. Piñon Hills Golf Course is located at 2101 Sunrise Parkway in Farmington. Bolack fireworks The Farmington High

School class of 1983 is planning a get-together to celebrate the 30 years since graduation. The event will begin at 5 p.m. on Friday, July 5, at Jackie Jaquez’s Party Barn, located at 1323 E. Murray Drive. For information, visit the “FHS Class of 83” Facebook page or contact Becky Thompson a t bthompson65@gmail.com.

For more information contact the Farmington Convention & Visitors Bureau at 505.326.7602


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

Modern veterinary anesthesia Despite mistruths, surgery safer than reported For both human and veterinary patients, an important part of any surgical procedure is the proper use of anesthetics. These drugs render us, and our animal friends, insensible to pain during an operation. Unfortunately, harrowing tales of anesthetic mishaps are often used by pet owners as a reason to avoid surgery for their pet. What are veterinarians doing to make sure your pet stays safe when a surgical treatment is needed? It’s a common thread of discussion on any pet-related website – someone mentions that they have a friend whose aunt lost a pet under anesthetic, and all of a sudden stories of dogs and cats dying under anesthesia are flying back and forth. Some businesses even play upon these fears and misinformation by incorporating scary statistics of anesthesia-related deaths into their marketing. So, what’s the real story?

MONDAY – JULY 1 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Best Of: Sandstone Productions: Grease 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Fourth of July celebrations around NM 7:55 a.m.: Monday Reboot: Tech News TUESDAY – JULY 2 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: C.H.I.P. (Community Health Improvement Project) District Attorney Rick Tedrow 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Cumbres & Toltec Railroad origins 7:55 a.m.: Adopt-A-Pet Tuesday WEDNESDAY – JULY 3 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Farmington Convention & Visitor’s Bureau: Tonya Stinson 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Santa Fe Opera 7:55 a.m.: San Juan Smart Talk with Jan Morgen THURSDAY – JULY 4 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morn-

PAWSITIVELY PETS Darren Woodson How dangerous is veterinary anesthesia and how does your veterinarian make sure her patients have an uneventful surgery? First, it’s important to realize that any two pets undergoing the exact procedure may be at different risk levels for anesthesia. The animal’s age, weight and physical condition, as well as any concurrent disease, will determine anesthetic risk. There is no “one size fits all” type of anesthesia. Next, consider the source of the information. As an example, companies and information sites that advocate “non-anesthetic” dental cleanings for pets, will often quote a small study showing 1 in every 256 animals had an adverse event under anes-

thesia. What they fail to tell you is that particular study was done at a veterinary teaching hospital whose caseload included many patients with significant risk factors for anesthesia. More comprehensive research has shown that problems with anesthetics occur in less than 1 in every 10,000 pets. Starting in the late 1960s and early 1970s, veterinarians, working alongside human anesthesiology counterparts, began developing standards and guidelines designed to provide better comfort and analgesia for animals undergoing surgery. This eventually led to the development of the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia, and

ing: Best Of: San Juan County Fire Restrictions & Fireworks Safety 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Erna Fergusson 7:55 a.m.: Save-A-Buck Thursday: Weekly economic & investing news Noon: A Review Too Far: local movie reviews

July 1: Rewind: Farmington Boys and Girls Club – Benadicta July 2: Community Ministries – Joe Barela, Linda Dean July 3: What about Meth? – Doris Aguilar-Budris July 4: Holiday – Happy Independence Day! July 5: Holiday – No Show 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.: "The Lunch Crunch" with Leah 3 – 8 p.m.: "The Drive" with

FRIDAY – JULY 5 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Best Of: Farmington Fire Restrictions & Fireworks Safety 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Clayton's Eklund Hotel Noon: Book Buzz: Guest: Julia Grady, San Juan College Student

approximately 220 boardcertified veterinary anesthesiologists around the world. Their work has helped provide veterinarians in general practice with better strategies in key areas, such as proper patient monitoring, prevention of drops in body temperature and how best to use the latest anesthetic drugs. In any anesthetic event, knowing what’s happening on the inside of the patient is crucial. Modern monitoring devices allow veterinarians and surgical technicians to quickly spot trends in patient vital signs. Here, we use the PC Vet Guard®, which is a wireless monitoring system (powered by Bluetooth) with multiple monitoring parameters. By closely watching blood pressure, pulse rate, oxygen saturation, body temperature, respiration and carbon dioxide levels, veterinarians can address and even prevent adverse events. Likewise, safety precau-

tions for the patient are highly important. Circulating warm water blankets or forced air warming blankets (Bair Hugger®) can prevent hypothermia in anesthetized patients, while state of the art calibrated fluid pumps can deliver precise levels of medications or vital fluids. Many veterinary hospitals now require that patients have an IV catheter for all but the shortest of procedures. Even anesthetic drugs have improved. Veterinary science now has safe anesthetic gases that quickly leave the pet’s system once the drug is removed from the breathing circuit. Reversible injections, such as Dexdormitor®, provide ways for veterinarians to wake up your pet more smoothly and get him back home to you sooner. Finally, trained and highly skilled veterinary technicians and assistants are on hand to monitor your four-legged

friend. Along with the hightech equipment, these surgical assistants watch all vital signs so that the patient is kept at just the right level of anesthesia – deep enough to prevent pain, but not deep enough to depress vital functions. Many of these technicians will also further their own education by specializing in anesthesiology and becoming part of the Academy of Veterinary Technician Anesthetists. Your veterinarian understands your concerns about anesthesia – it can be very scary. But before you believe all of the Internet rumors about rampant dangers of pet surgeries or dental cleanings, consider talking with your veterinarian and asking him about the hospital’s surgical and anesthesia protocols. You might be surprised how far advanced animal clinics will go to keep your pet safe and secure during surgery.

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Friday, June 28, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Fiction books Connie Gotsch books on sale at Petco June 29 Fiction books of the late Connie Gotsch, former program director at San Juan College's public radio station, KSJE 90.9 FM, will be available for purchase from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday, June 29, at Petco, 3530 E. Main, in Farmington. They all feature dogs.

Gotsch had a soft spot in her heart for animals, and some of the book's proceeds are funding a kennel that will bear her name at the new animal shelter. The remaining proceeds help to fund the Connie Gotsch Arts Foundation, which promotes the arts in San Juan

County. The foundation has already awarded money to several groups and individuals who have applied for it. Go to www.cgartsfoundation.com for more information about CGAF. The books include all three novels in Gotsch's award winning children's

Free screenings Hospital, heart center offer cardiac checks for teens Take a proactive approach to heart health and have your teen participate in a free cardiac screening for adolescents ages 13 through 18 from noon to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Aug. 17, in preparation for a healthy school year. The screening will include a limited echo and baseline EKG. Cardiologists and Heart Center staff will be present for inter-

pretation of results. Participants must bring a consent and participation form to the event. These forms can be found on our website, sanjuanregional.com. Pre-registration for this free screening is required and can also be done on our website starting July 1. A parent or legal guardian must be present with their teen on Aug. 17. Screenings will be

done at the hospital, 801 W. Maple St., in Farmington. Teens who have been previously screened at this event or elsewhere within the past two years, do not need repeat screening. Limited time slots are for those who have never been screened. For more information about the screening call 505.609.6774.

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series about a dog named Belle who faces a variety of challenges. They are Belle's Star, Belle's Trial and Belle's Challenge. Gotsch completed the final edits on Belle's Challenge the day she died on July 15, 2012, after a sev-

en-month battle with cancer. Also available for purchase are her two adult suspense novels, both featuring a dog as a major character. They include Snap Me a Future and Art Effects.

Award winning journalist and retired elementary school counselor Margaret Cheasebro, who wrote the free online activity guides for all three Belle books, will be available at Petco to sign the Belle books.

aztec pets of the week (Right) Are you a cat lover wanting to adopt a cat? We have every age, size, color and personality under the sun. Cats don’t take up much room, are easy to clean after, and the simplest toys will make an afternoon of fun. Cats are super easy to train to use a litter box and a scratch post. Rush on down and adopt today.

The Aztec Animal Shelter, 825 Sabena, is open from noon to 4 p.m. daily.

This Independence Day bring home these special sparklers. Their names are Opaque and Rusty. Opaque is a 1-year-old, female Boxer/Pit mix. Rusty is a neutered 5-year-old Lab/Heeler mix. Both have radiant hearts and are good with other dogs and kids.

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(Above right) We’re all dressed up and ready for the parade. Ask for Sergeant and Aria. Sergeant is a 3-yearold male Lab/Chow mix. He knows sit and shake. Aria is a spayed 1 þ-year-old Lab/Retriever mix. These two are very kid and dog friendly. Hurry. We don’t want you to miss the parade. (Above left) These rugged 1-year-olds are ready for adventure. They are Starsky and Hutch. Adopting these two German Shepherds is a guaranteed good time. They are smart and have that drive to please. Both boys are good with kids and other dogs. Bring on the BBQ.

farmington pets of the week

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Muffin is a beautiful tortoiseshell cat that enjoys being petted more than anything. Her beautiful orange and black coat is easy to keep groomed. She seems to enjoy dogs, and young children.

The Farmington Animal Shelter Hours are Mon. - Fri. 10 a.m. to 5:30p.m.; Sat. and Sun. noon to 3p.m. Also on Sundays at PETCO from noon to 3 p.m. Adoption Prices (Dogs): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $100; 6 mo. to 6 yrs. $80; Over 6 yrs. $50 Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the dog must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) Adoption Prices (Cats): $10 is refundable when the Rabies

Dylan is an adorable little 8-weekold orange tabby. He is one of the many, many, many, many, kittens that we have here at the shelter. He is spunky and rambunctious, and every Wednesday, he and all our other cats are available for only $25.

shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $70; 6 mo. to a 6 yrs $60; Over 6 yrs. $50. Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the cat must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) If you are interested in any of these animals, please give us a call at 505.599.1098. We have a large variety from which to choose, and we want to take the opportunity to thank everyone who chooses to save a life and adopt a local shelter animal.

Mister Z is a large handsome dog, and his eyes can melt the heart of anyone. He is about 2 years old, a Rottweiler mix, and would make a great addition to your home. He would be a wonderful protector and guardian.

Dodger is an adorable little Yorkie mix that loves to run and play. He is only about a year and a half, but could definitely use a good grooming. He gets along great with other dogs, and would be fantastic with young children.


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

prca tracks Farmington Museum needs you Volunteers are needed to serve at the newest traveling exhibit, An Adventure in the Arts, at the Farmington Museum, 3041 E. Main St., from July 20 to Sept. 21. Attend the docent training on Tuesday, July 9, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Learn about this special exhibition of art from the permanent collection of the Guild Hall Museum, East Hampton, N.Y. Attendees will learn about the history of modern art, artists featured in the show, and techniques on how to lead tour groups. Lunch will be served. Please contact Kandy LeMoine at 505.599.1421 or klemoine@fmtn.org to become a Farmington Museum System Volunteer

Ongoing arts… Join the Farmington Museum at Gateway Park, 3041 E. Main St. each Satu r d a y evening during the summer months, (now through

August,) for some live, local entertainment at our Annual Summer Terrace Music Series. Relax by the river and listen to great music. Admission is free. Also at the

Museum is the Handmade Fine Art Show. Stop in to view the artistic wealth Farmington has to offer. Items are for sale. For Farmington Museum information, call 505.599.1174. Grease is the word for this year’s Sandstone Production presented in the Lions Wilder-

ness Park Amphitheater. Performance at 8 p.m., gates open at 6:30 p.m., on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, through August 3. Tickets may be purchased online at webtrac.fmtn.org, and at the Civic Center Ticket Office, call 505.599.1148 or toll free at 877.599.3331. Ask

about theme nights! Celebrate the end of each week at TGIF with really good music and lunch in Historic Downtown Orchard Park through July 26. Three Rivers Eatery and Brewhouse will sell lunch each Friday. For more information about TGIF, call 505.599.1419.

Fireworks and furry felines The Kitten Summer Spectacular sale has been extended through July. On Wednesdays, all through July, the Farmington Animal Shelter, 1395 S. Lake St., will have kittens for adoption at only $25, which is less than half the normal adoption fee. Liberate a kitty for Independence Day! Pets want to celebrate too, and make their summer spectacular. Stop by the Animal Shelter to visit all the furry friends waiting for their loving forever home. Each cat and dog up for adoption will be spayed or neutered, vaccinated, dewormed, micro-chipped, and treated with a flea and tick preventive. For more information call 505.599.1098. Hours of operation are Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, noon to 3 p.m. Go wild Spots are going fast! Register for Wildlife Wednesdays before July 3. Need a special summer activity for kids ages 7 12? Wildlife Wednesdays is a five-week series of outdoor activities and hikes on Wednesday mornings at the Riverside Nature Center in Animas Park off Browning Parkway. Each week’s session is different, as we learn about bugs, birds, trails, the water creatures in the Animas River, plants, and more. Series starts on July 10 and continues through Aug. 7. Sessions start promptly at 9 a.m. and end at noon, with a snack included. Pre-registration at the Nature Center or the Farmington Museum is required by July 3. Fee is $20. Info: 505.599.1422

1 out of every 4 deaths in the United States is related to heart failure. That’s about 600,000 deaths per year. And the numbers keep rising. Fortunately, if you follow four simple steps, you may reduce your risk of heart failure by as much as 90%. It’s never too late to begin. Visit SanJuanRegional.com to learn more.

San Juan Regional Heart Center


MM SPORTS

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Month No. 1 of summer vacation is in the books, and as I write this week’s article I’m heading home to Wyoming for my 30th high school reunion. Time to prepare for the wins to get bigger, the losses to get closer and the legends to get more legen – wait for it – dary, legendary. The Coaching Carousel Last week I drew notice that the basketball ranks here in San Juan County have gone from long tenured coaches such as Marv Sanders to a host of rookies and second year coaches who seem to be rotating in and out quite quickly. As I asked last week: “Why?” The answer, at least in my mind, is quite simple, and it applies to all sports, not just basketball – pressure. Over the past decade or so the pressure to win It’s always fun when a major league All-Star makes a trip to Albuquerque on rehab assignment. Baseball fans in Albuquerque have seen guys like Mark Prior and Manny Ramirez make pit stops in the Duke City. The latest star to make a brief appearance in our own backyard was Los Angeles Dodgers outfielder Matt Kemp. The Dodgers placed Kemp on the 15-day disabled list with a mild right hamstring strain on May 30. This is Kemp’s third stop in Albuquerque over the past two years. The Oklahoma native played four games on two rehab stints with the Isotopes last season. “It’s always a bad sign when you’re sent down to rehab,” said Kemp. “But it’s nice to see familiar faces. I haven’t seen a lot of these guys since spring training.” The two-time Gold Glove winner, All-Star and Silver Slugger was originally drafted by the Dodgers in the sixth round of the 2003 FirstYear Player Draft and holds a career .292 batting average in eight Major League seasons, all with Los Angeles. As Ron Burgundy from Anchorman might say, “He’s kind of a big deal.” Kemp’s stay in Albu-

FRIDAY, JUNE 28, 2013

RICK’S PICKS

Rick Hoerner has grown exponentially. Teams are expected to win and it’s the coach’s fault if they don’t. This means that sport has now become a year-round process and means the paltry salary that is intended to cover a 16week season has extended to countless off-season open gyms, weights and off-season team camps. Now for many coaches this is the life and a choice they would make over and over again, but for many, especially assistants, the time commitment to a team is outweighing regular jobs, family and a personal life. This in turn becomes an equal burden on players and their families who are

now expected to take their free time to fulfill the need of year-round participation and the pressure that if your team isn’t working this hard, some other team is and the cycle continues as your team falls behind, loses, and coach is gone. Consider that the pressure to win at the prep level has changed our youth sports as well. It is no longer good enough to have a summer of baseball, enjoy the game and move on to another activity. Now you have to find an elite team that is trying to put its 2020 Connie Mack team together by having their team play elite competition and travel to Puerto Rico

THIS WEEK IN SPORTS JP Murrieta querque was short, but I don’t know if you would describe it as sweet. It got off to a shaky start as he went 0 for 5 with four strikeouts in his first game. He then went 2 for 6 with two doubles, a walk and a stolen base in the next two games for the Isotopes. He was called back up to Los Angeles and I’m sure he would like to stay in Dodger blue the rest of the season. “Drive in runs, steal bases, play good defense, hit balls hard, and hopefully I can get back to the way I know how to play baseball.” Living on Tulsa Time The University of New Mexico and University of Tulsa football teams have agreed to a home-andhome series in 2015 and 2017. The first game will take place on Branch Field at University Stadium on Sept. 12, 2015. The Lobos will make the return trip to H.A. Chapman Stadium in Tulsa, Okla., on Sept. 23, 2017. “Our football program has tremendous respect

for Tulsa,” UNM coach Bob Davie said in a released statement. “The fact that the Golden Hurricane have gone to a bowl game for three straight years shows the success they’ve had. Giving the proximity between the schools, the series should generate a great deal of fan interest.” Taking on the men of Troy The University of New Mexico football team announced this week they will play at USC to open the 2016 season. The game will kick off the season at the Los Angeles Coliseum on Sept. 3, 2016. UNM will take on a PAC-12 opponent for three straight years, as UNM will open a twoyear series with Arizona State next year on Branch Field at University Stadium. Never let it be said UNM is afraid of the big boys. Their schedule of non-conference opponents in the coming years includes Pittsburgh – 2013; Arizona State – 2014, 2015; Tulsa – 2015, 2017; USC –

* Sports A14

for the 10-year-old national championship. But even that is not enough. Fall comes around and while it should be time for soccer or football, it’s time for fall baseball, and if you’re not there, someone else is and your spot is in jeopardy. Other sports are no better. Soccer has elite travel teams that don’t participate in our local leagues but travel weekly to Bernalillo to play against other elite teams with the same goal of prep superiority – Here I am guilty with my own daughter. Volleyball has leagues and travel teams as well. Wrestling seems to run all spring and summer after state where students have youth wrestling and tournaments somewhere in the Southwest every weekend. Softball, like baseball,

* Picks A14 The world of golf is taking on a new initiative – one that has plagued the enjoyment of the game for many years. This month is Pace of Play Month, as officially adopted by many of golf ’s industry leaders. This initiative is attempting to bring to light how long it takes players to play the game and giving creative ideas to speed things up. The United States Golf Association has come up with a new ad campaign called “While We’re Young,” and is using such golf celebrities as Arnold Palmer, Tiger Woods and Clint Eastwood to get the message across. This initiative has been desperately needed for a very long time. Slow play is at the very root of the issue of why golf is losing players – quite simply the game takes too long and isn’t much fun to play when you are there for longer than four hours. So how can you do your part with regards to slow play? I thought you would never ask …. First, even though golf is a social game, be ready to hit when it is your turn. That means actually stepping up to hit the ball, not going through a 50-second pre-shot routine when you are up to play. Go through your mental routine and prac-

A13

Justin Solomon benefit set for July 4 Justin Solomon will return home to Farmington for the July 4th holiday and to attend a free pre-fireworks concert in his honor. The benefit concert will begin at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, July 3, at the Heights Middle School Football Field, and will continue until the Farmington fireworks display begins at dusk. The concert is being organized by cancer

survivor Johnny Ortiz of Bloomfield. He scheduled four bands to play, including Reverend Catfish and former Voice contestant Mary Miranda, according to Kevin Mauzy, who is helping publicize the event. The concert is free and open to the public, with donations being accepted to help Solomon and his family pay for treatments of his acute leukemia.

FIRST TEE Tom Yost tice swings while your playing partner is hitting, then when it is your turn, step up and hit the ball. Next, pull the trigger when you are standing over the golf ball. When a person stands and thinks about a million different thoughts on how to pull off the shot, the shot is doomed for failure anyway. Erase the plethora of thoughts going through your head, think about your target, and swing. You will be more relaxed and much more capable of hitting it well if you quit thinking. Hit a provisional ball if you think the first one is lost, and don’t spend too much time looking for the ball in the middle of the desert. Give it a good once through, but if you don’t see it sitting where you can hit it, you probably don’t want to find your golf ball anyway. Trim the time looking for balls from five minutes to three minutes and you will shave off a good portion of time. Play golf from the appropriate tee box that will allow you to enjoy the game in its entirety. This

will also speed up your play, since you won’t be taking extra shots from a tee box 50 yards back. Pick up your golf ball and put it in your pocket when you exceed a certain score. Nothing good comes of you making a double-digit number on a hole and the group behind you will thank you for not lining up the 10footer for a 12. STAY OFF THE CELL PHONE! Finally, be aware of the group in front of you. Your group can only play golf as fast as that group is playing, and if they are slow the marshal at your course can deal with them. When your group starts to fall behind, make sure you take the initiative and tell your other players that they need to start playing faster. The slow play campaign will surely make golf more enjoyable for everyone on the golf course, and maybe even bring some old players back to the game. If everyone does their part, golf can end at the four-hour mark – instead of five and a half.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

picks

1. Where does Evan Longoria rank on the all-time career home-run list for the Tampa Bay Rays? 2. The Atlanta Braves set a major-league record in 2012 by winning 23 consecutive games started by Kris Medlen. Who had held the record? 3. Only two NFL players have rushed for at least 1,000 yards in each of their first 10 seasons. Name them. 4. Name the coach of Oregon's men's basketball team when it ended UCLA's 98-game home winning streak in 1976. 5. Next season, the NHL's Colorado Avalanche plan to retire the number of Adam Foote. Name three of the other four players whose numbers the team has retired.

runs from January to August. Check your coworkers. I’m sure one of them can tell you the exploits of weekend travel or how they spent their vacation time following one of their children around from tournament to tournament in lieu of a vacation, and perhaps at the wellbeing of other children or the family in general. This in turn leads to the question of whether high school sports in a public school setting has now become economics based. After all, it takes a lot of money to travel with your child’s soccer team to Bernalillo every

weekend, or to take your child to four basketball team camps in the month of June. This hurts athletics on two fronts – it forces out those that do not have the economic means to participate and it forces athletic decisions at a young age when most athletes are not physically developed or do not have the ability to comprehend the commitment athletic competition can demand. I for one would not want to be judged athletically on what I could do as a 10-year-old. As a 24year veteran of sports in Farmington, there are many athletes we gave

up on too soon, and many more that peaked at 12. While it may seem I have diverged from my point, you may be asking yourself, “What does this have to do with coaching?” Connect the dots and it is this pressure that has run coaches off. Parents of the athletes that survive the youth sport process have expectations of success on their investments just as if their kid was a 401(k). In other words, parents now have expectations that the money they invested for their children to play sports should have a reward at the end,

whether it be championships, college scholarships or both. Honestly, this is a serious warped sense of priorities when it comes to your own children, and one I’m just as guilty of as the next guy, whether it is with my own teams or my own kids. But this is not what we initially got our kids into sports for, nor should it be to complete our unfinished athletic careers no matter what the cost. Sports on the Radio Prep Sports Weekly with Rick Hoerner & Walter Dorman every Sat-

urday at noon on KENN 1390 92.1 FM and kennradio.com Summer Sports Camps Charly Martin Football Camp at PVHS Soccer Field July 8 and 9: Grades 2 through 5, 8 to 10 a.m.; Grades 6 through 8, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Contact Frank Whalen fwhalen@fms.k12.nm.us Don’t forget to check out the 3rd Edition of Majestic Media’s Four Corner’s Sports magazine coming out on July 10. Happy 23rd Anniversary, Mary Hoerner, and Thank You

30 yards per kick return last season. He scored on a pair of kickoff returns in 2012, the most touchdowns since Terance Mathis scored on three kickoff returns in 1989. Playing with the big girls UNM women’s basketball coach, Yvonne Sanchez, calls her upcoming schedule “challenging, tough and competitive.” Sanchez recently released a list of opponents for the 2013-2014 season. The list includes Stanford, Texas Tech, Texas, Colorado and Arkansas. A pair of home exhibitions versus New Mexico Highlands and Western New Mexico on Saturday, Nov. 2, and Tuesday, Nov. 5, respectively, unofficially kicks off the 2013-14 season. The Lobos officially kick off the season by hosting Loyola Marymount on Saturday, Nov. 9.

From an Aggie to a Panther Former New Mexico State quarterback Andrew Manley found a new college home. Manley transferred to Eastern Illinois. Manley started all 12 games for the Aggies last season but wasn’t going to fit into the system with new head coach Doug Martin, so he decided to transfer. Manley threw for 2,764 yards and 18 touchdowns

last year. Manley will have two

years of eligibility left with the Panthers.

sports 2016; and Texas A&M – 2017. But it’s not just about getting better by taking on bigger competition. UNM is also receiving a nice paycheck for being an opening act for the Trojans. UNM will receive $950,000 for the game against USC. “Opening the season with USC in 2016 will be a great opportunity for our football team,” said Deputy Athletic Director Tim Cass. “We will not be playing Fresno State or San Diego State in 2016, so this game will provide us an opportunity to stay connected to California from a recruiting and alumni standpoint.” The Chase is on Beyond Sports Network has named University of New Mexico junior kick returner Chase Clayton to its preseason all-America third team. Clayton averaged over

Answers 1. With 130 entering the 2013 season, he is second, behind Carlos Pena's 163. 2. The New York Giants (Carl Hubbell, 1936-37) and the New York Yankees (Whitey Ford, 195053) each had 22-game streaks. 3. Barry Sanders and Curtis Martin. 4. Dick Harter. 5. Ray Bourque, Peter Forsberg, Patrick Roy and Joe Sakic.

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Friday, June 28, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

drugs chemicals most frequently found in Spice as Schedule I controlled substances, making it illegal to sell, buy, or possess them,” the institute stated on its website, drugabuse.gov. There have been complaints in the community about the drug being sold at local smoke shops, as well as concerns that it is easily acquired by teenagers. People were calling local law enforcement asking about “spice” and what it is. Reportedly, there also were medical problems associated with it. Region 2 Director Neil Haws said it has been known to cause seizures and the drug can be purchased by children because there is a lack of regulations regarding its use. “There’s no regulation on it, because it’s sold as

incense,” Haws said. “When a person buys it, they have no idea what they are getting.” After the public outcry, Region II started investigating the drug. The only problem was that testing of “spice” was costly. “When the DEA came in they were able to get it tested,” Haws said. “They also had the resources to follow the money and the banks.” Farmington Police Chief Kyle Westall also weighed in on the growing problems with “spice,” saying that while use has grown in the region and the state, Farmington was the first municipality in New Mexico to make synthetic marijuana illegal. The state followed suit the next year and Region II has been investigating the sale of

the substance ever since. Another problem with “spice” is that, because it is a chemical compound, those who make it change the compound slightly each time that compound is deemed illegal. The recent emphasis by local law enforcement and the DEA has been on banning the elements in the compound in hopes of getting it off the streets. The morning of June 26, as DEA agents and San Juan County Sheriff ’s Deputies waited outside the Rollet Smoke Shop 2, they were approached by a few young people attempting to enter the store to make purchases. One man with an Arizona license plate said he just wanted to buy some cigarettes. He was informed that the store was being

searched by authorities and would not reopen that day. During the more than three-hour search, multiple cars pulled into the parking lot, with a few passengers stopping and trying to gain access to the shop. The employees, who allowed law enforcement access to the building, stood outside talking and smoking while the building was searched. After filling a couple of bags and a box with evidence, the agents gathered their things and allowed an employee to lock up the business, which was then closed down. The four local shops that were hit were operating under the premise that the “spice” being sold there was legal. Earlier testing

The Farmington High School class of 1983 is planning a get-together to celebrate the 30 years since graduation. The event will begin at 5 p.m. on Friday, July 5, at Jackie Jaquez’s Party Barn, located at 1323 E. Murray Drive. For information, visit the “FHS Class of 83” Facebook page or contact Becky Thompson at bthompson65@gmail.com.

fields for newcomers – $100 does not level the playing field. What is that magic number? I’m not sure we are going to find it.” Roberts said he liked $250 per person, because then a married couple could donate $500 to a campaign. “It gives someone an opportunity to compete. … The cap of $2,300 – I doubt that will impact anyone’s giving. I advocated for something much lower,” he said, adding he would set limits on spending if it were constitutional. The U.S. Supreme Court ruled that placing limits on campaign spending violates a candidate’s freedom of speech. The Council decided to follow the state statute with regard to contribu-

tions. Sandel also brought up the issue of reporting campaign contributions, which according to Burnham’s ordinance would be done once five days prior to the Council election and 30 days after the election is completed. “Disclosure five days before an election doesn’t give the public the information it needs, and 30 days after doesn’t help much – the election is already over,” Sandel said. He asked for annual reports and a report in January and February during an election year. Then another report would be the Thursday before the election. “This gives good information of what is being raised and what is being spent,” Sandel said. Councilor Dan Darnell

did not like the idea of annual reporting, saying it would be a lot of work for a candidate and an elected official. “It’s going to discourage good people from seeking positions like ours,” he said. “I don’t think we should make running for local office extremely difficult.” Sandel said the idea was not to make it difficult, but to make it simpler. If a candidate files contributions and expenses each year, then they do not have to file four years of contributions and expenses just months before the election. “An annual report makes sense. It’s clearing out the books,” he said. Councilors Mary Fischer and Gayla McCulloch agreed. “I am in favor of the state and federal requirements. The reporting

done of the substance by the DEA laboratory revealed it was not legal, according to Westall. During the searches, authorities seized a lot of the product, some cash, vehicles and guns. “Having DEA on board was really important for the prosecution of this case,” Westall said, adding that Browning from Region II began the investigation and received assistance from the DEA. The Region II Narcotics

Task Force is a cooperative agency with law enforcement members from the Farmington, Aztec and Bloomfield Police Departments, as well as the San Juan County Sheriff ’s Office. The agency also works with Homeland Security. “This is exactly what we are supposed to do when we have a problem – we work together on solving the issue,” San Juan County Sheriff Ken Christesen said.

class reunion

guidelines ordinance would help in that process, because it would allow candidates to raise funds and then report those donations. This also would give the public an idea of the parties putting funds behind various candidates. The discussion, which continued from the June 11 Council meeting, involved limiting campaign contributions to $100, despite the State Statute that

places a contribution limit of $2,300 on individuals and $5,000 on political committees. Mayor Tommy Roberts wanted those contributions to be limited to $250. “When you think about campaign contributions in your own experience – when you get a contribution in excess of $250 that is pretty rare,” he said. “We are trying to find ways to level the playing

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is going to limit what people will contribute. The state and federal guidelines are there, and I don’t see a problem with mirroring them,” McCulloch said. Roberts added that he is not sure the public is happy about this ordinance. “I’ve been approached by people who are not happy with the discussions we are having here. There are people who will be impacted by this ordinance and who will think very hard about whether they will contribute at all and how much they will contribute. I think it will have an effect on how much candidates will be able to raise,” he said. Despite this statement, there was Council consensus to move forward with the ordinance.

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A16

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

Remains found CBI confirms it’s missing Colorado youth DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune A 13-year-old Colorado youth who went missing last Thanksgiving was found dead on Middle Mountain Road north of Vallecito Lake.

The Colorado Bureau of Investigation has confirmed that bones discovered in the area are the remains of Dylan Redwine. More than 40 law enforcement officials spent five days and 1,600 hours searching Middle Mountain,

which goes as high as 11,000 feet and consists of deep canyons and dense forest. The search teams negotiated steep drainages with extensive ground cover as they looked for clues. “Sectors were treated as possible crime scenes, and at times

the searchers were almost shoulder to shoulder as they moved up and down the difficult terrain,� according to a press release from the La Plata County Sheriff ’s office. Redwine arrived at Durango-La Plata County air-

port on Nov. 18, 2012, and was picked up by his father, Mark Redwine, for a court ordered Thanksgiving holiday visit. Elaine Redwine, Dylan’s mother, reported him missing to La Plata County Sheriff ’s Office the following day.

The investigation into Dylan’s disappearance and death is continuing, and anyone with information is asked to call La Plata County Sheriff ’s Office Investigators Dan Patterson, 970.382.7015, or Tom Cowing, 970.382.7045.

Meals for kids College development center sponsors food program The San Juan College Child and Family Development Center announces its sponsorship of the Child and Adult Care Food Program. All children in attendance will be offered the same meals with no physical

segregation of, or other discriminatory action against, any child because of race, color, age, national origin, sex or disability. If you feel you have been discriminated against, write immediately to: USDA, Director,

AZTEC SCHOOLS SUPERINTENDENT Kirk Carpenter New Teacher Evaluation As we begin the next school year, the new teacher evaluation system will be fully implemented. We piloted a portion of the system this school year, mainly dealing with the observation protocols, and it took most of the year for us to get the finalized NMTEACH protocols. They have been finalized and there were some changes that we saw in the rubrics and elements. The ones made were positive and provided better clarification for both teachers and administrators. As we move through next year we will

continue to learn by doing, as there is a lot about the new system that we did not get to work with. The new online system for teacher evaluation will host all the information from student achievement, student survey results, to the actual observation ratings that are given by our principals when they visit classrooms for their formal observations. The system is in the process of being built, so this will be something we will have to be trained on for both our principals and our teachers. Training will not wait until next year, as we have a two-day regional

training next Monday and Tuesday on the new evaluation system. The main focus of this training will be on the use of rubrics and gaining a better understanding on the overall manner in which we can improve our observations. Our work in the elements and rubrics this year will pay big dividends for us as we move forward as we will not have to focus on learning them, but will be able to work on implementing and improving our practice of observation so that we can make positive change on instructional practices in the classroom. Student achievement will not change without improvement in the instructional practices, so this work is very important and we will work together with staff to improve in the crucial area.

Happy Independence Day from San Juan Regional Medical Center Have fun celebrating the holiday. Stay healthy and reduce your risk of a heart attack by up to 90 percent with these four simple, life-giving steps:

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Office of Adjudication, 1400 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call toll-free 866.632.9992. Individuals who are hearing impaired or have speech disabilities may contact the USDA through New principal evaluation As if it were not enough to have a new teacher evaluation system, we will also see a new system for the principals in our district. It will have ratings similar to those of the teachers and will have student achievement as the main indicator of effectiveness for our principals. We are just now really getting into the work of developing this system, but we do know that 50 percent of the principal and assistant principal’s grade will come from the improvement of the school grade and 25 percent will come from the fidelity with which they carry out the new teacher evaluation system. The three components include: timeliness, completion and rigor/reliability. The final 25 percent will be made up of the following components:

the Federal Relay Service at 800.877.8339; or for Spanish, 800.845.6136. For more information, call the Child and Family Development Center at 505.566.3383.

teacher surveys, the principals Professional Development Plan and the Principal competencies as established by the Public Education Department. There is still a lot of work to be done in this area, and we will keep you posted as we continue to develop the process for the 2013-2014 school year. I am still serving on the NMTEACH committee, so I know that we will be meeting to finalize some of this in the near future. Common Core Implementation We will have the common core state standards fully implemented at all sites this next school year. This has taken a lot of work, and there is still plenty to do. We are in the process of developing new common formative assessments for the common cores in math and

language arts. All subjects will be affected by this implementation, as it calls for literacy and numeracy across the curriculum. These standards are more rigorous and will call for us to go deeper into content. One of the changes we also are looking at will be more of a standards based report card for parents. This is a work in progress, and though we will be doing it only for grades K -3 we will be moving to have this implemented down the road for K-5 and possibly into the middle school. All of the items discussed on this report are works in progress and will take a few years to fully implement with fidelity, but we are in a great place, having a district that operates as a PLC, because it will take collaborative learning and planning to make these things successful for students and staff.

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This immaculate 5-bedroom, 3-bath home at 6909 Alyssa Court in the Shea Heights Subdivision is filled with extras, including bright and beautiful chandeliers throughout. Some of the other special touches include in-floor heating, huge storage room, two dining areas, high ceilings, soaking

tub in the laundry room and textured walls. The amazing entryway has ceramic tile floors and opens into a spacious living room with a gas-log fireplace and beautiful wood floors. The master suite features a huge walk-in closet and big master bath.

The large kitchen is secluded and offers lots of cabinet space and a breakfast nook. The covered deck and patio can be accessed from either the kitchen or the master bedroom. Each bedroom features builtin desks, and the dining room has a built-in hutch. This more than 3,800-square-

foot home has a basement that includes an enormous family/theater room. Perfect for entertaining, this 39-foot by 29-foot room includes a wet bar. Two of the five bedrooms are in the basement, along with the big storage area. This home is located on a

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

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Second wave Use the right product to stop weed attack ADVICE YOU CAN GROW WITH Donnie Pigford It is happening again, weeds are on the attack! This is that time of year when a second wave of summer weeds moves in. If you didn’t apply your second application of pre-emergent, you may now be paying the price. These warmer season weeds seem to pop-up overnight and take over. Controlling these weeds is not difficult, if you properly identify them and use the right product. Weeds are opportunistic and tough. The presence of certain weeds is an indicator of possible problems with your lawn. For example, some weeds grow and thrive in hard, compacted soils. Other weeds indicate your lawn is too wet, shady, infertile or thin. Identifying

United States. Adapted to many sites, it grows very well in thin lawns that need to be fertilized and is a sign of soil compaction. Crabgrass – is a warmseason annual grass, which

means it sprouts from seed in late spring and summer and will die when the first hard frost arrives in the fall. This summer annual is a coarse spreading grass-like plant that has a low habit;

weeds and understanding how they grow will help you correct any problems with your lawn that encourage weed invasion. Prostrate Spurge – Also known as spotted spurge, creeping spurge is a low growing, mat-forming, summer annual. A common weed in newly established lawns or thin lawns, it thrives on harsh, sun-baked sites. The leaves have a red blotch in the center and the reddish stems ooze a milky sap when broken. It’s a vigorous plant that can grow up to three feet in diameter. This weed has been extremely prominent in lawns this summer. Plantain – is a very common lawn weed, almost as common as dandelions. It is found throughout the

the seed-head is the most obvious indicator, consisting of a central stem with typically 3 to 5 thin “chicken foot” looking seed heads at the top. Dallisgrass – is a coarse-

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

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Red Cross Real Heroes

Cutler recognized for service to community DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune She serves her community each day “with compassion and commitment,” and that is why the Red Cross selected Deb Cutler, of Farmington as the Humanitarian of the Year. It was Bev Owen, of Woods Insurance, who introduced Cutler as someone who dedicates her time to make San Juan County a better place. Owen pointed out Cutler’s involvement with the Festival of Trees, the San Juan Regional Auxiliary and the Farmington Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs Commission. “This is a woman determined to give back to the community,” Owen said. Cutler was recognized June 21 along with 11 other community members during the third annual Red Cross Real Heroes Breakfast at the Courtyard by Marriott. Cutler also founded the Homework Club at her church, where students receive after-school tutoring and their parents receive free parenting classes. Cutler prepares dinner for the families every Wednesday during the school year, so they leave with their minds and bellies full. After her husband Paul suffered a stroke, she has helped victims of stroke by developing a survivors of stroke support group. “She stayed by his side,” Owen said. “Deb is devoted to her family, neighbors and friends, and she strives to make a positive differ-

Michelle Ahlm, left of ConocoPhillips, awards Sgt. Jason McClelland the Military Hero of the Year Award from the Red Cross.

Deb Cutler, of Farmington, sits down with her trophy and gets a pat on the back from her husband, Paul Cutler, after being named the Humanitarian of the Year by the American Red Cross.

ence in this community.” When Cutler accepted the honor she said she could not do what she does without the support of her two daughters and her husband. "Behind every great person is a great family pushing them,” she said, adding that Farmington also has helped her achieve her goals. “This is one of the most amazing communities New Mexico could have. People volunteering here are amazing. I would encourage you to get out there and get start-

ed (volunteering).” Speaking to this group could be similar to preaching to the choir, because the room was packed full of community leaders and volunteers, those who give of themselves to make the world a better place. People such as Sgt. Jason McClelland received the military hero award. McClelland enlisted in 2008 in the U.S. Army and he served in both Iraq and Afghanistan. It was during a ceremony on base in Afghanistan that Mc-

Helen Chavez, right, and Toby Chavez, left received the Good Samaritan of the Year Award from the Red Cross. It was for work in their Straight Up Ministries.

Clelland and his men came under enemy fire. An Afghan soldier, who was supposed to be an ally, began firing on his fellow soldiers. McClelland found cover and helped four other of his comrades to find cover. They fired back on the enemy combatant and took him down. “They secured the area and the weapon,” said Michelle Ahlm, of ConocoPhillips, as she gave him the award. “The most important job we do is serve our country as a soldier,” said Judge John Dean, who served as the master of ceremony. He asked McClelland about his service. “Everything I do is for my family and other people in this country,” McClelland said. The Farmington School Resource Officers also do things to protect the families in the region. “Nothing is more important than protecting our children,” said Cathi Valdez, of Western Refining. She gave Donnie Kee, Michelle Delese and Ben McGaha the

Law Enforcement Heroes of the year award for their work as school resource officers. This group of police officers works to develop safety programs for students, while also conducting mock safety and emergency drills on all Farmington School campuses. They offered advice to those at the breakfast. “Remain alert to what is going on around you, and if you see something, say something,” Kee said. Others recognized at the breakfast included Carmen Ray for her volunteer efforts making blankets for the Red Cross’ Warm Up America program; Lauri Nutt Roberts, a youth good Samaritan, for remodeling three rooms at Frontline Mission for women who are victims of domestic violence; Toby and Helen Chavez for their Straight Up Ministries program; Joy Woolman for establishing a volunteer fire department in Jamestown; Debbie Coburn for saving wild horses through the work

of Four Corners Equine Rescue, and Paul Peerenboom for saving his neighbor from choking to death while camping at Navajo Dam. All of these people have something in common, according to Farmington Mayor Tommy Roberts, who spoke at the event. “They are prepared in the way they are brought up,” he said. “They are giving and caring people who have been raised in a very proper way.” Roberts said the room was filled with people who “do what is right” every day. “Everyone who gets engaged in their community is a hero,” he said. “A community is as strong as its volunteer base.” This community has that base and is a better place because of it, according to Roberts. “I am amazed with the people out there on the ground – people who elevate Farmington to be the place it is, where we live, work and play.” He also encouraged people to get out and volunteer, and one place they can start volunteering is with the Red Cross, where 90 percent of the staff is volunteer, according to Rahim Balsara, regional CEO. “All the work is being done by volunteers,” Balsara said, adding that because of the volunteer workforce, 91 cents on every dollar is invested back into the humanitarian services offered through the Red Cross.

WESST VP visit area Touts loan fund for small businesses DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune The vice president of lending for WESST visited San Juan County the week of June 24 to meet with clients and assist other small businesses in obtaining loans from the non-profit organization. Kim Blueher was in the area to meet with three loan clients and two prospects in need of a small amount of money to help their local businesses grow and succeed. WESST was founded in 1988 with the purpose of providing entrepreneurs with a home where they can “grow their business through market penetration, job creation and capital accumulation.” It provides business consulting services,

as well as a revolving loan fund, to individuals through the state. The loan fund offers money to start-ups in the amounts of $250 to $10,000, while existing businesses can obtain funding in the amounts of $250 to $50,000. “WESST is about building business capacity, and secondarily it is about lending,” Blueher said. The organization wants to offer business owners the tools they need to be successful, and sometimes that means loaning them a small amount of money to build their credit or loaning them funds for a special project or item needed to build upon the business. When a business owner comes to WESST for a loan, they go through a screening

process where they have to present a business plan, a need and a cash-flow projection. “Maybe they can’t secure a bank loan, or they have too much debt and not enough equity,” Blueher said, adding the business also could just be financially weak. WESST works with the business to receive a secured loan with collateral. The collateral, however, can be just about anything of value. Blueher said she once accepted an antique Concho belt as collateral, while another business owner put up his trained guard dog. Both clients paid off the loans to take back their collateral. It is about building responsibility and giving the business owner the help

they need. “The loan program is as education-oriented as the consulting program,” Blueher said. “We are giving people an ability to manage their business in a successful way, and we can really spend a lot of time with our clients and give them that help and stability.” The loan fund has an interest rate of 7.5 percent and a 1 percent loan fee. Repayment is always tied to cash flow and there is a 3 percent default rate, Blueher said, adding that she is not trying to compete with banks. “We want to help build capacity in putting a successful business together and on building credit,” she said. Chris Hunter, who is the WESST regional manager

in Farmington, works with clients to offer that stability through consulting. “I want to be a support system so a business owner can successfully grow his business,” Hunter said. The consulting is oneon-one and it is a partnership between the business and WESST, he said. He requires that the business owner meet with him at least once a month, but preferably once a week. There is a small fee for services, but Hunter stressed this is not a money-making venture for WESST. The fee of $10, $20 or $30 is to show business owners that they must invest in their business. “There is a strong connection between the billfold, the brain and the hand,” Hunter said. His goal is to work with

20 to 30 clients who will have the capability of building local businesses into enterprises that offer good paying jobs to area residents. Hunter serves on the Four Corners Economic Development board as a WESST representative, and said his organization is all about building the economy in San Juan County and throughout the state. He works with all types of prospective and existing businesses, including transportation providers, delivery services, restaurants and music teachers. The opportunities and the ideas are limitless, so long as the owner is invested and passionate about their business. For more information about WESST, call Hunter at 505.566.3715.


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505-326-1617 USED CARS 1//7 @UDN KR+ entq cnnq- H/888/@- V`r $5+884+ mnv $4+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BNQNKK@ KD+ $04+882 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X0036//@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 EH@S 4// svn cnnq+ GA RonqsY015268V`r $06+876+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- 'Knv lhkdr(Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 GXTMC@H Rnm`s`+ entq cnnq+ FKRY215636V`r $07+256+ mnv $05+276+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Noshl` DW+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $1/+880 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Rnqdmsn+ 22+084 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $11+576 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G114277- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ 20+164 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G087128- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $05+876 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 SNXNS@ X`qhr+ 2/+837 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd $03+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GI/02584- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

USED TRUCKS 1//0 ENQC E,14/ Rtodq B`a+ svn vgddk cqhud+ Onvdqrsqnjd chdrdk+ 103+350 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $6+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38/16@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 CNCFD Q`l 14// 3w3 Pt`c B`a+ Btllhmr chdrdk+ 032+165 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+8// oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38615@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 ENQC E,04/ WKS+ bqdv b`a+ kn`cdc- Oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 CNCFD Q`l 04// Pt`b b`a 3w3Y30527@V`r $06+884+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 ENQC E,04/ 1w1+ 6/+510 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G42/50`- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//8 FLB B`mxnm Bqdv B@a+ entq vgddk cqhud- Y325574@- V`r $10+456+ mnv $08+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 ENQC E,04/ 3w3 Rtodq Bqdv+ 38+04/ lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $16+276 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GC57253- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// qdftk`q b`a 3w3+ 21+082 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07+876- Rsnbj #9 G36582@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// svn vgddk cqhud+ dwsdmcdc b`a+ 05+668 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G40276@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

USED TRUCKS

LEGALS

LEGALS

1/01 BGDUQNKDS 04// bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $17+130 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX20015@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 JH@ Rntk+ 20+574 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $04+884 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G264046- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

NOTICE OF SALE

THE FOLLOWING items located at AAA Mini-Storage; 1630 Murray Dr,, 2016 Hutton Rd,. 6208 E. Main, and 7231 E. Main Farmington NM.,, will be sold or donated at the owners discretion by July 5, 2013

1/01 BGDUQNKDS Bnknq`cn+ bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $12+888 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X07543@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 MHRR@M Lhq`mn+ 11+856 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $13+676 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G102406- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

USED TRUCKS

1/01 ENQC E,04/ Rtodq Bqdv svn vgddk cqhud+ 47+388 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G244/2@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

SUVS/VANS 1//6 BGQXRKDQ @rodm Khlhsdc+ entq vgddk cqhud- H32734@- V`r $01+876+ mnv $7+884+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 IDDO Khadqsx+ entq vgddk cqhud+ ronqsY455/7/V`r $0/+876+ mnv $8+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//7 IDDO Vq`mfkdq W+ 3w3+ $10+541 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X36152@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/0/ BGDUQNKDS Sq`udqrd KS+ kn`cdc+ $07+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX13657@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Bnlo`rr+ 21+511 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07-876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G123680- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Khadqsx+ 40+8/7 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $05+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G468477- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ATHBJ Dmbk`ud+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $20+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX232574- GH,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ENQC Drb`od WKS+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $1/+488 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddXB27500Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

MISC. SGD E@QLHMFSNM Qhn cdk Rnk Jhv`mhr `mc sgd R`m It`m Ghrsnqhb`k Rnbhdsx `qd ronmrnqhmf sgd dudms ³Chmhmf Vhsg Sgd Cd`c½ nm Rdosdladq 10rs+ eqnl 3ol sn 7ol `s sgd Fqddmk`vm Bdldsdqx+ 05/5 MCtrshm+ E`qlhmfsnm+ ML- Sghr dudms vhkk qdoqdrdms 01 ne sgd d`qkhdrs `qd` ohnmddqr onqsq`xdc ax knb`k `bsnqr `mc ghrsnqx ateer@ a`qadptd vhkk `krn s`jd ok`bdShbjdsr `qd `u`hk`akd `s Gnv`qcºr Bkd`mdqr+ Gns Rstee Ro`r+ `mc R`m It`m Ghrsnqhb`k Rnbhdsx- Enq lnqd hmenql`shnm+ b`kk 4/4,215,/076 nq 4/4, 22/,8566-

LEGALS IN THE DISTRICT COURT COUNTY OF SAN JUAN STATE OF NEW MEXICO No.D-1116-PB-201300025-8 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CARROLL M. EVANS, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the Estate of Carroll M. Evans. All persons having claims against this Estate is required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claim will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned Personal Representative’s attorney, Val R. Jolley, Jolley Law Firm, P.C., P.O.Box 2364, Farmington, New Mexico 87499, or filed with the San Juan County District Court, 103 South Oliver, Aztec, New Mexico 87410. RONALD F. EVANS Personal Representative Of the Estate of Carroll M. Evans, Deceased 6343 South Sicily Way Aurora, NM 80016 JOLLEY LAW FIRM, P.C. VAL R. JOLLEY Attorney for Personal Representative P.O. Box 2364 Farmington, New Mexico 87499 (505) 327-6116 Legal No. 97 Dates 6/21, 6/28/2013

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to the Self-Service Storage Lien Act [48-11-1to48-11-9 NMSA1978], that the following personal property is in Lien. The property is located at Armored Self Storage 4200 U.S. Highway 64, Kirtland, NM 87417. Ursulena Perry PO Box 4912 Shiprock, NM 87420 Misc Furniture, Tools, Stroller, Bike, Luggage, Tubs, Boxes, Misc. Barbara Toledo PO Box 2494 Kirtland, NM 87417 Bench Seat, Boxes, Tubes, Bages, Misc.

75 Tonya Antonio 714 A McCormick School Rd Farmington, NM 87401 20 Kathleen Werito PO Box 6272 Farmington, NM 87499 B-16 Falicia Billie 817 W. Apache St. Farmington, NM 87401 B-13 Thaddeus Gambell 2015 E. 12th St. Farmington, NM 87401

Sean Yazzie PO Box 909 TeecNosPos, AZ 86514 Bike, Misc Furniture, Mattress Set, Bags, Boxes, Tubes, Misc Monte Bates 303 W Ash Bloomfield, NM 87413 Tool Box, Trunk, Boxes, Misc Ben Poncho PO Box 933 Fruitland, NM 87416 Bike, Toys, Misc Furniture, Tools, Boxes, Misc On July 5, 2013 at 8am the above property will become the sole property of Armored Self Storage, to be sold or disposition to satisfy the lien on said unit. AUCTION WILL BE HELD AT A FUTURE DATE to be added to the invite list contact asstorage7 @qwestoffice.net or 505-598-9983. Legal No.88 Dates 6/21, 6/28/2013

LEGALS STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SAN JUAN ELEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION OF FRANCISCO CARLOS PAREYRA FOR CHANGE OF NAME No.D-1116-CV-2013750-1 NOTICE OF PETITION TO CHANGE NAME OF PERSON AGE 14 OR OLDER NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT Francisco Carlos Pareyra filed a Petition to Change Name in the Eleventh Judicial District Court in San Juan County, New Mexico at 103 So. Oliver Drive, Aztec, on the 12th day of June , 2013. The Petitioner seeks to change the Petitioner’s current name from FRANCISCO CARLOS PAREYRA to the name of FRANCISCO CARLOS PEREYRA. Legal No.96 Dates 6/21,6/28,7/5/2013

How many pairs of ribs does a human body normally have? 12

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

369 Billson Gordo 140 Falcon Bluff Aztec, NM 87410

LEGALS

CATCH-ALL STORAGE 5848 US HWY 64 FARMINGTON, NM 87401 (505)632-2132 Notice is hereby given that a sale or donation of miscellaneous household and personal items will be held to satisfy debt of back rent ON OR AFTER Sunday, July 14, 2013 at CatchAll Storage, 5848 US HWY 64, Farmington, NM 87401. HELEN CHAVEZ 6920 CHANTELLE ST FARMINGTON, NM 87401 JUSTIN MAMLEY PO BOX 612 FLORA VISTA, NM 87415 Legal No.98 Dates 6/28, 7/5/2013

444 Eric Frohn PO Box 298 Aztec, NM 87410 391 Cheryl Gingras 2703 Southside River Rd Farmington, NM 87401 449 Mark Woods 2117 N. Western Farmington, NM 87401 E-27 Natasha Goodall 1605 Butler #B Farmington, NM 87401 P-17 Angela Linkous 1200 Bramble Ave Farmington, NM 87401 Q-22 David Turney 3404 Cochiti Ave. Farmington, NM 87401 Q-23 Francelina Kelewood 1201 Randolph Ave Farmington, NM 87401 Q-29 Maggie Bedah 301 Western Skies Dr. SE Apt. #107 Albuquerque, NM 87123

If you remember the early-1960s TV series "Route 66," you might be surprised to learn that the show was actually shot in Florida and Oregon, nowhere near the fabled highway.

Next time you're rolling the dice, pick up a die and take a closer look. The opposite sides of each gaming cube always add up to 7.

Legal No.94 Date 6/21, 6/28/2013

advice

of stem between the joints). The presence of these distinctive rhizomes is a good way to distinguish dallisgrass from other common clumping grasses in lawns, such as crabgrass. Its seed head has three to six spikes that arise from different points along the main stem and often droop. Nutsedge or Nutgrass – is an erect, fast spreading grass-like weed. It thrives in waterlogged soil, and their presence often indicates poor drainage. Although nutsedges resemble grasses and often are referred to as “nutgrass,” they aren’t actually grasses but are true sedges. Their leaves are thicker and stiffer than most grasses and are arranged in sets of three at their base. Nutsedge has many small nut- like nodes on the roots, each capable of growing new shoots. This makes it nearly impossible to physically pull these weeds. All of these weeds listed above are a nuisance, but are easily controlled with a product called “Fertilome Weed-Out plus Q.” This product was developed not only to control broadleaf weeds, but also able to control many common unwanted grass weeds as well. This selective weed killer can be used on the lawn without damaging bluegrass, rye, buffalo or fescue, but selectively killing the weeds. Please keep in mind that a thick healthy lawn will prevent many weed problems. If you have a bad weed problem, this may be an indicator that you have other problems, either with the soil, the water or the fertilization.


A21

Friday, June 28, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

wants. NN can officiate – NN is still a member in good standing with the Ministers-R-US school of ministry and can legally marry and bury people, just so’s ya know – and can be Minister Minnie Mouse, complete with mouse ears and that cute little dress MM always wears. NN does think that, at some time, the people at Disney might want to offer MM a new outfit. For a mouse of MM’s stature to have only ONE dress seems inappropriate and not-nice to NN. And shoes – for cryinoutloud, give the pretty mouse some new shoes! Where’s Clinton and Stacy of What Not to Wear when you need ’em? We could have Ashley arrive in a pumpkin carriage, wearing fluffy bunny slippers and, as part of the ceremony, Jonathan could whip out some glass slippers and put ’em on her. Brooke could then toss the bunny slippers into the crowd of well wishers and party goers and whoever catches ‘em gets a free marry or bury from NN. Isn’t NN just the most thoughtful person you know? NN is convinced Ashley should be her daughter on accounta the resemblance between ’em is nothing short of amazing. They’re both blonde, and while Ashley is tall and slender with legs that go on forever, NN has

’K, so one of Nosey Nellie’s most favorite people of all time is getting married. NN learned on Face Book – what did we do before FB? – that Ashley Dye, her ’nother child by a ’nother mother, was proposed to by the handsome and incredibly lucky Jonathan Gaston at the X Run last weekend, in front of a gazillion people. Unfortunately, NN was not there to witness what everyone says – on FB! – was a beautiful and magical moment. NN loves the beautiful and wonderful Ashley and is thinking about offering her amazing talent as a wedding planner to Ashley and Jonathan as a wedding gift. NN has never been a wedding planner, but if she stays at a Holiday Inn tonight, by tomorrow, she will be one. NN always believes the television commercials. So, since Ashley is a princess and Jonathan is her Prince Charming, NN believes they should have a Disney-style wedding. Ashley can be Cinderella, Jonathan can be Prince Charming, and Ashley’s gorgeous and sweet daughter, Brooke, can be whatever she

been vertically challenged her whole entire live-long life and has to have a step stool to stand up to anybody. Ashley and NN are both attractive, although everyone calls Ashley “beautiful” and they call NN “not real ugly.” Whatever. They still look alike and NN has lots of people ask if Ashley Dye is related to her and NN always says “Yes,” and they always roll their eyes in amazement. NN is pretty sure it’s because they think NN and Ashley are sisters, instead of the mother-daughter thingey they really are. NN is also pretty sure Ashley’s for reals mother, Ginger Palmer, will want to help plan the wedding and NN is good with that. NN loves Ginger almost as much as she loves Ashley, and there are some who actually think Ashley looks more like Ginger than she does NN, but NN just doesn’t see it. Whatever. So, NN’s gonna let Ginger participate and help. NN knows that GP is an amazing decorator kinda person – NN suspects GP also stayed at a Holiday Inn at some point. It’s the best place to become educated and certified in just about everything, just so’s ya know – so maybe she can take care of the pumpkin carriage and the piñatas and the 36 trombones. And NN is thinking nothing but the best for

“God Bless America”

OPEN YEAR ROUND

Fresh for Less

2330 E. MAIN ST.

Fairview

Main Street

STORE HOURS: MONDAY - SATURDAY 8:30-7, SUNDAY 9-6 SPECIALS GOOD THRU JULY 4TH WHILE SUPPLIES LAST. WE ARE OPEN YEAR ROUND.

X FRESH FOR LESS

BLUEBERRIES E PINT A C BASKET H

¢

99

AVOCADOS

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3 99

S AS

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F O R

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

Ashley and Jonathan, so she’s gonna suggest to GP that they pull out all the stops and get the really nice plastic tablecloths and the Dixie paper plates and cups that almost look like expensive plastic. NN has nothing if not class. Just sayin’. . . . NN has a friend in the Big House who makes the most beautiful paper flowers out of toilet tissue, so NN made her one acceptable call to Big Mama and asked her to do bouquets for the bridemaids, and nice big one for Ashley/Cinderella, and some larger centerpieces for the card tables NN has reserved. NN is hoping Ashley/Cinderella and Jonathan aren’t planning to get married too soon, on accounta it takes Big Mama several months to confiscate enough rolls of toilet tissue to do her magic. Big Mama did not ever stay in a Holiday Inn, but the arts and crafts group she joined at the Big House has given her a new lease on life, not to mention a new career when she gets out in 45 more years. Life is good in the ’hood, donchatahink? NN is excited about planning the wedding and is sure Ashley and Jonathan are going to be equally excited and thrilled when she tells ’em. They will be very surprised and NN guesses they’ll roll their eyes in amazement, too. NN is nothing if not thoughtful. ’Specially for her ’nother child. In other news this week, NN woke up early Monday morning to find her front yard full of pink flamingos! It was way fun, and while Mojito, the Devil Kitten, wanted to jump through the screen and attack them all – the DK wants to attack anything he thinks he can eat, which is why NN’s short legs are always scarred and scratched on accounta the DK thinks they’re drum

TENDER L SPEARS B

$ 99 STRAW 1 LB$ 99

3

BLACK 6 OZ

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1

¢ 99

1

SERRANO L & TOMATILLO B

VINE A RIPE C H

39

¢ 99

PEACHES L PLUMS 1 LB A $ 99 C NECTARINES B PACKAGE H MANGOS LIMES HONEYDEW

99

E A C H

¢

2

¢ HONEY

99 10 99 F O R

SWEET

F O R

2 $3

WATERMELON E

SWEET SEEDLESS

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$

1

99

Smiles

¢

SPINACH ¢ SPRING MIX & BABY E

TROPICAL TREAT

* Nellie A23

$ 99

APRICOTS CANTALOUPE E

PEAK OF THE SEASON

they may never eat at home again. Jack and Terri are one of Farmington’s Power Couples and two of the nicest people NN has ever known in her whole live-long life. NN did feel kinda bad, though, on accounta the Fortners are healthy eaters and NN’s plate was full of carbs and calories, not to mention the lack of nutrients in her adult beverage. Whatever. Schaefer Church was recognized last weekend at the Eagle Scout Court of Honor. Schaefer is the son of Jamie and Darrin Church and is one ‘nother of NN’s most favorite young people. Schaefer is amazing and wonderful and talented and one of the nicest young men you will ever hope to meet. He is good to the soul and is good to everyone he meets. Celebrating with Schaefer, Jamie and Darrin were Chris Parker, Cheryl Sitton, Cherry and Lee Church, Keith Banker, Stephen Mirabal, Melinda Roberts, Phil Damron, Rob Comer and Erin Hourihan. Congratulations, Schaefer! Also recognized recently were NN’s best buddies, Sherry and Kevin -- he Breakfast Flakes – Adam Savage, and Steven Bortstein, who were honored with big honker awards at the Broadcasting Awards event. They’re all like the best ever, and NN loves ’em like her own. Congratulations, friends! Dozer Dean, granddog of Gayle and Da Judge John Dean, graduated with honors from the Prison Training Dog School. And no, Dozer is not a convicted dog bone snatcher, he just needed some training and the Dean’s beautiful daughter, Kama, sent Dozer to the school, which partners prisoners with the dogs, which is beneficial to both. Dozer did exceptionally well and received the Dog-

ASPARAGUS

CHERRIES FRESH BERRIES JALAPENOS LARGE L RAINIER B

sticks. Whatever – they looked cute and NN loved ’em and was happy Matt Owens from the Farmington Young Professionals flocked her. NN was kinda sorta sad when the lovely Yanabah Bluehouse took ’em away, but understood that the flamingos had other people to make happy. Some of those ’nother people included Nathan Duckett – who is also the president of FYP—Mr. Muffler – NN has always wondered if Mr. Muffler has a Mrs. Muffler, and why no one ever sees or hears about her – Silvia Ramos, Dessert Hills Dental, Helen Woodward, and Sue Johnson. City Manager Rob Mayes, always the smart one, purchased insurance so he would not be flocked by flamingos! NN was also happy to see that one of her most favorite of all time younger friends, Esther Rogge, gave the Farmington firefighters a statue in appreciation for their help when she was in an automobile accident. Esther is a sweet and lovely girl who is an accomplished dancer. NN first met Esther when Esther was part of a group of dancers who were performing in the Nutcracker. NN was impressed by the beauty, talent and maturity of Esther back then, and knew this was a young girl who was going to make people happy, no matter what she did. Esther proved that this week, when she thanked her rescuers for helping her and making sure she is still able to dance. NN loves Esther, just so’s ya know. NN and her friend, Sheri Rogers, enjoyed dinner at a local restaurant this week and ran into Jack and Terri Fortner. The Fortners were practicing being empty nesters, since both their daughters will be at UNM – gee, go figure that one out! – in a few months and

RED RIPE

Mission of Mercy Comes to San Juan J County, yy,, September S e ptemb er 13 – 14 14,, at at McGee McG e e Park Park Dental profes e sionals will provide free services to adults and children who cannot afford care.

Community Communi C ommunity volunteers volunt voluntteers e ers are are needed ne e de d September Sept S epttember emb er 12 – 15 Volunteer opportunities include: t t t t t

Assisting with hospitality and food Greeting, registering and escorting patients Serving as translators Data entry Entertainment … to name a few.

Volunteers must be 18 years of age or older. Volunteer registration deadline: August 16. Find out more, and register now to volunteer: ww w ww..nmdentalffoundation.org A program of the New Mexico Dental Foundation


A22

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

game page

New York Times Crossword Puzzle QUESTION BOX By Mel Rosen / Edited by Will Shortz

Brought to you by Tucker, Burns, Yoder & Hatfield

Law Firm 505-325-7755 1

2

3

4

5

6

18

Note: When this puzzle is done, take the answers to the 10 starred clues and arrange them across and down in crossword fashion in the central 5x5 box. The resulting five-letter word spelled out diagonally by the circles will answer the question asked at 23-, 34-, 82- and 98-Across. Across

49 Stitch

1 *Some boat covers

50 Rhyming honor

6 Exorbitant

51 Ding, say

10 Eye liner?

52 Symbol of remoteness

14 Climbed

93 Company whose logo has a diagonal red arrow 94 Explorer or Escape, in brief

23

14 Big around the middle

98 End of the trivia question

20 A lot of the Beatles’ “She Loves You”

56 Insincere earnestness

21 Kama ___ 24 Horror director Eli

56

22 1960s TV boy

102 Journalist/writer Herbert

59 Shul reading

23 Start of a trivia question

25 Polynesian entertainments

63 Garden

103 Ryan of “The Beverly Hillbillies”

60

60India’s ___ Coast

26 Game stopper

65

65 Rocky Mountain tribe

104 Info for airport greeters

31 Protected goose

30 Constellation next to Gemini 31 Brooklyn athlete 32 Latin phrase at the end of a list 33 Three-part 34 Trivia question, Part 2 39 Joint czar with Peter I 40 Drink that’s stirred 41 “If only you could ___ now” 42 Maritime letters 45 Assess, with “up” 46 France’s Académie ___ Beaux-Arts 47 Grp. involved in back-to-school night

For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 each minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800814-5554.

66 ___ cable (TV hookup) 67 Cause for plastic surgery, maybe 70 PC game sensation of the early 2000s, with “The” 71 Certain drive-thru convenience

105 Maine-to-Florida rte. 106 Captain ___

15 *Works 16 French lord

32 Biblical son begat by a 105-year-old father

107 They’re tapped 108 Some deli buys

34 Protein-rich soup

109 *Cruise stops

35 Poet banished in A.D. 8

87

74 Complete loser 75 “___ boy!”

4 Lap-dog breed

76 Tammany Hall problem

5 Channel starting in 2003

43 Kelly of “The West Wing”

80 “N.B.A. on ___”

6 Tennis great Tommy

81 Like the earth and some apples

7 Espionage agcy. with a leader played by Tom Cruise

10 With lots of room to spare

48 52

44

67

68

69

95

96

97

49 53

55

58

59 61

62

63

64

66 71

72 76

88

83

73 77

78

84

79

74

80

81

85

89

86

90

91

93

98

106

92 Texas oil city

43

94

99

100

101

36 Level

42 One taking applications

91 Italian for 86-Down

47

92

38 Official in a mask

90 Razzers

57

82

3 Gemstone for most Libras

87 Betrays

41

51

75

102

9 Nashville-based variety show, 196992

42

22

38

46

70

37 *End of ___

8 Present need?

17

33

54

2 British fop

82 Trivia question, Part 3

16

26

37

50

1 Flimsy, as an excuse

73 Three-point line, e.g.

15

30

40

17 Wee

33 Sleeping sickness carrier

Down

36

14 21

32

45

55 Romeo and Juliet, e.g.

29 Wallops

13

29

39

19 Beau’s girl

28 Wallops

12

20

28

35

11

13 “Doctor ___”

95 J.F.K.’s historic ___ Flight Center

27 Patriots’ org.

10

25

31

54 Vocal fanfare

18 “Climb onto Papa’s lap!”

9

24

27

34

8

19

11 Breathe 12 Lugs

7

103 107

58 Dollar rival

72 Dr.’s order 73 Literary olios

44 *What’s in store

61 It’s said when a light bulb goes on

46 June honoree

62 Cheap booze

48 Be moribund, say

63 *Auto shop inventory

49 *Move, as a plant 51 Black ___ 53 Wrinkle remover

64 Jean-___ Picard of “Star Trek: T.N.G.”

74 “Les Trois Villes” novelist 77 At it 78 Features of some cowboy shirts

104

105

108

109

82 ___-Babylonian (ancient Semitic language)

93 “Pursuit of the Graf ___” (1956 war film)

83 Major-leaguer with three 60+ home run seasons

94 Lip

84 Sort of 85 Ogling type 86 Part of a day

95 Old satellitelaunching rocket 96 Gave out 97 Motion carriers

67 Lord’s worker

79 QB Tim

87 Type type

99 Shul fixture

80 Guttural

88 Cliché, often

100 ___ kwon do

56 *Chart-topper

68 ___ 51 (conspiracy theory subject)

81 Partition into

57 Novelist Puzo

69 Mercury and Saturn

89 *Late office opening, say

101 General on Chinese menus

54 *Sandy spots, maybe

multiple bits

thought for the week “When you spend time worrying, you’re simply using your imagination to create things you don’t want.”

— Author Unknown

Answers to this week’s puzzles are on page A23


A23

Friday, June 28, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

at the movies WHITE HOUSE DOWN

THE HEAT

Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: The White House is under siege in this action thriller from Independence Day director Roland Emmerich and The Amazing Spider-Man's writer James Vanderbilt in this Sony Pictures release. Channing Tatum stars.

Rating: R Synopsis: Uptight FBI Special Agent Sarah Ashburn (Sandra Bullock) and foul-mouthed Boston cop Shannon Mullins (Melissa McCarthy) couldn't be more incompatible. But when they join forces to bring down a ruthless drug lord, they become the last thing anyone expected: buddies. From Paul Feig, director of "Bridesmaids."

WORLD WAR Z Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: The story revolves around United Nations employee Gerry Lane (Pitt), who traverses the world in a race against time to stop a pandemic that is toppling armies and governments and threatening to decimate humanity itself.

AFTER EARTH Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: A crash landing leaves teenager Kitai Raige (Jaden Smith) and his legendary father Cypher (Will Smith) stranded on Earth, 1,000 years after cataclysmic events forced humanity's escape. With Cypher critically injured, Kitai must embark on a perilous journey to signal for help, facing uncharted terrain, evolved animal species that now rule the planet, and an unstoppable alien creature that escaped during the crash. Father and son must learn to work together and trust one another if they want any chance of returning home.

MAN OF STEEL Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: A young boy learns that he has extraordinary powers and is not of this Earth. As a young man, he journeys to discover where he came from and what he was sent here to do. But the hero in him must emerge if he is to save the world from annihilation and become the symbol of hope for all mankind.

MONSTERS UNIVERSITY Rating: G Synopsis: Mike Wazowski and James P. Sullivan are an inseparable pair, but that wasn't always the case. From the moment these two mismatched monsters met they couldn't stand each other. "Monsters University" unlocks the door to how Mike and Sulley overcame their differences and became the best of friends.

NOW YOU SEE ME Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: NOW YOU SEE ME pits an elite FBI squad in a game of cat and mouse against "The Four Horsemen", a super-team of the world's greatest illusionists. "The Four Horsemen" pull off a series of daring heists against corrupt business leaders during their performances, showering the stolen profits on their audiences while staying one step ahead of the law.

Answers to this week’s puzzles T H I N

T O F F

M I S O

O V I D

S M A S H

M A R I O

R O M A N

A D A G E

O P S H P U P A A G I R A L K O S N E T R E T H A A N V N Z E D E E M A R T A D A A R M L A B A R A P A H O M S A T O G A S Q U T S O U T E S S A N Y A S A A R I R M O K

I G H M I E F F E H T H U E T A L N A W A O G S S T T O R E P A N E P A R S M A M R A F T I R R E G I B S U N O P I G W E N E E G S

B Y A M I L E

R E S P I R E

P O R T S

S T A S H

L E C H E R

T H R O A T Y

O W R A H S O F O U R T S T A U T R I N U S A N D M E P T A R S I B E E L O P T O P L O T A U X A R C Z N T C O A S H A L S O R A S U V T A R E T A S U S E S P O

O P E R A

S I E U R

E E N S Y

H I R E R

M O I R A

S T A S H

S E R F

A R E A

G O D S

T H O R

W E N T

A Y E S

THIS IS THE END Rating: R Synopsis: The comedy This Is The End follows six friends trapped in a house after a series of strange and catastrophic events devastate Los Angeles. As the world unravels outside, dwindling supplies and cabin fever threaten to tear apart the friendships inside. Eventually, they are forced to leave the house, facing their fate and the true meaning of friendship and redemption.

THE PURGE Rating: R Synopsis: If on one night every year, you could commit any crime without facing consequences, what would you do? In The Purge, a speculative thriller that follows one family over the course of a single night, four people will be tested to see how far they will go to protect themselves when the vicious outside world breaks into their home. In an America wracked by crime and overcrowded prisons, the government has sanctioned an annual 12-hour period in which any and all criminal activity-including murder-becomes legal. The police can't be called. Hospitals suspend help. It's one night when the citizenry regulates itself without thought of punishment.

THE HANGOVER 3 Rating: R Synopsis: "The Hangover Part III" is the third and final film in director Todd Phillips' recordshattering comedy franchise. This time, there's no wedding. No bachelor party. What could go wrong, right? But when the Wolfpack hits the road, all bets are off.

FAST AND FURIOUS 6

Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Vin Diesel, Paul Walker and Dwayne Johnson lead the returning cast of all-stars as the global blockbuster franchise built on speed races to its next continent in Fast & Furious 6. Reuniting for their most high-stakes adventure yet, fan favorites Jordana Brewster, Michelle Rodriguez, Tyrese Gibson, Sung Kang, Gal Gadot, Chris "Ludacris" Bridges and Elsa Pataky are joined by badass series newcomers Luke Evans and Gina Carano. Since Dom (Diesel) and Brian's (Walker) Rio heist toppled a kingpin's empire and left their crew with $100 million, our heroes have scattered across the globe. But their inability to return home and living forever on the lam have left their lives incomplete.

Movie information and ratings are from Rotten Tomatoes. Ratings are based on 0 - 100%; each star represents a 20% rating.

Nellie gone Good Doggie Award – or if he didn’t, he should have. Maybe NN will become a Doggie Do Good Party Planner. There were birthdays again this week! Shannon Valderas, Pat Lucero, Rick Quevedo, Michael Kelly and Courtney Williams all celebrated, although, once again, withOUT NN. What does a girl have to do to get invited to a birthday party? One can only wonder. Happy birthday to all, anyway.

Damon and Jann Weems celebrated an anniversary this week. Damon and Jann have done and still do so much for our community, and I hope they had a party that lasts a gazillion more years! NN also wishes speedy recoveries to Carmen Martinez, Laura Huish and Brenda Blevins. These are three of the hardest working ladies NN knows and she misses seeing them at work/play. NN offers a special thank you to Karen Ellsbury and

Patrick Hazen for coming to her rescue late in the evening this week. A leaky swamp cooler created a messy ceiling and Patrick helped save the night! It’s the best when you have the best, best friends! For now, NN is making reservations at the Holiday Inn. She’s gonna stay a coupla days, so she can wake up a wedding planner, a plumber and a ceiling fixer. And maybe a millionaire. Ya never know . . . .

DON’T MISS OUT ON LOCAL NEWS! MM

Puzzles on page A22

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A24

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

ALL SHOWTIMES GOOD FROM

06/28/13-07/01/13

Prices: Adult (after 6:00 pm) $8.50 | Child $6.50 | Senior $6.50 Matinee (before 6:00 pm) $6.50 | *3D Movie Surcharge $2.00

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No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13 2:10 7:20 DAILY

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No Passes or Discounts PG-13 3D* 11:20 6:00 DAILY PG-13

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COMING SOON

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9PM SHOW TUESDAY 7/2/13

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www.allentheatresinc.com

7PM SHOW TUESDAY 7/2/13

July 3

July 3

July 12

July 12

July 17

July 19

July 19

July 19


JUNE 28, 2013

Shelly

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED • SERVING THE SAN JUAN BASIN

T R I - C I T Y

MM TRIBUNE

Buy-back Program for Tribal Nations

Pg. 7

MAJESTIC MEDIA

SHIPROCK EDITION

WWW.TRICITYTRIBUNEUSA.COM

27th Celebration begins July 2 and runs through July 7 LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Barbecue, swimming, and watching fireworks displays are a few of the activities people associate with the Fourth of July. The public has a chance to participate in patriotic activities during the 27th Annual Freedom Days, organized by the Farmington Convention and Visitors Bureau. From ice cream socials to an Independence Day golf tournament, Freedom Days offers activities for everyone in the community. Fireworks Display For those interested in watching the dazzling fireworks display in the night sky, San Juan College is the perfect viewing place. The fireworks will be set off from Sullivan Hill and the show will begin at 9:25 p.m. on Wednesday, July 3. The Farmington Police Department will patrol the campus and the Farmington Fire Department will set up a command post. While the public is encouraged to come out and enjoy the display, the following list explains the restrictions for those viewing

Send press releases, events and story ideas to editor@tricitytribuneusa.com fax to 505-516-1231 or mail 100 W. Apache St, Farmington, NM 87401

50¢

VOL. 3 NO. 39

s y a Annual Freedom D

the fireworks on the college’s campus. • No alcoholic beverages • No personal fireworks • No outside vending • No barbecue grills or open fires • No motorized off-road vehicles • No bicycles, skateboards, rollerblades, etc., on sidewalks or internal walkways • No fundraising activities or organizations • No access to campus buildings Some roads and entrances into the campus will be closed, so pay attention to detour signs and obey officers directing traffic. Portable toilets will be provided by the city of Farmington. To view a map of the campus that shows areas best for viewing, go to www.sanjuancollege.edu. Water balloon fight Water balloons will be soaring through the sky once again this Fourth of July. The Second Annual Fourth of July Water Balloon Fight was created as an alternative to shooting fireworks, because of the dry conditions affecting the area. The balloon launch will be at 2 p.m. at Brookside Park and everyone is welcome to attend. “It’s been a really dry

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year here, even more so than last year, and I’m really afraid of people being reckless with fireworks, and so this is a good way to spread the message of throwing water balloons rather than fireworks,” said American Classifieds Sales Manager Allen Elmore, who is one of the event coordinators. Last year, there were more than 7,000 water balloons thrown at the event. This year, Elmore said they are hoping to provide more than 10,000 balloons. Individuals who pick up the most balloon pieces after the water balloon fight will be awarded various water-related prizes. American Classifieds, Zebra’s Sports Grill, Defined Fitness, Sam’s Club, and the Farmington Convention and Visitors Bureau are sponsoring the event. Elmore said they are still looking for event volunteers. Anyone who wishes to volunteer, call Zebra’s at 505.599.9181. Skateboard Competition If interested in showing off skating tricks, the Sycamore Park Community Center is hosting the free

Skate Park Showcase Skateboard Competition in Brookside Park on Thursday, July 4. Registration begins at 11 a.m. and the competition kicks off at noon. The competition will consist of three age divisions: Ages 10 and under, 11 years old through 14 years old, and 15 years old and up. Prizes will be awarded to the top three contestants in each age division. Contestants must sign a waiver to participate in the competition. For additional information on the skate competition, contact Sycamore Park Community Center at 505.566.2480. Firecracker Fun Festival To continue the patriotic spirit the day after the Fourth of July, the public is invited to attend the Firecracker Fun Festival from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Friday, July 5, at Brookside Pool on Dustin Avenue. Outdoor swimming, relay water games, face painting, and T-shirt tie-dyeing will be available for children and their families. “It’s something we want

Outdoor activities

Tuesday, July 2 7 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.: Freedom Days Hi Yo, Silver….Away! at Totah Theatre Join us as we celebrate the imminent release of The Lone Ranger featuring Shiprock Pinnacle. Winners of the Kids’ Lone Ranger Movie Poster Contest announced, free popcorn, free Lone Ranger masks for kids and enjoy watching episodes of the original Lone Ranger TV series. All movie poster contest entries will be on display. Wednesday, July 3 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.: Food Fair and FREE Brass Band Concert at Gateway Park and Museum Featuring Kissmah Brass Band plus a variety of other musical acts. Great food available for purchase from fantastic food vendors. Enjoy a festive concert and stay for the fireworks. Best view in town! 9:25 p.m.: Fireworks Display at Sullivan Hill Thursday, July 4 11 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.: Party in the Park at Brookside Park Food, entertainment, fun vendors, live music, games & activities for the entire family! 11 a.m.: Skateboard Competition at Brookside Park at Party in the Park Registration 11 a.m. Competition begins at noon. 2 p.m.: Water Balloon Fight at Brookside Park Separated into age divisions, open to all. 3 p.m.: Papa John’s Pizza Eating Contest at Brookside Park Registration 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Benefiting San Juan County Special Olympics. 4 p.m.: Community Patriotic Concert and Ice Cream So-

cial at First United Methodist Church, 808 N. Monterey Ave. 8 p.m.: Outdoor Summer Theater “Grease” at Lions Wilderness Park, 5700 College Blvd. Call 505.326.7602 for ticket information. Friday, July 5 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.: Gem & Mineral Show at the Farmington Civic Center 8 p.m.: Outdoor Summer Theater “Grease” at Lions Wilderness Park, 5700 College Blvd. Call 505.326.7602 for ticket information. Saturday, July 6 8 a.m. - Dusk: Freedom Fours Coed Volleyball Tournament at Brookside Park 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.: Gem & Mineral Show at the Farmington Civic Center 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.: Ice Cream Social at E3 Children’s Museum, 302 N. Orchard Ave. Ice cream eating contest, yo-yo contest, musical entertainment, hay rides, and more! 5 p.m. - 7 p.m.: History Makers Hall of Fame at the Farmington Civic Center. Opening reception is from 5 to 6 p.m. Induction of Honorees is from 6 to 7 p.m. 8 p.m.: Outdoor Summer TheaterGrease at Lions Wilderness Park, 5700 College Blvd. Call 505.326.7602 for ticket information. Sunday, July 7 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.: Gem & Mineral Show at the Farmington Civic Center For more information contact the Farmington Convention & Visitors Bureau at 505.326.7602

to do for the kids during Shjan Sanisya- Spencer said. the holiday, and we want The event is organized to bring the families out so by the city of Farmington everyone can have fun,” and entry cost is $3 per Farmington Aquatic Center person. Administrative Coordinator * Freedom Days A3

San Juan Hospital Annual Summer Adventure Camp Pg. 6

Hospital adds new mammongraphy Pg. 3


2

SHIPROCK

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

Shelly:

Navajo Nation capable of running buy-back program Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly said to the Department of Interior that the Navajo Nation is capable of implementing the recently announced a Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations. The meeting was the first government-to-government consultation between DOI and the Navajo Nation about the buy-back program, which was announced on Tuesday. “Navajo Nation has the capability to acquire lands efficiently, which provides an opportunity to the Navajo people to maximize their interest and provided a valuation method through the Buy-Back Program,” President Shelly said. “Navajo Nation strongly recommends for the American Indian Trust Land funds to be allocated di-

rectly to the Navajo Nation through a contract to administer the Buy-Back land for its Navajo people,” President Shelly added. As part of the program, DOI has made $1.9 billion available to American Indian tribes to buy allotted lands that have multiple owners. The Navajo Nation’s por-

tion is about $103 million potentially to buy 4,355 tracts of land that have multiple owners. The program would buy land only from owners who agree to sell their land. John McClanahan, program manager for the Land Buy-Back Program, said the program plans to have

multiple meetings to with Navajo leaders, allotment landowners and other interested parties. “We want to make sure we are tailoring the program to the unique needs of the Navajo Nation,” McClanahan said during his opening presentation. Another suggestion

President Shelly presented was that lands that are purchased under the program should have environmental clearances to reduce environmental liabilities. “This will strengthen the chapters on the Navajo Nation and the opportunity to enhance residential, community and economic development through their comprehensive community land use plans,” President Shelly said. Sharon Pinto, Navajo Region director for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, said having a centralized location for the program would make it easier for landowners to learn about the BuyBack Program. “I think it is important to have a centralized location for landowners. We need to take this and move it forward to make it suc-

cessful,” Pinto said. Navajo Chief of Staff Arbin Mitchell said the buy-back program could help achieve rights of way for new projects since some allotment lands have multiple owners. “If one says no, that puts the whole project on hold or we have to change plans,” Mitchell said. President Shelly stated after the meeting that though New Mexico has the most fractionalized allotted lands, the Navajo Nation has to be concerned with the needs of all Navajo allottees, including allottees in Arizona and Utah. “We have Navajo families in all three states that have allotted lands. We have to listen to all the people about how we can make this program work for them,” President Shelly said.

Diné unwritten tradition

Shelly calls for more defined fundamental law Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly called for Diné Fundamental Law to be better defined, better to protect Navajo children. The Navajo Nation in 2002 adopted Diné Fundamental Law to recognize unwritten traditional Navajo laws and values in written statutes.

“Only the medicine men know what fundamental law is. We need it written out because we have repeat offenders being let off because of fundamental law,” President Shelly said during opening remarks at the 29th Annual Navajo Division of Social Services conference.

President Shelly added that Fundamental Law needs to be more specific and urged the conference attendees to start dialogue to find solutions that would help social workers keep offenders accountable for their actions. “We need stronger laws,” President Shelly added.

President Shelly also thanked the Division of Social Services for their commitment to helping Navajo families. “I know each of you have had hardships because of the situations you are asked to handle. I want each of you to know that I am thankful for your

service to our Nation, but most importantly to our children,” President Shelly said. The division has been making internal policy changes throughout the past year in efforts to serve Navajo people with more efficiency. President Shelly supports the division’s

strides to make changes. “I strongly support the restructuring of the divisions and programs. We can no longer operate as we have been for years. We have to become more and more efficient while we find creative ways to deliver services,” President Shelly said.

Finally delivered

Navajo president delivers long-anticipated FEMA checks Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly delivered reimbursement checks from the Federal Emergency Management Agency for Navajo chapters from disasters stemming from as far back as 2005. “Our chapters have been waiting years to be reimbursed for money they spent for emergencies since 2005. I am happy to report that we have completed a task that has been plaguing the Navajo Nation for years,” President Shelly said. President Shelly personally delivered checks to

12 chapters in the Navajo Eastern Agency last Friday and on Monday. Chapters in other agencies received hand-delivered checks by the Navajo Department of Emergency Management staff. The reimbursement checks varied in amount depending upon the amount of money chapters spent during emergencies from 2005 through 2010. At least $2.6 million is being reimbursed to chapters and the Navajo Nation government. Operations Hashtlish,

Monsoon and Snowfall are all part of the reimbursements of emergency spending, along with emergency spending from the monsoonal floods of 2006. In total, the Navajo Nation had 846 disaster projects that were reimbursed up to 75 percent of their total costs. “I know this has been a long time in the making. I am pleased that our Department of Emergency Management was able to move forward and help chapters receive their money,” President Shelly said.

Navajo Department of Emergency Management Director Rose Whitehair said the oldest projects are being reimbursed first, then other larger then smaller projects are expected to be reimbursed. “We have many checks for many chapters and we have been coordinating with all of them to disburse their checks,” Whitehair said. The Navajo Department of Emergency Management received and coordinated help with FEMA personnel and volunteers earlier this

year, which helped chapters and Navajo DEM complete necessary paperwork to complete reimbursement applications. “We are thankful for all the hard work FEMA and FEMA Corps did for us in the past few months. They have been very helpful and provided great insight,” Whitehair said. She added, though, that the money being reimbursed from FEMA must be used for certain projects. For some chapter workers, the reimbursements are

recognition of keeping sound chapter financial records and allocating funds to their specific purpose. “Some chapters have been waiting eight years,” said Michelle Bitsie, account maintenance specialist for Tsayatoh Chapter. She also worked for Coyote Canyon Chapter. President Shelly handed out checks to Tsayatoh, Manuelito, Red Rock, Churchrock, Iyanbito, Mariano Lake, Pinedale, Smith Lake, Thoreau, Casamero Lake, Crownpoint and Becenti Chapters.


SHIPROCK

Friday, June 28, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

3

Digital mammography available

Hospital hosts reception at diagnostic center LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Digital mammography is now offered at San Juan Regional Medical Center’s Outpatient Diagnostic Center, which increases breast cancer detection rates by approximately 12 percent, according to Doctor Kristy Wolske with Four Corners Radiology. The digital technology was introduced to the public during a June 19 reception, along with GE Healthcare’s SensorySuite, which provides a “less clinical and more spa-like experience,” said Linda Yentes, radiology department manager. “Everyone knows getting a mammogram is a little bit of a nerve-racking experience,” she said. “We want to ease the anxiety by introducing the SensorySuite.” The SensorySuite allows patients to experience the sights, sounds, and smells of a garden, beach, or waterfall. A digital flat screen displays the images on the wall and a scented bracelet that correlates with the scene is given to the pa-

tient. San Juan Regional Medical Center is the second hospital in the nation to offer the SensorySuite experience, Yentes said. The first hospital to receive the technology is Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, N.Y. The benefit of digital mammography is it can produce an image within 40 seconds, Yentes said. “We don’t have to wait for film to develop anymore, which used to be a three-

minute process. So the technologist will be able to determine if (a woman’s) images are good and then the radiologist will read it that same day.” Wolske said it is crucial for women to get an annual mammogram, because 1 in 8 women are diagnosed with breast cancer. “Unfortunately, what most women don’t know is as many as 10 to 15 percent of breast cancers are not readily detectable by mammography,” Wolske

said. “Mammography is a fantastic evolving and lifesaving technology, but some cancers are just very subtle. This is where repeat, routine annual mammograms really make a difference. It allows us to look for subtle changes that might show early stages of breast cancer. The key to a cure is detecting breast cancer early. We want the opportunity to save lives.” The new technology will, it is hoped, encourage

women to get their annual exam, Yentes said. “I think (breast cancer) is something women worry about a lot and if we can make their yearly screening more comfortable for them then I think we have succeeded. If it is a pleasant experience than they are more likely

to come back.” If interested in scheduling an appointment for a digital mammogram with SensorySuite call 505.609.6228. The Outpatient Diagnostic Center is located in Farmington at 2300 E. 30th St., Building C.

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

calendar ONGOING EVENTS BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been noted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, located in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for leisurely walk of 1to 2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org/museum GREASE, OUTDOOR SUMMER THEATER Come experience live local theater in a beautiful natural sandstone amphitheater. Performances are held Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., June 20 through Aug. 3, at Lions Wilderness Park. Concessions available onsite or bring a picnic and eat before the show. Information: 877.599.3331 or www.fmtn.org/sandstone SUMMER TERRACE SERIES The Farmington Museum hosts outdoor concerts Saturday nights throughout the summer. Concerts begin at 6 p.m. and are held at the Farmington Museum on the picturesque terrace next to the river at the Gateway Park Museum & Visitors Center, 3041 E. Main St., through August. Call for performance schedule. Information: 505.599.1174 or www.fmtn.org/museum MUSIC IN THE WINERY’S COURTYARD Enjoy live music & great wine at Wines of the San Juan from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. ever y Sunday from May through September 22. Wines of the San Juan is located at 233 Hwy. 511 in Turley, N.M. Information: 505.632.0879 or www.winesofthesanjuan .com TGIF Grab some lunch and listen to live music and relax on your lunch break, at Orchard Park in Downtown Farmington, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. each Friday after noon, June through July 29. Three Rivers Eatery & Brew House will sell burgers and hotdogs. TGIF is a Farmington Downtown Association and City of Farmington Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Affairs event. Information: 505.599.1419

TUES JULY 2 – SUN JULY 7 THE 26TH ANNUAL FREEDOM DAYS CELEBRATION The Fourth of July is celebrated with a variety of special events throughout Farmington, N.M. Festivities include fireworks, Brass Band concert, nighttime parade

and Party in the Park. Information: 505.326.7602 or 800.448.1240 or www.farmingtonnm.org.

THUR JULY 4 ANNUAL FREEDOM DAYS SKATEBOARD COMPETITION Come by the skate park at Brookside Park for a free skateboarding competition hosted by the Sycamore Park Community Center to benefit the Sycamore Skate Park. Registration star ts at 11 a.m. and competition is at noon. Information: 505.566.2480

Information: 505.599.1419

WED JULY 24 HEATHER MCGAUGHY CHILDREN’S SUMMER THEATER PRODUCTION Experience live theater performed by local children in the beautiful natural sandstone outdoor amphitheater at Lions Wilderness Park, 5800 College Blvd. Performance starts at 7 p.m. and is the culmination of a summer theater children’s workshop. Information: 505.599.3331 or www.fmtn.org/sandstone

FRI JULY 26 SAT JULY 6 ANNUAL FREEDOM DAYS ICE CREAM SOCIAL From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., cool down at the E3 Children’s Museum & Science Center, 302 N. Orchard Ave., with family entertainment, ice cream sundaes, root beer floats, cold drinks, hot dogs, fun photos, temporary tattoos, wagon rides, a yo-yo contest, face painting and water rocket launching. Buy a raffle ticket to win amazing prizes. All proceeds benefit the Farmington Museum System. Information: 505.599.1425

POETRY PICNIC Bring a picnic supper and eat in the garden at 6 p.m. There will be a program of poetry for about 20 minutes and then, stay to walk in the park and through the Riverside Nature Center Xeriscape Gardens. Information: 505.599.1422

FRI JULY 26 – SAT JULY 27 THE ANNUAL INDIAN MARKET & FESTIVAL This annual festival includes singing, dancing, food and arts & craft vendors, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. in Berg Park in Farmington. Information: 505.947.3332

FRI JULY 12 POETRY PICNIC Bring a picnic supper and eat in the garden at 6 p.m. There will be a program of poetry for about 20 minutes, and then stay to walk in the park and through the Riverside Nature Center Xeriscape Gardens. Information: 505.599.1422 CROWNPOINT RUG AUCTION 300 to 400 hand woven Navajo rugs are auctioned off each month at the Crownpoint Elementary School, 72 miles south of Farmington on Hwy. 371. American Indian arts and crafts vendors will also be onsite. Auction is sponsored by the Crownpoint Rug Weavers Association. Rug viewing from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., auction begins at 7 p.m. Information: 505.785.7386, 505.610.6797 and Christinae2011@Live.com

SAT JULY 13 THE ANNUAL ANIMAS RIVER BLUES FESTIVAL Blues, Brews and BBQ at Riverside Park in Aztec from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Information: 505.330.4616 or www.animasriverblues.com

SAT JULY 20 31ST ANNUAL LAND OF ENCHANTMENT ROD RUN From 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., join the Nor thern New Mexico Street Rodders in Historic Downtown Farmington for their annual Rod Run block party. Hot cars under the stars, great entertainment and lots of food!

EVENTS FOR ADULTS

July 13 - Off the Interstate July 20 - Grant & Randy July 27 - The Vintage People 50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 – 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. July 17 – Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380 HILLBILLY BAND ENTERTAINS 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. July 11 – Led by Bobbe Bluett Info: 505.599.1380 50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. – noon Friday, July 12 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Discount on your insurance can be good for two to three years, check your policy. Cost: $14; $12 for card carrying AARP Members. Pre-registration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Payment is due to the instructor on the day of class. ON-GOING CLASSES AT THE SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information

THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, NM 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building: 505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Center Activity Center: 505.566.2288 The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287

THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. & 13:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information.

50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 – 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. July 6 – Ramblin’ Fever

EXERCISE CLASS – WITH JEAN ELISE 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. or 1 - 2 p.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208

N. Wall Ave. Cost: 50 cents per session. Are you losing flexibility and want more energy to do the things you enjoy? If so, this class is what you need to get back into a good exercise program. Work at your own level and build up to where you want to be. Call 505.599.1390 for more information. DRAWING & CALLIGRAPHY 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bring your own materials and learn some new techniques. Call 505.599.1380 for more information. TAI CHI 9:30 a.m. Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Tai Chi is a series of fluid movements that can help with balance, flexibility, and muscle tone. These gentle exercises will leave you feeling refreshed. Free to anyone 50+. Info: 505.599.1390 ZUMBA GOLD 50+ 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Party on the floor with Latin dance music that will make you smile. This exhilarating exercise class will get you moving to the beat. Cost is $2.50 per session. Info: 505.566.2288 FARMINGTON RECREATION CENTER 1101 Fairgrounds Road Call 505.599.1184 for more information Monday through Friday, noon to 1 p.m., no charge – Walk Laps in the Gym Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 a.m. to Noon, no charge – Shuffleboard and Ping Pong ZUMBA Wednesday, 7 – 8 p.m. Saturday, 10 – 11 a.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with instructor Shirley Murphy, interval-training sessions where fast and slow

rhythms and resistance training are combined to tone and sculpt the body while burning fat. Check out the website at www.farmingtonzumba.com. Info: 505.599.1184 JAZZERCISE Monday/Wednesday/Friday/Saturday, 8:30 a.m. Monday/Tuesday/Wednesday/Th ursday, 5:30 p.m. At the Farmington Recreation Center, with Jazzercise, in just 60 minutes you’ll tighten and tone with dance, yoga, Pilates, and kickboxing movements choreographed to fun music. This is your hour. Come try it out – 1st class is free. For more info call 505.320.5364 or 505.599.1184, or visit www.jazzercise.com LIONS POOL 405 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.599.1187 for more information ADULT SWIMMING LESSONS 7 – 8:30 a.m., noon – 1 p.m., 4 – 5:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Adult Swimming Lessons will be offered at Lions Pool during lap swim. Four 30-minute lessons are $20; eight 30-minute lessons are $35. Info: 505.599.1167. MORNING AQUACISE 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. Monday – Friday SENIOR LAP* 9:30 – 10:30 a.m. Monday – Friday MORNING SPLASHERCISE* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday MORNING ARTHRITIS* 10:30 – 11:15 a.m. Tuesday/Thursday CROSS POOL* 11:15 am – noon Monday – Friday EVENING AQUACISE 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Monday – Friday Aquacise classes, $2 a visit *All adult aquatic exercise classes, $1.50 a visit

Freedom Days String Slingers and Ice Cream Children will have an opportunity to learn yo-yo tricks from Yo-Yo Man Extraordinaire Luke Renner. The yo-yo workshop will be from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Friday, July 5, at the E3 Children’s Museum & Science Center, 302 N. Orchard Ave. This workshop is in preparation for the 9th Annual Yo Down Show Down at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 6, at the children’s museum. “I’ve had some repeated contestants who competed in the first year and showed up and could only do a few tricks, but they have worked on it, and by practicing they were able to actually come back and win the contest. That is amazing,” said Renner, who became interested in playing with yo-yos in junior high school. “I

have been performing for 20 years and it is just fun.” Registration will begin at 1 p.m. on July 6, and all ages and skill-levels are welcome to compete. Make sure to show up at the competition with a sweet tooth, because the children’s museum also will host an ice cream social as children show off their yo-yo skills. Renner said the museum will provide a few yo-yos to contestants, but he recommends they also bring their own yo-yos. The yo-yo competition is sponsored by Duncan Toys, Vulto Yo-Yos, YoYoFactory, Yomega, and MagicYoYo. Independence Day Golf Tournament Freedom Days activities also cater to golf lovers, who can play in the Independence Day Best Ball Golf Tour-

nament at 8 a.m. on Saturday, July 6, at Piñon Hills Golf Course. The entry fee is $30. There is a cart fee of $14 and a $25 tournament green fee for non-pass holders. For additional information on the Independence Day golf tournament or registration, contact the Piñon Hills Pro Shop at 505.326.6066. Piñon Hills Golf Course is located at 2101 Sunrise Parkway in Farmington. Bolack fireworks The Farmington High School class of 1983 is planning a get-together to celebrate the 30 years since graduation. The event will begin at 5 p.m. on Friday, July 5, at Jackie Jaquez’s Party Barn, located at 1323 E. Murray Drive. For information, visit the “FHS Class of 83” Facebook page or contact Becky Thompson at bthompson65@gmail.com.


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Friday, June 28, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

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Beat the heat

Helping your pet keep cool this summer The summer heat is on and has come earlier than usual, thus I want to remind us all about the risk of heat stroke. The owner was frantic. Just an hour before, her Cairn Terrier Snickers was playing in the yard. Now he was listless and having trouble breathing. Rushing him to the nearest veterinary clinic, a concerned veterinary technician informed her that Snickers’ temperature was over 106 degrees – he was suffering from heat stroke. Luckily for Snickers – and with the help of a quick thinking owner and veterinary technician – he recovered. Every summer, hundreds of dogs find their way to the family veterinarian after spending just a few hours in the hot sun. It’s important to remember dogs don’t sweat like we do. Cooling themselves

PAWSITIVELY PETS Darren Woodson by panting, dogs use the moisture evaporating off their tongue as a means to lower their body’s temperature. Anything overwhelming this natural cooling system leads to heat stroke. With more families away from home during the day, our dogs are often left outdoors where it may be difficult to find shady, cool places and water to drink. Normally, a dog’s temperature ranges from 100 to 102.5 degrees. In cases of heat stroke, temperatures over 106 degrees are considered to be an emergency situation – temporaries over 110 degrees can be fatal in a matter of minutes. This level of hyperthermia (higher than normal

body temperature) can affect every major body system and it is imperative you get your pet to a veterinarian as soon as you safely can. Dogs who succumb to heat stroke often show the following signs: • Vigorous panting • Inability to stand, or weakness while standing • Thick, ropy saliva, literally foaming at the mouth • Bright red mucous membranes, although some dogs may show pale or even muddy gums. Heat stroke can affect any dog, although dogs with short faces, such as Boston terriers, Pugs, and Bulldogs may be at higher risk due their inability to

effectively pant and cool themselves. Many people believe that their pet will be fine outdoors. However, inadequate shade and/or water can affect even the most seasoned outdoor dog. Interestingly, heat stroke in cats is very rare. Most animal experts believe that cats are extremely good at finding the coolest spots to lie down and also to avoid the excessive excitatory exertions that many dogs seem to thrive on. If you find your dog vigorously panting on a warm summer day, immediately move the pet out of the environment and into a cooler place. Getting the pet into a shady area with a fan running on him can be very helpful. Using cool, not cold, tap water on the extremities and trunk can also help to lower the body temperature effective-

ly, as well as rubbing alcohol placed on the skin of the stomach. Do not use ice or extremely cold water. Although it seems logical, extreme cold will cause surface blood vessels to contract, forming an insulating area that traps heat in the body, delaying the cooling of the vital organs Attempting to force your pet to drink is also not advisable. If you suspect your dog is suffering from heat stroke, immediately load your pet carefully into a car and go to the veterinarian. Under no circumstances should you leave your pet alone in the vehicle. Without these life-saving steps, many dogs might lose their lives to the “dogdays” of summer. But as Snickers will testify, quick thinking owners and veterinarian professionals can help get them back on their

feet in no time. As I always recommend, preventable and proactive health care in regard to our pets will save you money and heartache. A few common sense steps to prevent heat stroke are as follows: • NEVER, never leave a pet in a car in the summer. • Always have water available for drinking. • Make sure an ambitious playful puppy can’t over turn its water source. • Put out a baby play pool for cooling off or water down an area under a tree or shrub. • Provide plenty of shade in your yard. • Don’t over run or over play your dog on a hot day. • Exercise in the early mornings or late evenings. As always, call your family veterinarian with your concerns.

One of 2 nationwide Gockel wins excellence in energy teacher award LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Tibbetts Middle School Teacher Erin Gockel was awarded the Bob Thompson Excellence in Energy Teacher Award, a national award that was given to only two teachers in the United States. Gockel has had a passion for teaching energy and conservation to her students since her teaching career

began 10 years ago. Since that time, she has brainstormed many creative and unique teaching techniques that educate students on the effects of energy. She became interested in teaching energy when she attended Fort Lewis College in Durango and met the director of the National Energy Education Development project. “I couldn’t believe how fun (energy) was and how empowering

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it is,” she explained, adding that NEED also utilizes a kids teaching kids approach. “It is really student centered, and that is how I think students should be taught.” Students in Gockel’s classroom experience many innovative projects and activities each year that help them learn about energy and conservation. This year, students had an opportunity to visit Apache Elementary School in Farmington and teach the students there about reusable energy. “We taught them about wind energy and solar energy and made solar cookers, which we made solar s’mores in,” Gockel said. Students also traveled to Santa Fe for Oil and Gas Day and met with Gov. Susana Martinez to talk about energy issues that affect the

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state. Bob Thompson was an inspiring energy teacher who taught at various NEED workshops in the country. The Bob Thompson Award was established by NEED after he passed away. “The Bob Thompson Award is given each year to a teacher who has proven and exemplified Mr. Thompson’s wonder of science and energy,” Tibbetts Principal Karen Brown said. “She does wonderful things with her students every

year.” Gockel said she was “flattered” to receive the award. “I’ve never won an award like that before,” she said. “It was nice (Brown) nominated me and to be recognized for that.” Along with learning about reusable energy, energy efficiency, and visiting power plants, Gockel’s students also have spoken to City Councilors about banning plastic bags inside the city limits. Gockel said her students collected data throughout

the school year about the influence of plastic bags on the environment. They even went the extra mile and wrote a letter to President Barack Obama asking him to ban plastic bags throughout the United States. “One person can make a differece even with a small step,“ Gockel said. At the end of the school year, students sent a scrapbook to NEED compiled of photos and information on energy activities and projects they completed in order to compete for the national title of Energy School of the Year. Gockel said Tibbetts Middle School was voted runnerup. On Wednesday, June 19, Gockel and 11 of her students flew to Washington, D.C., to attend the NEED Youth Award ceremony to receive the award. Gockel also will receive the Bob Thompson Award during the ceremony.

Helping small businesses Jenifer Doyle new Bloomfield Chamber executive director Jennifer Doyle understands the ins and outs of owning a small business, which has helped her transition into her new job as Bloomfield’s Chamber of Commerce executive director. Owner of the consignment store, Gypsies, in Farmington, Doyle said she is looking forward to working with business owners in Bloomfield. “I really want to grow the membership for the Chamber, and by doing

that it will in turn help the businesses who are members,” Doyle said about one of her goals as the new director. “I want to educate

business owners as to what the chamber does and encourage them to be a part of it because it is beneficial.” There are currently more than 175 Bloomfield Chamber of Commerce members. Doyle earned her marketing and communications degree at New Mexico State University in Las Cruces. “This was the perfect opportunity for me to use my degree.” Doyle began working as

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, June 28, 2013

Camp teaches kids self-confidence through outdoor activities LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune Juvenile probation teenagers found the courage to rappel down a 75-foot cliff in the Glade

Run Recreational Area in Farmington on June 19 as part of the annual Summer Adventure Camp organized by the Farmington Police Department’s school resource officer division.

The camp is one of two two-week camps that happen over the summer. This

camp session began on Monday, June 17, and will last until Wednesday, June 26. During that time, teenagers will learn how to canoe, hike and use a compass, mountain bike and climb the rope course at San Juan College, as well as learn about team building. “The looks on their faces when they achieve something and they challenge themselves to do something , that is what this camp is all about. They are challenged by choice and we teach them responsibility, self-confidence – and they do things they never thought they could,” said Michele DeLese, school resource officer coordinator, who has been involved in the camp since 2005. The summer camp began 12 years ago.

The school resource officers also work in conjunction with the juvenile probation office and the juvenile drug and grade court office, DeLese explained. Robbie Munn was a past camp participant, and this year he is mentoring the other teenagers. “I had a lot of fun (last year) and I got along with all of the officers and it pretty much made my summer even better. I thought it was a punishment, but it wasn’t, so I decided I wanted to come back and have fun.” Munn said rappelling down a cliff for the first time can be scary but “every time after that it just gets easier and easier.” As the teenagers slowly leaned back and took their first steps down the cliff, a few had wary expres-

sions, but as their feet hit the ground their expression shifted into excitement. So far, rappelling has been Josh Buescher’s favorite camp activity. “I wanted to do something and stay out of trouble during the summer,” he explained, adding this is a good opportunity to learn and experience new things. There are 27 teenagers participating in the camp’s second session. Tibbetts Middle School’s Resource Officer Lisa McGaha said the camp also is a great opportunity for the officers and teenagers to build relationships. “The kids get to see us out of uniform and that we are just normal people too. I think this makes them see that they can trust us.” At the end of each activity, awards are given out to teenagers who have exemplified kindness, diligence, humility, and perseverance, DeLese said. The final day of the camp, everyone involved will enjoy a cookout at the lake and fishing. “We do this for them,” DeLese said pointing to the teenagers. “It’s great.”


Friday, June 28, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

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Construction tour

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Officials check progress of new animal shelter LAUREN DUFF Tri-City Tribune City and county officials took a June 14 tour of the new Farmington Animal Shelter construction site. The nearly $4 million shelter is being built with funds from both the city and county, as well as with subsidies from the state and the non-profit organization The Pet Project, whose members also toured the site. The approximately 30 individuals were given a June 14 glimpse of construction progress being made on the 15,600 square foot facility in Animas Park off of Browning Parkway. “When you see the physical footprint you are impressed with the size of the facility and the interior and exterior walls. It all illustrates functionality of the facility,” Farmington Mayor Tommy Roberts said. “It is a beautiful area and it will be easily accessible by people who want to use the facility.” Inside the building, large planks of wood and steel beams support the structure. The floor is made of sealed concrete. There is an outdoor courtyard in the center of the building, which al-

Animal crematory

Discussion continues on equipment for new shelter DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune There is one place for the city to dispose of euthanized animals, and that place is the county landfill. The Farmington Animal Shelter puts down approximately 5,100 animals each year. Animal control picks up 350 deceased animals from the side of the road. These animals must be transported to the landfill and disposed of, costing the city $25,000 per year in fees. Animal Shelter Consultant Marcy Eckhardt has made a proposal to end this practice and find unwanted and ill pets a more humane resting lows the public to interact with the animals. “We have been working on this work for several months and we are excited to have it done, but it will take awhile,” said Daniel Sedillo, project manager at Jaynes Corporation, the

place. The cost for the crematory is estimated to be $50,000, and the cost to operate the system would be 4 to 6 cents per pound when dealing with weights between 300 and 750 pounds, according to Matthews Cremation. Eckhardt sent an email to Assistant City Manager Bob Campbell asking the city to consider building a crematory to dispose of domestic animals who meet their end at the shelter. A crematory is not only more popular among the public, it is environmentally friendly, according to Eckhardt.

“Across the United States communities have stepped up to embrace domestic dogs and cats and have fought actively to stop the practice of throwing these beings in the garbage once they are gone,” Eckhardt wrote. “Disposing of animals’ bodies in landfills is fraught with environmental issues,” she wrote in her proposal. “Not only can these bodies leach toxic substances and bacteria into the ground and the ground water, they are often picked at by birds and other scavengers and carried beyond the confines of the landfill.” The city uses Sodium Phenobarbital to euthanize

animals and it has been found to kill animals that feed on the carcasses of euthanized pets. As the city works to change policies and procedures to focus on animal welfare at the shelter, Eckhardt pointed out that it is hard on animal welfare employees to have to “throw the animal in the garbage after it has been put to sleep.” “Our actions speak louder than our words … we cannot expect employees to value animals when they’re alive if we then tell them to throw the same animals in the garbage once they’ve passed away,” she conclud-

company building the shelter. “We are enjoying this project and thank you for the opportunity.” There are two entrances into the facility – an adoption entrance and a surrender entrance. In the adoption wing there are several

playrooms for visitors to interact with the animals. The facility will have the ability to house 169 dogs, 112 cats, and 5 exotics. Within the canine adoption area, the floors are sloped allowing water to run into the trench drains providing for a more sanitary area, Farmington General Services Director Julie Baird said. The intake garage, where stray animals are dropped off by animal control, will have garage doors on either side of the room so animals are safe and secure. “At the old facility, the animals were getting away, and this is a much better procedural process to get them in safely,” Baird explained. Other additions to the facility include a multi-purpose education conference room, treatment and examination rooms, a feral cat room, and an isolation ward for sick animals that need to be evaluated before being brought into the general boarding area. Betty Berry with the Pet Project said she thinks the

community will be proud of the facility once completed. “I think we will be able to educate the public to be responsible pet owners, and that is really what we are trying to do.” The Pet Project has raised more than $500,000 to purchase furniture, cages, refrigerators and other office-type equipment. “Those of us who have been at this for quite a few years – we have found out that no one says animals are more important than people, but what we have found out is how important animals are to people,” Berry said. County CEO Kim Carpenter said the new shelter will be a benefit for its staff. “It makes people’s jobs easier and it is more user friendly for the people who come here,” he explained. “I think it will benefit the people because of its regional locale.” Carpenter added that even though the shelter will benefit the community, it is not the sole answer for finding a solution to the

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ed. Eckhardt proposed the city purchase a Matthews IEB 16 unit, which costs $49,597. It can accommodate a 300 pound load by breaking it into 75 to 100 pounds per hour, according to information from Matthews. Farmington General Services Director Julie Baird has continued to research the possibility of the crematory and stated in an email that the city needs to “determine the common utility needs of the various units and plan for an appropriate size and space.” No decisions have been made at this time. growing problem of stray animals in the area. “What else do we need to do to control the animal population? Will there have to be a mandatory spay and neuter ordinance?” Carpenter asked. “The county needs a better working agreement with the Navajo Nation, because we are spending well into six figures for animals coming off the reservation.” The county also has experienced expenditure increases at the Farmington shelter because of a variety of circumstances including the construction of the new larger shelter, which will employ six additional fulltime animal caregivers. “This particular part of the county’s operation – we partner with the city on – is the single largest inflationary project that we have and the prices have gone through the roof for this over the years,” Carpenter said. The new Farmington Regional Animal Shelter is expected to be open to the public this September.

Doyle the Chamber’s director on June 5. She said it was “definitely an experience” beginning her job a week before the popular San Juan River Balloon Rally in Bloomfield June 14 through June 16. “If that is any hint what the job will entail, it will definitely be something that I will enjoy and be able to grow and learn new things,” Doyle said. “We gave her one of the hardest tasks to do – step into an event that has already been planned and ask her to execute it, and she did a terrific job,” Bloomfield Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors President Janet Mackey said about Doyle organizing the balloon rally. The balloon rally was successful, Doyle said, adding the Chamber is trying to

make it an even larger event next year. “We want to have more things to do on Saturday night so if the balloons are grounded like they were this year there will still be reasons for people to come out and meet the pilots and let the kids have a good night.” Growing up in San Juan County, Doyle said she loves sports, being in the outdoors, spending time with her family and boyfriend, and helping out at 4-H and Future Farmers of America clubs. “I would like to thank the hiring committee for giving me this opportunity, and the community for supporting me when I was younger to get my education and to come back and give back what they gave me,” Doyle said.


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Tribulation DURABLEND® Espresso 86” Dual Reclining Sofa YOU SAVE ASHLEY $ DIRECT PRICE $11199

588

5-Piece Living Room: Includes dual reclining sofa and loveseat, cocktail table and 2 end tables. 99 ASHLEY $ 00 DIRECT PRICE YOU SAVE $200

1578

Porter Queen Panel Bed Includes headboard, footboard and rails

$

488

ASHLEY DIRECT PRICE

YOU SAVE $6199

5-Piece Bedroom: Includes queen panel bed, dresser and mirror. 00 ASHLEY $ 97 DIRECT PRICE YOU SAVE $311

1188

Porter 5 Piece Dining Room Includes 70” to 88” rectangular extension table & 4 chairs

$

788

ASHLEY DIRECT PRICE

YOU SAVE $36199

SEE STORE FOR DETAILS. Some pieces and fabric prints may vary by region. Selection may vary by store. Although every precaution is taken, errors in price and/or specification may occur in print. We reserve the right to correct any such errors. Prices valid for a limited time only. Participation times may vary. Picture may not represent item exactly as shown, advertised items may not be on display at all locations. A deposit equal to 10% and an amount equal to Sales Tax and delivery charges is required for all financed purchases and is not eligible for this credit promotion. HomeStores are independently owned and operated. ©2013 Ashley HomeStores, Ltd.

5200 E. Main Street | Farmington, NM 87402 | 505.516.1030 STORE HOURS: Mon-Sat 10am-8pm | Sun 12pm-6pm

* With approval of a RAC Acceptance contract


Tri-City Tribune 06282013  

Weekly newspaper in Farmington, New Mexico

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