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NOVEMBER 15, 2013

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Piedra Vista Ceremony dedicated to World War II veterans

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VOL. 4 NO. 7

Statewide energy policy

Upgrades, new business

Airport master plan pinpoints Oil, gas industry part of listening session ways to increase services DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune LAUREN SEIP Tri-City Tribune

The last airport master plan for the city of Farmington was drafted in the 1990s, but the city of Farmington has a new plan that should be finalized and sent to the FAA for approval. The Farmington City Council approved the new airport master plan during its Nov. 12 meeting. It identifies improvements that could be made at the Four Corners Regional Airport to improve service and attract more business travelers to the facility. The plan was developed by Wendy Renier, a senior airport planner with

* airport

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Moving forward

Animal control could soon be part of police department LAUREN SEIP Tri-City Tribune Farmington animal control could soon move from the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs Department to the city’s police department – a move the police say is needed. The Farmington City Council had a public hearing Nov. 12 to hear from

staff and the public about this proposed change to the city operations. Animal control has been dispatched out of the Animal Shelter for the past 30 years, with the proposed change coming about after the construction of a new regional shelter. The Animal Advisory Board unanimously passed the recommendation, which came

* animal control

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Leaders in the oil and gas industry and area residents were invited to participate Nov. 13 in the first listening session of five to develop a statewide energy policy. Energy Secretary David Martin and Dr. Dan Fine, an energy expert hired by the state to oversee the process, led the six-hour meeting at the San Juan College Quality Center for business. They will travel to Dr. Dan Fine, left, and New Mexico Energy Secretary Dave Martin, right, visit about the state’s five different commu- future energy policy, which will be developed after five “listening sessions,” the first of which nities throughout New was Nov. 13 in the Quality Center for Business at San Juan College. – Josh Bishop photo Mexico to hear from energy leaders and residents proach to energy in New Mexico,” Fine said. “It about the effects energy has on their communities. will let people know we are not toll roads and The purpose is to develop an energy policy pipelines to Texas. The policy will be developed that declares objectives and sets forth a plan as to to move constraints along the way.” The policy is being developed through the how energy “can be deployed to create economic development” opportunities within the state, Fine listening sessions. “The purpose of our group explained during a press conference after the was listening to all comments. This group will meeting. The last energy policy was developed listen and give priorities for this region,” Fine said. in 1991. “This policy would provide a value added ap- * energy A7

‘Nobody ever told Joyce no’

Annexation

Plan includes 55.84 acres west of city

Donald dedication to friends, Farmington immeasurable

LAUREN SEIP Tri-City Tribune

DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune

The Farmington City Council agreed to move forward with the annexation of 55.84 acres located west of the city limits and north of U.S. Highway 64 during a Nov. 12 regular meeting. Before councilors agreed to move forward with the annexation process, Fran Fillerup, city planner, presented a cost benefit analysis. The cost benefit analysis showed that in the “short term” the city would receive $52,174

* annexation

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Tony Bennett photo

Turkey Trot City sponsors run downtown

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50¢

A woman, who worked tirelessly to make sure area veterans received recognition, died in Farmington on Veterans’ Day. Joyce Donald, 85, did so much more for this community than work on the city’s Veterans’ Park and bring the Healing Field of Flags to the community in honor of our servicemen and women. Donald essentially was the mother of Farmington. Donald and her late husband Harry moved to Farmington in 1976. Her brother lived in New Mexico. He would send the Donald family cards to their home in Cleveland, Ohio, asking them when they were * Donald A7

Clothes for kids

Inside Calendar.......................................A4 Editorial ........................................A6 Horoscope..................................A10 Pawsitively Pets .........................A11 Pets of the Week........................A12 Sports.........................................A13

going to move to God’s country. Joyce planned to move here, join the country club and play golf, but she had too much energy and determination to live a life of leisure. She went to work as the first female employee at the Better Business Bureau in Albuquerque, where she worked for nine years before moving to Farmington. Then she took over the directorship of the Four Corners Better Business Bureau, selling 656 memberships in her first year. She used her position in with the BBB to cement herself in the middle of the community, where she began tirelessly working to improve the city and provide opportunities to its residents.

Funeral Notice............................A15 Real Estate.................................A17 Advice You Can Grow With ........A18 Classifieds/Nosey Nellie.............A20 Games ........................................A22 Movies........................................A23

Kiwanis Club helps 305 needy kids buy clothes

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE seven-day forecast FRIDAY

SATURDAY

54/31

61/37

Scattered T-Storms/Wind Sun

Rise Set 6:52 a.m. 5:03 p.m.

Few Showers Sun

SUNDAY

MONDAY

48/25

53/25

Rise Set 6:54 a.m. 5:02 p.m. Sun

Rise Set 6:55 a.m. 5:01 p.m. Sun

Partly Cloudy

Rise Set 6:53 a.m. 5:02 p.m. Sun

Sunny

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

55/27

Mostly Sunny Rise Set 6:56 a.m. 5:00 p.m. Sun

THURSDAY

55/31

53/31

Partly Cloudy

Mostly Sunny

Rise Set 6:57 a.m. 5:00 p.m.

Sun

Rise Set 6:58 a.m. 4:59 p.m.

airport consultants WH Pacific. “The airport is in good shape right now to serve what you’ve got,” she said. She identified projects, which are needed to increase service at the facility. Those projects, with a price tag of $3.5 million, include pavement maintenance, thermoplastic surface painted holding position signs, and the construction of eight new T-hangars. Should the FAA approve the plan, the city could received $3.2 million to complete the projects, while the state of New Mexico would kick in $136,000 and the city would have to pay $144,000. One reason the regional airport has not been able to attract larger aircraft is the length of the runway. An extension would cost nearly $75 million, so Mayor Tommy Roberts asked what could done to receive federal funds for a runway extension project. “How do we generate that demand? It seems we would want to extend the runway first to create that demand.” Renier said the jets have

to come first, then the city can show a “need” for the runway, which has a hefty price tag. “We need to focus on near terms and not the distant future. The demand is not there for longer runways based on the (airport’s) operations today,” she said. Renier made her presentation after Assistant City Manager Bob Campbell presented a report on the Four Corners Regional Airport. He discussed challenges the airport is facing, but also pointed out that the airport’s future looks promising. City staff intends to attract another airline to the Four Corners Regional Airport, reported Campbell, who said former manager Todd Gressick met with such carriers as Delta, Atlantic Aviation and United about setting up routes through Farmington. Delta seemed promising with a desire to add a Salt Lake City destination. Great Lakes Airlines is the only one operating out of Farmington at this time, making four trips a day to Denver, Colo.

Campbell said it would be difficult to attract another commercial airline because regional airports must support three round trips per day made by 75seat passenger planes that each have an 85 percent occupancy rate, according to what United Airlines officials reportedly said during a meeting with Four Corners Economic Development and the DurangoLa Plata Airport. The Great Lakes aircraft model that flies into Farmington is a Beechcraft that seats 19 people, according to Campbell. Although it may be challenging to draw in other commercial airlines, attracting corporate planes to the Four Corners Regional Airport could grow. “We think that is a potential market that our airport could take advantage of,” Campbell explained. “Our airport could handle (corporate planes) in the current conditions.” There are an estimated 100 corporate flights that fly into the Four Corners Regional Airport every

animal control from newly hired Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs Director Cory Styron, who believed animal control fit better under the supervision of police. Betty Berry, Animal Advisory Board member, said she believed that animal control officers would be protected if supervised by the police department. “I think what is important is we are asking our animal control officers to go into situations that they are not adequately trained to take care of,” Berry explained. “I think they would receive excellent training.” The plan was to train these officers in a paramilitary-type style, Styron said in an earlier meeting. The police would handle that training, paid for by the police department, Deputy Chief Vince Mitchell said. “I think training these animal control officers is going to be for their safety,” said Leslie Jedrey, a member of the Animal Advisory Board. This change would be “a new life for us.”

Councilor Mary Fischer asked what training the animal control officers would be required to complete. Mitchell responded that the officers would engage in officer safety training, such as learning how to respond to calls. “Those things seem so simple, but there is a method to our madness,” he said, adding that animal control officers also should wear ballistic vests. “I would like to ask that we go ahead and be moved over for safety training,” Animal Control Officer Jose Gonzalez said. Along with the safety training, animal control officers also would be dispatched more quickly because they would be dispatched through central dispatch, just as other law enforcement officers are. “The response and communication available through the police department is a lot more oriented to individual safety, especially responding to an event where there may be some high ten-

sions,” said John Roe, an Animal Advisory Board member. “It could mean a situation that is tenuous could go into a bad situation if it wasn’t handled rather quickly,” Berry added. If animal control officers are supervised by the police department, their safety would not only be enhanced, but they also would take pride in their job, Jedrey said. “The citizens of San Juan County probably would have more respect for these men and women because they are not the dog catchers,” Jedrey said. “Let’s not wait and do something later. Let ’s move these rangers into the 21st century and I think they will be protected and the police department will stand behind them.” The council voted unanimously to move forward with the process, which includes formally adopting an ordinance that changes the officers’ duties. This vote is scheduled for the council’s Dec. 10 meeting at city hall.

month, according to Campbell. “That is a bright light.” Another challenge the airport faces is the unreliability of Great Lakes flights, Mayor Roberts pointed out. “I believe we are fortunate to have services from Great Lakes. But, reliability continues to be an issue,” he said. “I think the people would feel comfortable knowing when they book a flight, they would leave on time. It would be a great benefit not only to the people of San Juan County, but to Great Lakes.” Campbell said city staff surveyed the airport’s activities and within the past 17 months, 65 percent of Great Lakes flights were on time, 13 percent of the flights were delayed greater than one hour, and 5 percent of the flights were cancelled. Regardless of these numbers, though, Roberts said Great Lakes has continued

to see reductions of cancellations and delayed departures. Campbell reported that Great Lakes is committed to the Denver hub, and will continue services in Farmington potentially by adding an additional flight. “Adding an aircraft would benefit their service,” Campbell said. Great Lakes also intends to remain in Farmington, because this airport provides maintenance services to the aircraft. Campbell said this could be an advantage the city might use to set up a pilot training school or aircraft maintenance training program through a partnership with Great Lakes. One other future priority at the regional airport is improving the building’s appearance because it does not represent the city of Farmington’s quality of buildings, Campbell ex-

plained. “It is a poor representation and we need to work on something to improve that building.” Improving the building’s aesthetics is one project that was included in the Airport Master Plan. Campbell said the airport will continue operating as usual, despite the loss of its airport manager – a position the city does not intend to fill at this time. “Let’s take the opportunity to slow down and look at our airport and its operations and get a profile of what kind of (airport) manager we want and need,” Campbell said. “We may want someone who has more of a business approach to operating the airport.” The city council voted unanimously to approve the airport master plan. The plan must now be submitted to the FAA for review and approval.


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

calendar ONGOING EVENTS BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been noted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, located in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for leisurely walk of 1-2 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org

& Penny in the historic Aztec Theater, 104 N. Main Ave. in Aztec, N.M. Tickets are $12 and are available online, doors open at 7:30pm. Information: 505.427.6748 or www.crashmusicaztec.com

FRI NOV. 22 SAT NOV. 23 ANNUAL HOSPICE CHARITY BOWL SALE This event is at the San Juan College Henderson Fine Arts Performance Center lobby. The event benefits Northwest New Mexico Hospice. The hours for the sale are 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. each day. Information: 505.566.3464

FRI NOV. 15 MODERN JAZZ QUARTET COMBO Join the Silhouette Series of performing arts at San Juan College Little Theatre for this amazing performance. Show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8 adults, $6 students and seniors. Information: 505.566.3430 or www.sanjuancollege.edu/silhouette

SAT NOV. 16 SPACE FLIGHT EXPLORERS FAMILY FUN Join us for some space fun with activities straight from NASA at the E3 Children’s Museum from 11a.m. to 1 p.m. This event is suitable for ages 7 and up. Hope to see you there and don’t forget your imagination. Information: 505.599.1425 WHAT A GIRL WANTS EXPO! Come to the ultimate girls’ day out! Join us for a fabulous event catering to women and experience our unique expo with special discount pricing. Come shop till you drop! Expo hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at McGee Park. Admission is $2. Information: 970.375.4521 or www.whatagirl wantsexpo.com

TUES NOV. 19 VICTOR & PENNY Crash Music presents Victor

SAT NOV. 23 SAN JUAN SYMPHONY – COME HEAR US NOW! THE MESSIAH Join the Durango Choral Society, Farmington’s Vicus Voces, two extraordinary vocal soloists and the San Juan Symphony for an early start to the holiday season, with our first performance of Handel’s cherished oratorio. We’ve selected the most popular numbers from Handel’s masterpiece to create a 90minute concert designed to lift your spirit and usher in the season of reverence and renewal. Enjoy this amazing concert at 7:30 p.m. at the San Juan College Henderson Performance Hall. Information: 505.566.3430 SUNRISE COMET WALK A recently discovered comet should be visible just before sunrise this morning. Astronomers think Comet ISON may be the comet which was last visible in 1608, when it was noted by Spanish explorers in the Southwest and other viewers around the world. Join us at the Riverside Nature Center at 6 a.m. for coffee or hot chocolate before the two-mile walk. Information: 505.599.1422

Nov. 15. This family friendly event will include activities such as children’s carnival, games, face painting, a kids gobble contest, music and more. Participate in a Turkey Trot and Gobble Wobble costume contest! Enter individually or as a group. This is an all-weather event, plan to participate rain or shine. Information: 505.599.1184

FRI NOV. 29 SAT NOV. 30 THE 29th ANNUAL CHAMPIONSHIP BULLRIDING EXTRAORDINAIRE This annual bull riding spectacular is at McGee Park Memorial Coliseum, between Farmington and Bloomfield on Hwy. 64, behind SunRay Park & Casino. Information: 505.287.9534 or www.casperbacarodeo.com

EVENTS FOR ADULTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, New Mexico 87401 Information Numbers:

Main Building: 505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex: 505.566.2256 Senior Activity Center/The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287 50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 - 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Nov.16 - Otis & the Rhythm Nov.23 - Forever Young Nov.30 - NO DANCE, HOLIDAY WEEKEND Info: 505.599.1380 50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 - 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Nov.20 - Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380 MEDICARE PART D BENEFITS COUNSELING BY APPOINTMENT Mondays, Nov.4 - December

2, by appointment only Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. S.H.I.P. (State Health Insurance Program Volunteers) will be available and ready to help you analyze your current plan and compare it to 2014 plans, so you can more easily make a decision to stay, or switch plans. If you need help and can't get to one of these appointments, call the Medicare Help Desk at 1 (800) 6334227 for assistance from your home. Make sure you have your Medicare card and your prescriptions, or a list in front of you so they can be entered into the plan finder. Bring the Medicare card and a list or your prescriptions to the Senior Center if you make an appointment with us. Call 505.599.1390 for more information or to make an appointment. THANKSGIVING DINNER 11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m. Friday, Nov.15 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Lunch is a $3 donation for anyone 60+ and a $6 fee for anyone younger. Enjoy

a traditional Thanksgiving Dinner with all the trimmings. Call 599-1380 for more information. GOBBLE GOBBLE BINGO PARTY 1 - 2 p.m. Monday, Nov.18 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Cost $2 per card – Please bring a non-perishable food item for ECHO Food Bank. Half of the Black Out game proceeds will be awarded to ECHO Food Bank. Prizes and refreshments furnished by the Senior Center. Please be checked in and seated by 1 p.m. to play Blackout.

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2013 Hospice Hoospice Charity Ch haritty ty Bowl Bow wll Sale Salle Frrid Friday, day ay, y, November Nov ovve vem mber 22 9 a.m. to 6:30 6 p.m. Saturday, Sat atu turrday, ayy, No November ove ov vemb mberr 233 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

TURKEY TROT & GOBBLE WOBBLE This event features a 5K Turkey Trot and a Two-Mile Gobble Wobble Walk at 9 a.m. in Historic Downtown Farmington. Registration deadline is

Henderson H enderson Fine Finee A Arts rt rtss Gallery Gal allle lerry ry 566-3464 566 6-3464

The Tri-City Tribune (USPS 5601) is published weekly by Majestic Media, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401. Periodicals postage paid at Farmington, NM 87401. COPYRIGHT: The entire contents of the Tri-City Tribune are copyright 2013 by Majestic Media. No portion may be reproduced in whole or in part 100 W. Apache St. by any means including electronic retrieval systems without the written permisFarmington, NM 87401 sion of the publisher. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Tri-City Trib505-516-1230 une, 100 W. Apache St., Farmington, NM 87401 Fax: 505-516-1231 Subscription Rates: IF YOUR PAPER IS LATE: The Tri-City Tribune should arrive by 9:00 a.m. each Friday. If it hasn’t, www.tricitytribuneusa.com 52 week subscription $27.85 please call our circulation department at 505-51626 week subscription $15 1230, ext. 205. Mail Subscriptions Rates: The publisher reserves the right to change sub52 week subscription $83.54 scription rates during the term of a subscription Printed on 100% Recycled Paper 26 week subscription $41.77 upon one month’s notice. This notice may be by with Soy-Based Ink. All subscriptions payable in advance. mail to the subscriber, by notice contained in the

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PRESIDENT Don Vaughan 505-516-1230 ext. 204 don@majesticmediausa.com EDITOR/PUBLISHER Cindy Cowan Thiele 505-516-1230 ext. 202 editor@tricitytribuneusa.com REPORTER Debra Mayeux 505-320-6512 debra@tricitytribuneusa.com Lauren Seip 505-608-4400 lauren@tricitytribuneusa.com CIRCULATION Shelly Acosta 505-516-1230 ext. 211 circulation@tricitytribuneusa.com PRODUCTION 505-516-1230 ext.203 Suzanne Thurman suzanne@majesticmediausa.com 505-516-1230 ext.203

PRODUCTION Jennifer Hargrove jennifer@majesticmediausa.com Michael Billie michael@majesticmediausa.com ADVERTISING SALES Shelly Acosta shelly@majesticmediausa.com Deyan Valdez deyan@majesticmediausa.com Aimee Velasquez aimee@majesticmediausa.com LEGALS legals@tricitytribuneusa.com

505-215-4559 505-486-6046 505-947-7872


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Friday, November 15, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

One-of-a-kind fundraiser Bowl sale to benefit Northwest New Mexico Hospice Looking for the perfect gift for that hard-to-shopfor person on your Christmas list? Try a hand-made, one-of-a-kind ceramic creation from the Hospice Charity Bowl Sale at the San Juan College Farmington Campus. The sale will be held from 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 22, and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Nov.

23, in the 9000 Rooms. Ceramic bowls made by San Juan College students and staff will be available for purchase at the sale for $10. Each purchased bowl comes with a free fill-up of soup from Mary’s Kitchen at San Juan College. An array of other items also will be on sale from vendors including Christmas ornaments, dif-

ferent types of pottery, scarves, beadwork and more. All proceeds from the bowl sales benefit Northwest New Mexico Hospice and vendors also donate 20 percent of their proceeds to the organization. For more information about the Charity Bowl Sale, contact Cindy McNealy at 505.566.3464.

by calling 505.566.2256. Pay cash or check to the instructor on day of class. A discount on your insurance can be good for 2 to 3 years, check your policy.

Wednesday, Nov.27 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. This course will teach preventative measures and treatments for COPD. Topics include risk factors, ways to reduce the possibilities of developing COPD, what questions to ask your physician, and how to discuss your concerns. Handouts and refreshments will be available. Presented by San Juan Regional Medical Centers Cardiopulmonary Rehab: Carol Cherrey, RN. For more information call 505.566.2287

DRAWING & CALLIGRAPHY 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bring your own materials and learn some new techniques! Call 505.599.1380 for more information.

calendar DIABETES AWARENESS AND PREVENTION 10 -11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov.20 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. This course will teach preventive measures and treatments. They will talk

about risk factors and ways to reduce the risks of developing diabetes, what questions to ask your doctor if you have concerns. Handouts and refreshments will be available. Presented by San Juan Regional Medical Center, Nicole Clark, RD. For more information call

505.566.2287 50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. - Noon Thursday, Nov.21 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: $14 - $12 for card carrying AARP members. Pre-registration is required

CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE (COPD) 10 - 11 a.m.

San Juan College Veterans and Native American Centers will host

Honoring Our Veterans Gourd Dance Friday, November 15 1 to 5 p.m. Henderson Fine Arts Center, 9000 Rooms Admission Free to Veterans and public

ON-GOING CLASSES AT THE SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information

Featuring: F eattu urin ng: g: Master Ma M aster o of C Ce Ceremonies eremo mon onies – Leon Leonard eonard A Ant Anthony, ntho ony nyy,, W Wh White hittee Ea Eagle agle G Gou Gourd ourrd Soc Society ociety Head H ead Gourd Gou G ourrd Dancer Dance anccer – L Lar Larry arrr y A Ande Anderson nd dersson o S Sr., r., B Blac Black lacck Creek Creeek Gourd Gou ourrd Society Soc S ociieety ty Southern So S outhe her ern Gou Gourd ourrd Dru Drum rum – “Likity “Liik kittyy S Spl Split pliit S Si Singers� in nge ger erss� Honor H ono nor o Color Co C olor Guard Gua G uard – Upper Up e Fruitland Fru F ruiittllan and C Ch Chapter haap pter IInformation: nfo nf forma mattio ion: SJC S JJC C Veteran’s Veeterrans V an’s Center: Ceentteer: 50 C 5505-566-3970, 05-56 566 666-3 -39 397 970 70, 0, draked@sanjuancollege.edu drrake aked@ ed@ @ssaanj nju uanco anccollege ge.e e edu SJC S JJC C Native Nativ ive ve A Ame American mer ericaan C Ce Center: entteer: 5505-566-3321, 05-56 566 666-3 3321, na nac nac@sanjuancollege.edu acc@ssaanj nju uanco anccolllege.e egee edu

THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. & 1 - 3:30 p.m. Monday - Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information.

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EXERCISE CLASS - WITH JEAN ELISE 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. or 1 - 2 p.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: 50 cents per session. Are you losing flexibility and want more energy to do the things you enjoy? If so, this class is what you need to get back into a good exercise program. Work at your own level and build up to where you want to be. Call 505.599.1390 for more information.

PILATES 9 - 10 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Achieve total muscle conditioning and flexibility with light weights. Strengthen your muscles and improve your core, with emphasis on stretching and breathing techniques. There are modifications for various fitness levels, so everyone can participate. Class is taught by Patti Glover TAI CHI 9:30 a.m. Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Tai Chi is a series of fluid movements that can help with balance, flexibility, and muscle tone. These gentle exercises will leave you feeling refreshed. Free to anyone 50+. Info: 505.599.1390 ZUMBA GOLD 50+ 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Party on the floor with Latin dance music that will make you smile. This exhilarating exercise class will get you moving to the beat. Cost is $2.50 per session. Info: 505.566.2288 BIBLE READING IN NAVAJO 10 - 11:30 a.m. Fridays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bible reading in the Navajo Language, taught by Dorothy Tewangoitewa. Info: 505.599.1380


TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Editorial

Friday, November 15, 2013

A6

E-Mail: editor@tricitytribuneusa.com

Phone: 505-516-1230

Fax: 505-516-1231

Space discoveries call for prudence on Earth The possibility of life on other planets might encourage us to think rationally and prudently about our lives on this humble globe that we call Earth. The subject of extraterrestrial life came up last week with the publication of research in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Geoff Marcy, an astronomer at the University of California, Berkeley, and his co-authors spent four years using the Kepler telescope to examine 42,000 sunlike stars in the Milky Way. They discovered that about 22 percent of them have planets that appear similar in size to Earth and, more important, that orbit within the so-called Goldilocks Zone – at a distance from their stars that would permit water, if there is any, to exist in a liquid

state. As we understand life, liquid water is a prerequisite for its origin. Extrapolating from their data, these astronomers calculate that among the hundreds of billions of stars in our galaxy, some 8.8 billion planets orbit in a zone and under conditions similar to those on Earth. And our Milky Way is only one of perhaps 200 billion galaxies in the universe. In these terms, life beyond our Earth seems not only possible, but almost inevitable. This is an enticing prospect. Humans have long been intrigued by the possibility that our Earth isn’t the only place in the universe where life exists. This fascination has expressed itself in countless books and movies, as well as in a persistent passion for UFOs

JOHN CRISP SCRIPPS HOWARD and supposed visitations by extraterrestrials. Our hope that any intelligent life we find elsewhere in the universe will be friendly probably outweighs our fear that extraterrestrial beings will be as malevolent and scary as those depicted in books and movies such as War of the Worlds. In fact, rather than our finding extraterrestrial beings, perhaps they will find us, because they’re more advanced than we are; indeed, maybe they can help us resolve some of our current Earthly dilemmas. But even if we’re unique in the universe, we might take some pleasure in dis-

covering that in our (comparative) neighborhood, almost 9 billion other planets could feature conditions similar to those on Earth. These may be places that we’ll want to go someday. Here’s the problem: Our Earth-bound civilization seems to be pushing up hard against all sorts of limits. Some believe Earth has already exceeded its population carrying capacity, while others disagree. But no one can reasonably argue that the planet’s resources are unlimited. Despite meager gestures toward conservation and renewable energy, our rate of consumption continues to

increase, and few real efforts are being made to bring consumption into balance with Earth’s productivity and limited resources. Although the perils of this imbalance are obvious – pollution, climate change, starvation, war – we’re reluctant to acknowledge them. But even those who argue that we’re not at a point of crisis can’t deny that we’re doing very little to prevent the inevitable bad effects of too many people desperate for too few resources. The complacent assumption is that technology will rescue us, but I suspect that if there is any answer, it will be philosophical rather than technological. The story of America is consistent with the story of civilization: When local resources are exhausted, we move to new territory

and take it away from the natives – by force, if necessary. When we reach territorial boundaries, we push technological limits. Philosophy might help us get over this. But we shouldn’t let the discovery of billions of Goldilocks planets distract us from the fact that we evolved to live on this one. Our problems will be solved here – or not at all. In the event of an extraordinarily unlikely extraterrestrial intervention, I stand corrected. But if we don’t live in the only isolated spot in the vast reaches of the universe where intelligent life can exist, still, we’d be prudent to act as if we did. John M. Crisp teaches in the English Department at Del Mar College in Corpus Christi, Texas. Email jcrisp@delmar.edu

If I could save time in a bottle I remember when my children were very young, and we lived in Virginia, I came to see my family’s life as being on a familiar loop: Putting up the Christmas lights, followed by hunting for Easter baskets and celebrating a raft of spring birthdays, then summers at the pool and, before long, the hunt for the perfect Halloween costumes. A great loop – but a fast and familiar one, nonetheless. I commented to friends then that my loop seemed to be gaining speed, and I supposed it would do so until it stopped for good. In a surprise to me, the loop changed venues after an unexpected divorce. In the suburbs of Chicago, a similar loop developed in my new life as a single mom

BETSY HART SCRIPPS HOWARD with school-aged kids. Faster and faster it went, until I waved goodbye to that home, too – after nine years that felt like two. And now I’m with a new husband in yet another home, and beginning to watch my children go off to college and wondering how quickly this loop will get into high speed. But will it? I’ve come to hope that this time around, so to speak, I may be able to slow things down a little. I’d always thought it seemed that time speeded up as we got older because, relative to our life span, it

does. A year to a 2-year-old is half a lifetime; to an 80year-old, it’s a small fraction of a lifetime, leaving us powerless to stop the speed-up. But in discussing this recently with a dear friend from high school – has it actually been more than 30 years? – while I lamented the inexorability of the increasing rush of time, she explained that I had it all wrong. (If only I would slow down and consider the matter!) What we talked about that evening led me to find out more, and this is what I discovered: A wide range of

research suggests that while the relative-time argument has merit for why time feels like it goes faster as we get older, there’s something else that may account much more for the phenomenon. It turns out that our brains have to work hard at taking in new information, and the effort needed to process the novel information exaggerates our sense of time involved. In contrast, when things are familiar, the brain can shortcut right through it with sort of a “been here, done that, let’s move on” mentality that makes time seem to go faster. No wonder taking a math test can seem like an eternity, but dinner with close friends in the same amount of time goes by in a moment. Time really does fly when we’re having fun.

So then it should be no surprise that familiar life loops and routines, more and more the typical pattern of life as we get older and more established, give our brains endless shortcuts. But a child or other young person taking in new information at every turn, having a constantly busy brain – well, that makes time seem much slower. As writers Belle Beth Cooper and Caroline Gregoire outlined it for one piece I looked at, this one in The Healer’s Journal, from this summer, research shows that “... if we feed our brains more new information, the extra processing time required will make us feel like time is moving more slowly.” They and other writers and researchers on the sub-

ject said new experiences, learning new things, simply working to notice the same or novel things more (pile on the details and information), minimizing routine and brain shortcuts – are all ways to change the perception of time passing quickly. In other words, with a little practice, maybe we can slow time down to a steady jog, or occasionally even a walk. Well, I’m glad to have this information as I start my new loop. Timing is everything. Betsy Hart’s latest book, “From The Hart: A Collection of Favorite Columns on Love, Loss, Marriage (and Other Extreme Sports),” has been revised. Email hartmailbox-mycolumn@yahoo.com.


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Friday, November 15, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Donald “She believed in and modeled the ethic of servant leadership,” said Chris Hunter, the regional manager for WESST. Joyce was one of the first people he met when his family moved to Farmington in 1999. “It was Joyce Donald among a few select others, who took me under her wing and encouraged me to build my own business. … Joyce believed in me and in our business community.” Hunter said everyone could use an “encourager like Joyce, and when one as special as Joyce passes, we’d be kidding ourselves to deny the hole left in our hearts.” She was a once-in-a-lifetime friend to almost everyone she met, said Dorothy Nobis. “She shared her energy, her love, her commitment to her community, her patriotism, her wisdom, her

faith, and so much more, to those she cared about, and Joyce cared about everybody,” Nobis said. “Her circle of friends is unending and our community and our world are so much better because of her.” Joyce just wanted to help people to better themselves, so they could better their community. She did this by co-founding Leadership San Juan with the help of Marge Black, Jim Henderson, Nancy Shepherd and Tucker Bayless. The purpose was to help people better themselves and realize their potential. Through the organization, participants learn about their community, as well as how to network with others. At the same time Joyce was working to develop Leadership San Juan, she approached the state’s governor and asked for funds

to start a woman’s conference. She received $500 and started the Four Corners Women’s Conference. The money was used to bring in speakers that could help women develop themselves in business and leadership. It became an annual event, where women could network and learn about ways to better themselves on every level. The conference was so popular that men wanted to attend as well. Donald transformed it into the Four Corners Conference for Professional Development. “Joyce was the true definition of dynamite comes in small packages. There was nothing she did not set out to do that she did not enjoy success,” Nobis said. “There was no one who ever told Joyce ‘no,’ and there are few who have made such a profound im-

pact on our community.” She was recognized throughout the years for the contributions she made to Farmington. She was named the Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year and the Four Corners Conference Woman of the Year. She was not only the first woman in New Mexico to join the Rotary Club, she achieved the Paul Harris Award. Joyce also was inducted into the Farmington Chamber of Commerce’s Historymakers Hall of Fame. On a personal side, Joyce helped a lot of people find what they were searching for in their lives, and she encouraged them toward fulfilling their dreams whatever their dreams might be. Debby Gent got to know Joyce while Gent was growing up. “She was very special to me,” Gent said. “She

Industrial Cooling Exchange – I.C.E. Chris Jaquez Jr & Chris Jaquez Sr "We are appreciative of Four Corners Community Bank taking the inherent risk that comes with all new start up businesses. Our bank believed that we could and would offer products and services that would make I.C.E. and the bank successful partners. FCCB stood behind our vision and also gave us the foothold we needed to start the race set before us. We are glad that our bank provides much needed assistance and faith in local economic ventures, keeping jobs and money local.”

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gave more in a week than most people would give in a lifetime. She had a heart for helping people. She wanted to help anybody and everybody she could.” When Roger Sheak first met Joyce, she gave him advice and opened doors for him in his business, Nightlight Electric. Sheak was friends with Harry and then met Joyce. He developed a lasting friendship with both of them, and when Harry died Roger became an advocate for Joyce. He would help her with the things a husband or son would do. She would call him when a mouse got into her house and she wanted it gone. She would

count on Sheak to take her shopping and to events she wanted to attend in the community. “We had a lot of good times, and shared a lot of meals and discussions,” Sheak said. “One of her favorite quotes was, ‘Sometimes it’s 60 percent me and 40 percent you, and sometimes it’s 40 percent me and 60 percent you.’” Most people would say Joyce’s life was about giving 100 percent all of the time. She will be remembered during a service at 10 a.m. Monday, Nov. 18, at the Farmington Civic Center, 200 W. Arrington St. Lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m., also at the Civic Center.

energy Each region is expected to set different objectives and priorities, according to Fine. The Four Corners region will focus mainly on oil and gas. In the Hobbs area the focus will be on oil and gas and nuclear. Santa Fe will focus on renewable and efficiency, while Albuquerque will be about innovation. Las Cruces will focus on biomass, wind, algae and solar. Once the objectives are established, Fine said the state can look at ways to work with industry to create more jobs, including a component that would focus on industries outside of energy, but focused on the byproduct of energy development. This would include feed stock, petrochemicals and fertilizers. “Dell, DuPont and others are looking at coming back from overseas and putting up plants near the supply,” Fine said. The only foreseeable difficulty would be moving the products out of this region to where they need to go, and that could be accomplished through the construction of a railroad line from Thoreau to Farmington. The Navajo Nation is in partnership with Burlington Northern to develop a line out of Thoreau, so the tribe also has been invited to have a seat at the table for the development of this policy. “This will be the first New Mexico Energy Policy that will have an adjunct with the Navajo Nation,” Fine said. “The state is recognizing their energy policy. That is something new.” The tribe is developing its own coal facility with the purchase of Navajo Mine from BHP Billiton. That coal will need to be hauled away from the facility and rail is the tribe’s best bet to get that done. “Burlington Northern could export that coal,” Fine said, adding this is being worked on in the

private sector, but would benefit the entire state. “You have the potential that someone could put in rail and make money,” Sec. Martin said. Another aspect of this policy is to develop a federal-state partnership through a Memorandum of Understanding that would allow for the “co-management” of federal lands. “There are common areas where we could work together to make (the process) more effective,” Sec. Martin said. “We need to think outside of the box.” This came after Fine and Martin heard about the difficulties the industry has in securing federal permits to move forward with oil and gas development on BLM lands. The process takes four to six months through the BLM, while Martin believes the state could hand out the permits in less than 10 days. He also stated that while the BLM process allows for environmental impact studies and public comment periods, the state could award the permits in a shorter length of time. Martin suggested cutting the timeframe for the public comment period, but still respecting the environment. “Protecting the environment and the public health is paramount,” Sec. Martin said. The local session was “very productive” and provided “ample input,” Fine said, adding the audience was “reflective, informed and intelligent.” The representatives shared one important message of how dependent San Juan County is on the energy industry. “That message was loud and clear,” Fine said. The listening sessions will continue into 2014. The comments will be presented at a “cabinet level,” and the completed policy is expected to be completed within nine months, Martin said


A8

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

What’s the biggest parenting mistake?

Too hard to choose; there’s more than just one A journalist recently asked “What is the biggest mistake parents make?” I had to think about that. Which parents? The biggest mistake made by some parents is they pay entirely too much attention to and do entirely too much for their children. These children usually, but not always,

end up as spoiled brats. Why not always? Because some children, by mysterious means, manage to do well in spite of less-than-optimal parenting. The notion that one is produced by the manner in which one is raised is belied by the many excep-

LIVING WITH CHILDREN John Rosemond tions, including children who do well despite bad upbring-

ings and children who do badly in spite of good up-

bringings. On the other hand, some parents’ biggest mistake is that they pay entirely too little attention to their kids. Those folks are not generally found reading parenting columns, so I will not belabor their misdeeds. It would only

serve the purpose of giving my regular readers reason to celebrate themselves, which is an untoward thing to do under any circumstances. The biggest mistake made by still other parents is that

* Rosemond A18

annexation in property tax and gross receipts tax collection, while spending $12,500 on services. In the long term, the city would spend more than it receives, because the combined property tax and GRT collection would be $104,365, while the costs of services are expected to be $282,800 annually. “Most departments believe at current levels they can serve the development, but in the long term they identified other costs,” Fillerup said. “The expenses are greater in the long run annually than the anticipated revenues.” The property is being annexed to complete the Little Creek Subdivision, and 90 percent of the property belongs to Joe Kozimor, Joe and Stan, LLC. It will be zoned for single family residential use. The annexed property would be the new location for Kozimor to build lowincome housing, “more squeezed together, less-expensive housing above Water Works and a few more lots above Soaring Eagle,” Kozimor said during an October City Council meeting. Councilor Dan Darnell asked about “Smart Development” and if the land would include light industrial, multi-family units and single residential houses. Kozimor said that option was considered, but he felt he could build houses and offer them to families at a lower cost than rental options within the city. The city originally planned to annex the Kozimor property along with 0.9 acres belonging to Hector Rangel. The Rangel property was removed from the annexation after Rangel wrote a letter of opposition. “I am opposed to being annexed into the city of Farmington for a variety of reasons, succinctly summarized as higher taxes and additional regulation,” Rangel wrote in an Oct. 16 letter. “Given that this annexation appears to be predominantly residential in nature, it is doubtful if there will be any financial benefit to existing Farmington residents through the annexation.” City Attorney Jay Burnham must prepare an ordinance for the annexation to move forward. That ordinance should be completed and published prior to the Dec. 10 City Council meeting, when the Council is expected to adopt it, completing the process.

“I got new knees and my old life back!”

Sandy Kennedy of Farmington, New Mexico, had lost much of her mobility. She had both knees replaced care of San Juan Regional’s Total Joint Program. Within weeks, she was up on her feet and taking walks with her husband. Sandy Kennedy was suffering from chronic knee and joint pain. “I couldn’t function normally from day to day, recalls Sandy. “That’s when I said to myself, okay, you can’t walk. That was the turning point. I called the Total Joint Care Center at San Juan Regional Medical Center.” Most people who need joint replacement have severe pain that makes it difficult to walk, climb stairs, get up from a chair, or carry on with other normal activities. Knee and hip replacements can significantly relieve pain and increase mobility in about 90% of people who get them. Joint replacement can be a life-changing procedure for the right patients. Weeks after her surgery and with physical therapy, Sandy is back to her old self — rather her new self. She’s able to move comfortably around her kitchen, vacuum her home, and even go for walks in the countryside with her husband. If you suffer from debilitating pain in your hips, knees or joints, call today, 505.609.6846. And get your life back.

sanjuanregional.com


AND

MM LIFE LEISURE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

A9

our nation’s soldiers

Piedra Vista High School Assistant Principal Anthony Smagacz welcomes veterans and students to the World War II Veterans Commemoration Ceremony on Nov. 11.

Ceremony dedicated to World War II veterans LAUREN SEIP Tri-City Tribune With the American flag as the backdrop, World War II veterans rose from their seats and a cheering audience stood up to honor them during a Nov. 11 Veterans Day Commemoration Ceremony at Piedra Vista High School in Farmington. While veterans from other wars were also recognized at the ceremony in the Turano-Chrisman Theater, the theme specifically revolved around World War

II.

Navajo Code Talkers were among the World War II veterans honored at the commemoration ceremony.

“We honor all veterans, but this year we decided it was time to honor WWII veterans,” said Colonel David Naber, the Piedra Vista Junior ROTC instructor. Piedra Vista’s JROTC program organizes the Veterans Day presentation every three years. More than 15 World War II Veterans from San Juan County were honored at the ceremony. “You will always be recognized as America’s heroes. You are what is defined as the great-

est generation,” said Anthony Smagacz, Piedra Vista assistant principal. Those World War II veterans who were recognized included Jackson Lee, who was a colonel in the U.S. Army Air Corps and served in the South Pacific as an air traffic controller during the war. Veterans Day is a time for him to “mostly remember,” explained Lee, adding that serving in World War II “changed everyone around. I really had not got settled down when the war started. It gave me a new insight on what was going on.” After World War II ended, Lee was appointed by former President Ronald Reagan to be the liaison for the Federal Communications Commission. Lee was born and raised in Nebraska and lived in North Carolina for 30 years before moving to the Four Corners. At the Veterans Day ceremony, Piedra Vista Junior ROTC members presented the colors and performed a drill team exhibition, which is a modified routine that involves complex marching sequences. The Piedra Vista choir and band performed a World War II medley and a United States Armed Forces Service medley. Then, two students played “Taps” on their trumpets while the audience rose to show their respect

Junior ROTC Cadet Corbin Moorhead presents a historical overview of World War II.

World War II veterans greet one another before the Veterans Day celebration begins in the Turano-Chrisman Theater at Piedra Vista High School.

The World War II Veterans Commemoration Ceremony was organized by the high school’s Junior ROTC program.

for the fallen soldiers. “Taps” is a musical piece sounded during flag ceremonies and at military funerals. Naber said it is crucial for students to witness the Veterans Day Commemoration Ceremony because

“We are so blessed in this country to have rights that many countries don’t have – freedom of speech, religion, to pursue dreams and goals – but all freedoms come at a sacrifice. You see what World War II did and

how many died for us to enjoy the freedoms we have today. By inviting the student body here, it might help them recognize the freedoms and what it takes to maintain those freedoms.”


A10

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

Oxfam Banquet

Event focuses on hunger, poverty issues facing many Americans DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune ARIES (March 21 to April 19) You enjoy the attention early in the week, but it might be a good idea to opt for some privacy by week's end so that you can have more time to consider an upcoming decision. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) You unearth some surprising facts. Now you need to consider how to use them to your advantage. Meanwhile, it might be best to keep what you've learned secret for now. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) A comment by a colleague piques your curiosity to know more. Best advice: You'll find people more likely to offer information if you're discreet when making your inquiries. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Your energy levels begin to rise by midweek. This allows you to catch up with your heavy workload and still have plenty of get-up-and-go to go out on the town this weekend. LEO (July 23 to August 22) You're probably roaring your head off about a perceived slight from a longtime critic. Ignore it. That person might just be trying to goad you into doing something you might later regret. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) The early part of the week is open to spontaneity. Then it's time to settle into your usual routine to get all your tasks done. A personal situation could require more attention from you. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) A meeting of the minds on a workplace project might well develop into something more personal for Librans looking for romance. Aspects are also favorable for platonic relationships. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A more-positive mood might be difficult to assume in light of a recent problem involving the health of someone special. But by week's end, your emotional barometer should start to rise.

Each night in Farmington, more than 200 homeless children go to bed hungry. Hunger on a global scale is even greater as the world’s population becomes poorer and poorer. The San Juan College chapter of the National Society of Leadership and Success and Student Activities will address the issue of local and global hunger during the Oxfam Hunger Banquet from 6 to 9 p.m. Monday, Nov. 18, in the 9000 Rooms of the Henderson Fine Arts Building. Those attending the banquet will pay $5 for a seat and meal. Just as people are born into poverty or wealth, those at the banquet will become wealthy or impoverished for three hours by the luck of the draw. “Folks will draw their

class – lower, middle or upper – when they walk in,� said Aaron Joplin, copresident of the National Society of Leadership and Success. A person’s opportunity to draw wealthy or poor will be based on the makeup of the world’s population, which consists of greater numbers of poor than wealthy. Each group is served a meal representative of their income group, providing a realistic look at the hunger and poverty issues facing those less fortunate. The event will include a talk about world hunger, and a presentation from ECHO Food Bank about local hunger. Oxfam America is an international relief and development organization that creates lasting solutions to poverty, hunger and injustice, according to a press release

AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) A tug of war develops between the artistic Aquarian's creative aspect and his or her practical side. Best advice: Prioritize your schedule so you can give appropriate time to both. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) You could be entering a career phase awash with job-related demands. But avoid being swamped by the overflow and, instead, keep treading water as you deal with demands one by one. BORN THIS WEEK: You are an exceptionally loyal person, and you're respected for your ability to keep the secrets entrusted to you.

are available to mentor members, who set their goals and want to achieve them. “We do this in a group setting and hold you accountable, while mentoring you to overcome roadblocks,� Joplin said. There also are Life Broadcasts made available through the society’s national office. “People are featured talking about their journey,� Joplin said. The public can join the journey, or begin their own on Monday at the hunger banquet. Those planning to attend are encouraged to bring non-perishable food items that will be collected for ECHO Food Bank. Tickets can be purchased in advance or at the door. All proceeds will benefit the ECHO Food Bank. For more information call the Student Activities Office at 505.566.3403.

Battle of the Bands

Nine bands compete at Crash Music on Saturday Crash Music, 104 N. Main Ave. in Aztec, will be hosting a Battle of the Bands at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 16. Nine local bands will be competing for cash prizes, gift cer-

tificates and more. Three talented judges will determine the winners and critique the bands. Admission is $5 at the door. The show is sponsored by Clancy’s Irish

Cantina in Farmington and Main Street Music in Aztec. Crash Music offers live musical performances to the area and supports the arts by offering private

and group lessons in guitar, bass, banjo, mandolin, drum set and two hand drumming classes every week. For more information call 505.427.6748.

HEAD START/EARLY HEAD START NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS! We offer High Quality Programs which are available at no cost for children 6 weeks -5 years old in the Farmington, Aztec Bloomfield, and Kirtland areas Children with special needs or in foster care are welcome Services offered include: • Quality Early Childhood Education • Developmental,Vision, and Hearing Screenings • Community Referrals and Resources • Parent Involvement • Nutritious Meals • Safe, Licensed Facilities and ...much more!

SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Look for a changed attitude from a former adversary once he or she realizes you have your colleagues' full support. Now you can refocus your energies on that workplace project. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) This time, a difference of opinion might not be resolved in your favor. But be patient. It could all ultimately work out to your advantage, as new information begins to develop.

from San Juan College. “Together with individuals in more than 90 countries, Oxfam saves lives, helps people overcome poverty and fight for social justice. They work on scene, helping people gain hope, skills and direction to create a new future.� Raising the awareness of hunger in the world is one of the projects of the Society of Leadership and Success, which focuses on helping people develop leadership skills. “We help people find their passion and start working towards it,� Joplin said. This process is done in three ways on campus. The society offers an orientation and a leadership training day, which consists of a three-hour class, where students think about their passion and where they want to go with that passion. Success Networking teams

For more information please call:

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Friday, November 15, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Arthritis:

What we can do to help our aging pets Well, the clock is turned back and the warmth of summer and fall is changing to the cold and dark of winter! This is the time of year I worry about my older patients and arthritis. I always say that if you’re lucky enough, your pet will live long enough to get arthritis. Whether you’ve got a large breed of dog or a small cat, chances are that you’ll be dealing with arthritis as your pet ages. Arthritis is a disease of the joints that typically reduces a pet’s mobility and causes pain. The onset of arthritis can happen for a bevy of reasons, but the more common form results from simple joint wear

as luxating patellas.

PAWSITIVELY PETS Darren Woodson DVM prevention and treatment. Armed with the knowledge that you’ll have to deal with arthritis at some point in your pet’s future, ask your veterinarian for an honest assessment of her risk for the disease. Some factors that can come into play: breed, size, excess weight, current or past evidence of arthritis (slowing down, exercise intolerance, reluctance to jump and loss of muscle mass), past injuries and joint abnormalities such

and tear that’s often accelerated by conditions such as hip dysplasia. This type of arthritis is referred to as osteoarthritis or degenerative joint disease. Although you can’t halt the progression of the disease, the onset of severe arthritis in pets can often be delayed and its symptoms – pain, weakness, difficulty rising, limping and muscle wasting – can be alleviated using a variety of accessible and effective approaches to both

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So what can you do at home to prevent and manage arthritis? Weight loss is mandatory for the majority of veterinary patients with arthritis. Whether you have an afflicted or an at-risk pet, I strongly recommend that all patients – even very young pets who are either giant breeds or who have conditions like hip dysplasia and luxating patellas – stay on the trim side. It’s no longer enough to just maintain a normal weight – keeping your pet lean is the best way to prevent and control arthritis and is such a simple cost-effective and healthy remedy. Feed a good quality food, set amounts twice daily. Do not free feed. Exercise is the other important and no-cost-to-you activity and treatment which will help pets with arthritis. I had a 70-year-old man doing work at our house, such as raking and bagging leaves and some chainsaw work. I was amazed at his ability to do physical work, and of course he was lean and in shape. When asked his secret he said you must keep moving otherwise you will be like an old unused car that rusts up and locks up. Really simple but accurate advice. With an arthritic pet, it is imperative to have daily activity and play time. Flat surface leash walks are best for old dogs and for cats find a special

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Here is a top ten list to help an arthritic pet 1. Take your pet in for regular checkups so that your veterinarian can monitor your pet’s arthritis and make necessary adjustments to the treatment plan. 2. Getting or keeping your pet slim can help by decreasing the load on his joints. Your best bet: feeding your pet the right amount of high-quality food. Science Diet has a prescription diet called J/D (Joint Diet) that is very effective. 3. Controlled exercise is a must, but make sure you carefully monitor your pet while she plays, walks, or runs. If possible, find a soft surface for activity. Your veterinarian can offer more suggestions for getting your pet moving regularly. 4. As much as possible, keep your pet warm and dry, since cold and damp conditions can aggravate arthritis. Consider investing in a padded bed and apply warm compresses to painful joints. 5. Laser therapy – We have had a class IV therapeutic laser for some time now and found it very effective for arthritis such as hip and knee pain. Google “Companion Laser Therapy” to learn more. 6. Pain medication, including nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (commonly called NSAIDs), in NM's cattle country 7:55 a.m.: San Juan Smart Talk

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toy such as a laser light or a peacock tail feather to motivate them.

MONDAY – NOV. 18 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: San Juan College Occupational Therapist Assistant Program 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Aztec Museum & Pioneer Village 7:30 a.m.: Four Corners ChapterAmerican Red Cross 7:55 a.m.: Monday Reboot: Tech News TUESDAY – NOV. 19 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Attorney Eric Morrow 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Peggy Pond Church and the Flood of 1904 7:55 a.m.: Adopt-A-Pet Tuesday WEDNESDAY – NOV. 20 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: Farmington Police 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Boca Burgers: Veggie burgers made

THURSDAY – NOV. 21 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning: San Juan County 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Bosque Farms: A Modern town with a beleaguered beginning 7:55 a.m.: Save-A-Buck Thursday: Weekly economic & investing news Noon: A Review Too Far: local movie reviews FRIDAY – NOV. 22 7 a.m.: The Scott Michlin Morning Program: ECHO Hope Housing 7:30 a.m.: New Mexico Mile Marker: Fort Wingate: Making a historical site from an environmental hazard Noon: Book Buzz: Guest: Adrienne Boggs, Farmington Museum Education Coordinator

may help relieve pain, and disease-modifying osteoarthritis drugs (DMOADs) can also play an important role. Talk to your veterinarian before giving your dog any medication. 7. Glucosamine and chondroitin supplements can be used to help improve joint mobility and support better joint functioning for pets with arthritis. All older pets should be on these supplements. 8. Acupuncture isn’t just for people. This painless technique has shown some success in animals suffering from arthritis. 9. If your pet’s arthritis is advanced, surgery may be an option. Ask your veterinarian about the pros and cons of surgery and what you can expect. 10. Be sure to take steps to adjust his environment at home. Some things that can help an arthritic dog or cat include; providing soft supportive bedding for his achy joints, using ramps to help a dog get in and out of a car or up to a bed, and putting down carpeting and secure rugs to help him get traction as he walks. One of the aspects I enjoy the most about practice is helping our senior pets have an engaged, and, as much as possible, painfree quality of life. We have a lot of treatment tools to accomplish this. If you think your pet is experiencing arthritis, it is time to call your Farmington veterinarian to help your four-legged family member. MONDAY – FRIDAY 5 – 5:30 a.m.: Focus on the Family 5:30 – 6 a.m.: Adventures in Odyssey 6 – 9:30 a.m.: "The Morning Show" with Emmet 9:30 a.m. – 10 a.m.: "Four Corners Spotlight" with Jim Baker Nov. 18: One Light Still Shines - Marie Monville, author Nov. 19 The ARC of San Juan Co. – Mark Silversmith Nov. 20: Houses of Hope Ronna Jordan, Jared Okello Nov. 21: Grace Place - Wendy Curtin Nov. 22: Pro-Relationships Hattabaugh 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.: "The Lunch Crunch" with Leah 3 – 8 p.m.: "The Drive" with Donnie SATURDAY Noon – 2 p.m.: The Weekend 22 10 p.m. – midhight: The HypeChristian Hip Hop Show

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SUNDAY 5 – 6 a.m:. Focus on the Family's Weekend Magazine 10 a.m. – noon: The Weekend 22


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

prca tracks Family Bingo and Pizza Night Bring the entire family to the Farmington Recreation Center, 1101 Fairgrounds Road, for an evening of Bingo and Pizza! Join us from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 15. We will give a mu s i n g prizes to the lucky winners throughout the evening. The cost is only $5 per person. Space is limited, register by Friday, Nov. 15, at

www.fmtn.org/recreation. For more information, call 505.599.1184. Sketch the great outdoors Meet at the Riverside Nature Center in Animas Park off Browning Parkway at 10: a.m. on Satu r d a y, Nov.16. Walk to a location in Berg Park, and “Learn to Sketch Outdoors.” During this two-hour class, art teacher

Marilyn Taylor will show you how to make your own quick drawing of an outdoor scene, along the Animas River. Even if you have never drawn anything before, you will learn to record your observations of nature on this short walk. We provide paper and charcoal, or you may bring your own. This activity is for children and adults, and is designed for those who have never sketched anything before, though experienced artists are welcome. While you are at the Nature Center, we invite you to view the photo exhibit Wetlands Winter, presenting winter scenes

farmington pets of the week

Ezmi is a 5-month-old female Terrier. She is very sweet and a little shy at first, but playful. Moose is a 1-year-old male Domestic Long hair. He is solid black. He is very curious and likes to explore.

The Farmington Animal Shelter Hours are Mon. - Fri. 10 a.m. to 5:30p.m.; Sat. and Sun. noon to 3p.m. Also on Sundays at PETCO from noon to 3 p.m. Adoption Prices (Dogs): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $100; 6 mo. to 6 yrs. $80; Over 6 yrs. $50 Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the dog must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) Adoption Prices (Cats): $10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet; 6 wk. to 6 mo. $70; 6 mo. to a 6 yrs $60; Over 6 yrs. $50. Senior Citizen Costs: Adopter must be 50 or older and the cat must be over the age or 6 yrs. $33 ($10 is refundable when the Rabies shot is given by a vet.) If you are interested in any of these animals, please give us a call at 505.599.1098. We

have a large variety from which to choose, and we want to take the opportunity to thank everyone who chooses to save a life and adopt a local shelter animal. The Farmington Animal Shelter will host an Adopt-A-Thon, starting Tuesday, Oct. 29, through Wednesday, Nov. 13. All animals will be $39 regardless of size, breed, or type. The Farmington Animal Shelter is moving soon to its new home at the Farmington Regional Animal Shelter on Browning Parkway. The AdoptA-Thon will help facilitate the move, and situate as many animals as possible into their forever homes. At the Farmington Animal Shelter, each cat and dog up for adoption, will be spayed or neutered, vaccinated, de-wormed, micro-chipped, and treated with a flea and tick preven-

tive. The Farmington Animal Shelter Adopt-A-Thon, now underway, will be extended an additional week, through Wednesday, Nov. 20. All animals will be $39 regardless of size, breed, or type.

and wildlife from our collections. See the work of many local photographers, who have helped document the seasons in Animas Park. Be inspired to do your own photography of winter beauty in Farmington’s river parks. Info: 505.599.1422 Out of this world! Calling all families! From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., on Saturday, Nov. 16, join us at E³ Children’s Museum & Science Center, 302 N. Orchard Ave., for Family Art Saturday – Space Flight Explorers Family Fun. Enjoy, engage, and explore space activities straight from NASA. Participate in a 20-minute Q and A video conference straight from NASA’s Johnson Space Center with Christopher Blair.

The activities are suitable for ages 7 and up. See you there, and don’t forget your imaginations! For more information call 505.599.1425 Calling all Trotting Turkeys and Wobbling Gobblers The Farmington Downtown Association is joining forces with the Department of Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Affairs to host Farmington’s third Turkey Trot and Gobble Wobble in Historic Downtown Farmington at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 23. The Farmington Turkey Trot will be a 5K race and the Gobble Wobble will be a 2-mile walk – both will start and finish at Orchard Park, on the corner of Orchard Avenue and Main Street. This year we are

proud to partner with Safe Routes to School as our charity beneficiary. The day’s events, 9 to 11 a.m., will include the run, walk, carnival games, crafts, kids’ gobble call contest, Turkey Bingo, Turkey Walk costume contest, awards, a fall turkey dinner, and more. Chip timing is provided for the 5K by Chasing 3. The deadline to enter the race and walk is Tuesday, Nov.19. Registration is underway now at the Farmington Recreation Center as well as online at www.fmtn.org/prca. Registration costs $20 and includes an event T-shirt and lunch. Receive $3 off when you combine with a Reindeer Romp entry by Nov.15. Info: 505.599.1184 or 505.599k.1419.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4 4:30pm-6:00pm Tree Purchase Opportunity 6:00pm-9:00pm Festival Open to the Public Purchase Raffle tickets Free Admission

6:00pm-8:30pm

PMS Holiday Health Fair Free admission

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5 9:00am-10:00am Teddy Bear Tea* $5/person Each Child will receive a free Teddy Bear 10:30am-11:30amTeddy Bear Tea* $5/person Each Child will receive a free Teddy Bear

11:30am

Festival Open to the Public Free Admission - Purchase Raffle Tickets Tea with the Trees* $15/person Family Night - Free Admission

2:00pm-3:30pm 5:00pm-8:00pm FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6 8:00am-10:00am Coffee Break with the Trees $6/person

10:00am-9:00pm Festival Open to the Public Elizabeth is 2-year-old Airedale/ Terrier cross. She likes to curl up at your feet and have her belly rubbed. She is good with people and other animals.

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Purchase Raffle tickets - Free Admission Senior Social Time - Free Admission “Holiday Happy Hour” $10/person Food, Drinks, & Dancing to Jose Villarreal

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7 8:30am-12:00pm Festival Open to the Public Purchase Raffle tickets Free Admission

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MM SPORTS

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

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Calling trotting turkeys, wobbling gobblers Parks and Rec. hosts annual Thanksgiving 5K race, 2-mile walk Downtown The Farmington Downtown Association is joining forces with the Department of Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs to host Farmington’s third Turkey Trot and Gobble Wobble. Trot or wobble in Historic Downtown Farmington at 9 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 23. The Farmington Turkey Trot will be a 5K race and the Gobble Wobble will be a 2-mile walk – both starting and ending at Orchard Park, Main Street and Orchard Avenue in Downtown Farmington. This year the city is proud to partner with Safe Routes to School as our charity beneficiary.  The local Safe Routes to School program, known as Farmington Walk and Roll, embraces the fact that walking and biking to school has many benefits, especially for our children. Walking or biking can give

children a send of freedom and responsibility, allowing children to enjoy fresh air, providing opportunities for children to get to know their neighborhoods, all while arriving at school alert, refreshed, and ready to start their day. The deadline to enter

THIS WEEK IN SPORTS JP Murrieta One down, many more to come. University of New Mexico men’s basketball coach Craig Neal won his first game as head coach beating Alabama A&M, 88-52. “I was nervous again,” said Neal following the win. Despite his nerves, Neal was motivational in his first pregame speech as head coach. “I put on the board, before we went down, ‘The Journey Begins Tonight,’” said Neal. “This is Cameron (Bairstow) and Kendall’s (Williams) last journey with us. I told those guys to take a moment and enjoy the journey.” Lobo big man Alex Kirk is only a junior, but in my opinion this will likely be his last journey too. Based on his stock already, if Kirk has a good season he would likely enter the NBA draft. But there’s a long way to go before he gets to next summer. “We made a pretty good statement to the country that we’re going to be good again,” said Kirk following the win. Kirk has a fan club of at least one in the locker room. Kirk explained how 7-foot-1-inch freshman center Obij Aget wasn’t afraid to tell Kirk how much he admired him.

“He came up to me before the game and said ‘I’m going to be the next you’ and I’m like ‘Whoa! What’s happening here,’” said a humbled Kirk. The Lobos will host Charleston Southern on Sunday afternoon. Special K Kendall Williams and Alex Kirk are considered two of the top 50 players in the country. The two Lobos were named to the John Wooden Award watch list. The honor goes to the best player in college basketball. Williams and Kirk are the only two Mountain West players on the list. Williams scored 17 points with seven assists and no turnovers against Alabama A&M last Saturday, while Kirk had a double-double of 16 points and 12 rebounds to go along with two blocked shots. Coming soon Neal received two national letters of intent this week. Xavier Adams, a 65 swingman out of Texas, and Joe Furstinger, a 6-8 forward, will join the team for the 2014-15 season. Adams averaged 25.7 points per game as a junior and grabbing 13.6 rebounds per game in high school just outside of Dallas.

* Murrieta A14

the race and walk is Tuesday, Nov. 19. Registration is underway now at the Farmington Recreation Center as well as online at www.fmtn.org/prca. Registration costs $20 and includes an event T-shirt and lunch. Receive $3 off when you combine with a ReinSoccer and cross country seasons are in the books for 2013 and the local schools showed well with Aztec girls’ soccer in the finals and five local teams placing in the Top 4 at state cross country on Saturday. Football and volleyball seedings were announced over the weekend with volleyball wrapping up this Saturday and football playoffs getting underway on Friday. Basketball gets an early start this week with a few games. Last Week… State soccer concluded last weekend with an especially strong showing from the District 1AAAA girls. Piedra Vista, Aztec and Farmington all reached the Elite 8 when No. 11 Piedra Vista upset No. 6 Ten weeks down and, for most leagues, playoffs will be starting Week 14. Bye weeks will be completed Week 12, so it is time to start cutting loose dead weight that you may not use again once the bye weeks are over. Injuries again begin playing an important role in securing a playoff spot. Imagine the team of injured reserved players alone. Aaron Rodgers at quarterback with Arian Foster and Doug Martin at running back with Julio Jones and Reggie Wayne at wide receiver would be the base for a solid team in any league. Each week the Fantasy Geek will give you some unsolicited advice on playing NFL Fantasy Football. Realizing that the Thursday

deer Romp entry by Nov. 15. The day’s events, 9 to 11 a.m., will include the run, walk, carnival games, crafts, kids’ gobble call contest, Turkey Bingo, Turkey Walk costume contest, awards, a fall turkey dinner, and more. Chip timing is

provided for the 5K by Chasing 3. Orchard Park is located at the intersection of Main Street and Orchard Avenue. We would like to thank our sponsors, Full Engagement Training powered by San Juan Regional Medical Center, Brown’s Shoe Fit

RICK’S PICKS

Rick Hoerner Los Alamos. Unfortunately for our schools, all three of them were on the same side of the bracket, making for a district matchup in the quarterfinal and semifinal round. In the quarters, Aztec survived a 1-0 scare from Piedra Vista while Farmington handled Goddard 3-1. This put Farmington and Aztec in a semifinal matchup, which may not be ideal, but does guarantee a district team in the championship. Aztec topped Farmington 3-1 advancing the Tigers to a showdown with No. 1 St.

Pius. The Sartans prevailed in the finals 2-1. On the boys’ side, the results were disappointing for Bloomfield and Farmington with both teams losing in the quarterfinals. Bloomfield was blanked by Bosque 3-0 while the Scorpions lost to Los Alamos 1-0. In state cross country, four seemed to be the magic number for the county schools. The girls from Piedra Vista, Shiprock and Navajo Prep along with the Chieftain boys all finished fourth in their clas-

THE FANTASY GEEK Rick Hoerner

night game is already over, players from Thursday’s game will not be in consideration, but since most leagues let you change players that haven’t played yet, every other squad is fair game. Each week we’ll look at the players that led to victory or disaster in Love Them and Loathe Them, followed by a section on Studs and Duds, who you may look at starting and sitting this week. Finally, there will be a quick section on pick-ups on the waiver wire for some players that

may be available in your league. Last Week with The Geek… Week No. 10 Record – 7-3 – 70 percent Overall Record – 68-32 – 68 percent Love Them … Saints QB Drew Brees – 392 Yards, 4 TDs Washington QB Robert Griffin III – 281 Yards, 3 TDs, 44 Yards Rushing Saints RB Pierre Thomas – 111 Total Yards, 7 Catches, 2 TDs Seahawks RB Marshawn Lynch – 161 Total Yards, 3 catches, TD Dolphins WR Rishard Matthews – 11 Catches, 120 Yards, 2 TDs Broncos WR Demaryius Thomas – 7 Catches, 108 Yards, 3 TDs Vikings TE John Carlson – 7 Catches, 98 Yards, TD Broncos TE Julius Thomas – 3

Company, and Big Belly Bar-B-Que, for helping to make this event possible. For more information on the Turkey Trot and Gobble Wobble, contact the Farmington Recreation Center at 505.599.1184, or the Downtown Association at 505.599.1419. sifications. Only the Piedra Vista boys brought home the hardware finishing third behind national powers Los Alamos and Albuquerque Academy. Individually, Timberlin Henderson and Harrison Fleming led the PV boys, finishing 9th and 10th, while in 3A, Shiprock’s Shawvan Levi finished 2nd. The district title was on the line Friday night at the Hutch where Farmington and Piedra Vista hooked up for their annual crosstown clash. The Scorpions were superior on both the offensive and defensive lines, leading Farmington to a 21-6 win over the Panthers. Over in Kirtland, the Broncos and the Tigers

* Hoerner A14 Catches, 96 Yards, TD Rams DST – 3 Sacks, 4 Ints, 2 TDs, 8 Points Allowed Loathe Them… Cowboys QB Tony Romo – 128 Yards, TD 49ers QB Colin Kaepernick Ryan – 91 Yards, Int., 16 Yards Rushing Colts RB Trent Richardson – 35 Total Yards, 3 Catches Falcons RB Steven Jackson – 20 Total Yards, 3 Catches Bucs WR Vincent Jackson– 3 catches, 28 Yards Cowboys WR Dez Bryant – 1 Catch, 44 Yards, Panthers TE Greg Olsen – 1 Catch, 14 Yards Bears DST – 1 Sack vs. Detroit Studs… Seahawks QB Russell Wilson – Percy Harvin returns against his former team that give up big numbers Eagles QB Nick Foles – On a great fantasy roll, and gets the Washington DST Lions RB Reggie Bush – Steelers DST not what it once was Chiefs RB Jamal Charles – Chiefs will try to control clock with

* geek A14


A14

Hoerner tried to make a case to get into the Round of 12 this week completing their district seasons. Aztec finished up the year with a 32-20 win over the Broncos. Both Navajo Prep and Bloomfield continued their easy paths to district championships. Prep put 76 on Dulce by the end of the first half and Bloomfield crushed Shiprock 61-8. In district volleyball action this past week, Aztec upset

Murrieta “He’s one of those kids who was a bit under the radar,” said Neal when describing Adams. “He went from an unknown to like No. 8 in the state of Texas, but he’s really talented. He’s had some big scoring nights in high school and he’s going to continue to get better and better.” Joe Furstinger also averaged a double-double last year as well for Santa Margarita Catholic. The 6-8, 200-pound forward averaged 16.6 points per game and 10.7 rebounds per game last season as a junior. Said Neal of Furstinger, “Joe is a late bloomer… (Joe is) 6-8, 6-9, probably about 210, 215 pounds. I was really impressed with him this summer, and he plays for a former Lobo. I think

geek Charles in Denver, but if they get behind, they’ll throw it to him too Washington WR Pierre Garcon – High targets against porous Eagles DST Texans WR Andre Johnson – Only offensive weapon left 49ers TE Vernon Davis – Best passing threat should Niners get behind Saints early Cardinals DST – Tough against the run stops Jones-Drew forcing Henne to beat them Duds… Ravens QB Joe Flacco – No run-

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

No. 11 and Navajo Prep comes in at No. 10 in 2A. Pool play began on Thursday with bracket play beginning today.

Farmington to reach the 1AAAA district championship against Piedra Vista. The Panthers justified their No. 1 seed with a straight set 3-0 win over the Tigers. Shiprock came out on top in District 1AAA with an impressive tournament run that got them to the state playoffs knocking off Wingate in the district championship. State Seedings The football state seedings came out on Saturday and, as expected, the 1AAAA dis-

trict champions Farmington received a No. 2 seed, a bye this coming weekend and a home game next week. Piedra Vista came in at No. 10 and will have to travel to Valencia on Friday. If the Panthers can get by the Jaguars on Friday, it would set up a district championship rematch with the Scorpions. Bloomfield also received a top 4 seed which allows the Bobcats to wait around this weekend and play at home next week and despite a 9-1 record the Navajo Prep

Eagles only received a No. 8 seed which gives them a home game this weekend to kick off their playoff run. The volleyball seedings for pool play came out this weekend as well. It appears that Aztec’s upset of Farmington got the Tigers in at the No. 11 seed. Farmington fell to the No. 7 seed and Piedra Vista claimed the top overall seed in class 4A trying to make it to the finals for the second consecutive year. Shiprock’s district tournament run has them coming in at a

This Week… Friday, Nov. 15 Football Schedule No. 10 Piedra Vista travels to No. 7 Valencia at 7 p.m. Volleyball bracket play begins today for the survivors of pool play Saturday, Nov. 16 Volleyball state championships at Santa Ana Star Farmington and PV swimming at Peter B. Barney Memorial Swim Meet in Albuquerque No. 8 Navajo Prep Football hosts No. 9 New Mexico Military Institute Tuesday, Nov. 19

he’s going to develop and be a really good player. Both of these guys will have a chance to play as freshman.” Double-double animal style UNM guard Antiesha Brown was named the Mountain West Conference Player of the Week for her effort on opening day. Brown scored a career best 28 points and eleven rebounds in UNM’s 69-65 win over Loyola Marymount. It was Brown’s first career doubledouble. Her 28 points were the second most scored by a Lobo in a season opener. Run, run away The Lobo football team racked up an impressive 451 yards in a 45-37 win over Air Force last Friday. Senior running back Kasey Carrier finished with 179 yards on 27 carries and quarterback Cole Gautsche put up 140

yards of his own. UNM called 58 straight rushing plays against Air Force. 58 in a row! The Lobos only threw the ball three times. Their only completion was UNM’s first touchdown of the game. So why don’t they throw the ball more? Head coach Bob Davie says it has nothing to do with any lack of confidence in their quarterback. Davie says they run the ball so much because he wants to keep his defense off the field. Makes sense. The Lobos can’t stop anybody. They gave up 445 yards to the Falcons and only managed two defensive stops. UNM is surrendering over 35 points a game. “If we were better on defense, we would throw it more,” said Davie. “We just want to find a way to NOT punt the ball. It’s not because

we don’t have more confidence in Cole to throw it, it’s more of a defense issue right now.” When Davie was asked this week if they would throw the ball more against Colorado State on Saturday, he said “I hope we don’t have to.” Go fish UNM men’s soccer coach

Jeremy Fishbein was named the Conference USA Coach of the Year. New Mexico, the C-USA regular season champion, was led by Kyle Venter who was voted the league’s Most Valuable Player and Defensive Player of the Year alongside Freshman of the Year Christopher Wehan. The conference coach of the year award is the fifth

ning game from Ray Rice has meant a disastrous year for Flacco 49ers QB Colin Kaepernick – Struggled against Panthers. Not sure it gets better in New Orleans. Could come from behind throwing, though Bengals RB BenJarvus Green-Ellis – Bernard getting more and more involved even on the goal line Patriots RB Stevan Ridley– Panthers DST will again flex its muscles, this time at home in prime time Seahawks WR Golden Tate – Harvin’s return takes points away from Tate. Maybe not this

week, but soon Lions TE Brandon Pettigrew – Not much value for a team that throws as much as the Lions Chiefs DST – No. 1 DST may have their hands full at Denver Waiver Wire… Time to start thinking playoffs and looking to fill some holes. These may be some players to look at Bills DST– Could be a nice playoff gamble. Playoffs weeks would be against Buccaneers, Jaguars and Dolphins 49ers WR Michael Crabtree – May be coming back soon, if you are weak at WR

Good luck this week!!

$

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Piedra Vista Basketball at Navajo Prep Wednesday, Nov. 20 Navajo Prep girls’ basketball at Dulce Thursday, Nov. 21 Aztec Girls’ Basketball hosts Crownpoint Sports on Fox Sports New Mexico AM 1340 & 93.9 FM NFL Football: Detroit Lions vs. Pittsburgh Steelers Sunday at 11 a.m. NFL Football: Kansas City Chiefs vs. Denver Broncos Sunday at 6 p.m. NFL Football: New England Patriots vs. Carolina Panthers Monday at 6 p.m. First Sports with Steve Bortstein weekday mornings from 7 to 10 a.m. The Fast Track sponsored by SunRay Park and Casino on Saturday and Sunday at 9 a.m.

of Jeremy Fishbein’s New Mexico career. He was the MPSF Coach of the Year or co-Coach of the Year in 2002, 2005, 2006 and 2011. The Lobos, who clinched the Conference USA regular season title on Saturday, have earned a first-round bye in the Conference USA Tournament.

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AUCTION SURPLUS

Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013 10:00 AM FARMINGTON SCHOOLS PLANT OPERATIONS WAREHOUSE 2855 B. SOUTHSIDE RIVER RD. THE FOLLOWING IS A PARTIAL LISTING ONLY! 3 PICKUPS/ 3 PICKUP BEDS/ 3 REFRIGERATORS/COUCH/ 2 REFRIGERANT RECOVERY SYSTEMS/OVER 100 CHAIRS/ OFFICE DESKS/ SCHOOL DESKS/ BOOKSHELVES/ SHOP TOOLS/ CHAIN LINK FENCING-6 FT. & 4 FT. / SHOP BENCHES/ UPRIGHT PIANO/2 NEW CARRIER BEARINGS/ LARGE PILE FIREWOOD/MISC. TIRES/ FILE CABINETS/ 8 WOODSHOP TABLES/ 3 COMMERCIAL STEAM WARMERS/ PICKUP TOOL BOXES/ 15 MOTOROLA MAX-TRAC RADIOS/ AIR RIDE SEAT/ WASHER & DRYER/ 16 LOCKERS-10 PER UNIT/ MISC. SCRAP METAL/ VACUUMS/ METAL STORAGE CABINETS/ GRAPHIC ZOOMER-Q205

**ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES** THE FACILITIES ARE FULLY ACCESSIBLE TO PERSONS WITH NOBILITIES DISABILITIES. IF YOU PLAN TO ATTEND THE AUCTION, AND WILL NEED AUXILIARY AIDE, OR SERVICE, PLEASE CONTACT THE AUCTIONEERS OFFICE AT: 505-860-7708, OR 505-330-9672 PRIOR TO THE AUCTION SO THAT ARRANGEMENTS CAN BE MADE.

TERMS OF SALE:

All purchases must be paid in full on the day of sale with cash, cashiers check, or good personal check with proper id. Credit cards accepted are: Mastercard, Visa, and Debit Cards. All items shall be sold, “as is - where is”

Vaughan Auctioneers 505-860-7708 • 505-330-9672


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Friday, November 15, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

transitions

every Friday at 8pm 900 W. Broadway Bloomfield

505-632-2457

engagements, weddings, anniversaries, obituaries

obituary Joyce Elizabeth Donald A beautiful life, well lived .… On November 11, 2013, Joyce Elizabeth Donald passed from this world to the next, leaving behind a legacy that will linger on – Joyce was born and lived in the Cleveland, Ohio, area for many years and she and her husband, Harry, later moved to Albuquerque and then on to Farmington in 1979. Since that day she worked to enrich the lives of thousands of people in San Juan County and beyond. Her more than 30year association with the Better Business Bureau is legendary. Using that organization to reach into

the community, she was deeply involved in the welfare of people in this area. Joyce’s “projects” included extensive work with the San Juan County Rotary, Leadership San Juan, the Four Corners Conference for Professional Development, the All Veterans Memorial Park, the Four Corners Vietnam War Monu-

ment, the Regional Animal and Pet Shelter Project, the Anasazi Foundation, the Freedom Days Parade, the Farmington Chamber of Commerce, the United Way, and many other groups over the years. Her awards were many and varied: First woman in the state of New Mexico to join Rotary, Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year, Four Corners Conference Woman of the Year, Rotary’s Paul Harris Award, Farmington Chamber’s Historymakers Hall of Fame, Navajo Ministries “Celebrity Roast” and many other acknowledgements of the work she did daily. Joyce’s legacy lives on through the many people’s

lives that she touched over the years. She constantly worked to help people attain their goals and she made each person feel like they were part of her “family.” Everyone knew her, loved her and wanted to do the good things that she asked them to help her accomplish. Ever a mother, mentor and a friend .… “To live, to love, to learn, to leave a legacy .…” Stephen Covey Memorials may be made to: San Juan Rotary Club, P.O. Box 2105, Farmington, NM 87499, the Regional Animal and Pet Shelter Foundation, Inc., 4409 Sandia Court, Farmington, NM 87401 or to the non-profit agency of your choice.

New shows for 2014 season Tickets for six additional shows to go on sale today DURANGO, Colo. – Tickets for six additional shows, newly-added to the 2014 season at the Community Concert Hall at Fort Lewis College, will go on sale at 9 a.m. on Friday, Nov. 15, online at www.durangoconcerts.com, and beginning at 10 a.m. by phone, 970.247.7657, or in person at the Ticket Office inside the Durango Welcome Center at 8th Street and Main Avenue in Downtown Durango. All sales final. Added to the line-up at the Community Concert Hall for Winter/Spring 2014 are: The Grascals With special guest Running Out Of Road Jan. 18, 2014 7 p.m. $18/$24 The Grascals are among the most beloved and acclaimed bands on today’s bluegrass scene. As their releases prove, The Grascals’ rare musical empathy gives the band members an unerring ear for just the right touch to illuminate each of-

fering’s deepest spirit – whether they’re digging into one of their original songs or reworking a bluegrass classic or pop standard. This unique sound has earned the band two Grammy nominations for Best Bluegrass Album. The Grascals’ special guest, Durango-based Running Out Of Road, delves into the nature of great American roots style music through arrangement and performance of original material, contributing to the ever-growing bluegrass tradition of Colorado. Colin Quinn “Unconstitutional” Feb. 6, 2014 7 p.m. $28/$34 A veteran of “Saturday Night Live,” stand-up comedian Colin Quinn returns to the stage in “Unconstitutional,” tackling 226 years of American Constitutional calamities in 70 minutes. In 1787, 55 delegates in wigs and tights sat down to create a country from scratch. In 2013, Quinn offers his unique comedic perspective on the U.S. national character.

Carla Allen Kathleen Phelan

Revis Taylor

Fall Art Student Exhibit 2013 November 15 - December 6 Reception: November 15, 5:30 to 7 p.m. Henderson Fine Arts Gallery, 566-3464

From predator drones to the Kardashians, he pulls no punches in asking if this is what the founding fathers planned. “Unconstitutional” has received rave reviews, including “Hilarious! Wonderfully riotous!” (The Hollywood Reporter) and “Fast, furious and funny! In Quinn we trust.” (New York Daily News). An Evening with Keb’ Mo’ Feb. 26, 2014 7 p.m. $40/$50 The music of blues great Keb’ Mo’ is a post-modern expression of the artistic and cultural journey that has transformed the blues over time. His distinctive sound embraces multiple eras and genres, including pop, rock, folk and jazz, in which he is well-versed. His unique sound owes as much to the contemporary singer-songwriter movement, including inspiration from his longtime friends and collaborators Bonnie Raitt and Jackson Browne, as to the spirit of blues godfather Robert Johnson. For Keb’ Mo’, the common bond between these influences is the underlying storytelling ethic, the power of song to convey human experience and emotional weight. Cody ChesnuTT March 20, 2014 7:30 p.m. $18/$24 Hailed as a thrilling new figure in music, Cody Ches-

nuTT is a soul troubadour whose frank, socially conscious ruminations on life continue to challenge popular notions of what modern soul music can look and sound like. Called a “raw storyteller for the people, wearing a guitar and a toothpick-chewing smirk,” ChesnuTT has always stood his own creative ground. Truthfulness emanates from ChesnuTT’s vocal chords and the strings of his guitar, while his strong, sensitive voice continues to command listeners with its riveting sound, leading them to their own higher ground. Los Lobos Disconnected March 27, 2014 7:30 p.m. $39/$49 Los Lobos may be most widely known for the hit La Bamba, but for 40 years the band has reigned as one of the world’s most innovative and critically acclaimed groups. Formed in the mid1970s by David Hidalgo, Cesar Rosas Louis Perez and Conrad Lozano, Los Lobos began as a traditional acoustic Mexican group, but under the influence of L.A.’s ’80s punk rock scene, the members went electric, thus incorporating their blues, R&B, Latin, jazz and rock influences into an energized sound. With the current tour, Los Lobos is celebrating 40 years of ground-breaking music with a new album, Disconnected.


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

Campus-wide celebration San Juan College plans Native American Heritage events for November November is Native American Heritage month and the Native American Center at San Juan College will be celebrating with activities on the Farmington campus for the entire community. There is something for everyone with free meals, a craft fair and a health fair, all available to the public. “Native American Heritage month is a great way for many of our students to celebrate their background and also to educate others about Native American culture,” said Michele Peterson, director of the Native American Center. The NAC was host to its Feed the Community

Honoring patriots

College Veterans Center hosts gourd dance event on Nov. 13. At least three different types of stew were served with frybread. The event was open to the community and took place in the Native American Center. On Nov. 19, the NAC will host a free health fair with health screenings, nutrition information, diabetes screenings and a blood drive. The health fair is open to the public and will be held in multiple rooms on the Farmington campus

The Veterans Center and the Native American Center of San Juan College will host the Honoring Our Veterans Gourd Dance to recognize Veteran’s Day from1 to 5 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 15, in the 9000 rooms of the Henderson Fine Arts Center. The event will feature Leonard Anthony, of the White Eagle Gourd Society, as the Master of Ceremonies; Larry Anderson Sr., of the Black Creek Gourd Society, as the Head Gourd Dancer; Southern Gourd Drum, the “Likity Split Singers” from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Stop by the NAC on Nov. 19 for more information. Heritage month events will wrap up from 10 a.m.

and the Upper Fruitland Honor Guard. “This Gourd Dance is a great way to combine Native American traditions with the tradition of honoring those who have served our country on Veteran’s Day, especially those veterans from around the Four Corners region,” David Drake, coordinator of the Veterans Center said. A gourd dance is traditionally a men’s dance that is typically performed in honor of men who have

to 2 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 21, with a craft fair in the Suns Room. Vendors can purchase a booth for the fair by filling out the

brought pride to the people of the tribe. The Veterans Gourd Dance will honor both men and women who have served in any branch of the United States military. This event is free and open to the public. All veterans are encouraged to attend. Information about educational assistance available to veterans at San Juan College also will be available at the event. For more information, call David Drake, coordinator of the Veterans Center, at 505.566.3970.

application online at sanjuancollege.edu/nac or by stopping by the NAC on the Farmington campus. For more information

about the Native American Center or Native American Heritage Month, call Michele Peterson at 505.566.3363.

Amish Recycling The Amish have many admirable traits: generosity, a work ethic, a Godly discipline, thriftiness and a small footprint on the ecology. Talk about recycling! They put us glass, tin can, cardboard, energyhungry practitioners to shame. We use so much diesel, gas and oil driving, hauling, mashing, crushing and condensing the messes we make it’s probably not an even trade! The Amish don’t make a mess in the first place. An example of their “leave no mess” philosophy was demonstrated when Amish Joe decided to sell a cull cow at the

ON THE EDGE OF COMMON SENSE Baxter Black, DVM

local sale barn in rural Indiana. Joe hired a man to haul her. Joe’s son Jack and his brother-in-law, Amos all wanted to go. They could only fit three in the pickup so Amos climbed in the stock trailer with the cow. It was November, the trailer was a solid body gooseneck with full doors so there was no danger of Amos getting cold. Once they reached the auction and parked in the unloading line, Joe and

Jack went into the barn to visit. Amos waited patiently for them to come back, till finally he beat on the side of the trailer. This racket woke the driver, who came back and opened the trailer gates. Amos stepped out into the daylight, paused, and the cow ran out over the top of him! She trotted through the parking lot and as truck doors opened she showed them all her tail! Out onto the four lane highway, she looked

back with pride, and was blindsided by a well-used faded gray Toyota Camry! When Joe reached the scene of the collision he noted that the hood was dented and one headlight had a black eye. Joe offered to take the victim’s information, but he took one look at the dazed cow and said, “No thanks!” Before anybody could grab a rope, the cow struggled to her feet and ran into a newly harvested soybean field. The chase was on! The pursuers never had a chance, bogged down, slinging mud and stumbling over each other. Then, the Indiana State

Police arrived! One officer stayed to monitor the radio, the other, Officer York, had just come on duty. His hat was clean, his shirt was starched, his brass was polished and his shoes were shined. “I ain’t goin’ out der,” said Officer York, “but with your permission I will restrain the cow.” He drew his Glock 22, chambered for .40 S&W and began firing at the cow 20 yards away. After a few stray shots he handed the pistol to Joe, who brought her down with one bullet. The policeman asked about disposal of the carcass. Joe said he would

take care of it. After a 30 minute trip to Wal-Mart he returned to the scene of the gun battle with a roll of plastic, Coleman lantern, meat saw and some butcher knives. By 2 a.m. they were putting a cowful of wrapped primal cuts in his propane freezer back home in the milk barn. We can all learn a lesson about real recycling from Joe. As to what Joe learned, he remarked that if he was ever being pursued by the state police he’d prefer it be Officer York, especially if gun fire was involved. www.baxterblack.com

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

This immaculate 5bedroom, 3-bath home at 6909 Alyssa Court in the Shea Heights Subdivision is filled with extras, including bright and beautiful chandeliers throughout. Some of the other special touches include in-floor heating, huge storage room, two dining areas, high ceilings, soaking tub in the laundry room and textured walls. The amazing entryway has ceramic tile floors and opens into a spacious living room with a gas-log fireplace and beautiful wood floors. The master suite features a huge walk-in closet and big master bath. The large kitchen is secluded and offers lots of cabinet space and a breakfast nook. The covered deck and patio can be accessed from either the kitchen or the master bedroom. Each bedroom features built-in desks, and the dining room has a built-in hutch. This more than 3,800-square-foot home has a basement that includes an enormous family/theater room. Perfect for entertaining, this 39foot by 29-foot room includes a wet bar. Two of the five bedrooms are in the basement, along with the big storage area. This home is located on a cul-de-sac and has an oversized attached garage. Priced at $369,000 the home has been preinspected and is ready for you and your family to move right in. For more information or to set up a private showing call Sam Todd at RE/MAX of Farmi n g t o n , 505.327.4777.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 15, 2013

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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

Anthurium

Beautiful plant will add color to your house this winter It is general knowledge that houseplants add huge health benefits to homes. Reducing indoor air pollution, increasing good humidity levels and adding oxygen are all benefits of houseplants. Achieving all of these great benefits with a beautiful blooming easyto-grow plant is a huge plus. Anthuriums are a gorgeous, relatively easy-togrow flowering plant. This plant is well known for its huge red, pink or white heart-shaped flowers. They are resilient and will survive

ADVICE YOU CAN GROW WITH Donnie Pigford

as an indoor plant for a remarkable period of time, even in unfavorable indoor conditions. Anthuriums grow best with day temperatures of 78 to 90 degrees, and night

temperatures above 55 F. Temperatures above 90 F

may cause foliar burning, faded flower color, and reduced flower life. Night temperatures between 40 to 50 degrees can result in slow growth and yellowing of lower leaves, and a freeze will kill. Anthuriums prefer a growing medium that is coarse and well drained.

They should be planted in a light, well-draining soil, or coconut coir. When they are young, plants should be planted in a mix that is not quite so coarse, to retain moisture. The soil should be settled firmly around the roots and the root system should fill the pot before the plant is stepped up to a larger pot size. Fertilizing is an important part of all houseplant care. When fertilizing flowering plants, it is necessary to use a good balanced fertilizer that contains nitrogen, phos-

phate and potash. I prefer using an organic fertilizer (such as Fox Farm’s Tiger Bloom) on indoor potted plants, since they are not as highly concentrated. Overfertilizing can do major damage to plants. With the right light, good watering technique and proper fertilizing, Anthuriums can add a major impact to an indoor location. Plants such as Anthuriums, African Violets, Peace Lilies and Kalanchoes will add colorful flowers to the indoors, during the cold winter months.

One Book, One Community Committee hosts experts for uranium mining discussion The One Book, One Community Committee will host a panel discussion with the topic surrounding the impact of Uranium mining at 7 p.m. on Nov. 21, in the Little Theatre. The panel discussion is being held in conjunction with the 2013 One Book, One Community selection Yellowcake. The panel will include Doug Brugge, Timothy Benally, Nina Benally and Michael Darmody. Doug Brugge holds a Master’s of Science degree

from Harvard University School of Public Health and a Ph.D. in cellular and developmental biology, also from Harvard. He is currently a professor at Tuft’s University School of Medicine. His research includes studies of asthma; of traffic-related pollution; of the impact of culture and language on health communication; the health impact of environmental tobacco smoke; motor vehicle related injuries; and the impact of uranium mining

and processing on American Indians. In 2007 he testified before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform on uranium contamination in the Navajo Nation. Timothy Benally cowrote The Navajo People and Uranium Mining with Doug Brugge and Esther YazzieLewis. He also conducted and translated interviews with former Navajo uranium miners, widows and children of miners for the book Memories Come to Us

Rosemond they think the misbehavior of a toddler is cute, or they rationalize their failure to discipline at that critical state by saying such things as “He’s only 20 months old, after all” and “It’s just a stage – he’ll grow out of it.” Parents of the pre-psychological era understood the need to nip misbehavior in the proverbial bud, when it first reared its ugly little head. Today’s parents lull themselves into dangerous inaction with such fluffy, largely meaningless homilies as “Don’t sweat the small stuff ” when in fact all of the big stuff begins as small stuff. Without early correction, tantrums grow into rages, disobedience grows into defiance, occasional disrespect grows into belligerence, and not picking up one’s toys grows into refusal to do one’s schoolwork. The biggest mistake made by a lot of parents is they combine wordy explanations with instructions, as in “Honey, a friend of mine is coming over and I’d like to serve coffee in this room, so I need you to pick up these toys and move them somewhere else, okay?” Explanations invite push-back, as in “I was here first! Why can’t you and your friend use the kitchen?” These parents tell me their children are argumentative, which simply means that they, the parents, combine explanations with instructions. Under those conditions, all children, being clever, will seize the opportunity to push back. In this example, the proper form is “I want

you to pick up these toys and move them somewhere else, right now,” and the proper response to “Why?” is “Because I said so.” And then, as in the above example, the biggest mistake made by some parents is attaching “okay?” on to the end of what they think are instructions. This quickly becomes a bad habit. I once had a parent count the num-

ber of times she did that in a day. She reported over 50, telling me that even though she was counting, she couldn’t make herself stop. “Okay?” is not an instruction. It is a nambypamby request, a petition made to the resident prince or princess of petulance. It deserves to be ignored, which is what usually happens.

in the Rain and the Wind: Oral Histories and Photographs of Navajo Uranium Miners and their Families. He is the former director of the Office of Navajo Uranium Workers, a Navajo Nation office that worked with the U.S. Department of Justice to identify former Navajo uranium workers and ensure that they received appropriate compensation. He was also the Director of the Uranium Education Project at Diñe College before he retired Nina Benally worked as a volunteer and legal assistant for attorney Cheri

Daut-Neztsosie in Shiprock from 1989-1999. During that time, she conducted over 100 interviews with families affected by illnesses related to uranium exposure. Michael Darmody is an artist and adjunct instructor in the San Juan College Art Department. His graduate thesis revolved around the uranium industry and traced its impact from the Navajo Reservation to California. Yellowcake follows the stories of two families – one Navajo and one Anglo – some 20 years after the closing of the uranium mill

near Shiprock, where they once made their homes. With some of the mine workers facing illnesses, community members are banding together in hopes of a lawsuit, while others have no interest in dredging up the past. Yellowcake is the moving story of how everyday people sort their way through life, with all of its hidden hazards. For more information about the One Book, One Community and events surround Yellowcake, contact Traci Halesvass at 505.566.3950 or visit sanjuancollege.edu/onebook.

San Juan Local First Business Members Animas Credit Union AMF Clean-Up Armstrong Coury Insurance Artifiacts Gallery AVI Insurance Bedrooms Plus Brown’s Shoe Fit Co. Budget Blinds Carpet One Floor & Home Cheney-Walters-Echols Inc. Citizens Bank Denae’s Boutique Desert Hills Dental Employee Connections Directory Plus Fish Window Cleaning Four Corners Federal Credit Union Glyphic Design and Development Integrity Dental by James Cole Kathy’s Discount Party Store KNMI Vertical Radio Live True 22, LLC Lusk Family Dentistry

Majestic Media Millenium Insurance Namaste House Next Level Audio & Video Parker’s Office Products Partners Assisted Living Services Sandia Hearing Aids San Juan Closet Works San Juan Reproduction San Juan Veterinary Hospital Si Senor Sonia Lukow CPA, LLC Spotless Solutions Sun Glass LLC. Techna Glass The Shoe Shoppe Three Rivers Brewery Ubru at Home Wal Art Gallery Silver River Adobe Inn The Vacuum Shoppe

Membership list effective 11/4/13

Friday, November 15, 7 p.m. Little Theatre Tickets: $8 adults, $6 students and seniors %R[2I¿FH Purchase tickets on the web at: sanjuancollege.edu/silhouette

Thank you for Shopping Locally! Strengthen Your Local Economy... Each dollar you spend at independent businesses returns 3 times more money to our local economy than one spent at a chain a benefit we all can bank on.

www.SanJuanLocalFirst.org San Juan Local First is a non-profit organization.


Business

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

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Rio del Sol Kiwanis Club

Group helps 305 needy kids buy clothes Campaign, which began Nov. 7 and ends Dec. 7 with more than 600 local children receiving new or gently used coats. Nearly 90 percent of the children who received new clothes in the Clothes for Children event signed up to receive coats, and their siblings also signed up to receive the jackets. “We hope that we can collect 600 to 700 coats so that we have enough coats to distribute,” McQueary said.

DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Little Lileigh Peace hugged her new purple top to her chest and flashed a huge smile. The 4-year-old child showed up at Target on Nov. 7 in a little pink outfit and no shoes. She was ready to shop for something new. “My girls love coming out to shop,” said Chris Peace, the father of Lileigh. Earlier in the week, he had received an invitation from the Rio del Sol Kiwanis Club, and that invitation was to spend as much time as he needed to find $100 worth of clothing and shoes for his little girls with the club footing the bill. Peace was one parent of hundreds who were given the opportunity to shop with their kids and buy them new clothing as part of the Kiwanis Club’s Clothes for Children event Nov. 6 and7 at the Farmington Target. “It’s nice having a program like this to help us out,” Peace said. “Sometimes we have a hard time buying clothes. This helps and it means a great deal to us.” The Rio del Sol Kiwanis club raised enough funds to buy $100 worth of clothing and shoes for 305 needy children in San Juan County. Natalie Mulnix was there with her 4-year-old daughter Serenity, who wanted a

Coats are being collected through Dec. 4 in bins set up at Farmington’s Fire Stations 1, 2, 4, 5 and 6, Best Buy, Howard’s Cleaners, Permian Power Tong, United Way and ConocoPhillips. “We are asking for new and gently used coats, and there is a need for small sizes,” Brooks said. The coats will be distributed to children on Dec. 7 at the Farmington Fire Station 6 at 3101 W. Main St.

Clothes for Children volunteer Norleen Begay, left, and Rio del Sol Kiwanis Secretary Jill McQueary, right, show off a shopping cart filled with brand new coats purchased and anonymously donated Nov. 7, during the Clothes for Children event at Target. The coats will be given to needy children throughout the county during the Rio del Sol's Coats for Kids event on Dec. 7 at Farmington Fire Station 6. – Debra Mayeux, photo

new pair of pants. “This is actually really special. It means a lot to us,” Mulnix said. The Kiwanis Club pulled this event together in a few short months, when its members realized the longstanding program might not continue. “With the Kiwanis motto of ‘Saving a community one child at a time,’ it was a perfect match for us,” said Bob Brooks, chairman of the campaign. “We felt strongly the programs needed to continue.” The club members began contacting local businesses and seeking financial donations, and as always the community not only

opened its heart, it opened its pocketbooks. “Our sponsors were ConocoPhillips, BHP Billiton, Western Refining, BP, Merrion Oil & Gas, Orthopedic Associates, XRAYNM Services, and Target,” said Jill McQueary, secretary of Rio del Sol Kiwanis Club. ConocoPhillips and BHP even offered their employees to volunteer to shop with parents and their children. The volunteers’ duty was to add up each desired item and let the family know when the $100 limit was reached. Then the volunteers helped the families through designated shopping lanes that Target

opened specifically to help the Clothes for Children project. Doug Hepner was a volunteer from ConocoPhillips who enjoyed helping a little boy find some new Marvel tennis shoes. “I think this is pretty cool,” he said. Near the end of the event on Nov. 7, another ConocoPhillips volunteer purchased and delivered more than 20 brand new children’s coats from Target to the Kiwanis Club. McQueary had tears in her eyes when she saw the coats piled high in a shopping cart. The coats were to be given to San Juan County children through the club’s Coats for Kids

Lileigh Peace, 4, holds a new shirt that she received Nov. 7 at the Rio del Sol Kiwanis Club’s Clothes for Children event at Target. – Debra Mayeux, photo

Mon’s Grill

New restaurant offers unique Spanish dishes DEBRA MAYEUX Tri-City Tribune Phil Gallegos has always enjoyed a good meal, so he learned to cook. Cooking soon became his passion, and he left a career in law enforcement to open a restaurant. On Oct. 4, in Historic Downtown Farmington, Gallegos opened the doors to Mon’s Spanish Grill. He rented the building that formerly housed the Emerson Gallery and converted Anthony Emerson’s studio into a kitchen. Gallegos wanted a location in the downtown, because he felt the area was “drying up, and we’re hoping we can turn that around,” he said. The grill offers a variety of unique Spanish dishes including a ceviche taco,

with a warm ceviche; seafood paella and enchiladas with unique Spanish-inspired fillings. “Most of our recipes are from Spain, but we altered them a little bit,” Gallegos said. “We wanted

to start with what people would like, or would at least try.” For example, seafood paella typically includes clams, mussels and shrimp, but at Mon’s it is shrimp and vegetables. Gallegos

said many local residents did not want to eat clams and mussels. He also pointed out that ceviche in Spain would be served in an empanada, but there was a percentage of the population that was not

familiar with that, so he puts the fillings in tacos and enchiladas. “We’re hoping to introduce people to a flavor,” he said. The flavor is developed from old family recipes that have not been altered. “The chilis are my grandmother’s recipe. I would watch her and watch my dad cook,” Gallegos said. “Over the years people have changed the recipes. When you go back to the old recipes, it makes them new.” He uses fresh ingredients and prepares the meats when ordered. “We try to get the meals out in under 15 minutes,” Gallegos said. “Some of the plates we can do that, because everything is grilled fresh. Everything we grill, it’s been marinating. Once

it’s ordered, I grill it.” Gallegos runs the business with his wife, Nelly, and he said both were raised to be hard workers. They wanted to take that work ethic and transform it into a business of their own. “We wanted to do something for ourselves and for the community by helping rebuild Downtown Farmington,” he said. Another way Gallegos, a Marine Corps Veteran, wants to help the community is by dedicating an entire wall of the restaurant to members of the United State Military. “We would love for community members to bring in photos of their loved ones who are serving or who have served,” Gallegos said. “This is for the community and we want it to take on a life of its own.”


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CLASSIFIEDS

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

USED CARS 1//1 ATHBJ Bdmstqx+ entq cnnq+ btrsnlY174674- V`r $5+876+ mnv $3+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Fqd`s rbgnnk b`q- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//2 LHMH Bnnodq+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $5+880 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX36822@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 RBHNM WA+ ehud cnnq+ `tsnl`shbY/4/455Mnv $05+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Kn`cdc vhsg $7/// ne `cchshnm`k rsdqdn `mc su dptholdmsGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 JH@ Rodbsq`+ entq cnnq- Y325/81- V`r $7+876+ mnv $5+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//7 @UDN KR+ entq cnnq- H/888/@- V`r $5+884+ mnv $4+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 BNQNKK@ KD+ $04+882 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X0036//@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 EH@S 4// svn cnnq+ GA RonqsY015268V`r $06+876+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- 'Knv lhkdr(Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

FOR SALE BY OWNER

FURNISHED/ UTILITIES PAID

OPEN HOUSE NOVEMBER 17 12 NOON TO 5PM

Weekly/Monthly Rates Studios, 1 & 2 BR Mobile Homes Monday-Friday 9am-5pm

505-326-1617 USED CARS 1/01 GXTMC@H Rnm`s`+ entq cnnq+ FKRY215636V`r $07+256+ mnv $05+276+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Noshl` DW+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $1/+880 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 JH@ Rnqdmsn+ 22+084 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $11+576 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G114277- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ 20+164 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G087128- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 MHRR@M @kshl`+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $05+876 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 SNXNS@ X`qhr+ 2/+837 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd $03+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GI/02584- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

Darn it. Nosey Nellie had just about completed her probationary period for “alleged” crimes, misdemeanors, and felonies when she got busted by a city Code Compliance Officer. The good thing is, when you’re “cited” by a CCO, you get it in the mail, as opposed to misdemeanors and felonies, which are hand delivered by law enforcements with handcuffs and weapons. Just so’s ya know. However, NN has discovered that CCOs take their jobs very seriously and you

USED TRUCKS 1//0 ENQC E,14/ Rtodq B`a+ svn vgddk cqhud+ Onvdqrsqnjd chdrdk+ 103+350 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $6+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38/16@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 CNCFD Q`l 14// 3w3 Pt`c B`a+ Btllhmr chdrdk+ 032+165 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+8// oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G38615@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//5 ENQC E,04/ WKS+ bqdv b`a+ kn`cdc- Oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 CNCFD Q`l 04// Pt`b b`a 3w3Y30527@V`r $06+884+ mnv $04+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 ENQC E,04/ 1w1+ 6/+510 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $06+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G42/50`- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

can’t just blow them off. The “Notice of Violation” stated pretty clearly that you have 14 (not 13 or 15, but 14!) days to “remove miscellaneous yard debris from the back of the property, outside of the fence, and to the center of the alley.” Also, the violations states (and is underlined, so’s ya know they mean business) “In the event that you have not corrected the condition cited in Paragraph Number 1 within the time limits stated in Paragraph Number 2, a citation will be issued or a criminal complaint will be filed against you. This is the only notice that you will receive regarding this matter.” At first, NN thought maybe it was a mistake. NN pretty much never has “trash,

Great horse property! #17 CR 1740 Four stalls, corral, bordering BLM. Ranch style, 3500+ square feet, four bedrooms, three baths, large kitchen with pantry, living, dining, family, sunroom, hot tub room, two car garage, & more. Three acres. Asking $369,682.

505-325-4307 USED TRUCKS

USED TRUCKS

1//8 FLB B`mxnm Bqdv B@a+ entq vgddk cqhud- Y325574@- V`r $10+456+ mnv $08+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddGh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// svn vgddk cqhud+ dwsdmcdc b`a+ 05+668 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G40276@- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/00 ENQC E,04/ 3w3 Rtodq Bqdv+ 38+04/ lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $16+276 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 GC57253- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/01 BGDUQNKDS 04// bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $17+130 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX20015@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

1/00 FLB Rhdqq` 04// qdftk`q b`a 3w3+ 21+082 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07+876- Rsnbj #9 G36582@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

garbage, rubbish, vehicle parts, paper, cans, wood, cardboard, litter, or glass” in the back of her property, outside of the fence and to the center of the alley. NN is pretty careful to shred all trash, cardboard and litter on accounta, for some people, it could be construed as “evidence.” Most of the “rubbish” NN has collected over the years is currently in the care of the Big House, where they are “invited” to pay for their alleged “dastardly deeds” in more ways than one. NN does, however, have “yard clippings” and the occasional “decorative” weed in the back of her property, outside of the fence and to the center of the alley. NN doesn’t collect “vehicle parts,” and/or put them in the back

1/01 BGDUQNKDS Bnknq`cn+ bqdv b`a+ 3w3+ $12+888 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X07543@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ENQC E,04/ Rtodq Bqdv svn vgddk cqhud+ 47+388 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $11+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G244/2@- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

SUVS/VANS

1//6 BGQXRKDQ @rodm Khlhsdc+ entq vgddk cqhud- H32734@- V`r $01+876+ mnv $7+884+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//6 IDDO Khadqsx+ entq vgddk cqhud+ ronqsY455/7/V`r $0/+876+ mnv $8+876+ oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1//7 IDDO Vq`mfkdq W+ 3w3+ $10+541 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- X36152@Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777,552, 162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/0/ BGDUQNKDS Sq`udqrd KS+ kn`cdc+ $07+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX13657@Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Bnlo`rr+ 21+511 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $07-876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G123680- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/00 IDDO Khadqsx+ 40+8/7 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $05+876 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G468477- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ATHBJ Dmbk`ud+ kd`sgdq+ qnne+ $20+884 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddX232574- GH,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl1/01 ENQC Drb`od WKS+ onvdq+ kn`cdc+ $1/+488 oktr s`w+ shskd+ `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddXB27500Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

of the property, outside of the fence and to the center of the alley either. Vehicle parts can be turned in for cash, in case someone needs cash for bail or gas to get outta town, just so’s ya know. NN has a few “friends” in the “vehicle parts redemption” business and they’re pretty good about working with NN to keep her property free of said parts, which NN now knows is a violation of the code compliance rules/regulations/ordinance/law. It’s good to know these things, ya know. So, NN first thought the citation was a mistake, although she is pretty certain CCO’s don’t make many of ’em. She thought maybe someone might have “dropped” said illegal refuse

SUVS/VANS

LEGALS

1/01 JH@ Rntk+ 20+574 lhkdrR`kd oqhbd+ $04+884 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq eddRsnbj #9 G264046- Gh, Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0, 777,552,162/- vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

THE FOLLOWING items located at AAA Mini-Storage; 1630 Murray Dr., 2016 Hutton Rd., 6208 E. Main, and 7231 E. Main Farmington NM., will be sold or donated at the owner’s discretion by November 27, 2013

1/01 MHRR@M Lhq`mn+ 11+856 lhkdr- R`kd oqhbd+ $13+676 oktr SSK `mc cd`kdq sq`mredq edd- Rsnbj #9 G102406- Gh,Bntmsqx @tsn Fqnto+ 0,777, 552,162/vvv-, ghbntmsqx`tsnfqnto-, bnl-

LEGALS STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SAN JUAN IN THE PROBATE COURT IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CECIL STANLEY MCKENZIE, deceased.

48 Delfrieda Martinez 2500 W. Apache St. #1203 Farmington,NM 87401 364 Theodora Oaks PO Box 403 Blanco, NM 87412 431 Helena Manygoats PO Box 2073 Farmington, NM 87413 444 Eric Frohn PO Box 298 Aztec, NM 87410 541 Patrick Ayres 13 CR 3938 Farmington, NM 87401 612 Jack Casey 511 A. Leighton Farmington, NM 87401

Probate No.5545 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that GLORIA ALDRICH has been appointed Personal Representative of this Estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned Personal Representative at the following address: Gloria Aldrich 514 E 3rd St Hastings, NE 68901 Or filed with the Probate Court, P.O. Box 550, Aztec, New Mexico, 87410. DATED this 1st day of November, 2013. GLORIA ALDRICH, Personal Representative 514 E 3rd St Hastings, NE 68901 Legal No. 136 Dates 11/15, 11/22/2013

at the back of her property, outside of her fence and to the center of the city’s alley. Just in case, and because NN does want to stay on the good side of the law whenever she can, she put on her refuse cleaning clothes, her heavy duty work gloves (as opposed to her very cute, fishnet glamour gloves) and went to the back of her property, outside of her fence and almost to the middle of the city’s alley to “review” the alleged violations. NN saw some dirt/leaves that were placed “inside” and outside of her fence at the back of her property, an old and decaying, but small, tree trunk, some weeds that may or may not be considered “decorative,” and lots of leaves from trees that are NOT at

17 Verleen Nez Box 921 Waterflow, NM 87421

681 & 683 Denise Gardenhire 5501 Bogie Ave. Farmington, NM 87402 E-20 Neal Anderson 6501 McCarty Ave. Farmington, NM 87402 H-22 Kandi Begay 2633 E. 22nd St Farmington, NM 87401 H-11 Danette Spalding 304 Robinson Ave Aztec, NM 87410 T-16 Keith Nelson 3106 Stanford Farmington, NM 87402 Legal No. 135 Dates 11/8, 11/15/2013

If you're of a morbid inclination and have some time to kill in Chicago, head to that city's Graceland Cemetery. Find the monument known as "Eternal Silence" -- a tall figure in robes -- and look into the statue's eyes. It's said that if you do that, you'll have a vision of your own death.

the back of NN’s property or inside or outside of her fence. However, since NN really does try to be a good and model citizen, she started bagging some of the “debris” and putting some of the rest of it in her trash polycart, with the hope that the trash people won’t also consider it illegal and refuse to pick it up. NN also put the bagged “debris” in an old storage shed that is in the inside of her fence, at the back of her property, but not very near the center of the alley. It had been awhile since NN had been in that storage shed and was surprised to see her “work” table still set up and “work” waiting to be done. Several months ago,

* Nellie A23


A21

Friday, November 15, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Great works

Fall Student Art Exhibit opens today The Fall Student Art Exhibit at San Juan College will open on Nov. 15 in the Henderson Fine Arts Center Art Gallery on

the Farmington Campus. The art exhibit will display art students’ works from a range of media including sketches, pot-

tery and paintings. The San Juan College Art Department faculty also will have works on display. The Fall Student Art Exhibit

will be shown until Dec. 6. An opening reception for the exhibit will be held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 15, in

the HFAC Art Gallery. For more information about the exhibit or the reception, call Cindy McNealy at 505.566.3464.

Celtic vocalist Maura O’Connell

Special guest, John Mock opens show Friday at Fort Lewis DURANGO, Colo. – Maura O’Connell, a singer known for blending the Celtic and folk sounds from her formative years in Ireland, and filtering them through contemporary American country and bluegrass music, comes to the Community Concert Hall at Fort Lewis College, Friday, Nov. 15. Her special guest, guitarist John Mock, takes the stage at 7 p.m. Called a captivating stylist, introspective chanteuse, musical explorer and songwriter’s singer, O’Connell began her professional musical journey as a vocalist for the traditional Celtic group De Dannan. While in Dublin, and on later trips to Nashville, she met a series of leading acoustic players, including Sam Bush, Béla Fleck, Tim O’Brien and Jerry Douglas.

Maura O’Connell

John Mock

She discovered the music of these talented Americana artists resonated with her, and ultimately it influenced her then ground-breaking musical penchant for weaving her Celtic traditions

with a wide variety of other genres. Wrote the Dallas Morning News, “Maura O’Connell brings great songs to passionate life with her voice: a sturdy, melodic,

Answers to this week’s puzzles O P E L

B A M A

A R N O

E N G C O M G L E A N O C H R E

C L A U S

H A R M S

S O L O S

E X A C T

A O R T A

M I S S J A P A N N Y P D O D D S O N

A S H E X C O R D O U N S I E L S S D O B I E D R L O O N V E T O

T O H E L E N I L S A L Y E E R I N

H O R N E F I N E T U N E S O R A L S

A W N A D S A G B O B O D R C U A C T S E C H E R B E D A V Y Y N B A T U S U S T S I Y S E L S E T

M E R R I E R R E L Y A N K S F T C

O N E A L S

T R I P S

T O N E

O N E L I B T C A R D A T E E T K A T E E M O N A D E A R D L A T A N A S S S H S T I A L A R R U I T E R R A P E

C L E E A X N U S R B O S P E D R N I T E E P L E L R S A F L L I A E

L A R V A

A I L E Y

P R E S S

T O R S O

S K I M P

E S T E S

E M I L

M E D T S A C

N I B S

N E R O

A S A P

Puzzles on page A22

522 E. Broadway

327-6271

Made you look! “We Sell the Best and Service the Rest!”

from-the-soul instrument. Her interpretive powers are near-perfect as is her ability to make someone else’s personal lyrics universal.” Stepping outside her personal music world, O'Connell was cast by Martin Scorsese as an Irish immigrant street singer in the epic The Gangs of New York, released in 2002. O’Connell has also collaborated with numerous Celtic, folk, pop and country artists including Shawn Colvin, Van Morrison and Dolly Parton. With a self-imposed mandate to always bring something new and exciting to everything she sings, O’Connell’s multi-decade career has earned her international acclaim, as well as two Grammy nominations – including one in 2010 for her most recent release Naked With Friends, her first a cappella album revered for its undiluted

and their stories. Audiences enjoy the casual narration and storytelling, which enliven the characters and places upon which the music is based. A native of Connecticut’s eastern shore, Mock will take the Concert Hall stage with O’Connell as her guitarist. He is also known throughout the world for his classical arrangements, which have been performed by numerous symphony orchestras, including the London Symphony and the symphonies of Atlanta and Nashville. View a concert promotional video of John Mock statement on the art of at www.youtube.com/ watch?v=9S1WMPsinging. View O’Connell per- KHvNw. Tickets for Maura O’forming It Don’t Bring You Connell, with special guest at The Franklin Theater in John Mock, ($24/$29) are Tennessee in Oct. 2013 at available on-line at http://www.youtube.com/ www.durangoconcerts.com watch?v=LHFSQrSwea0&l ist=TL_twARPW5XFsT- or call 970.247.7657, or mjFaiBpyy85ZX9Qmn- visit the Ticket Office inside the Durango Welcome CenmSF. O’Connell’s special ter at 8th Street and Main guest, John Mock, is an Avenue in Downtown Duartist who draws inspiration rango. All sales final. The Community Concert for his music and his art Hall is a not-for-profit, from the sea and its coasts. multi-use performance venWith muses found from ue located on the campus New England to Ireland, of Fort Lewis College. Its Mock shares this heritage ability to bring a diverse of the sea with audiences spectrum of shows to through his unique presSouthwest Colorado is entation of original instrumade possible through a mental compositions on partnership with the colthe guitar, concertina, mandolin and tin whistle, com- lege, a state-supported, inbined with his own pho- dependent institution of tographs. Through sound higher education, and and image, Mock is said through financial and into create all-encompassing kind contributions from atmospheres that capture generous members of the these special landscapes community.


A22

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

game page

New York Times Crossword Puzzle STOLEN PRODUCE By Andy Kravis and Victor Barocas / Edited by Will Shortz

Brought to you by Tucker, Burns, Yoder & Hatfield

Law Firm 505-325-7755 1

2

3

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5

6

19

Across 1 Winner of the 2005 and 2007 Grammys for Best Spoken Word Album

40 Serious break, after 48-Across? 42 Author John Dickson ___ 43 Mao ___-tung

99 Where Margaret Thatcher studied chemistry, after 108-Across?

13 Shape (up)

101 Winglike

16 Caterpillar, for one 17 Dancer Alvin 24 Book in which Moses is born

6 Relief for the snowbound

46 Harvests

102 “The King and I” role

10 Seal words

47 “I don’t know why ___ this way”

106 Ulrich of Metallica

15 Put one’s hands together

48 Schedule planners

110 Prefix with genarian

33 Ball game

56 Greek goddess of witchcraft

111 Money holders

36 Saints’ home, for short

59 Salinger title girl

113 Only inanimate zodiac sign

20 Actress Chaplin of “Game of Thrones”

54 She, overseas

22 Burrow, perhaps 23 Many service dogs, after 29-Across?

51 On the q.t. 53 Sail extender

60 Legendary Scottish swimmer, after 66Across? 68 Potter ’s base

26 ___ Stanley Gardner

69 Painted crudely

27 French colony until 1953

72 Marx without much to say

28 The Warrior Princess

74 Cruiser repair site

31 Rapper with the 2013 No. 1 album “Born Sinner”

112 Guam, e.g.: Abbr.

114 Lee of Marvel Comics 115 Beginning

66 Tart treats

25 Roi’s wife

29 They get stuffed at Greek restaurants

18 Iron

29 Split the check

50 Years, for Cicero

71 Gulf of ___

77 List component

116 Northeast vacation locale, with “the” 117 “The Lion’s Share” author Down 1 Car with a lightning bolt in its logo

38 Frederick’s of Hollywood purchases

41 Adjusts carefully 43 Many a broken statue 44 Tighten one’s belt 45 Politico Kefauver

84 “The Lion King” lioness

4 Tokyo beauty, maybe

35

36

15

21

22

25

26

16

17

18

43

44

45

79

80

30

33

37

34

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41

46

47 50 54

60

61

39 42 48

51

62

49

52

55

53

56

63

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68

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69

72

57

58

66

59 67

70

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81

74 82

87

71 75

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102 103 104 105

106

107

108

109

110

111

112

113

114

115

116

117

65 Preacher, for short

55 Psychedelic drug

67 Fourth-longest river

6 Poe poem

87 Swelled head?

7 Tony winner Lena

57 Mary Lincoln, née ___

35 Foil user ’s words

88 Ice cream brand

38 Foreshadows

89 Ice cream treats

8 All that ___ bag of chips

58 Jackson-toBirmingham dir.

98 Begins to wake

14

29

32

52 Mother, e.g.: Abbr.

85 Overflowed

97 Forces from office

31

13

48 Hockey fake 51 “Here’s looking at you, kid” addressee

94 Jet Ski competitor

28

12

42 Twin-hulled vessel

3 River of Pisa

93 Clobber

27

39 Flutter, as one’s eyes

34 Eighty-sixes

For any three answers, call from a touch-tone phone: 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 each minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800814-5554.

24

11

37 Feds

49 Phone button

92 Mastodon features

10

35 Med. test

2 The Tide

91 Shield border

23

32 Buds

33 Sees red

39 A/C measures

9

20

30 They’re way out

81 Circus founders, after 89-Across?

5 Smokestack emission

8

15 Wipes off, say

108 Short-lived pests … or an alternative title for this puzzle

19 Setting for Henry James’s “The American”

21 Company whose logo was, appropriately, crooked

107 Obliterate

14 Glenfiddich bottle size

7

of Europe 70 Powerful line 73 Puck’s master

9 Second word of “A Tale of Two Cities”

60 Earthy pigment

10 “The more the ___”

62 Damages

11 N.B.A.’s Shaquille and Jermaine

76 Word of woe

63 “Law & Order: SVU” force

78 Does what George

12 Psychedelic experiences

64 Many a collector ’s resource

61 Santa ___

75 “Over There” soldiers

Washington couldn’t?

79 Oscar winner Jannings 80 Lead-in for physics … and pieman? 82 Enthusiastic reply 83 Grease dissolver 85 Casual top 86 Medal awarded to MacArthur in W.W. I and W.W. II 89 Superlative for Atlanta International Airport

90 “Holiday Inn” costar 91 Favored against the field

104 Great-grandson of Mark Antony

94 Performs

105 Quickly, quickly

unaccompanied 95 Perfect 96 Vessel with an arch

98 Drink loudly

101 Vicinity 103 Pen points

92 Scrap

97 Some exams

100 Andrews of Fox Sports

108 Org. “protecting America’s consumers” 109 Marco Rubio’s home: Abbr.

thought for the week “Remember, happiness doesn’t depend upon who you are or what you have, it depends solely upon what you think.”

— Dale Carnegie

Answers to this week’s puzzles are on page A21


A23

Friday, November 15, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Nellie

NN was “working” on a project that her “financial advisers” believed would make her a gazillion dollars. Since NN never has enough money for retail therapy, wine, or mortgage and/or car payments, NN set up shop in the old storage shed and started to “work.” The project included taking the hooker heels off the hooker shoe part, drilling a small hole in the heel, and filling it with things that people like James Bond or Iman Investor could use in the course of their “work.” NN had several drills for holes that could accommodate treasures that could save lives, repel “bad” guys/gals, and/or be useful if JB or II were being held “hostage” some place. NN filled those cute little hooker heels with a pea shooter and some peas, arrows in case JB or II happen to have a bow in their backpack/designer bag, N&Ns, in case they get hungry; Baileys and coffee, in case they need to get their jolt on; and Crayons and a coloring book, in case they’re bored. Everything was going pretty well until NN got to the Baileys and coffee part. NN kept “spilling” the Baileys into a large tube that was hooked up to NN’s mouth in case she needed refreshments. NN prob’ly had a few too much “refreshment” and spilled the tube of Baileys into the fire pit she uses to keep the bad spirits away when she’s working. The Baileys and the fire didn’t like each other and a “small” explosion occurred, sending hooker heels, hooker shoe parts, frozen peas and sharp arrows all over the back of NN’s property, outside of the fence and into the back yards (inside the fences) of mosta NN’s neighbors. Someone called 8-1-1, which transferred the call to 7-1-1, which relayed it to 6-1-1, which sent it to NN’s cell phone, which worked out pretty well for NN. She called all the neighbors, told ’em it was a routine explosion and no one was injured or harmed during the “exercise,” and they should all lock their doors, go to bed and pull the covers up over their heads until the sun rose the next morning. Knowing that she is now on the “Most Dangerous and Horrible, Awful Violator of City Code Compliance,” NN was careful to recover the hooker heels and the arrows and to put them inside of her back fence at the rear of her property. The frozen peas were a little harder to find, so come spring, some of NN’s lovely neighbors may have peas growing in places they never dreamed of. NN does hope that none of the peas that may have landed at the back of her property, outside of her fence and to the center of the alley don’t survive the winter, in case the CCO’s aren’t peas in – or outta – the pod. Just sayin’. . .. NN is certain the hair on her head will grow back and the roof on the old storage shed will be repaired (NN’s “friends” in the “vehicle parts redemption” business came to the scene of the “incident/explosion” and have about a hundred old tires that will aid in the repair of the roof. NN is pretty certain that if the tires are inside of her fence, at the back of her property and nowhere near the center of the alley – and painted a lovely pea green – the CCO won’t cite her again. In addition to the excitement of the “Notice of Violation,” NN knows people who had birthdays this week, but still did not invite her to the party to have cake and ice cream and adult beverages. What’s up with that, NN wonders? Anyway, Tony

at the movies Atkinson, who mentored NN and was good and kind to her before he discovered her “alleged” crimes and that NN listed TA as an “accomplice” and that he, too, can never, ever go to Las Vegas again under his own name and must always, always dress in drag so the nice, but vigilant, law enforcement people there won’t know it’s him. TA is actually a pretty good looking woman, and the one time TA and NN hung out at an Off the Strip Dance Club, he got more hits than NN did. Just sayin’. . . ., TA had a birthday and prob’ly a party and prob’ly adult beverages and didn’t even call or text or send PMS messages so NN could join him and his ’nother (but prob’ly more important) friends. Whatever. Jenny Lee Ryan (who everyone knows loves Disneyland and Star Trek and her four-legged friends more than anything), DeeAnn Durbin (who is one of the sweetest, kindest and most amazing Farmington Young Professional and Wonder Women NN has ever known), Rick Tedrow (who cannot publicly acknowledge that he actually knows NN because of some “oath” he took stating as the Most Magnificent District Attorney in the World, he can’t hang out or be friends with “alleged” felons), Sheldon Pickering (who NN has actually and for reals heard make music from old blackboard erasers and three flash cards), Tedra Liessman (who is beautiful and good and kind and puts up with Richard Neeley like, almost every day, and while NN LOVES Richard, she thinks Tedra should get combat pay some of those days – just sayin’. . . . ), Rob Saline (who is one of those teddy bear kinda guys that all women love and he’s funny on top of it), and Fred Slayton (who is the bomb and has the cutest puppies EVER), all celebrated birthdays without NN. Happy birthday to you all and next year, don’t let NN’s invitation get lost in the mail. Please. NN and one of her BFFs, Lisa Martin, went to Albuquerque this week to see the beautiful and wonderful Gayle Dean honored as the Outstanding Fundraising Professional by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, New Mexico Chapter. It was a lovely luncheon and NN and LM sat at the same table with GD and her husband, Judge John Dean, and some ’nother important people. It was hard for JJD, however, on accounta he and NN are a “couple” and they sat next to each other and NN knows that everyone in that room felt the tension between NN and JJD. Gayle is such a sweetheart about it, on accounta she knows that NN never EVER messes with another woman’s husband, especially when that ’nother woman is as wonderful and perfect as Gayle. Just sayin’. . . . Congratulations to Gayle on an honor well deserved. NN and LM hooted and hollered and were asked to leave the dining room, but JJD used his “influence” and promised to make them behave if they could stay. It’s nice having friends in high places. Just sayin’. . . . On a very sad note, NN mourns the loss of one of Farmington’s finest, most endearing and most treasured citizens, Joyce Donald. Joyce was an icon in our community and a friend to everyone. Her energy and enthusiasm, and her total and complete devotion to her community, her family and her friends, will be missed by so many. Losing Joyce leaves a void that will never be filled, but NN is happy that Joyce has reunited with her husband and her children. Rest in peace, our friend, and thank you for all you did for us.

12 YEARS A SLAVE Rating: R Synopsis: Chiwetel Ejiofor stars as Solomon Northup, the New York State citizen who was kidnapped and made to work on a plantation in New Orleans in the 1800s. Steve McQueen (Hunger) directs from a script he co-wrote with John Ridley, based in part by Northup's memoir. Michael Fassbender, Brad Pitt, Benedict Cumberbatch, Sarah Paulson, and Paul Giamatti costar.

THE BEST MAN HOLIDAY Rating: R Synopsis: When college friends reunite after 15 years over the Christmas holidays, they will discover just how easy it is for long-forgotten rivalries and romances to be ignited.

ENDER’S GAME Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: In the near future, a hostile alien race (called the Formics) have attacked Earth. If not for the legendary heroics of International Fleet Commander Mazer Rackham (Ben Kingsley), all would have been lost. In preparation for the next attack, the highly esteemed Colonel Hyrum Graff (Harrison Ford) and the International Military are training only the best young children to find the future Mazer. Ender Wiggin (Asa Butterfield), a shy, but strategically brilliant boy is pulled out of his school to join the elite. Arriving at Battle School, Ender quickly and easily masters increasingly difficult war games, distinguishing himself and winning respect amongst his peers. Ender is soon ordained by Graff as the military's next great hope, resulting in his promotion to Command School. Once there, he's trained by Mazer Rackham, himself, to lead his fellow soldiers into an epic battle that will determine the future of Earth and save the human race. Based on the best-selling, award winning novel, ENDER'S GAME is an epic adventure which stars Asa Butterfield, Hailee Steinfeld, Ben Kingsley, Viola Davis, with Abigail Breslin and Harrison Ford.

GRAVITY Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: GRAVITY, directed by Oscar (R) nominee Alfonso Cuaron, stars Oscar (R) winners Sandra Bullock and George Clooney in a heart-pounding thriller that pulls you into the infinite and unforgiving realm of deep space. Bullock plays Dr. Ryan Stone, a brilliant medical engineer on her first shuttle mission, with veteran astronaut Matt Kowalsky (Clooney). But on a seemingly routine spacewalk, disaster strikes. The shuttle is destroyed, leaving Stone and Kowalsky completely alone.

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA Rating: R Synopsis: 86 year-old Irving Zisman is on a journey across America with the most unlikely companion, his 8 year-old Grandson Billy in "Jackass Presents: Bad Grandpa." This October, the signature Jackass character Irving Zisman (Johnny Knoxville) and Billy (Jackson Nicoll) will take movie audiences along for the most insane hidden camera road trip ever captured on camera. Along the way Irving will introduce the young and impressionable Billy to people, places and situations that give new meaning to the term childrearing. The duo will encounter male strippers, disgruntled child beauty pageant contestants (and their equally disgruntled mothers), funeral home mourners, biker bar patrons and a whole lot of unsuspecting citizens.

THOR: THE DARK WORLD Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Marvel's "Thor: The Dark World" continues the big-screen adventures of Thor, the Mighty Avenger, as he battles to save Earth and all the Nine Realms from a shadowy enemy that predates the universe itself. In the aftermath of Marvel's "Thor" and "Marvel's The Avengers," Thor fights to restore order across the cosmos...but an ancient race led by the vengeful Malekith returns to plunge the universe back into darkness. Faced with an enemy that even Odin and Asgard cannot withstand, Thor must embark on his most perilous and personal journey yet, one that will reunite him with Jane Foster and force him to sacrifice everything to save us all.

FREE BIRDS Rating: PG Synopsis: In this irreverent, hilarious, adventurous buddy comedy, directed by Jimmy Hayward (Horton Hears a Who!), two turkeys from opposite sides of the tracks must put aside their differences and team up to travel back in time to change the course of history - and get turkey off the holiday menu for good.

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 Rating: PG Synopsis: Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 picks up where Sony Pictures Animation's hit comedy left off. Inventor Flint Lockwood's genius is finally being recognized as he's invited by his idol Chester V to join The Live Corp Company, where the best and brightest inventors in the world create technologies for the betterment of mankind. Chester's righthand-gal - and one of his greatest inventions - is Barb (a highly evolved orangutan with a human brain, who is also devious, manipulative and likes to wear lipstick). It's always been Flint's dream to be recognized as a great inventor, but everything changes when he discovers that his most infamous machine (which turns water into food) is still operating and is now creating food-animal hybrids - "foodimals!" With the fate of humanity in his hands, Chester sends Flint and his friends on a dangerously delicious mission, battling hungry tacodiles, shrimpanzees, apple pie-thons, double bacon cheespiders and other food creatures to save the world again!

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: Captain Phillips is a multi-layered examination of the 2009 hijacking of the U.S. container ship Maersk Alabama by a crew of Somali pirates. It is - through director Paul Greengrass's distinctive lens - simultaneously a pulse-pounding thriller, and a complex portrait of the myriad effects of globalization. The film focuses on the relationship between the Alabama's commanding officer, Captain Richard Phillips (two time Academy Award (R)-winner Tom Hanks), and the Somali pirate captain, Muse (Barkhad Abdi), who takes him hostage. Phillips and Muse are set on an unstoppable collision course when Muse and his crew target Phillips' unarmed ship; in the ensuing standoff, 145 miles off the Somali coast, both men will find themselves at the mercy of forces beyond their control.

LAST VEGAS Rating: PG-13 Synopsis: The ensemble comedy follows four old friends who decide to throw a Las Vegas bachelor party for the only one of them who has remained single. LAST VEGAS is being produced by Laurence Mark (Julie & Julia, Dreamgirls) and Amy Baer. Nathan Kahane and Lawrence Grey are serving as executive producers. Good Universe's Matt Leonetti is co-producing.

ESCAPE PLAN Rating: R Synopsis: One of the world's foremost authorities on structural security agrees to take on one last job: breaking out of an ultrasecret, high-tech facility called "The Tomb." Deceived and wrongly imprisoned, Ray Breslin (Sylvester Stallone) must recruit fellow inmate Emil Rottmayer (Arnold Schwarzenegger) to help devise a daring, nearly impossible plan to escape from the most protected and fortified prison ever built. Movie information and ratings are from Rotten Tomatoes. Ratings are based on 0 - 100%; each star represents a 20% rating.


A24

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

11/15/13-11/20/13

ALL SHOWTIMES GOOD FROM

Prices: Adult (after 6:00 pm) $8.50 | Child $6.50 | Senior $6.50 Matinee (before 6:00 pm) $6.50 | *3D Movie Surcharge $2.00

Online ticket sales available at

www.allentheatresinc.com

ALLEN 8

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available | We installed new seats!

1819 E. 20TH STREET

No Passes or Discounts R

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13 3:15 6:10 8:55 12:35 SAT & SUN

No Passes or Discounts R 3:05 6:00 9:00 12:10 SAT & SUN

3:35 6:40 9:25 12:50 SAT & SUN

PG-13

PG-13

No Passes or Discounts PG 3D*

R 2:15 4:30 6:50 9:05 12:00 SAT & SUN

1:50 6:30 8:45 PG

PG-13 Online ticket sales available at

2:25 4:50 7:25 9:50 11:55 SAT & SUN

3:25 6:20 9:15 12:25 SAT & SUN

www.allentheatresinc.com

No Passes or Discounts 1:45 4:20 7:00 9:35 11:10 SAT & SUN

4:05 11:35 SAT & SUN

HUNGER GAMES MARATHON Thursday 11/21 Hunger Games at 6:30 | Catching Fire at 9:30

ANIMAS 10

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG-13

ANIMAS VALLEY MALL 4601 East Main Street

No Passes or Discounts 3D* PG

R 2:30 4:50 7:10 9:30 12:15 FRI - SUN

2:00 4:40 7:20 10:00 11:20 FRI-SUN PG-13

Advance ticket purchase available | All theatres digital projection ATM available | Stadium seating available

2:00 6:40 8:55

PG-13

PG-13

2:35 5:00 7:25 9:50 12:10 FRI - SUN

1:50 4:25 7:00 9:40 11:10 FRI - SUN

PG

PG-13

PG

No Passes or Discounts 1:30 4:05 6:40 9:15 10:55 FRI-SUN

No Passes or Discounts 2:45 4:55 7:05 9:20 12:30 FRI - SUN

PG-13

COMING SOON

No Passes or Discounts 3:00 6:05 8:40 12:25 FRI-SUN

PG

3D*

3D*

No Passes or Discounts 4:15 11:40 FRI - SUN R

No Passes or Discounts 2:15 6:50

4:35 9:05 11:50 FRI - SUN

Online ticket sales available at

www.allentheatresinc.com

3:30 6:30 9:10 12:50 FRI - SUN

SPECIAL SHOWING THURSDAY 11/21/13

November 22

November 22

November 27

November 27

November 27

December 6

December 13

December 13

December 20


NOVEMBER 15, 2013

Concert

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED • SERVING THE SAN JUAN BASIN

T R I - C I T Y

MM TRIBUNE MAJESTIC MEDIA

Robert Mirabal to perform at Fort Lewis

Pg. 2

SHIPROCK EDITION

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PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY • ONLINE EVERY DAY

VOL. 4 NO. 7

Help for homeless students

CCSD purchases clothing, school supplies, hygiene products with Federal funds JAMES PREMINGER District Public Relations Specialist They didn’t smile. A homeless boy and a girl, just tall enough to be eye level with the conveyor belt, watched every item above them go by. Nothing escaped being observed, categorized, and filed. They knew the new clothing, shampoo and other hygiene products, and school supplies would soon be theirs. But these weren’t gifts and the smiles would come another day. Other more fortunate children took the items on the conveyor belt at the west-side Farmington, N.M., Wal-Mart for granted. Lane Hammitt, the Federal Programs specialist with the Central Consolidated School District Administration in Shiprock, N.M., also watched as the shopping carts were unloaded, and items made their way across the conveyor belt. She waited as the cashier scanned each item, reloaded the carts, and presented her the total bill. The district uses Federal Title

A homeless Central Consolidated School District student tries to take the receipt during a district shopping trip to Wal-Mart.

1 funds, under the McKinneyVento Homeless Education Assistance Act, to provide homeless CCSD students, including this boy and girl, with new clothes, school supplies, and hygiene products. Purchases can include

CCSD’s Lane Hammitt checks a receipt at checkout.

We want your stories Send press releases, events and story ideas to editor@tricitytribuneusa.com fax to 505-516-1231 or mail 100 W. Apache St, Farmington, NM 87401

50¢

blankets and sheets if needed. “We are providing them everything they need to get to school,” said Kristy Stock, the district’s curriculum and instruction supervisor who also oversees Federal Programs and the Title 1 grant. All purchases go through the district’s purchase order system. The shopping excursion was for referred homeless children living with their moms at a domestic violence shelter; it was for children who have been removed from their homes by Navajo Nation Social Services due to domestic violence or alcohol abuse, and it was for children who double-up with relatives or friends because their parents can’t afford to give them a home. “It’s (also) considered homeless if your house burns down. That was happening a lot last April and May,” Hammitt said. “A lot (of homeless situations) lately is because of the economy. A lot of families are downsizing and moving in with other family members because they lost their job or got laid off.” The program helps any referred child enrolled in the Central Consolidated School District

Clean up

who meets these or similar homeless situations including living out of a car, on the streets, or in an abandoned building. CCSD students in any homeless situation should be referred by their school nurse, school guidance counselor, or principal – or by the parents themselves – to Hammitt’s office. The district also gets referrals from Navajo Nation Social Services. Hammitt, the Central Consolidated School District’s homeless programs liaison, goes to Wal-Mart a couple of times a month, or more if necessary, to

make purchases for CCSD homeless students who have referrals. “I will purchase the items with the parents,” Hammitt said, adding the program, which allocates $100 in purchased supplies per referred student, can be utilized only once a year. “Last year the Federal Title I Grant helped about 50 to 60 homeless CCSD students,” she said, adding she wished more parents knew about the program and sought help if needed. For help or for further information contact Lane Hammitt at 505.368.4984 or hamml@centralschools.org.

Students leave the store with their shopping cart.

Veto

Kirtland Early Childhood Centerʼs 4th annual event

President Shelly signs leasing act

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SHIPROCK

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

BLUE CORN, The Journey

Robert Mirabal in concert at Fort Lewis American Indian flutist and composer Robert Mirabal comes to the Community Concert Hall at Fort Lewis College with BLUE CORN, The Journey, featuring the Jemez Pueblo Dancers, on Tuesday, Nov. 19. Curtain is 7 p.m. A two-time Grammy award-winner, Robert Mirabal lives at the foot of the sacred Taos Mountain in northern New Mexico and maintains a traditional life, keeping the centuries-old customs of the Taos Pueblo people. He has been described as a “Native American Renaissance man” – musician, composer, painter, master craftsman, poet, actor, screenwriter, horseman and farmer. A proponent of world music, Mirabal has merged his indigenous American sound with those of Africa, Asia and the Caribbean, tapping into a planetary pulse with a style that defies categorization. Offering “exquisitely nuanced flute playing” (according to the New York Times), Mirabal creates music from his soul that honors the spirits of the Earth. Mirabal immersed him-

self in music at Indian school, learning clarinet, sax, piano, drums and more. At age 18 he discovered the flute and purchased his first instrument – handmade by a man in the pueblo – with money borrowed from his grandmother. Shortly thereafter he had the opportunity to

meet American Indian flute player R. Carlos Nakai, who greatly influenced him. By 1988 he had recorded his first self-titled album. Since that time, Mirabal has continued the evolution of his flute making, performances and music. His growing discography

of traditional music, rock and roll, and spoken word are said to present a contemporary view of American Indian life that is unequaled. Also skilled in theatrical performance, Mirabal portrayed Tony J. Lujan, the famed husband of Mable Dodge Lujan, in the movie

Georgia O’Keeffe, a retrospective about artist Georgia O’Keeffe starring threetime Academy Award nominee Joan Allen. In August 2012, Mirabal premiered Po’Pay Speaks in Santa Fe, his one-man show about a leader of the Pueblo Revolt in 1680, now touring internation-

ally. According to Billboard, Mirabal is “…an incredibly gifted writer, vocalist, musician, dancer and storyteller … a world music triumph … an artist for all seasons and all cultures.” View select videos of Robert Mirabal at http://www.mirabalnativeflutes.com/press-presenters/promotional-video. Tickets for Robert Mirabal ($23/$33) are available on-line at www.durangoconcerts.com, call 970.247.7657, or visit the Ticket Office inside the Durango Welcome Center at 8th Street and Main Avenue in Downtown Durango. All sales final. The Community Concert Hall is a not-for-profit, multi-use performance venue located on the campus of Fort Lewis College. Its ability to bring a diverse spectrum of shows to Southwest Colorado is made possible through a partnership with the college, a state-supported, independent institution of higher education, and through financial and inkind contributions from generous members of the community.

What’s a responsible pet owner?

Taking care of your four-legged family members We who have fourlegged family members will all most likely agree that a responsible pet owner must provide the basics of food, water, shelter and a safe environment. We all would likely agree as well that a proper diet and the health recommendations of your family veterinarian would be involved, and of course lots of love! But what about the other, less tangible needs of our pets? Being a responsible pet owner requires so much more than simply spaying and neutering and providing food and water for your pet. Years of public relations campaigns have convinced most of us that spaying and neutering is important – and yes it is – in preventing unwanted animals in shelters, and that justly applies to our Four Corners shelter efforts. But the fact is, despite the efforts and incentives to spay and neuter, millions of animals every year

PAWSITIVELY PETS Darren Woodson are surrendered or re-surrendered to shelters, and many of them die there. What else can be done to reduce shelter population and save more animals and further enrich the lives of pets and humans alike? Let’s go back to those other intangibles of being a responsible pet owner, particularly one very often overlooked. Responsible pet care starts with good choices and preparation, realistic expectations and an ongoing commitment to meet your pet’s mental, grooming, health and, especially, behavioral aspects. Being aware of these needs, and meeting them, will lead down the road of happy pet companionship and lessen the likelihood of abandon-

ment to the shelter later. The National Council on Pet Population Study and Policy spent one year in 12 selected cities across the USA to find out why owners gave up a pet. Of the 2,000 dogs sent to shelters, 45 percent of the owners cited a behavioral issue as the reason for relinquishment. For the 1,400 cats, human and personal issues (allergies, no time for pet, new baby, etc.,) were reasons. According to the study, 50 percent of dogs were between age 5 months to 3 years and, get this, 96 percent had received zero obedience training! Equally disturbing is that a third of these dogs and one-half of the cats had never been to a veterinarian for preventive health care and educa-

tional experiences. What can be learned from this? And yes, we must learn! First, understand the needs of the particular pet breed you want and select and match that to the reality of your home situation with its time constraints and economics. Next, be careful about adopting a “free” pet. While the pet itself may be free, there will be ongoing daily expenses and unexpected expenses. These include the previously discussed “good” diet, health care, parasite prevention and grooming, and I challenge you to consider the added responsibility of allotting some family resources of time and money for proper obedience training! Behavior training and spending time with your pet is often ignored. Which dog is happier and healthier, the one that has a safe fenced backyard and daily interaction with its family, or the one that is chained up and forgotten because it jumps on

the children or urinates in the house? The old adage that a tired dog is a good dog holds true. Good dogs don’t become so by accident. The same can be said for cats! Finally, pet owners should always be prepared for some sort of animal emergency. Traumatic injuries and serious illnesses are common occurrences and, sadly, many owners will either surrender the pet to a shelter or euthanize this beloved family member simply because of the cost. Plan for these emergencies and major illnesses in advance with a pet health savings plan or a well-researched pet insurance policy. People who use their pet health insurance policy say they could not live without it. Such policies will oftentimes save the life of your best friend. We in San Juan County face a challenge with our pet overpopulation problem. It will take a community team effort from the San Juan County vet-

erinarians, the animal advocate groups, the county and Farmington shelters and municipalities, the Navajo Nation and yes, each individual who has or is planning to add a companion pet to your family. Let’s all work together to support and educate each other and develop a culture of responsible pet ownership – and please include timely behavioral training. Many times I have heard pet owners say, “My pets are like my children.” Who can argue with that? If you spend time with and discipline your children, do the same for your four-legged “children.” Let’s all make sure we do everything to insure each pet’s success in our family. Your veterinarian is a perfect and willing source for advice on health and behavioral topics! The whole veterinary team wants to see your family stay together, including all fourlegged members.


SHIPROCK

Friday, November 15, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

3

Tabled indefinitely

County Land Use Code put on backburner for now LAUREN SEIP Tri-City Tribune A proposed code that would create zoning regulations within San Juan County was tabled indefinitely by the San Juan County Commission at the Nov. 5 regular meeting. Commissioner Jack Fortner moved to table the Land Use Development Code and Commissioner Margaret McDaniel seconded the motion. Because the Commission unanimously approved to table the code, it can only be reconsidered by a majority vote. “No one from the business community was coming forth and saying we think this is a great idea. Even the people who weren’t resisting (the code) were cautiously optimistic, saying this could work but needs more tinkering,” Fortner explained. “I thought we should put a stop to it and my constituents agreed. I felt it was the right thing to do.” Originally, Commissioners agreed to vote on the code during the Dec. 3 regular meeting. But because county staff wanted to gather more public input on the code, County Op-

erations Officer Mike Stark suggested Commissioners revisit the code during the April 1, 2014, meeting. This may not happen, however, since Commissioners voted to table the code indefinitely. The land use code would create zoning regulations within the county, excluding the municipalities and tribal land. Under this code, the unincorporated areas within the county would be divided into several land use districts: residential neighborhood protection, industrial, commercial highway, and multiple-use. These districts identify where future commercial businesses, agricultural businesses, and homes can be built. The code would impose restrictions on businesses coming into the community as well as on builders building homes, Fortner explained. “The last thing we need to do during these economic times is discourage businesses from coming in or builders from building.” Lucy Blackwell from Flora Vista said while she didn’t agree with some sections in the land use code, she had hoped the Commission would pass the ordinance that pro-

hibits businesses with dust output from moving next to residences. Blackwell lives next to a sand blasting business and the dust has forced her to stay inside her trailer home and has affected the health of her horses. “I wish something can be passed on” the ordinance that addresses “businesses affecting other people’s lives. I hope you take that into consideration,” she said at the County Commission meeting. County CEO Kim Carpenter said the Commission has not “fully closed” the door on the land use code. “There are parts that have good strength that are an absolute must. The subdivision regulations have to be addressed because of state laws,” Carpenter explained. Because the code has been tabled indefinitely, Carpenter said instead of the Commission voting on the more than 150page land use code, they could vote on separate ordinances that address specific issues such as adult entertainment stores near churches or residences and noise pollution from businesses.

“By no means is all of the work put into this done in vain,” Carpenter said. “We have valuable information that we will continue to provide” to the Commission. The county has worked with the consulting company Duncan Associates Sites Southwest in creating the Land Use Development Code. Since this process began, the county has held more than 60 public meeting regarding zoning and growth management. During these public meetings citizens have voiced their concerns on the land use code, saying their land uses could change if the zoning regulations are implemented. “There are things in (the code) that don’t need to be there. They are taking away our property rights,” said Ron Lyman, a La Plata resident. Instead of voting on the entire code, Lyman said he thinks it should be narrowed down to specific issues. “If they want to pass an ordinance it should be on a specific item and it should be by public rule,” he explained. “I don’t think the county would keep it if the public says they don’t want it.

That’s why I say these should be individual issues.” But while citizens feel the code could infringe on their rights, others believe it would be an economic value to the community. “When people look to relocate companies in an area, if they see that the area’s land uses are willy-nilly, then they automatically assume, whether it is true or not, that everything else in the community has the same level of disorganization,” Four Corners Economic Development CEO Ray Hagerman said. He added that a land use code also will allow businesses and homes to be clustered within the community. “If you are living in a house with something industrial next to you, you probably won’t be as happy,” he said. Fortner said in order for him to reconsider the land use code, he would “like to see land owners, home owners and businesses come forward and say we think this will be a good idea after all. If no one does that, I don’t see a reason to move forward with” the Land Use Development Code.

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SHIPROCK

TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013 At left, Naomi Roberts, crime scene investigator with the Sheriff’s Office, talks about the two vehicle bays in the Crime Lab that are used to examine vehicles involved in crime scenes. At right, the new evidence room at the Sheriff’s Office is much larger than the previous one and stores the evidence in movable compartments.

New lab

Cutting edge facility increases communication, efficiency LAUREN SEIP Tri-City Tribune The new Crime Lab at the San Juan County Sheriff ’s Office in Aztec was unveiled during a Nov. 5 ribbon cutting ceremony. The Crime Lab is part of a new 18,000-squarefoot facility adjoining the Sheriff ’s Office, which also houses training rooms and a larger evidence storage room. The total cost of the new addition is approximately $5.6 million. “We truly are looking forward to this from a county perspective, to make things better and more efficient for those out on the streets and doing investigations,” County CEO Kim Carpenter said. “This is really a cutting edge facility.” The new two-story facility also houses the detective unit. Seven years ago, due to lack of space in the Sheriff ’s Office, the detectives moved to the vacant Rio Vista Middle School in Bloomfield. “Now they are back here and this will help increase communications among patrol and staff, and will help us achieve our goal – which is reducing crime,” County Sheriff Ken Christesen said.

The renovations and new addition to the Sheriff ’s Office is part of the “Law Enforcement Complex” project, which also consisted of a new District Attorney’s Office and renovations at the Eleventh Judicial District Court in Aztec. This project was authorized in 2007. The “Law Enforcement Complex” project was funded by revenue bonds in the amount of $17 million. The county also received $690,000 in state appropriations for the construction of the crime investigative facility and $200,000 for equipping and furnishing the Sheriff ’s Office new addition. The law enforcement complex was to be built on Andrea Drive, near the county’s Adult Detention Center, but due to issues with the soil, it became cost prohibitive to build at that site. County Commissioners decided to separate the projects and build a new $6.2 million District Attorney’s Office on South Miller Avenue, which was completed last year, and to construct the new Crime Lab at the existing Sheriff ’s Office. Previously, the Crime Lab was located at an old water treatment facility in

From left, former County Commissioner Tony Atkinson, Commissioners Glojean Todacheene, Margaret McDaniel, Keith Johns, Scott Eckstein, and former County Commission Chairman James Henderson cut the ribbon at the Sheriff’s Office in Aztec.

Farmington. “By moving (the Crime Lab) here and updating it, we can do much more here and it is safer for our employees,” Christesen said. “If they need to test a piece of evidence they can walk across the hall get the evidence out of the evidence room and test it in the Crime Lab. You don’t have to drive from one place to another.” NCA Architects in Albuquerque designed the new Crime Lab to be functional and efficient for employees. In the Crime Lab, there are two vehicle bays where detectives can examine vehicles involved in crime scenes. “We can bring it in and they can process it and look for hair, fibers, and blood evidence,” Christesen explained. Across the hallway from the Crime Lab is the deputy room, where deputies can record any collected evidence and place it in the evidence lockers. On the other side of the evidence lockers is the evidence room, where the evidence can be tranfered from the lockers and

securely placed in motorized compartments. “If you ever saw the old evidence room, it was nowhere near this size,” said Thomas Montanez, superintendent for B & M Cillessen, the local company that constructed the new addition to the Sheriff ’s Office. “Most law enforcement agencies will build an evidence room and in just a matter of a few years, those fill up and become overwhelmed,” Christesen said. “We built this evidence room to last us 30 or 40 years. We want to make sure we are functional way into the future so we are not asking taxpayers for more money.” In addition to the new two-story facility at the Sheriff ’s Office, construction also consisted of remodeling the lobby area, renovating the old evidence room into a larger supply and armory area, and renovating the sergeants area into new offices for the Sheriff and Undersheriff. The exterior of the building also was upgraded. County Commission

San Juan County Sheriff Ken Christesen talks to guests about the new technology offered in the Crime Lab.

Chairman Scott Eckstein, who retired as a Sergeant from the Sheriff ’s Office in 2007, said since employees moved into the Sheriff ’s Office building in 2000, “The next seven

years I saw this building get smaller as the Sheriff ’s Office grew,” he said. “It has been a neat experience for me to go through the beginning and to see what we have now.”

Bloody clothing hangs in an enclosed compartment where evidence from crime scenes is dried.


Friday, November 15, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

Fall clean up at KECC

SHIPROCK

5

Kirtland Early Childhood Center parents, students and staff work side by side JAMES PREMINGER District Public Relations Specialist They pulled, cut, and picked up weeds, brush, and leaves by the wheelbarrow, sending a loaded pickup truck to the dump at least four times. Parents, teachers, staff, and students turned out to lend a hand at the Kirtland Early Childhood Center’s 4th annual fall clean-up session held Oct. 19, 2013 – a Saturday. “It’s pretty much to help the school look better so I decided to come out and do that,” parent Linda Jones said. “The school does so much for our kids so why not help them?” Most of the weeds and dead brush – although mainly out of sight – had grown through the back chain-link fence, making it a chore to remove. “We do this every year,” said Melissa Christianson, a parent with the school’s Parent Advisory Committee – comprised of parents and teachers. They meet monthly to organize events – such as a fundraiser, family movie night, gingerbread activities, and barbecues. They also address any concerns. Parent Jaime Moon volunteered her time so that “the kids have a clean and enjoyable, pleasurable atmosphere to be learning in.” Moon, who has a 4year-old enrolled in the Kirtland Early Childhood Center, added, “I really like the center. The classes are small. All of the staff

Parent Melissa Christianson and her son cut weeds.

are really nice. The kids get along really well. They’re all considered one big family.” The Kirtland Early Childhood Center has 126 students – half attend the morning session, and the other half attend the afternoon session. Each session is 3.5 hours. The district provides school bus service. Morning session students receive breakfast and lunch; while

the afternoon session students receive lunch and an afternoon snack. There is room for additional students to be enrolled. Parent Melissa Christianson and her son cut weeds. “I’m really proud of our preschool program in the district. “It has given a lot of students a head start to kindergarten,” said Cathy Martinez, the Kirtland Early Childhood and

Teacher Becky Brandt cuts weeds during the annual fall clean up Oct. 19 at the Kirtland Early Childhood Center.

Parent Linda Jones and her daughter sweep.

Pre-K Administrator for the district. “I’m the administrator of this school

and the (pre-kindergarten) grant administrator for the entire district.”

The Central Consolidated School District operates early childhood preschool centers, in addition to the Kirtland Early Childhood Center, at Nizhoni Elementary School in Shiprock, Naschitti Elementary, Newcomb Elementary, and Ojo Amarillo Elementary. There are 423 children in the early childhood program district wide. “As a teacher I think you have to be an example to the parents and to the kids of what you expect of them, what you want from them,” Becky Brandt said about why she spent her Saturday morning helping out. “If you participate in activities they are more willing to do that.” And that they did. Children worked alongside their parents. “The children are very proud when they come back and see they helped clean up the building,” Martinez said, adding, “They’ll tell their other friends that ‘I helped clean that up.’”


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TRI-CITYTRIBUNE Friday, November 15, 2013

911 legislation

Shelly signs leasing act, vetoes NHA Improvement Act WINDOW ROCK, Ariz. Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly signed legislation that gives the Navajo Nation Telecommunications Regulatory Commission (NNTRC) authority to implement and manage a 911 emergency response system on the Navajo Nation. “I am pleased to sign this legislation. We have to give our Navajo Nation residents the opportunity to call for help in emergency situations. We have been working to create the infrastructure to enable a 911 emergency response system on the Navajo Nation. We look forward to making more progress in this area,” President Shelly said. Legislation CO-51-13, which enabled the NNTRC to implement a 911 system, was one of the pieces of legislation from the fall session of the Navajo Nation Council that was signed. President Shelly also signed a bill that updated Navajo leasing regulations and he vetoed a Navajo Housing Authority reform measure. President Shelly signed the Navajo Nation General Leasing Regulations Act of 2013, legislation CO-53-13, into law. The act streamlines current leasing approvals by establishing procedures to approve all land leases with the exception of mineral leases. “The Navajo Nation needs to create opportunities for growth. One of the ways we can do that is to streamline land lease procedures. This will

allow businesses and homes a streamlined process to have leases approved. I welcome these changes,” President Shelly said. President Shelly vetoed legislation CO-57-13, which would have updated Navajo Housing Authority board selection approvals. He vetoed the legislation stating that the language in the legislation needed to be clearer and that the Naabik'iyati' Committee doesn't have to approve assigned or appointed commissioners. President Shelly outlined his reasons for his veto in a memo to Navajo Nation Council Speaker Johnny Naize.

In Section 606 and 607of the bill was “confusing and not clear” about how many commissioners would serve on the board that oversees NHA. In addition paragraphs in Section 606 and 607 restate the need to appoint a commissioner within 90 days, and since the two paragraphs state the same need, one paragraph was not necessary. Thirdly, Section 614 would have gave the Naabik'iyati' Committee to approve appointed and assigned commissioners. However, President Shelly, in his veto memo, stated this practice could infringe upon NHA's

efficiency. “The NHA, like other tribal entities, was created and delegated to carry out administrative function efficiently, without the cumbersome process of governmental bureaucracy. Requiring NHA to go through the legislative process negates the efficiency objective,” President Shelly wrote. Earlier this week, President Shelly signed legislation CO56-13 that would have reduced fees for voter-based initiatives to be place on voter ballots. Signed on Nov. 4, in his memo to Speaker Naize, President Shelly wrote the Navajo

Council should consider other referendum measures recommended by the Office of Government Development and the Commission on Navajo Government Development based from a 2012 convention. “We ask that the Navajo Nation Council reconsider the referendum measures on lowering the initiative signatures requirements; amendment laws approved by initiative/referendum; amending N.N.C. (subsection) 102,” Andrew Curley, commission vice-chairman, wrote in a letter addressed to President Shelly and Speaker Naize. President Shelly cited Curley's letter in his veto memo to Speaker Naize. “I robustly urge the Navajo Nation Council to reconsider remaining referendum measures,” President Shelly wrote. “We need to listen to our Navajo people entirely.” Other legislation signed from the fall session included the Navajo Nation Energy Policy of 2013, Navajo Transitional Energy Company operating amendments enabling the purchase agreement for Navajo Mine near Farmington, N.M., and an allocation of nearly $4.1 million to NTEC as company start up costs. “We are making progress on the Navajo Nation. We must continue to work hard for the Navajo people and ensure that the Navajo Nation is progressing toward positive changes for our people,” President Shelly said.

Works on display

Fall student art exhibit opens today The Fall Student Art Exhibit at San Juan College opens today in the Henderson Fine Arts Center Art Gallery on the Farmington Campus. The art exhibit will display art students’ works from a range of media including sketches, pottery and paintings. The San Juan College Art Department faculty also will have works

(Left) Drawing by Sherdeana F. Thompson. (Above) Ceramic art fish by Ricki Sue.

on display. The Fall Student Art Exhibit will be shown until Dec.6. An opening reception for the exhibit to be held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. today in the HFAC Art Gallery. For more information about the exhibit or the reception, call Cindy McNealy at 505.566.3464.


SHIPROCK

Friday, November 15, 2013 TRI-CITYTRIBUNE

7

calendar ONGOING EVENTS BIRD WATCHING RIVERSIDE NATURE CENTER Enjoy bird watching and a beautiful walk through Farmington’s riverside trails every Tuesday morning. More than 100 species of birds have been noted throughout Animas Park and new birds fly in each season. Meet at the Riverside Nature Center, located in Animas Park off Browning Parkway, to join the friendly RNC staff for leisurely walk of 12 miles. Information: 505.599.1422 or www.fmtn.org

FRI NOV. 15 MODERN JAZZ QUARTET COMBO Join the Silhouette Series of performing arts at San Juan College Little Theatre for this amazing performance. Show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $8 adults, $6 students and seniors. Information: 505.566.3430 or www.sanjuancollege.edu/silhouette

SAT NOV. 16 SPACE FLIGHT EXPLORERS FAMILY FUN Join us for some space fun with activities straight from NASA at the E3 Children’s Museum from 11a.m. to 1 p.m. This event is suitable for ages 7 and up. Hope to see you there and don’t forget your imagination. Information: 505.599.1425 WHAT A GIRL WANTS EXPO! Come to the ultimate girls’ day out! Join us for a fabulous event catering to women and experience our unique expo with special discount pricing. Come shop till you drop! Expo hours are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at McGee Park. Admission is $2. Information: 970.375.4521 or www.whatagirl wantsexpo.com

TUES NOV. 19 VICTOR & PENNY Crash Music presents Victor & Penny in the historic Aztec Theater, 104 N. Main Ave. in Aztec, N.M. Tickets are $12 and are available online, doors open at 7:30pm. Information: 505.427.6748 or www.crashmusicaztec.com

FRI NOV. 22 SAT NOV. 23 ANNUAL HOSPICE CHARITY BOWL SALE This event is at the San Juan College Henderson Fine Arts Performance Center lobby. The event benefits Northwest New Mexico Hospice. The hours for the sale are 9 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. each day. Information: 505.566.3464

SAT NOV. 23 SAN JUAN SYMPHONY – COME HEAR US NOW! THE MESSIAH Join the Durango Choral Society, Farmington’s Vicus Voces, two extraordinary vocal soloists and the San Juan Symphony for an early start to the holiday season, with our first performance of Handel’s cherished oratorio. We’ve selected the most popular numbers from Handel’s masterpiece to create a 90-minute concert designed to lift your spirit and usher in the season of reverence and renewal. Enjoy this amazing concert at 7:30 p.m. at the San Juan College Henderson Performance Hall. Information: 505.566.3430 SUNRISE COMET WALK A recently discovered comet should be visible just before sunrise this morning. Astronomers think Comet ISON may be the comet which was last visible in 1608, when it was noted by Spanish explorers in the Southwest and other viewers around the world. Join us at the Riverside Nature Center at 6 a.m. for coffee or hot chocolate before the two-mile walk. Information: 505.599.1422 TURKEY TROT & GOBBLE WOBBLE This event features a 5K Turkey Trot and a Two-Mile Gobble Wobble Walk at 9 a.m. in Historic Downtown Farmington. Registration deadline is Nov. 15. This family friendly event will include activities such as children’s carnival, games, face painting, a kids gobble contest, music and more. Participate in a Turkey Trot and Gobble Wobble costume contest! Enter individually or as a group. This is an all-weather event, plan to participate rain or shine. Information: 505.599.1184

FRI NOV. 29 SAT NOV. 30 THE 29th ANNUAL CHAMPIONSHIP BULLRIDING EXTRAORDINAIRE This annual bull riding spectacular is at McGee Park Memorial Coliseum, between Farmington and Bloomfield on Hwy. 64, behind SunRay Park & Casino. Information: 505.287.9534 or www.casperbacarodeo.com

EVENTS FOR ADULTS THE BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER 109 E. La Plata St. and 208 N. Wall Ave. Farmington, New Mexico 87401 Information Numbers: Main Building: 505.599.1380 or 505.599.1390 Senior Center Annex:

505.566.2256 Senior Activity Center/The Silver Fitness Center: 505.566.2287

nished by the Senior Center. Please be checked in and seated by 1 p.m. to play Blackout.

range of motion. Cost is $20 a year. Call 505.599.1390 for more information.

50+SATURDAY NIGHT DANCES 7 - 10 p.m., doors open at 6:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Nov.16 - Otis & the Rhythm Nov.23 - Forever Young Nov.30 - NO DANCE, HOLIDAY WEEKEND Info: 505.599.1380

DIABETES AWARENESS AND PREVENTION 10 -11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov.20 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. This course will teach preventive measures and treatments. They will talk about risk factors and ways to reduce the risks of developing diabetes, what questions to ask your doctor if you have concerns. Handouts and refreshments will be available. Presented by San Juan Regional Medical Center, Nicole Clark, RD. For more information call 505.566.2287

EXERCISE CLASS - WITH JEAN ELISE 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. or 1 - 2 p.m. Monday/Wednesday/Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: 50 cents per session. Are you losing flexibility and want more energy to do the things you enjoy? If so, this class is what you need to get back into a good exercise program. Work at your own level and build up to where you want to be. Call 505.599.1390 for more information.

50+ FREE WEDNESDAY DAYTIME DANCE 12:30 - 2:30 p.m. Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Nov.20 - Country Jammers Info: 505.599.1380 MEDICARE PART D BENEFITS COUNSELING BY APPOINTMENT Mondays, Nov.4 - December 2, by appointment only Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. S.H.I.P. (State Health Insurance Program Volunteers) will be available and ready to help you analyze your current plan and compare it to 2014 plans, so you can more easily make a decision to stay, or switch plans. If you need help and can't get to one of these appointments, call the Medicare Help Desk at 1 (800) 633-4227 for assistance from your home. Make sure you have your Medicare card and your prescriptions, or a list in front of you so they can be entered into the plan finder. Bring the Medicare card and a list or your prescriptions to the Senior Center if you make an appointment with us. Call 505.599.1390 for more information or to make an appointment. THANKSGIVING DINNER 11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m. Friday, Nov.15 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Lunch is a $3 donation for anyone 60+ and a $6 fee for anyone younger. Enjoy a traditional Thanksgiving Dinner with all the trimmings. Call 599-1380 for more information. GOBBLE GOBBLE BINGO PARTY 1 - 2 p.m. Monday, Nov.18 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Main Building, 109 E. La Plata St. Cost $2 per card – Please bring a non-perishable food item for ECHO Food Bank. Half of the Black Out game proceeds will be awarded to ECHO Food Bank. Prizes and refreshments fur-

50 +AARP DRIVERS’ SAFETY CLASS 8 a.m. - Noon Thursday, Nov.21 Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Cost: $14 - $12 for card carrying AARP members. Pre-registration is required by calling 505.566.2256. Pay cash or check to the instructor on day of class. A discount on your insurance can be good for 2 to 3 years, check your policy. CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE (COPD) 10 - 11 a.m. Wednesday, Nov.27 Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. This course will teach preventative measures and treatments for COPD. Topics include risk factors, ways to reduce the possibilities of developing COPD, what questions to ask your physician, and how to discuss your concerns. Handouts and refreshments will be available. Presented by San Juan Regional Medical Centers Cardiopulmonary Rehab: Carol Cherrey, RN. For more information call 505.566.2287 ON-GOING CLASSES AT THE SENIOR CENTER ACTIVITY CENTER & ANNEX 208 N. Wall Ave. Call 505.566.2256 for more information THE SILVER FITNESS CENTER 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. & 1 3:30 p.m. Monday - Friday Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. We feature exercise equipment that is extremely safe and easy to use. Perfect for improving your overall health, stamina, and

DRAWING & CALLIGRAPHY 9:30 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bring your own materials and learn some new techniques! Call 505.599.1380 for more information. PILATES 9 - 10 a.m. Tuesdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Achieve total muscle conditioning and flexibility with light weights. Strengthen your muscles and improve your core, with emphasis on stretching and breathing techniques. There are modifications for various fitness levels, so everyone can participate. Class is taught by Patti Glover TAI CHI 9:30 a.m. Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Tai Chi is a series of fluid movements that can help with balance, flexibility, and muscle tone. These gentle exercises will leave you feeling refreshed. Free to anyone 50+. Info: 505.599.1390 ZUMBA GOLD 50+ 10:30 - 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays & Thursdays Bonnie Dallas Senior Activity Center behind the Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Party on the floor with Latin dance music that will make you smile. This exhilarating exercise class will get you moving to the beat. Cost is $2.50 per session. Info: 505.566.2288 BIBLE READING IN NAVAJO 10 - 11:30 a.m. Fridays Bonnie Dallas Senior Center Annex, 208 N. Wall Ave. Bible reading in the Navajo Language, taught by Dorothy Tewangoitewa. Info: 505.599.1380


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Tri-City Tribune 11152013