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CZECH VILLAGE / NEW BOHEMIA MAIN STREET DISTRICT

STRATEGIC REVITALIZATION PLAN APPENDIX September 2013 The following data sets, studies and publications were referenced in the completion of the Strategic Revitalization Plan. These documents augment the information contained in the Plan and should be used to complement the recommendations contained in the complete plan. Strategic Revitalization Plan – Public Survey Results National Register of Historic Places: Bohemian Commercial Historic District (boundary increase) Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District Market Study Summary City of Cedar Rapids — Neighborhood Planning Process (Sasaki) Documents current at time of publication; validate prior to reference. Potential Funding sources Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Code of Ordinances, Czech Bohemia Overlay District Chapter 32B — Floodplain Management Ordinance


STRATEGIC REVITALIZATION PLAN OPN Architects

Survey Results


SURVEY RESULTS

Strategic Revitalization Plan- appendix

Survey overview 

The online survey was active for 2 months starting on October 29th, 2012

Promoted via email, Facebook, Twitter and traditional media

Total Participants = 412


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

How often do you come to the Czech Village/ New Bo Main Street District?

Never a few times a year

3%

Daily

Why don’t you come to the District? 

Just never think about it

I don't know what's there.

Was unaware of until recently.

We moved here in June and just haven't. Its really hard to find information of stuff going on in CR.

There is currently nothing there that interests me.

Just don't know enough about it.

Not sure what to do in the district.

18%

22%

once or

once or

twice a

twice a

month

week

31%

26%


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

Which groups should the district appeal to?

How do you get to the District?

400 300

300

200 250

100 0

200 150 100 50

250 200

0

150 100 50 0 Singles

Seniors

Teens

Children

Pet Owners


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

What brings you to the District?

The Historic character of the district is important.

300 250

Disagree No Opinion 3% 3%

200

Strongly Disagree 2%

150

Agree

100

32%

50

Other

Museums

Businesses

Restaurants / Bars

Services

Shopping (food)

Art

Shopping (retail)

Live Music

I work in the District

Festivals

I live in the District

0

Strongly Agree 60%


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

List three words that describe the District today.

Wordle is an online tool for generating “word clouds� from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text.


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

Which annual events do you attend?

200 150 100 50 0


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

What do you like about the District today? • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

the new changes that are coming truly unique businesses and preservation efforts It seems to have a great new energy NewBo City Market, Brewed Cafe, NCSML, street art, new businesses opening all the time I like the changes that are taking place diversity of shops; attitude regarding flood recovery The history and the variety lots of great businesses within walking distance of each other Art, restaurants, and its overall eclectic culture City Market, Restaurants, CSPS historical aspects honored & respected beside new ideas restaurants, improved shopping Unique restaurants emphasis on live music, theater and museum that there is great momentum and pride. good mix of shopping, culture and food/drink Restaurants the energy Energy and feel of something different The feel of the area and the looks. Restaurants, museum the variety of restaurants available, the addition of NewBo Books and the Farmers Market. We frequent Sykora's and Smuggler's Wharf the most. Pedestrian area with decent nightlife. The atmosphere and the variety The artsy feel of the streets, lamp posts, businesses, etc. The mix of businesses, restaurants and now market Uniqueness NewBo has had a huge renaissance, the arts, the entertainment. the new market have given our city a destination worth experiencing seeing more people!

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

NewBo City Market, renovated CSPS, Brewed Cafe, Batas -- all very exciting additions to our city! The NewBo Market and surrounding businesses are exactly what Cedar Rapids needed. What a fun place! So much to see and do and lots of variety of programming New choices in restaurants -- it is kind of becoming a magnet area for where to eat. Usually pretty easy to park, too. NewBo Market and the old world feel of Czech village (16th avenue) the varied uses of historic buildings Quality restaurants, my favorite is Parlor City. I LOVE the district! I think it is where all the most wonderful things in Cedar Rapids are taking place or will take shape in coming years. There is an excitement that you can feel and be a part of when you are in the district. Historic character and preservation efforts paying off art and music New Streets Most owners really care about their business and you can tell (ie:Parlor City) seems like it's on the brink of something great Walkability of area, close knit community feel. The development of new and different things to see and do. I like the steps that local developers and the city are taking to beautify the area, and bring new and innovating ideas to the area. I also enjoy the restaurant scene down there. The local businesses to shop or dine in. It brings a vibe that CR has needed for a long time. If it continues to grow we won’t have to go to other cities. Watching the above change I think the NewBo district is thriving. the variety the culture NewBo Market and restaurants I like the new things popping up to bring people to town! active development The variety of shops and restaurants The new things coming through exciting, style, fun A sense of pride. That it has done a great job of blending Cedar Rapids' historical heritage with new purposes and is a creative, vibrant, non-corporate environment. It has heart and soul. the history of it, antique shops, fun festivals


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

What do you like about the District today? • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

It's growing, it's becoming a neighborhood for locals to gather i.e. the Ped Mall in Iowa City or Court Avenue in Des Moines. Cedar Rapids doesn't really have that. All the new businesses and focus on sustainable. parking is free and abundant, Parlor City has great food and good music on Sunday evenings - that is the only place we visit in NewBo, don't visit Czech Village location NEWBO MARKET! More activities and places for young professionals to hang out Variety of independent businesses. NewBo Market is awesomez The energy Cedar Rapids has needed for a long time. The old buildings that have been or are being refurbished, the possibilities for more retail and residents, nice green spaces. Restaurants and old-town feel of the area. Food, fun, and history it's uniqueness The options available museum & NewBo LOVE the City Market. Am very excited to start going to the district more often. shopping and vibe Always something new & fun going on Fresh food and activities Parlor City, NewBo City Market Newbo market! the NewBo Market, restaurant The walkability, the potential the area has. strong sense of optimism, purpose and direction; makes me very proud If the money comes, they will build wall to protect the west side also..... The new growth and vibrancy of the area CSPS Hall The variety of bars, restaurants and that they are bicycle friendly Wide variety of musical events at CSPS, restaurants, the bookstore, and now the market that its growing so much. there are plenty of things to do within walking distance of my apt.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • •

NewBo Market NewBo city market NewBo Market Has a different character than downtown for going out. the restaurants/cafes & the new market Opportunity, excitement, uniqueness beer It's staying true to its Czech roots of hard working, innovative places that are INVITING to all people. It’s getting better and is more than coming back from the flood ... It will get there the variety cultural vibe, urban feel among historic landmarks, walkable, trail system, people I like the new things happening, the new design The addition of Newbo Market, the different restaurants and CSPS. NewBo City Market, Brewed Cafe, Smuggler's Wharf the character of the buildings! Thank you for not tearing the old down Being able to cross to cross the street safely as I am a senior citizen Its unique culture and urban atmosphere. The NewBo City Market and surrounding business. NewBo Market The feeling of community I feel like I belong there. We visit Parlor City often. It is one place in CR that all ages can enjoy. Great music, staff, food, BEER, and atmosphere. Parlor City Pub, CSPS, NewBo Books, NewBo City Market bars, beer, food The energy see above variety Newbo market restaurants bars arts Atmosphere Architecture, atmosphere, culture All the energy and new offerings lots of small business owners, great music The area has cleaned itself up some from when I grew up in the area on C Street, the museum has made a bit of a change to the area, but in my opinion it's still known for its bars and night life. Friendly, new, good food, variety The family-friendly artsy feel. The multiple options of things to do and see Newborn city market The art opportunities: renovated CSPS, Cherry building, bookstore/coffee shop


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

What do you like about the District today? • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

It is getting better and better, a real destination new big city feel Cupcakes at NewBo NewBo market, business district, live entertainment NewBo City Market Its hipness historic yet modern feel in NewBo It's an eclectic mix of people and business that are locally owned, and preserve historic areas. Repurposed, reused, and reinvented spaces. It's not commercialized, and is a great locally flavored area. NewBo market, Brewed cafe, NewBo books, parlor city. If more businesses opened like that, the district would thrive. The shops, the historic look it's a forum for interesting people and stuff in cedar rapids I love that there is life being put back in these historical places! antiques, great bars with great brews, great service, vibrancy charm and quality of life it projects Accessible, vibrant Restaurants/food I like the commitment to the history and the arts. That the culture is expanding to include healthy choices and events, not just bars. It is becoming a destination. It is lively. all the things to see and do diversity Coop bicycle shop the history and vintage shops arts orientation NewBo opportunities Love the energy and new biz happening variety, tolerance, friendly

• •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

it's forward movement, uniqueness It is an artistic and cultural gathering place with a strong link to CR Heritage and respect for the historic buildings in the area. The buildings and the people have individuality and unique personalities. it is a fun part of town to be in. Artist Cultural events Redevelopment, preservation Locally owned Redevelopment, historical preservation, cultural events good I love the atmosphere...especially with the addition of NewBo Market. walkability The preserved urban grit - not dirty or overly industrial. There seems to be a lot of opportunity for outdoor activities (shopping, eating, etc). I also like the community atmosphere The variety of reasons to visit it - mostly food related I like the close proximity of good bars, restaurants, etc. It created a kind of vibe that this city has needed for so long. Variety I like there are some good options for food. brewed cafe. It makes me feel I have a centralized place where I can get local food, bike there, entertainment and fests. Laid back area with a decent amount to do. The historic character of the remaining building stock, the NewBo Market has helped bring activity back to the district, the locally owned businesses the buildings Newbo market, restaurants Great Food Options. CR has too many chains. Finally...a true destination location other than Lindale Mall and Collins Road and franchise restaurants. I like the diversity, the emphasis on culture, the repurposing of old buildings, the freshness of new businesses. I'm as likely to run into a tattoo as I am a phd. Open wide sidewalks, bike trail close by Revitalization, Arts, Entertainment, 3rd St. culture, food, drink The village or district feel with a variety of entertainment The continued progress I see. Very positive. The promise it has for the revitalization of the downtown area. you can smell the excitement in the air Something new and different to the area with the previous places still in place (Chrome Horse, Parlor City)


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

What do you like about the District today? • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

fun place to hang out with family and/or friends the historic theme NewBo City Market and a variety of restaurants all together The effort to make improvements; to get young adults to participate in their city. Unique venues, businesses, living options that can't find anywhere else in the city character The restaurants and bars and festivals The enthusiasm of the community to bring it back That its development has been, so far, fairly organic. It's a hub of activity, arts and events restaurants, coffee house, farmers market Increasing density of culturally diverse activities Restaurants and new businesses. Haven't made it to NewBo yet but will very soon. Always seems to be things going on It's slowly getting better; more to do the new businesses and the shift in culture Market Great Potential it is very cleaned up, tidy and sharp looking more and more to do The local businesses and that it is generally bicycle friendly. Bike lanes and less rude motorists would help that though ;)

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

It's the only part of Cedar Rapids that has character like what you'd find in Iowa City or Davenport the vitality I enjoy going to the NCM store and eating at the Frog. It vitality Color, Liveliness good restaurants/bars, NewBo market, lots to do within a walking distance of each other "Hip" artistic feel. I like that it's taking shape and looks like it will become a great place to visit. It’s beginning to look like a cultural arts district; a place to be proud of in our city. NewBo Market, Unique places to go local business, unique atmosphere, dedicated community members more businesses, increasing variety, historic character Special events, walkability Regrowth It is taking on a relaxing atmosphere that encourages migration throughout the time you spend there. something else to do in the city, appealing to many groups of people Desire to improve while retaining history a new beginning.


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

What do you think is missing from the District?

Wordle is an online tool for generating “word clouds� from text that you provide. The clouds give greater prominence to words that appear more frequently in the source text.


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

Housing in the District

What kind of housing would you look for?

Would you live in the Maybe 32%

District?

120

Yes 32%

No 36%

100 80 60 40 20

Would you like to: Buy 65%

0

Rent 35%


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

Would you live in the district? If No, Why? • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

- Answers received, other then “I like where I live now…”

School district Safety It doesn't seem like a family friendly area with much outdoor play space. Would worry about crime. Not ideal for a growing family. Would definitely consider if single or once the kids leave the house. If I were at a different stage in my life, i DEFINITELY consider living in the District. Seems to have a higher crime rate than other areas of Cedar Rapids I have no interest in living in the city. I have young children so prefer to be closer to playgrounds and have a large yard to play in. But we love to visit it as a destination. The area is surrounded by abandon buildings and the area has a high crime rate. I have a young child and own a home with a backyard. It is not my style I have large dogs and kids. I think it is a great place for young singles or young married couples to start out. I would love to live in the Water Tower or Bottle Works but won't even consider it due to the train horns! Every intersection, like 12 times from the time it crosses from Penford until it goes by the US Cell Center! Stop the train horns all night long! flood zone I want to live in the country Houses are not recovered from the flood. Poor neighborhood at night. it is not close to work for me or close to a major road to get there Schools too close to the river - flooding. flood plain should be reserved for open green space Not family friendly area bad area We have a young child and prefer the Linn-Mar schools. Schools Too far from work. not my kind of thing Needs better schools nearby plus housing for higher income families too close to river, lost out in last flood Like living outside of town

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

dangerous area at night. Not near my job Fears of another flood and parking complications. Too many bars and motorcycles. It does not feel kid friendly. With the bus and vehicle traffic, I could never imagine my kids playing outside, safely. potential floods, not a house I would like It's still doesn't feel quite safe enough. Not family friendly No variety in housing it's not near work, daycare, school, etc. I never considered moving back to the area, and definitely not to the flooded area. Doesn't seem developed for large single family homes with 4+ bedrooms Too far from my work and family I like to have a large garden. Flood, lack of housing, crime I want more space around me and relish quiet. I'm not a live in the center of things type. Not family oriented as a place to live. should be for entertainment want larger lot/privacy Family - does not seem like a residential area suitable for family (yard, house size, etc). Can't live in town, need my space. too much low income housing in the area I wouldn't live in an urban area I like more suburban neighborhood to raise my family. If I were younger (single), perhaps. I prefer more of a traditional neighborhood at this stage in my life (have a young child) Don't live in the area, probably would prefer an area farther away from downtown with a family. Age of our kids, maybe as empty nesters If I were single or without children, then I would love to live in the neighborhood. I would like a safer neighborhood with a large yard for kids location I like having a yard to take care of and having residential structures around me yet still living in the core of the community Presently, there are no homes, condos or homes large enough to accommodate our family. crime area is too close I am too old If I was single and wanted to live in an apartment I would consider it. I would definitely consider it - maybe years from now, but I own a house now and am set for near future. Not an urban dweller, maybe if I were younger. like more family-oriented communities Need more space w/two young kids, would consider loft/condo/townhome down the road


SURVEY RESULTS

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

Your Age

Demographics of Respondents 66+ 56-65

Male

46-55

Sex

36-45

Female

26-35 19-25 Under 18

0

Do you have Children? No 44%

Yes 56%

20

40

60

80

100

120

What age are your children? 100

0 0-5

6-10

11-18

18+


West Branch

Waterloo

Walford

Swisher

Shuevville

rural

Robins

Quad cities

Other

oelwein

North Liberty

New Bohemia District

N.E. Iowa

Mount Vernon

Marion

Iowa City / Coralville

Hiawatha

Fairfax

Eastern Iowa

Dubuque

Denver, CO

Davenport

Ames Anamosa Atkins Bertram Cedar Falls Cedar Rapids - NE Cedar Rapids - NW Cedar Rapids - SE Cedar Rapids - SW Center Point coggon

SURVEY RESULTS Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District - Strategic Revitalization Plan

Where do you live today?

100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0


Prepared by

Downtown Professionals Network Batavia, Illinois  www.downtownpros.com

in association with

Main Street Iowa Iowa Economic Development Authority


Population

0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

2000 Census

1,590

8,953

37,665

2011 Estimate

1,219

7,307

32,166

2016 Projection

1,325

7,646

33,214

+ 8.7%

+ 4.6%

+ 3.3%

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

Change: 2011 – 2016

Households

0.5 Mile

2000 Census

656

3,743

15,223

2011 Estimate

525

3,136

13,107

2016 Projection

574

3,304

13,680

+ 9.3%

+ 5.4%

+ 4.4%

Change: 2011 – 2016

Median HH Income

0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

2011 Estimate

$34,904

$30,027

$40,940

2016 Projection

$35,525

$32,558

$50,553

+ 1.8%

+ 8.4%

+ 23.5%

Change: 2011 – 2016


Q. Would you live in the District? Response â–ş

Count

Percent

Yes

105

29%

Maybe

109

31%

No

95

40%

Czech Village / New Bohemia District | Consumer Online and Intercept Survey | 2012-13

â–ş

List three words that describe the District today. Words/Word Groups

Online Survey

Fun

31

10.0%

Growing

27

8.7%

Historic, Historical, History

20

6.5%

Vibrant

20

6.5%

Art, Artistic, Arts, Artsie, Artsy

19

6.1%

Exciting, Excitement

16

5.2%

Eclectic

14

4.5%

Potential

13

4.2%

Cultural, Culture

12

3.9%

Emergent, Emerging

10

3.2%

New

10

3.2%

Czech Village / New Bohemia District | Consumer Online Survey | 2012


►   

Would you place a high, moderate or low priority on possible District enhancement efforts to: Consumers

Restore and preserve the District’s historic character? Improve streets, sidewalks, lighting, furnishings, green spaces, trails, etc., in the District?

Rank

High %

Rank

60%

2

59%

3

3

   

Businesses

High %

58%

69%

►  

2 ►

Stage additional festivals and special events in the District?

43%

4

72%

1

Create incentives for new and expanding businesses in the District?

60%

1

59%

4

Improve and/or create more housing in the District?

27%

5

34%

5

 

Czech Village / New Bohemia District | Consumer Intercept and Business Surveys | 2013

 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Market Study Summary March 2013

Prepared by

Downtown Professionals Network 28 South Water Street • Suite 214 Batavia, Illinois 60510  www.downtownpros.com

In Association With

Main Street Iowa Market Analysis Services


“Times they are a-changing.” The phrase, echoed throughout the decades, personifies the nature of changes in the economic landscape of traditional downtown and neighborhood commercial districts. Expanding retail competition, evolving technologies, and changing lifestyle trends will continue to affect business opportunities and the ways in which people interact within traditional commercial district environments. The key to improving the economic performance of the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District in Cedar Rapids, Iowa ultimately lies in the development and implementation of market-driven business improvement and marketing strategies that capitalize on local assets and emerging opportunities. Cedar Rapids’ Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street organization spearheaded the market study process to promote a more in-depth understanding of local and regional market conditions and trends impacting the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District’s current economic performance and opportunities for the future. Information and direction gained throughout the market analysis process provides a sound basis for local decision-making processes and strategies aimed at enhancing the economic and social qualities of this Cedar Rapids historic treasure. The delivery of market analysis technical assistance and services are facilitated by Main Street Iowa (MSI) as part of a comprehensive “self-help program” that provides extensive training and technical services to participating Iowa communities. Local Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street staff, leaders and volunteers played a critical role in efforts to collect and analyze information that provides a snapshot of the District today, that anticipates changes in the District and surrounding area, and that identifies opportunities for improvements and growth. Key steps in the process included: 

The collection and review of background information.

The analysis and summary of trade area demographic, lifestyle and economic data provided by Main Street Iowa.

The performance of consumer and business surveys, with special assistance provided by ENACTUS members from Mount Mercy University.

An extensive amount of information and data was compiled and analyzed throughout the course of the market analysis process. This report has been prepared to highlight key information and findings that could be particularly relevant to the community’s ongoing downtown enhancement efforts. For more information contact:

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District th 101 16 Avenue SW, Suite A Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52404 Telephone: (319) 432-9785 Email: crmainstreet@gmail.com Website: www.crmainstreet.org

Limitations and Disclaimers Retail market analyses, their components (such as retail sales gap analyses) and derivative business development plans provide important guidance on how a commercial area should, theoretically, be able to perform and on the sales levels businesses should be able to achieve. However, a number of factors affect the actual performance of businesses and commercial areas, including the skills of the business operator, level of business capitalization, the quality of the physical environment, changes in overall economic conditions, the effectiveness of business and district marketing programs, and many other factors. The information in this document is intended to provide a foundation of information for making business development decisions, but it does not and cannot ensure business success. As is true of all demographic, economic and market studies, our analysis’ reliability is limited to the reliability and quality of the data available. Our research assumes that all data made available by and procured from federal, state, county, city, primary and third party sources is accurate and reliable. Because market conditions change rapidly and sometimes without warning, the information and opinions expressed here represent a snapshot in time and cannot predict or gauge future changes or results.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

•1


Background and Context Content was contributed by: The National Czech & Slovak Museum & Library; and Mark and Jan Stoffer Hunter.

Located in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District straddles the banks of the Cedar River on the city’s southeast side. Just south of the city’s primary downtown business district, the Main Street District (one of the first urban neighborhood models in the state) fosters connectivity to shared amenities and attractions while maintaining its own unique culture and feel. The Main Street District is made up of two diverse neighborhoods, Czech Village and New Bohemia, th spanning approximately forty blocks bounded by 8 Avenue SE, the former Union Pacific railroad line, and former Sinclair site on the east side of the river th as well as three blocks centered on 16 Avenue SW st from 1 Street SW to the river. Cedar Rapids is part of the greater Iowa Cultural Corridor which encompasses Linn and Johnson counties as well as nine adjacent counties. With a population of more than 126,000 residents, Cedar Rapids is the second largest city in the state of Iowa. The Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District has a storied past and stands as a shining example of the perseverance of its residents and business owners. Carrying on the legacy of early Czech settlement, the District represents a wide mix of small businesses; arts, culture and entertainment venues; and former industrial sites.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District

History Early Settlement Patterns In 1871, a new company, T.M. Sinclair meatpacking, began operations in Cedar Rapids across the street from the new Czech social hall in the downtown business district. The new industry was welcomed by city leaders but there were concerns about "questionable odors" from this particular location so close to the young city's downtown area. At the encouragement of community leaders, the following year, 1872, Sinclair relocated his slaughterhouse/packing plant to the south end of Third Street East of the Cedar River. This single action changed the course of Czech settlement patterns in Cedar Rapids. The new Sinclair plant was very successful and a large amount of new workers were needed within the first few years. The nearby Bohemian immigrant population suddenly had a good new source of long term sustainable employment. Word got out to friends and relatives of the Cedar Rapids Czech community in Europe and waves of new Bohemians arrived in Cedar Rapids throughout the 1870's, knowing employment was available at the new Sinclair plant. The previously undeveloped area between the downtown and the Sinclair plant quickly became populated with Czech immigrant housing. Further evidence of rapid growth for the new South End neighborhood included the construction of a new iron bridge across the Cedar River at 14th Avenue east (16th Avenue west) to help facilitate traffic coming and going to the Sinclair plant from farmlands west of the river. St. Wenceslaus Catholic church was established in 1874 near the packinghouse. The first brick church edifice was completed in 1882.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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Commercial buildings housing Bohemian immigrant businesses began sprouting up on street corners closer to the packinghouse and away from the earlier established Czech settlement area near downtown Cedar Rapids. The earliest commercial buildings to appear were at the intersection of 14th Avenue and Third Street SE. These included storefront "blocks" erected by families such as Petrovitsky and Lesinger in the 1880's. The 1880's saw the influx of additional job source industries in the new Bohemian neighborhood, the "South End." The area had excellent railroad access, which made it easier for companies such as Whiting's Foundry, the Star Wagon Works and the J.G. Cherry Company to locate in this area. The factories tended to locate near the south extension of Downtown Cedar Rapids' 4th Street railroad corridor. Thus the areas between the tracks and the river rapidly filled with an eclectic mix of distinctively "neat and frugal" Czech immigrant residences. As the 1890's approached, the majority of Cedar Rapids Bohemian commercial businesses had located in the South End neighborhood, creating a "Little Bohemia." Plans were made to build a grand new CSPS Hall at the corner of 11th Avenue and Third Street SE to replace the 1870 structure in the downtown area. The new structure's cornerstone was laid on October 30, 1890 with great ceremony. The splendid new CSPS Hall was dedicated in June of 1891 and the appearance of this grand three story structure helped permanently establish that this was the center of the Cedar Rapids Czech community. Between 1900 and 1910, the city of Cedar Rapids designated the area to the north of what is now New Bohemia, as a wholesale/warehouse/manufacturing district. Almost overnight, entire blocks of the first Czech settlement area of Cedar Rapids were demolished and replaced by structures such as large scale wholesale/warehouse buildings, a lumberyard, an ice cream factory, and three major railroad freight houses. Although the majority of the Czech businesses had moved to the south of this area by 1900, the few remaining had to scramble for new locations. This included the Sokol Gymnastic Association of Cedar Rapids, originally known as the Jednota Tyrs Association. The Sokols had initially used the old CSPS building at 5th Avenue & First Street SE and had just built a new Sokol Turner Hall at 7th Avenue near Third Street SE in 1901. Because of the new railroad freight station developments, the Sokols were faced with finding a new location in 1908. Interestingly, rather than choose a location in the South End, a lot was chosen at 417 Third Street SE, closer to downtown and a half block from the Cedar Rapids passenger train station. The new Sokol gymnasium had a grand opening in January of 1909. Today, it is the only surviving building standing of Czech heritage in the first and earliest Czech settlement neighborhood of Cedar Rapids. South of Ninth Avenue SE, the second Czech settlement neighborhood of the city continued to thrive and grow after 1900. In 1901, the very first building in the United States built for a Czech School was opened at 925 Second Street SE. The Czech School (Matice Skolska) had begun in Cedar Rapids in 1870 and is recognized as the oldest continuously operated ethnic school in the country. The Czech School was the site of a lecture given by Thomas G. Masaryk on September 13, 1907. The man who played a great role in the formation of Czechoslovakia in the years to come was met with great enthusiasm by the Mayor and citizens of Cedar Rapids. Impressive new building projects were completed in the South End area between 1890 and 1920, particularly along Third Street and 14th Avenue SE. Substantial commercial storefront buildings continued to appear, including the P. Matyk Dry Goods store in 1893 across the street from the new CSPS Hall and a series of commercial storefronts at 1119-1129 Third Street SE. The intersection of Third Street and 12th Avenue became the location of two major improvements. First was in 1908 with the erection of the ZCBJ (Zapadni Cesko-Bratrska Jednota) Hall on the southeast corner and the completion of the new Iowa State Savings Bank in 1917 at the southwest corner. In addition, three movie theatres showing silent films were opened in the neighborhood between 1911 and 1915. These included the Ideal Theatre at 215 14th Avenue SE, the Praha Theatre at 227 14th Avenue SE and the Olympic (later the Strand) at 1124 Third Street SE. The Olympic also offered small stage performances, adding to the rich cultural choices available in the South End district.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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th

Third Czech Settlement Area of Cedar Rapids…16 Avenue SW (Czech Village) Prior to 1900, the core of the Czech business community was almost entirely focused on the east side of the Cedar River only. The area known today as "Czech Village," centered on 16th avenue SW, was not a primary Czech settlement neighborhood in the late 19th century in Cedar Rapids. However, 16th Avenue SW was a small commercial district as early as the late 1880's. The street was a main pass- through for traffic coming from rural areas to the west and going into the Sinclair packinghouse across the bridge on the east side. Records show that the earliest residents and business owners on 16th Avenue SW were a "melting pot" mixture of primarily Italian, Russian and Syrian (Lebanese) immigrants. Some of these non-Czech ethnic names still exist along the top of a couple of commercial buildings in the Czech Village today. This is not to say there were not any Czech immigrants living on the west side, but the numbers were more consistent with other ethnic groups. Several factors led to a sudden shift of the Czech population and business district after 1900, and particularly from 1910-1940. Primary of these was the aforementioned shift in downtown development on the east side beginning in 1900 as the northern, oldest downtown section of Czech settlement areas were removed for a warehouse/freight station district. In 1903, a large new industry, the Douglas Starch Works (now Penford Products), began operations on the west bank of the river. This new source of good steady jobs encouraged many residents of Bohemian descent to consider moving across the river. A third contributing factor was the completion of a new, sturdy concrete bridge connecting 14th Avenue east with 16th avenue west. The new 1910 bridge replaced the old iron span bridge erected in 1875. Also, as late as 1905, much of the west side of Cedar Rapids south and west of 16th Avenue was largely undeveloped and was an attractive alternative to the more established (and noisier) neighborhoods on the east side. Better access to automobiles meant that residents could live a little farther from the business districts of the city. As the west side residential area rapidly expanded, so did public and social amenities such as the opening of new schools such as Hayes Elementary and Wilson School, and churches such as St. Ludmila's Catholic built new structures by 1930. All of these factors made 16th Avenue SW from the west approach of the bridge and extending two and a half blocks to the west very attractive and lucrative to build a more formalized retail and service district that could feature shops and businesses owned and operated by Czech speaking families. As early as 1906, the "Industrial Club of 16th Avenue West" was established. Later known as the 16th Avenue Commercial Club, the organization functioned as a chamber of commerce to promote and support the efforts of Czech businesses. These efforts paid off, and within a few years, 16th Avenue SW was established as a major shopping district for Cedar Rapids, second only to the downtown area between 1920 and 1960. The effect of 16th Avenue SW on the older "South End" district on the east side was a reduction in some key retail businesses. However, the primary social centers of the Czech community, such as CSPS and ZCBJ, continued on the east side well into the mid-20th century and both neighborhoods flourished as established Czech centers of activity. Neighborhoods Established In 1973, the Czech Heritage Foundation, in the interests of preserving Cedar Rapids Czech traditions and history, began forming the concept of 16th Avenue SW as a "Czech Village" to appeal to the tourist trade. In October of 1975, much of the third settlement area was officially named Czech Village. South End, the second Czech settlement area for Cedar Rapids, experienced the effects of the closing of the old Sinclair packinghouse site in 1990. But since 2000, there have been increasing efforts to reconnect with this area’s historic past and focus on historic preservation. This area has been named "New Bohemia."

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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Flood of 2008 The Great Flood of June 2008 devastated both the Czech Village and New Bohemia areas with floodwaters rising more than eight feet high in most buildings. Virtually all of the businesses and residential structures in the District were heavily damaged. Many property owners sold and left the area, while others stayed put and began the arduous task of rehabilitation. Through the dedication and collaborative efforts of several leaders in the community, many key businesses and organizations in the Main Street District were among the first to reopen among the flood affected throughout Cedar Rapids. Despite the level of destruction experienced, members of the community have expressed their commitment to not just rebuild, but to preserve the unique character and historic assets of the area. Czech Village/New Bohemia Main Street District Established The Czech Village / New Bohemia (CV/NB) Main Street District was formed in May of 2009 to breathe economic life into a historic area of Cedar Rapids. Established by Czech immigrants, the Main Street District had suffered economic decline for many years and was nearly destroyed by record flooding in 2008. Despite these hardships, courageous business owners and residents began the task of rebuilding. The proven success of the Main Street model as an incremental process for economic development and historic preservation has shown to be effective in helping to assist business and property owners to rebuild post-flood. Numerous grant opportunities have been facilitated by the CV/NB Main Street program including a $75,000 façade grant, Main Street Iowa Challenge grants, and I-Jobs funding. Optimism is evident throughout the Main Street District. Construction is prevalent and new investments are announced regularly. The creative cultural community has embraced the District bringing new and return visitors who spread the word about the exciting improvements. Thorough consistent application of Main Street’s Four Point Approach®, Czech Village/New Bohemia will continue to be Cedar Rapids desired location to live, work, and play.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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District Attractions Designated as an Iowa Cultural District, the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District is an area rich in history, alive with music, and bustling with shops old and new. Today one will find a mixture of shops, businesses, and people that represent the ethnic history of the area. The district has a wide variety of food to satisfy one’s palette. Restaurants offer authentic Czech cuisine, seafood, classic burgers & fries, soup & sandwiches, and fresh gourmet creations. Or one can let their nose be their guide and check out the food vendors inside the NewBo City Market representing a wide range of ethnic cuisines. Events are a great time to visit the district. Several events both with deep tradition as well as new additions are held annually including: NewBo Arts Fest, EcoFest, Old Prague Christmas Market, Very Cherry Holiday, Houby Days, St. Joseph’s Parade, 2x2xU, and Czech Fall Festival. Annual festivals bring thousands of visitors to the district each year. Many world-class cultural attractions including the National Czech & Slovak Museum & Library, African American Museum of Iowa, and Legion Arts provide history, culture, performing & fine arts; drawing visitors from all over the world. St. Wenceslaus Catholic Church, founded in 1874, continues to serve the community and carry on the Czech heritage. Live music is featured multiple days a week at many bars, restaurants, and outdoor venues. The Bohemian spirit is very much integrated into the neighborhood with many community driven projects occurring on a grass-roots level. Over twenty-five artist studios showcase a variety of crafts including woodworking, painting, ceramics, jewelry, photography, and many more. Independent retailers offer a wide selection of goods including home furnishings, gifts & collectibles, hobby stores, antiques, and vintage finds. The Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District maintains the urban, industrial grit and preserves the historic architecture while introducing new businesses to meet the needs and interests of modern consumers. Interspersed with the various commercial properties are former immigrant houses allowing for residents to live in close proximity to necessary shopping and services. In addition, former large-scale industrial facilities have been thoughtfully converted into attractive loft-style condominiums, like Bottleworks and Water Tower Place, or artist studios, like the Cherry Building. Many upper-story housing opportunities are also available throughout the district.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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Historic District, Architecture and Aesthetics The district was listed to the National Register of Historic Places in 2002 as the Bohemian Commercial Historic District under criteria A and C for architecture, commerce, and ethnic heritage. An expansion of the historic district was made in 2010 to include the Czech Village. Historic architecture dates from 1880 to 1952 and ranges in style including Romanesque, Italianate, and Classical Revival among others. Buildings are typically two to three stories high and constructed in wood or brick. Several community buildings such as banks, social halls, and factories were much larger in scale and constructed in brick or limestone with architectural detailing. Early residential structures are mainly comprised of modest worker’s cottages with later construction including twostory bungalows and gable fronted wood-framed structures. Streetscape & Public Improvements th

Streetscape enhancements were completed on 16 Avenue SW, in the Czech Village neighborhood, in 2006. With much th of the improvements surviving the flooding in 2008, 16 Avenue serves as the centerpiece of the neighborhood featuring attractive, pedestrian-friendly, sidewalks lined with trees and flowers in large-scale concrete planters, benches, banners, convenient parking, and prominent brick gateway pillars. rd

Work on the 3 Street SE reconstruction and streetscape improvements project, in the New Bohemia neighborhood, began in 2005. In the past 20 years, the area had become blighted with many of the fronting buildings along the street being underutilized or empty. At the time work on the project started, the area did have a thriving arts and entertainment scene. Utilizing community input through a series of design charrettes, a preliminary design was developed. Fortunately, these designs had not yet been implemented by 2008 when the flooding occurred. When the flood waters receded, the task of clean up and reconstruction began immediately. The City felt that the rd redevelopment of 3 Street SE could serve as the catalyst to spur development throughout the southeast side of Cedar rd Rapids, making the 3 Street SE Project a central part of the City’s post-flood redevelopment activities. Recognizing the enormous economic impact that the Project had on the owners of flooded properties, the City developed an innovative series of agreements. This was done to reward property owners, who had taken the initiative to rebuild on their own, or to incentivize property owners who had not yet taken the steps to redevelop their properties, by forgiving all or a part of their assessment amount.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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Streetscape elements include trees, benches, planters, plaques recognizing historic buildings that had been demolished, informational kiosks, brick inlays in the th th intersection of 10 Avenue SE and 12 Avenue SE, bike racks, streetlights, preservation of historic advertising tiles, development of spaces for the presentation of 2D and 3D art, and bollards to allow the street to be closed easily for street festivals. Parks and Recreation The Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District features three public parks near the Cedar River (Sokol, Masaryk, and Osborn), the Kosek bandstand featuring live music throughout the summer, and the recent addition of NewBo Beach sand volleyball and recreation area. The Cedar River Nature Trail passes through the district connecting downtown Cedar Rapids to the nearby town of Ely. Near-Side Neighbors The Main Street District is surrounded by several well established residential neighborhoods including Oakhill Jackson, Wilson and Taylor. The District is also supported by nearby schools, churches, and community organizations, many with Czech heritage.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District Market Snapshot Study Area Geographies The profile assembled for the Czech Village / New Bohemia District markets is based upon information contained in a series of ESRI reports generated for a 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mile radius originating from the center of the Czech Village / New Bohemia District.

The half-mile radius profiles a “captive” resident and convenience-oriented market for the Czech Village/New Bohemia District. The population residing in the half-mile area would also be more likely access the district on foot, bicycle and via other alternative modes of transportation. Demographic and psychographic data could be particularly useful for assessing performance and expansion opportunities for convenience and clientele-oriented businesses and uses, and for analyzing and profiling the composition of the current and potential Czech Village/New Bohemia District housing market. The one-mile and two-mile radius likely depicts primary consumer markets for the Czech Village / New Bohemia District. Data and information for the 1- and 2-mile radii could be helpful for comparing and contrasting the traits and characteristics of the nearby population with that in the larger Cedar Rapids community. The consumer profile may also be indicative of the nearby “comparison market” for Czech Village/New Bohemia area service, retail and eating & drinking uses. Consumers in the Cedar Rapids regional market, all things being equal, may be more naturally inclined to frequent business districts and commercial areas in other parts of the community based on convenience, variety and a host of other considerations. Opportunities for the Czech Village/New Bohemia District to capture consumers from the broader region, and to increase its retail market share, will most likely revolve around retail and service anchors; specialty retail and destination-oriented eating & drinking places; recreational attractions and venues; and events.

Czech Village/New Bohemia District Markets

Fast Facts Population

0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

2000 Census

1,590

8,953

37,665

2011 Estimate

1,219

7,307

32,166

2016 Projection

1,325

7,646

33,214

+ 8.7%

+ 4.6%

+ 3.3%

Change: 2011 – 2016 Households

0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

2000 Census

656

3,743

15,223

2011 Estimate

525

3,136

13,107

2016 Projection

574

3,304

13,680

+ 9.3%

+ 5.4%

+ 4.4%

Change: 2011 – 2016 Median HH Income

0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

2011 Estimate

$34,904

$30,027

$40,940

2016 Projection

$35,525

$32,558

$50,553

+ 1.8%

+ 8.4%

+ 23.5%

Change: 2011 – 2016 Source: ESRI – 2012

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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Reports generated and data used to examine the Czech Village / New Bohemia District markets include: ESRI Census 2010 Summary Profile Data from the Census 2010 and Census 2000 enables analysts to perform time-series studies, evaluate population changes, and assess the value of current sites and services. ESRI Demographics and Income Profile - 2011 Built on 2010 counts and in 2010 geography, ESRI’s updated demographics database provides current year estimates and 5-year projections for select demographic and income categories. ESRI Retail Goods and Services Expenditures Built on ESRI’s 2011 Consumer Spending database, shows the amount that households spend in select products and services categories compared to national figures. ESRI Tapestry Segmentation Area Profile Tapestry classifies U.S. residential neighborhoods into 65 unique market segments based on socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. ESRI Retail MarketPlace Profile Retail MarketPlace data provides a measure of retail activity by trade area and compares retail sales to consumer spending by NAICS industry classification.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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Demographic Snapshot The demographic snapshot compiled for the Czech Village/New Bohemia District markets benchmarks and tracks changes in the marketplace. Analysis and comparison of data for the three study area radii and the Cedar Rapids city limits reveals some interesting characteristics and trends.

Population and Households The population in the study area radii decreased by about -15% to -26% from 2000 to 2010, while the city’s population increased by a rate of 3.7% during the same ten-year period. The largest 2000 to 2010 percentage decline in the study area rings occurred within the one-half mile radius and was estimated at -25.7%. Five-year 2011 – 2016 projections anticipate a reversal of trends in the study areas with population percentage gains estimated at about 3% to 9% – and with the largest percentage gain expected to occur in the one-half mile radius (8.7%). The city’s population is anticipated to increase by 3.7% through 2016. Like population, the number of households in the study area rings declined by about -15% to -23% from 2000 to 2010, with the largest percentage loss occurring again in the half-mile radius (-22.6%). Five-year 2011 – 2016 projections anticipate the number of households will increase by about 4% to 9% in the study area rings, and by about 4% in the city limits, from 2011 to 2016. Consistent with the “Graying of America” phenomenon, median age continues to increase at all study area geography levels and for the city’s population. The 2011 median age estimated for the population in the study areas and the city is lower – by up to two years and more – than the 38.1 median age estimated for the Iowa population. Median age is expected to increase by about one-half to one year in the study areas and the city from 2011 to 2016.

Demographic Snapshot

Czech Village/New Bohemia District Study Areas 0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

Cedar Rapids City Limits

Population 2000 Census

1,590

8,953

37,665

121,840

2010 Census

1,182

7,217

32,007

126,326

- 25.7%

- 19.4%

- 15.0%

+ 3.7%

2011 Estimate

1,219

7,307

32,166

127,241

2016 Projection

1,325

7,646

33,214

131,909

+ 8.7%

+ 4.6%

+ 3.3%

+ 3.7%

2000 Census

656

3,743

15,223

50,233

2010 Census

508

3,089

13,001

53,236

- 22.6%

- 17.5%

- 14.7%

+ 6.0%

2011 Estimate

525

3,136

13,107

53,657

2016 Projection

574

3,304

13,680

55,967

+ 9.3%

+ 5.4%

+ 4.4%

+ 4.3%

2010 Census

36.4

35.7

34.1

35.3

2011 Estimate

36.3

35.8

34.2

35.8

2016 Projection

36.8

36.4

34.6

36.3

Change: 2000 - 2010

Change: 2011 - 2016 Households

Change: 2000 - 2010

Change: 2011 - 2016 Median Age

Source: ESRI – Compiled from Census 2010 Summary Profile; and Demographic and Income Profile (2011 Data) Report.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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Population by Race & Ethnicity The population in study area radii is largely composed of White Alone residents with concentrations in 2011 estimated at about 83% to 87% for the various study area radii, as compared to the 88% figure reported for the city’s population. Five-year 2011 – 2016 projections anticipate small change in the composition of the study areas’ population by race, with the percentage of White Alone residents decreasing by about -1% to -2% and small gains generally distributed among the Black Alone and Two or More Races groups. Persons of Hispanic origin (considered an ethnicity, not a race) represented an estimated 3.5% to 4.0% of the 2011 population residing in the study area rings. The percentage of the population with Hispanic origin is expected to increase by about 1% in the study area radii and the city limits through 2016.

Demographic Snapshot Race and Ethnicity

Czech Village/New Bohemia District Study Areas 0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

Cedar Rapids City Limits

2011

2016

2011

2016

2011

2016

2011

2016

White Alone

87.0%

85.6%

83.0%

81.3%

83.7%

81.8%

88.2%

86.8%

Black Alone

6.7%

7.4%

10.3%

11.3%

9.4%

10.5%

5.5%

6.1%

American Indian Alone

0.2%

0.2%

0.3%

0.3%

0.4%

0.4%

0.3%

0.3%

Asian Alone

0.6%

0.6%

0.9%

1.0%

1.1%

1.1%

2.1%

2.2%

Pacific Islander Alone

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.0%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

0.1%

Some Other Race Alone

0.7%

0.8%

1.0%

1.1%

1.1%

1.3%

0.9%

1.2%

Two or More Races

4.8%

5.4%

4.5%

5.0%

4.3%

4.8%

2.9%

3.2%

Hispanic Origin (Any Race)

3.5%

4.4%

3.7%

4.6%

4.0%

5.1%

3.4%

4.3%

Source: ESRI – Compiled from Census 2010 Summary Profile; and Demographic and Income Profile (2011 Data) Report.

Housing Units The number of housing units in all study area rings decreased by an estimated 9.3% to 13.6% across the various geographies from 2000 to 2010, with the largest decline reported for the half-mile radius (-13.6%). The growth rate of 8.8% reported for housing units within the city limits slightly outpaced the 8.4% rate of increase reported for Iowa from 2000 to 2010.

Demographic Snapshot

Czech Village/New Bohemia District Study Areas 0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

Cedar Rapids City Limits

Housing Units 2000 Census

733

3,987

16,136

52,606

2010 Census

633

3,523

14,630

57,217

- 13.6%

- 11.6%

- 9.3%

+8.8%

Change: 2000 - 2010

Source: ESRI – Compiled from Census 2010 Summary Profile; and Demographic and Income Profile (2011 Data) Report

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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Housing Units by Occupancy The percentage of renter-occupied housing units in the study area radii ranges from about 39% to 47% in 2010, with the largest concentration reported for the one-mile radius (47.2%). By comparison, the percentage of renter-occupied housing in 2010 was estimated at 31.8% in the city limits and 27.9% in Iowa. Housing unit vacancy rates in 2010 for the study area rings were comparatively high, ranging from 11.1% to 16.4% as compared to estimates of 7.0% and 8.6% posted for the city limits and Iowa, respectively, in 2010.

Demographic Snapshot

Czech Village/New Bohemia District Study Areas 0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

Cedar Rapids City Limits

Housing Units by Occupancy– 2010 Occupied Housing Units Owner Occupied Units Average Household Size Renter Occupied Units Average Household Size Vacant Units Vacancy Rate

508

3,089

13,001

53,236

60.2%

52.8%

61.2%

68.2%

2.42

2.40

2.40

2.43

39.8%

47.2%

38.8%

31.8%

2.08

1.95

2.12

2.04

100

425

1,628

3,981

16.4%

12.1%

11.1%

7.0%

Source: ESRI – Compiled from Census 2010 Summary Profile; and Demographic and Income Profile (2011 Data) Report.

Median and Average Household Income Median and average household income estimates for 2011 show incomes for households immediately within and surrounding the district are significantly lower than figures reported for all households within the Cedar Rapids city limits. For example, 2011 median household income for households in the one-mile radius is estimated at $30,027 as compared to the $52,650 estimate for households in the city limits. Median household income is expected to grow at a five-year rate ranging from 1.8% to 23.5% in the study area rings through 2016, and average household income is forecast to increase by 12% to 15% during the same five-year period.

Demographic Snapshot

Czech Village/New Bohemia District Study Areas 0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

Cedar Rapids City Limits

Median Household Income 2011 Estimate

$34,904

$30,027

$40,940

$52,650

2016 Projection

$35,525

$32,558

$50,553

$62,559

+ 1.8%

+ 8.4%

+ 23.5%

+ 18.8%

2011 Estimate

$43,255

$39,947

$52,776

$65,797

2016 Projection

$48,436

$44,765

$60,678

$75,849

+ 12.0%

+ 12.1%

+ 15.0%

+ 15.3%

Change: 2011-2016 Average Household Income

Change: 2011-2016

Source: ESRI – Compiled from Census 2010 Summary Profile; and Demographic and Income Profile (2011 Data) Report.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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Consumer Spending The ESRI Retail Goods and Services Expenditures report, built on ESRI’s 2011 Consumer Spending database, shows the amount that households spend in select product and service categories and compares amounts to national figures. The comparison to national household spending amounts is reported as an index where 100 equals the national average. Overall, the data generally shows spending amounts, indices and patterns which mirror study area household income patterns and, for most categories, are considerably less than national average consumer household expenditures. Czech Village/New Bohemia District Study Areas

Consumer Spending ESRI Retail Goods & Services Expenditures

Apparel and Services

0.5 Mile Index

1.0 Mile

Avg. Spent

Index

2.0 Miles

Avg. Spent

Index

Avg. Spent

45

$1,046.71

42

$978.33

56

$1,289.58

Men's

42

$188.69

39

$174.69

52

$231.72

Women's

41

$328.09

38

$303.52

50

$399.67

Children's

48

$186.02

44

$172.07

59

$229.63

Footwear

32

$127.77

30

$120.71

39

$158.32

Watches & Jewelry

62

$117.03

58

$108.33

77

$145.59

109

$99.11

109

$99.02

137

$124.66

Computers & Hardware for Home Use

65

$119.84

59

$110.33

79

$147.24

Software & Accessories for Home Use

64

$17.71

58

$16.05

78

$21.66

65

$2,026.41

59

$1,855.52

79

$2,469.02

63

$377.71

56

$333.12

76

$458.08

Membership Fees for Clubs (2)

65

$102.62

57

$90.25

77

$122.74

Fees for Participant Sports, excl. Trips

64

$65.73

56

$57.88

77

$79.25

Admission to Movie/Theatre/Opera…

63

$92.44

57

$84.41

78

$114.01

Admission to Sporting Events, ex. Trips

66

$38.35

57

$33.08

79

$45.69

Fees for Recreational Lessons

59

$78.09

51

$67.01

72

$95.80

Dating Services

64

$0.48

64

$0.48

80

$0.60

66

$796.85

62

$748.49

81

$970.25

Community Antenna or Cable TV

68

$475.75

65

$455.39

83

$577.04

Televisions

63

$118.26

57

$107.73

78

$145.56

VCRs, Video Cameras, DVD Players

66

$12.95

60

$11.90

80

$15.78

Video Cassettes and DVDs

66

$33.45

62

$31.48

81

$41.44

Video/Computer Game Hard/Software

71

$38.45

62

$33.69

84

$45.46

Satellite Dishes

55

$0.68

51

$0.62

71

$0.87

Rental of Video Cassettes and DVDs

67

$26.89

61

$24.43

82

$32.67

Apparel Products and Services (1) Computer

Entertainment & Recreation Fees and Admissions

TV/Video/Audio

Source: ESRI Retail Goods and Services Expenditures, 2011. ESRI forecasts for 2010 and 2015; Consumer Spending data are derived from the 2006 and 2007 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Data Note: The Spending Potential Index (SPI) is household-based, and represents the amount spent for a product or service relative to a national average of 100. Detail may not sum to totals due to rounding. See full ESRI reports for category descriptions and notes.

Source: Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 14


Czech Village/New Bohemia District Study Areas

Consumer Spending ESRI Retail Goods & Services Expenditures

0.5 Mile Index

1.0 Mile

Avg. Spent

Index

2.0 Miles

Avg. Spent

Index

Avg. Spent

Streaming/Downloaded Video

65

$0.88

60

$0.81

79

$1.07

Audio (3)

60

$85.43

55

$78.35

74

$105.00

Rental/Repair-TV/Radio/Sound Equip

56

$4.12

56

$4.10

73

$5.36

Pets

78

$325.09

72

$298.63

95

$397.05

Toys and Games (4)

66

$92.88

60

$84.96

80

$113.30

Recreational Vehicles and Fees (5)

51

$160.36

46

$145.38

65

$203.25

Sports/Recreation/Exercise Equipt (6)

49

$86.32

44

$77.36

60

$105.71

Photo Equipment and Supplies (7)

66

$65.92

58

$58.04

78

$78.68

Reading (8)

69

$102.83

63

$93.92

81

$121.45

Catered Affairs (9)

77

$18.45

65

$15.62

89

$21.26

66

$4,903.44

62

$4,606.19

80

$5,983.51

Food at Home

66

$2,862.89

62

$2,709.57

80

$3,484.76

Bakery and Cereal Products

67

$387.03

63

$364.40

81

$467.54

Meats, Poultry, Fish, and Eggs

66

$658.39

63

$630.13

80

$807.42

Dairy Products

66

$320.58

62

$301.24

80

$387.67

Fruits and Vegetables

65

$491.10

62

$468.08

79

$602.04

Snacks and Other Food at Home (10)

67

$1,005.79

63

$945.72

81

$1,220.09

Food Away from Home

65

$2,040.56

61

$1,896.62

80

$2,498.75

Alcoholic Beverages

69

$382.82

63

$350.59

83

$461.28

Nonalcoholic Beverages at Home

66

$282.02

63

$266.99

81

$343.02

Investments

62

$1,042.51

55

$926.15

73

$1,232.91

Vehicle Loans

64

$3,028.04

58

$2,779.25

78

$3,728.72

Nonprescription Drugs

65

$65.43

62

$62.26

79

$78.92

Prescription Drugs

72

$346.96

68

$327.60

84

$404.25

Eyeglasses and Contact Lenses

69

$51.81

62

$45.88

81

$60.40

Mortgage Payment and Basics (11)

61

$5,505.07

52

$4,698.41

74

$6,683.51

Maintenance and Remodeling Services

60

$1,151.92

52

$1,006.85

73

$1,411.02

Maintenance/Remodeling Materials (12)

60

$214.56

51

$184.71

72

$259.52

Utilities, Fuel, and Public Services

68

$2,985.78

64

$2,805.98

82

$3,605.02

Food

Financial

Health

Home

Source: ESRI Retail Goods and Services Expenditures, 2011. ESRI forecasts for 2010 and 2015; Consumer Spending data are derived from the 2006 and 2007 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Data Note: The Spending Potential Index (SPI) is household-based, and represents the amount spent for a product or service relative to a national average of 100. Detail may not sum to totals due to rounding. See full ESRI reports for category descriptions and notes.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 15


Czech Village/New Bohemia District Study Areas

Consumer Spending ESRI Retail Goods & Services Expenditures

0.5 Mile Index

1.0 Mile

Avg. Spent

Index

2.0 Miles

Avg. Spent

Index

Avg. Spent

Household Furnishings and Equipment Household Textiles (13)

63

$81.22

58

$74.49

77

$98.99

Furniture

61

$356.57

56

$327.87

76

$442.65

Floor Coverings

68

$49.79

61

$44.14

81

$58.93

Major Appliances (14)

62

$183.74

57

$167.80

76

$224.57

Housewares (15)

56

$46.42

52

$43.22

69

$57.39

Small Appliances

69

$21.83

63

$20.06

81

$25.87

Luggage

64

$5.73

56

$5.00

76

$6.85

Telephones and Accessories

44

$18.27

41

$17.04

55

$22.51

Child Care

61

$272.22

54

$241.28

76

$339.95

Lawn and Garden (16)

62

$250.33

55

$224.53

75

$303.27

Moving/Storage/Freight Express

53

$31.11

54

$31.57

70

$41.32

66

$451.62

62

$420.32

80

$545.12

Owners and Renters Insurance

65

$292.95

58

$260.38

78

$350.34

Vehicle Insurance

65

$737.48

61

$689.03

80

$902.48

Life/Other Insurance

68

$274.68

60

$243.35

80

$322.35

Health Insurance

71

$1,325.78

66

$1,232.07

83

$1,552.11

Personal Care Products (18)

64

$249.05

60

$233.49

79

$306.16

School Books and Supplies (19)

74

$76.47

69

$70.89

90

$92.42

Smoking Products

74

$308.14

72

$299.46

89

$366.62

Vehicle Purchases (Net Outlay) (20)

63

$2,686.48

58

$2,470.82

78

$3,311.77

Gasoline and Motor Oil

66

$1,846.42

62

$1,719.87

81

$2,248.00

Vehicle Maintenance and Repairs

64

$586.98

60

$546.45

79

$720.09

Airline Fares

60

$264.90

54

$239.04

74

$329.10

Lodging on Trips

61

$259.53

54

$229.94

75

$315.39

Auto/Truck/Van Rental on Trips

60

$21.46

53

$19.03

74

$26.47

Food and Drink on Trips

62

$259.73

55

$233.77

75

$317.70

Household Operations

Housekeeping Supplies (17) Insurance

Transportation

Travel

Source: ESRI Retail Goods and Services Expenditures, 2011. ESRI forecasts for 2010 and 2015; Consumer Spending data are derived from the 2006 and 2007 Consumer Expenditure Surveys, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Data Note: The Spending Potential Index (SPI) is household-based, and represents the amount spent for a product or service relative to a national average of 100. Detail may not sum to totals due to rounding. See full ESRI reports for category descriptions and notes.

Source:

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 16


Consumer Spending ESRI Retail Goods & Services Expenditures Report | Category Notes (1) Apparel Products and Services includes material for making clothes, sewing patterns and notions, shoe repair and other shoe services, apparel laundry and dry cleaning, alteration, repair and tailoring of apparel, clothing rental and storage, and watch and jewelry repair. (2) Membership Fees for Clubs includes membership fees for social, recreational, and civic clubs. (3) Audio includes satellite radio service, sound components and systems, digital audio players, records, CDs, audio tapes, streaming/downloaded audio, tape recorders, radios, musical instruments and accessories, and rental and repair of musical instruments. (4) Toys and Games includes toys, games, arts and crafts, tricycles, playground equipment, arcade games, and online entertainment and games. (5) Recreational Vehicles & Fees includes docking and landing fees for boats and planes, purchase and rental of RVs or boats, and camp fees. (6) Sports/Recreation/Exercise Equipment includes exercise equipment and gear, game tables, bicycles, camping equipment, hunting and fishing equipment, winter sports equipment, water sports equipment, other sports equipment, and rental/repair of sports/recreation/exercise equipment. (7) Photo Equipment and Supplies includes film, film processing, photographic equipment, rental and repair of photo equipment, and photographer fees. (8) Reading includes magazine and newspaper subscriptions, single copies of magazines and newspapers, and books. (9) Catered Affairs includes expenses associated with live entertainment and rental of party supplies. (10) Snacks and Other Food at Home includes candy, chewing gum, sugar, artificial sweeteners, jam, jelly, preserves, margarine, fat, oil, salad dressing, nondairy cream and milk, peanut butter, frozen prepared food, potato chips, nuts, salt, spices, seasonings, olives, pickles, relishes, sauces, gravy, other condiments, soup, prepared salad, prepared dessert, baby food, miscellaneous prepared food, and nonalcoholic beverages. (11) Mortgage Payment and Basics includes mortgage interest, mortgage principal, property taxes, homeowners insurance, and ground rent. (12) Maintenance and Remodeling Materials includes supplies/tools/equipment for painting and wallpapering, plumbing supplies and equipment, electrical/heating/AC supplies, materials for hard surface flooring, materials for roofing/gutters, materials for plaster/panel/siding, materials for patio/fence/brick work, landscaping materials, and insulation materials for owned homes. (13) Household Textiles includes bathroom linens, bedroom linens, kitchen linens, dining room linens, other linens, curtains, draperies, slipcovers, decorative pillows, and materials for slipcovers and curtains. (14) Major Appliances includes dishwashers, disposals, refrigerators, freezers, washers, dryers, stoves, ovens, microwaves, window air conditioners, electric floor cleaning equipment, sewing machines, and miscellaneous appliances. (15) Housewares includes plastic dinnerware, china, flatware, glassware, serving pieces, nonelectric cookware, and tableware. (16) Lawn and Garden includes lawn and garden supplies, equipment and care service, indoor plants, fresh flowers, and repair/rental of lawn and garden equipment. (17) Housekeeping Supplies includes soaps and laundry detergents, cleaning products, toilet tissue, paper towels, napkins, paper/plastic/foil products, stationery, giftwrap supplies, postage, and delivery services. (18) Personal Care Products includes hair care products, nonelectric articles for hair, wigs, hairpieces, oral hygiene products, shaving needs, perfume, cosmetics, skincare, bath products, nail products, deodorant, feminine hygiene products, and personal care appliances. (19) School Books and Supplies includes school books and supplies for college, elementary school, high school, and preschool. (20) Vehicle Purchases (Net Outlay) includes net outlay for new and used cars, trucks, vans, motorcycles, and motor scooters.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 17


Lifestyle Profile The ESRI Community Tapestry segmentation system classifies U.S. neighborhoods by 65 market segments using proven methodology introduced more than 30 years ago by the ACORN segmentation system. Segmentation and geodemographic systems are stable and reliable because the characteristics that define a neighborhood change slowly. The stability of a neighborhood comes from its fixed features: location, housing, transportation, schools, places of worship, and employment. Self-organization and self-perpetuation also figure into the stability of a neighborhood, patterns which we refer to as “keeping up with the Joneses.” U.S. consumer markets are different and diverse. Capturing the essence of each market to characterize those differences requires sorting the most accurate and powerful data available using a wide array of attributes. Each neighborhood is analyzed and sorted by more than 60 attributes including income, source of income, employment, home value, housing type, occupation, education, household composition, age, and other key determinants of consumer behavior. To capture the subtlety and vibrancy of the U.S. marketplace, data sources include Census 2000, proprietary ESRI BIS demographic updates, the Acxiom InfoBase consumer database, the Mediamark Research Inc. national consumer survey, and other sources. Comparative View of Study Area Tapestry Household Segments The following table shows and compares concentrations of ESRI Tapestry household segments found within a 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mile radius of the Czech Village/New Bohemia Main Street District’s core. The data shows the changing lifestyle composition of the various study areas, and how the composition becomes more diversified as one moves outward from the Czech Village/New Bohemia Main Street District’s core. For example, while the half-mile radius is dominated by the Rustbelt Traditions Tapestry segment (77% of all 0.5 mile radius households), the Great Expectations segment is the most prevalent segment in the 2.0-mile radius, representing 20.9% of the area’s households. 0.5 Mile

Households Tapestry Code – Segment

Count

Pct.

1.0 Mile Rank

Count

Pct.

2.0 Miles Rank

Count

Pct.

Rank

32. Rustbelt Traditions

404

77.0%

1

829

26.4%

1

1,949

14.9%

2

65. Social Security Set

58

11.1%

2

426

13.6%

3

426

3.3%

11

57. Simple Living

48

9.2%

3

699

22.3%

2

699

5.3%

7

62. Modest Income Homes

14

2.7%

4

353

11.3%

5

353

2.7%

13

29. Rustbelt Retirees

0

0.0%

--

355

11.3%

4

1,902

14.5%

3

48. Great Expectations

0

0.0%

--

350

11.2%

6

2,735

20.9%

1

53. Home Town

0

0.0%

--

89

2.8%

7

774

5.9%

4

19. Milk and Cookies

0

0.0%

--

0

0.0%

--

755

5.8%

5

524

100.0%

3,101

98.9%

9,593

73.3%

Count/Percent of Area

Descriptions for the eight prevalent Tapestry segments found within the study areas follow. Information on ESRI Tapestry methodology and applications, along with descriptions for Tapestry’s 65 segments, are contained in the ESRI Community Tapestry Handbook available for download at http://www.esri.com/library/brochures/pdfs/communitytapestry-handbook.pdf.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 18


Snapshot Descriptions of Prevalent Czech Village/New Bohemia District Tapestry Segments Segment 32 – Rustbelt Traditions Study Area Households : Count – Pct. (Rank)

0.5 Mile 404 – 77.0% (1)

1.0 Mile 829 – 26.4% (1)

2.0 Miles 1,949 – 14.9% (2)

Demographic These neighborhoods are primarily a mix of married-couple families, single parents, and singles who live alone. With a population of 8.4 million, this segment is one of Tapestry Segmentation’s largest. The median age is 36.7 years, just below the US median. There is little diversity in these communities. Socioeconomic The median household income is $51,378, slightly below that of the US median. Half of the employed residents work in white-collar jobs. For years, these residents sustained the manufacturing industry that drove local economies. Now, the service industry predominates, followed by manufacturing and retail trade. The median net worth is $82,469. Their education attainment is improving; more than 84 percent of residents aged 25 years and older have graduated from high school, 15 percent hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree, and 44 percent have attended college. Residential The backbone of older industrial cities in the Great Lakes border states, residents of these neighborhoods live in modest, single-family homes. Home ownership is 72 percent. The relatively low median home value of $94,696 is because nearly two-thirds of the housing was built before 1960. Preferences These residents stick close to home; for years, they’ve lived, worked, shopped, and played in the same area. Not tempted by fads, they stick to familiar products and services. They drive domestic cars. They will spend money on their families, yard maintenance, and home improvements. They will hire contractors for special projects such as the installation of roofing, carpet, and flooring. These financially conservative residents prefer to bank at a credit union and have personal savings. They might carry a personal loan and hold low-value life and homeowner’s insurance policies. They’re frugal and shop for bargains at Sam’s Club, JCPenney, and Kmart. They go online weekly to play games and shop. They go bowling, fishing, and hunting and attend car races, country music shows, and ice hockey games. They’re big TV fans; they watch sitcoms and sports events. They also subscribe to cable and watch it regularly. Favorite channels are truTV, the Game Show Network, and the Disney Channel.

Demographic Traits

Household Income: Median Age: Family/Household Type: Housing Style: Employment Levels: Education Levels: Ethnic Diversity:

Lifestyle Traits

Middle 36.7 Mixed Single Family Skilled/Professional/Management/Service High School Grad; Some College White

1. Buy children’s and baby products 2. Use credit Union 3. Do painting, drawing 4. Watch cable TV 5. Own/Lease domestic vehicle

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 19


Segment 65 – Social Security Set Study Area Households : Count – Pct. (Rank)

0.5 Mile 58 – 11.1% (2)

1.0 Mile 426 – 13.6% (3)

2.0 Miles 426 – 3.3% (11)

Demographic Four in ten householders are aged 65 years or older; the median age is 46.4 years. Most of them live alone. Somewhat ethnically diverse, Social Security Set neighborhoods are a blend of different racial groups; however, half of the residents are white and one-third are black and 18 percent are Hispanic. Socioeconomic Although Social Security Set residents live on very low fixed incomes, they have accumulated some wealth they can tap into now that they’re retired. Their median household income is $16,805; their median net worth is $10,814. Unemployment is high among the younger residents who are still part of the labor force. Eight percent of households rely on public assistance; 16 percent receive Supplemental Security Income. The service industry provides more than half of the jobs held by these employed residents. Overall, more than two-thirds of the residents graduated from high school. Thirty-seven percent attended college; 16 percent hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree. Residential Located in large US cities, these communities are dispersed among business districts and around city parks. Most Social Security Set residents rent apartments in low-rent, high-rise buildings; a few elderly residents opt to live in congregate housing. Owner-occupied houses in these neighborhoods have a median value of $111,801. Because more than half of these households do not own a vehicle, many residents rely on easily accessible public transportation. Preferences Limited resources somewhat restrict the activities and purchases of residents in Social Security Set neighborhoods. They shop at discount stores but prefer grocery stores close to home. Many depend on Medicare or Medicaid to pay their health care costs. They bank in person and pay cash when they shop. Many purchase renter’s insurance. Most households subscribe to cable television; residents enjoy their daytime and prime time TV. They watch game shows, a variety of sports, and entertainment news shows. This high viewership provides an easy way to reach these residents. Avid newspaper readers, many will read two or more to stay current on sports and the news.

Demographic Traits

Household Income: Median Age: Family/Household Type: Housing Style: Employment Levels: Education Levels: Ethnic Diversity:

Lifestyle Traits

Low 46.4 Singles High-Rise Rentals Retired/Professional/Management/Service No HS Diploma; HS Graduate White; Black

1. Read books, paint, draw 2. Consult financial planner 3. Attend auto racing (NASCAR) events 4. Read science/technology magazines 5. Own/Lease domestic vehicle

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 20


Segment 57 – Simple Living Study Area Households : Count – Pct. (Rank)

0.5 Mile 48 – 9.2% (3)

1.0 Mile 699 – 22.3% (2)

2.0 Miles 699 – 5.3% (7)

Demographic With a median age of 41.3 years, this market is slightly older than the US median of 37 years. Approximately onefifth of Simple Living residents are aged 65 years or older; 12 percent are aged 75 or older. Half are singles who live alone or share housing; 32 percent are married-couple families. Young families with children and ethnic cultures are in the minority; most residents are white. This market size is stable with negligible growth. Socioeconomic The median household income is $29,408. Nearly 40 percent of households collect Social Security benefits, 8 percent receive Supplemental Security Income, and 6 percent receive public assistance. Over the years, residents have built equity in their homes and saved their hard-earned dollars to achieve their median net worth of $15,034. Most residents who are employed work in the health care, retail trade, manufacturing, educational services, and accommodation/food services industry sectors. Overall, 75 percent of residents aged 25 years and older have graduated from high school. Only 15 percent hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree. Residential Simple Living neighborhoods are in the urban outskirts or suburbs throughout the United States. Residents live in older housing; 62 percent were built before 1970. More than half of them rent. Forty-two percent of housing is single-family dwellings, and 47 percent is in multiunit buildings of varying stories. Some seniors live in congregate housing (assisted living). The median home value is $96,358. Twenty-two percent of households do not own a vehicle; 45 percent own only one vehicle. Workers benefit from an average commute time to work of 20 minutes. Preferences The lifestyle of these residents is reflected by their ages; younger people go to nightclubs and play musical instruments; seniors refinish furniture and go saltwater fishing. Community activities are also important to the latter; they join fraternal orders and veterans’ clubs. Simple Living households spend wisely on a restricted budget. They buy the essentials at discount stores and occasionally treat themselves to dinner out and a movie. Cable TV is a must for these frequent viewers of family programs, news programs, and game shows. They are big fans of daytime TV. Owning a personal computer, cell phone, or DVD player isn’t important. Demographic Traits

Household Income: Median Age: Family/Household Type: Housing Style: Employment Levels: Education Levels: Ethnic Diversity:

Lifestyle Traits

Lower Middle 41.3 Singles Multi-units; Single Family Professional/Management/Skilled/Service No HS Diploma; High School Graduate White

1. Go fishing, do furniture refinishing 2. Own annuities 3. Order from QVC 4. Watch syndicated TV 5. Own/Lease domestic vehicle

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 21


Segment 62 – Modest Income Homes Study Area Households : Count – Pct. (Rank)

0.5 Mile 14 – 2.7% (4)

1.0 Mile 353 – 11.3% (5)

2.0 Miles 353 – 2.7% (13)

Demographic Eighty-three percent of the residents in Modest Income Homes neighborhoods are black. Single-person and singleparent household types are predominant; however, a higher-than-average proportion of other family households is also present. The median age of 36 years is a year younger than the national median of 37. Many adult children still live at home. More than one-fourth are aged 65 years or older and have retired. Many are caregivers for their grandchildren, demonstrating strong family ties in these neighborhoods. Socioeconomic Most of the retirees in Modest Income Homes rely on Social Security benefits for support. Slightly more employed residents work part-time than full-time, mainly in service and blue-collar occupations. The median household income is $21,444; the median net worth is $12,922. The unemployment rate is 23.2 percent. Thirteen percent of households receive Supplemental Security Income, and 10 percent receive public assistance. With little savings, home equity contributes the lion’s share to a household’s net worth in these neighborhoods. More than 60 percent of residents aged 25 years and older have graduated from high school. Eight percent hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree, and 28 percent have attended college. Residential Most Modest Income Homes neighborhoods are in older suburbs of Southern metropolitan areas, with a smaller concentration in the Midwest. More than two-thirds of the housing is single-family dwellings; 15 percent are duplexes. Homeowners and renters are almost evenly divided. Seventy-one percent of the households own at least one vehicle. Because demand for housing is low, home prices are very moderate; the median home value is $53,529. Preferences Residents are big fans of daytime and primetime TV. They go to the movies occasionally and also like to watch movies on TV channels such as the Lifetime Movie Network and The Movie Channel. They also watch football and basketball games on TV. They listen to urban radio. The Internet is the least effective way to reach these folks. To save money, they shop at discount stores, limit their long-distance telephone calls, and restrict nonessential services such as Internet access and fitness center memberships. When they participate in physical activities, they might play basketball. Most drive used domestic sedans.

Demographic Traits

Household Income: Median Age: Family/Household Type: Housing Style: Employment Levels: Education Levels: Ethnic Diversity:

Lifestyle Traits

Low 36.0 Other Family Households; Singles Single Family; Duplex Services/Skilled/Not in Labor Force No HS Diploma; High School Graduate Black

1. Eat at fast-food/drive-in restaurants 2. Own annuities 3. Go to sporting events; watch on TV 4. Watch cable and syndicated TV 5. Own/Lease Dodge

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 22


Segment 29 – Rustbelt Retirees Study Area Households : Count – Pct. (Rank)

0.5 Mile 0 – 0.0% (--)

1.0 Mile 355 – 11.3% (4)

2.0 Miles 1,902 – 14.5% (3)

Demographic Most of the households in these neighborhoods are married couples with no children or singles who live alone. Twenty percent are married couples with children. The median age is 45.6 years; more than one-third of the householders are aged 65 years or older. Seventeen percent are veterans. These neighborhoods are not ethnically diverse. Socioeconomic Although many residents still work, the labor force participation rate is 58 percent. Most households derive income from wages. However, 45 percent of households earn income from interest, dividends, and rental properties; 40 percent draw Social Security benefits; and 28 percent receive retirement income. The median household income is $52,216, just below that of the US median. The median net worth is $130,866, slightly above the US value. Overall, 86 percent of residents aged 25 years and older have graduated from high school, approximately 50 percent have attended college, and 20 percent hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree. Residential Most Rustbelt Retirees neighborhoods can be found in older, industrial northeastern cities, especially in Pennsylvania, and other states surrounding the Great Lakes; 67 percent of the households are located in the Northeast and Midwest. Twenty-eight percent are in the South. Eighty-four percent of the housing is single-family homes with a median home value of $119,104; three-fourths were built before 1970. Unlike many retirees, these residents are content to stay put and live in the same house for years. Preferences These hardworking folks are settled; many have lived in the same house for years. Loyal to country and community, they tend to be politically conservative. They participate in public activities and fund-raising, visit elected officials, and work for political parties or candidates. They belong to fraternal organizations, unions, and veterans’ clubs. Practical people who take pride in their homes and gardens, Rustbelt Retirees buy home furnishings and work on remodeling projects to update their houses. They watch their pennies, use coupons, and look for bargains at discount stores and warehouse clubs. They own savings bonds and certificates of deposit and hold life insurance policies. They eat out at family restaurants such as Perkins and Friendly’s and watch rented movies on DVD instead of going to the theater. They also go bowling, play cards and bingo, gamble in Atlantic City, and go to horse races. They watch home improvement shows, sports events, news programs, game shows, and old reruns on TV. Favorite channels include Home & Garden Television, the Hallmark Channel, and the Weather Channel. They listen to country, oldies, and sports radio and peruse the daily newspaper.

Demographic Traits

Household Income: Median Age: Family/Household Type: Housing Style: Employment Levels: Education Levels: Ethnic Diversity:

Lifestyle Traits

Middle 45.6 Married Couples with no Kids; Singles Single Family Professional/Management/Skilled/Service HS Graduate; Some College White

1. Play bingo 2. Own annuities 3. Belong to fraternal orders, unions, etc. 4. Watch news shows on TV 5. Own/Pontiac

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 23


Segment 48 – Great Expectations Study Area Households : Count – Pct. (Rank)

0.5 Mile 0 – 0.0% (--)

1.0 Mile 350 – 11.2% (6)

2.0 Miles 2,735 – 20.9% (1)

Demographic Young singles who live alone and married-couple families dominate the Great Expectations market, although all household types are represented. The median age is 33.3 years. Some residents are just beginning their careers or family lives. Compared to the US figures, this segment has a higher proportion of residents who are in their 20s and a higher proportion of householders younger than 35 years. The ethnic diversity and racial composition of this segment are similar to US levels. Socioeconomic The median household income of $40,243 and the median net worth of $21,548 are lower than the US values. Nearly half of the population aged 25 years and older has some postsecondary education; 18 percent hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree. Labor force participation rate is 66 percent; most of the jobs come from the manufacturing, retail, and service industry sectors. Residential Great Expectations neighborhoods are located throughout the country, with higher proportions in the Midwest and South. Half own their homes; half rent. More than half of the households are single-family dwellings; approximately 40 percent are apartments in low- or mid-rise buildings. The median home value is $100,315. Most of the housing units in these older suburban neighborhoods were built before 1960. Preferences Great Expectations homeowners are not afraid to tackle smaller maintenance and remodeling projects, but they also enjoy a young and active lifestyle. They go out to dinner and to the movies. They do most of their grocery shopping at Wal-Mart Supercenters, Aldi, and Shop ’n Save. They throw Frisbees; play softball and pool; go canoeing; watch horror, science fiction, and drama films on DVD; and listen to country music, classic rock, and sports on the radio. They watch dramas, auto racing, and the evening news on TV. They occasionally eat at Arby’s and Dairy Queen. They shop at major discount and department stores. They rarely travel. Focused on starting their careers, they’re not investing for their retirement years. Demographic Traits

Household Income: Median Age: Family/Household Type: Housing Style: Employment Levels: Education Levels: Ethnic Diversity:

Lifestyle Traits

Lower Middle 33.3 Mixed Single Family; Multi-units Professional/Management/Skilled/Service High School Graduate; Some College White

1. Do painting, drawing nd 2. Have 2 mortgage (equity loan) 3. Listen to classical music on radio 4. Read baby magazines 5. Own motorcycle

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 24


Segment 53 – Home Town Study Area Households : Count – Pct. (Rank)

0.5 Mile 0 – 0.0% (--)

1.0 Mile 89 – 2.8% (7)

2.0 Miles 774 – 5.9% (4)

Demographic Home Town households are a mix of married-couple families, singles who live alone, and single-parent families. With a median age of 34.5 years, this is a slightly younger market than the United States as a whole. However, one in three is aged 65 years or older. Many families encompass two generations who have lived and worked in the community; their children plan to do the same. Seventy-two percent of the residents are white; 15 percent are black. Socioeconomic The median household income is $33,823; the median net worth is $20,574. Although 73 percent of households derive income from wages and salaries, some rely on Supplemental Security Income and public assistance for support. The manufacturing, retail trade, and service industry sectors are the primary sources of employment for these residents. Unemployment in this segment is 14.9 percent. Overall, educational attainment is lower for Home Town than for the United States. Only 8 percent hold a bachelor’s or graduate degree; 31 percent have attended college. Residential Change is rare in these low-density, settled neighborhoods, located primarily in the Midwest and South. Home Town residents may move from one house to another, but they seldom cross the county line. Seventy-three percent of homes are single-family dwellings, and 11 percent are two- to four-unit structures. Home ownership is at 58 percent; the median home value is $63,863. The average gross rent is two-thirds of the US average. Because the population in these neighborhoods hardly grows, new construction is scarce. Most of the housing was built before 1970. Preferences Home Town residents savor their quasi-country lifestyle by spending time outdoors fishing and playing football. Indoors, they play video games or watch TV favorites such as courtroom programs, wrestling, or reality shows. Internet access and cell phone use are less important here than in other markets. They shop for groceries at Kroger, Aldi, and Wal-Mart Supercenters. They buy clothes at discount department stores such as Wal-Mart and Kmart, typically located in small local malls. When they eat out, they go to Bob Evans and Ryan’s family restaurants or fast-food places.

Demographic Traits

Household Income: Median Age: Family/Household Type: Housing Style: Employment Levels: Education Levels: Ethnic Diversity:

Lifestyle Traits

Lower-Middle 34.5 Mixed Single Family Skilled/Services No HS Diploma; HS Graduate White

1. Play football, go fishing 2. Have personal education loan 3. Attend country music performance 4. Watch syndicated TV 5. Own/Lease domestic vehicle

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 25


Segment 19 – Milk and Cookies Study Area Households : Count – Pct. (Rank)

0.5 Mile 0 – 0.0% (--)

1.0 Mile 0 – 0.0% (--)

2.0 Miles 755 – 5.8% (5)

Demographic Upscale living on a family allowance, Milk and Cookies represents young, affluent married couples who are starting their families or already have young children. The median age of 33.8 years represents the presence of kids; nearly half of the households include children. One in four householders is between the ages of 45 and 54. The population diversity is comparable to that of the United States, and the proportions of the population by race approximate the US distributions with slightly above-average ratios of black and Hispanic residents. Socioeconomic Ninety percent of Milk and Cookies households earn income from wages. The labor force participation rate of 69.8 percent is above average. The median household income is $64,880, and the median net worth is $135,190. Fifty-eight percent have attended college; more than 20 percent hold bachelor’s or graduate degrees. Residential Milk and Cookies residents prefer single-family homes in suburban neighborhoods of cities, largely in the South, particularly in Texas. Smaller concentrations of households are located in the West and Midwest. The median home value is $128,801. Housing units are generally 20–30 years old. Given the concentration of dual-income families, 71 percent of households have at least two vehicles. A family with two or more workers, more than one child, and two or more vehicles is the norm for these neighborhoods. Preferences As Milk and Cookies residents settle into their family-oriented lifestyle, they focus on family and the future. They are properly insured, carrying life and accidental death and dismemberment policies. They use a credit union, have overdraft protection, and usually have a new car loan. Although they may still own a motorcycle or small car, they prefer larger vehicles. When they move, they rent a U-Haul and move their own belongings. Many households own a dog. The presence of children in Milk and Cookies households drives their large purchases of baby and children’s products including baby food, baby equipment, clothes, shoes, medicine, vitamins, board games, bicycles, toys, video games, and children’s DVDs. Most households own one of the latest video game systems and a large-screen TV. To save time in their busy lives, they frequently buy prepared dinners from the grocery store and fast food. They play video games, go bowling, and visit theme parks such as Six Flags and Sea World. They watch professional football and basketball games. Favorite cable channels include Cartoon Network, Discovery Channel, National Geographic Channel, and BET. They also work on their lawns, tackle interior painting projects, or do minor maintenance on their vehicles.

Demographic Traits

Household Income: Median Age: Family/Household Type: Housing Style: Employment Levels: Education Levels: Ethnic Diversity:

Lifestyle Traits

Middle 33.8 Married Couples with Kids Single Family Professional/Management/Skilled Some College White

1. Frequent fast-food/drive-in restaurants 2. Have mortgage insurance 3. Buy children’s toys/games 4. Watch educational channels, Cartoon Network 5. Own/Lease Nissan

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 26


Retail Market Performance ESRI's Retail MarketPlace 2010 data provides a direct comparison between retail sales and consumer spending by industry. To capture a snapshot of an area's retail market place, the leakage and surplus factor summarizes the relationship between supply (retail sales by businesses) and demand (consumer spending by household). Deviations from potential sales may reveal areas of opportunity in the trade area’s retail sectors, keeping in mind any extenuating circumstances that may be driving the results. ESRI uses the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) to classify businesses by their primary type of economic activity. Retail establishments are classified into 27 industry groups within Retail Trade sector, and four industry groups within the Food Services & Drinking Establishments subsector. To estimate sales, the Retail MarketPlace database combines a number of data sources, including ► Census Bureau's Census of Retail Trade (CRT) ► Census Bureau's Nonemployer Statistics (NES) ► ESRI's demographic data ► infoUSA's business database ► Bureau of Labor Statistics All estimates of actual sales (supply) reflect current dollars derived from receipts of businesses primarily engaged in selling merchandise. Potential sales (demand) is estimated by using ESRI's consumer spending data which provides estimated expenditures for more than 700 products and services that are consumed by U.S. households. The estimate of a trade area’s demand is based upon estimated expenditures by households within the trade area. Leakage within a specified trade area represents a condition where supply is less than demand. Retailers outside of the trade area are fulfilling demand for retail products. Surplus within a specified trade area represents a condition where supply exceeds the area's demand. Thus retailers are attracting customers that reside outside the trade area.

Sales Surplus and Leakage Estimates | 2010 Total Retail Trade and Food & Drink estimates for the study area’s 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0-mile radii show a sales surplus at all geography levels ranging from about $3.7 million for the half-mile radius to more than $108 million for the two-mile radius. Overall sales surplus figures in the study areas are largely driven by what appears to be strong performance in the Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores, Health & Personal Care Stores, and Food Services & Drinking Places categories. Escalated surpluses in the 1.0- and 2.0-mile radii can also be attributed to strong performance in the Food & Beverage Stores category. Czech Village/New Bohemia Main Street District 2010 ESRI Sales Surplus & Leakage Estimates

NAICS Code: Business Description

0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

Surplus/(Leakage)

Surplus/(Leakage)

Surplus/(Leakage)

Total Retail Trade and Food & Drink (NAICS 44 – 45, 722)

$3,726,638

$81,671,840

$108,073,026

Total Retail Trade (NAICS 44 – 45)

$1,343,234

$76,543,510

$104,025,152

Total Food & Drink (NAICS 722)

$2,383,404

$5,128,329

$4,047,874

The following table presents a detail of sales surplus and leakage estimates for 27 industry groups in the Retail Trade sector and for the four industry groups within the Food Services & Drinking Places subsector for the Czech Village/Ne Bohemia Main Street District study area geographies.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 27


Czech Village/New Bohemia Main Street District • ESRI Retail MarketPlace Report 2010 Summary 0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

Surplus/(Leakage) Estimate

Surplus/(Leakage) Estimate

Surplus/(Leakage) Estimate

Total Retail Trade and Food & Drink (NAICS 44 – 45, 722)

$3,726,638

$81,671,840

$108,073,026

Total Retail Trade (NAICS 44 – 45)

$1,343,234

$76,543,510

$104,025,152

Total Food & Drink (NAICS 722)

$2,383,404

$5,128,329

$4,047,874

441: Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

($2,603,045)

($4,966,906)

($7,187,935)

4411: Automobile Dealers

($2,243,174)

($4,683,648)

($5,969,642)

4412: Other Motor Vehicle Dealers

($199,985)

($810,937)

($2,108,169)

4413: Auto Parts, Accessories, and Tire Stores

($159,886)

$527,679

$889,876

442: Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores

$1,182,331

$18,918,211

$20,921,052

4421: Furniture Stores

$1,017,382

$18,270,161

$20,360,142

$164,949

$648,051

$560,910

$40,768

$4,339,733

$12,524,847

444: Bldg Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores

$373,063

$2,985,198

($1,480,171)

4441: Building Material and Supplies Dealers

$425,483

$3,007,897

($610,344)

4442: Lawn and Garden Equipment and Supplies Stores

($52,421)

($22,700)

($869,826)

445: Food & Beverage Stores

($15,512)

$10,763,343

$64,516,880

($138,716)

$10,011,388

$63,569,078

($174)

$115,285

$540,785

$123,378

$636,670

$407,017

446/4461: Health & Personal Care Stores

$1,019,572

$41,274,909

$48,946,475

447/4471: Gasoline Stations

$3,567,262

$6,026,875

($5,648,646)

448: Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores

($391,793)

($639,571)

($5,811,910)

4481: Clothing Stores

($293,396)

($424,327)

($4,391,317)

4482: Shoe Stores

($46,819)

($202,345)

($1,065,237)

4483: Jewelry, Luggage, and Leather Goods Stores

($51,578)

($12,899)

($355,355)

2010 ESRI Sales Surplus & Leakage Estimates

NAICS Code: Business Description

4422: Home Furnishings Stores

443/4431: Electronics & Appliance Stores

4451: Grocery Stores 4452: Specialty Food Stores 4453: Beer, Wine, and Liquor Stores

Data Source: ESRI Retail MarketPlace Profile, 2010. Data Note: The polarity of surplus/leakage estimates shown in this report (as compared to those shown in the original ESRI reports) have been reversed to show a surplus as a positive value, and to show a leakage as a negative value. The Retail Gap (Sales Surplus/Leakage) represents the difference between Retail Potential and Retail Sales. A positive value represents a surplus in retail sales, often indicating a market where customers are drawn in from outside the defined trade area.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 28


Czech Village/New Bohemia Main Street District • ESRI Retail MarketPlace Report 2010 Summary 0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

Surplus/(Leakage) Estimate

Surplus/(Leakage) Estimate

Surplus/(Leakage) Estimate

($106,052)

$83,348

($412,731)

4511: Sporting Goods/Hobby/Musical Instrument Stores

($82,379)

$183,597

$43,872

4512: Book, Periodical, and Music Stores

($23,674)

($100,249)

($456,603)

452: General Merchandise Stores

($1,754,145)

($5,206,326)

($26,853,710)

4521: Department Stores (Excluding Leased Depts.)

($1,020,836)

($4,317,906)

($22,917,868)

($733,309)

($888,420)

($3,935,842)

453: Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$190,679

$1,000,326

$431,889

4531: Florists

($20,959)

($67,198)

($260,413)

4532: Office Supplies, Stationery, and Gift Stores

$141,060

$139,168

($311,830)

4533: Used Merchandise Stores

$50,767

$157,452

$26,773

4539: Other Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$19,811

$770,904

$977,359

($159,895)

$1,964,368

$4,079,112

($38,645)

($163,158)

($868,108)

($9,421)

($40,512)

($211,374)

4543: Direct Selling Establishments

($111,830)

$2,168,037

$5,158,594

722: Food Services & Drinking Places

$2,383,404

$5,128,329

$4,047,874

7221: Full-Service Restaurants

$1,249,034

$2,576,863

$1,131,432

($1,019,571)

($2,669,414)

($2,146,414)

$1,562,208

$3,044,787

$1,157,816

$591,734

$2,176,093

$3,905,041

2010 ESRI Sales Surplus & Leakage Estimates

NAICS Code: Business Description 451: Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, and Music Stores

4529: Other General Merchandise Stores

454: Nonstore Retailers 4541: Electronic Shopping and Mail-Order Houses 4542: Vending Machine Operators

7222: Limited-Service Eating Places 7223: Special Food Services 7224: Drinking Places (Alcoholic Beverages) Data Source: ESRI Retail MarketPlace Profile, 2010.

Data Note: The polarity of surplus/leakage estimates shown in this report (as compared to those shown in the original ESRI reports) have been reversed to show a surplus as a positive value, and to show a leakage as a negative value. The Retail Gap (Sales Surplus/Leakage) represents the difference between Retail Potential and Retail Sales. A positive value represents a surplus in retail sales, often indicating a market where customers are drawn in from outside the defined trade area.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

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Sales Surplus/Leakage Factors Sales Surplus/Leakage Factors present a snapshot of retail opportunity. This is a measure of the relationship between supply and demand that ranges from +100 (total surplus) to -100 (total leakage). A positive value represents a surplus of retail sales (often indicative of a market where customers are drawn from outside the trade area). Categories showing the highest surplus factors may be indicative of relative strength in the market and opportunities for expansion. Negative leakage factors may reveal retail opportunity, with the lowest values indicating possible targets for retail expansion or recruitment. The following table shows study area estimates for some of the lowest and highest Surplus/Leakage Factors for select Retail and Food & Drink categories and subcategories in the half-mile radius. Corresponding figures for the one- and two-mile radii are shown for comparison and for assessment of broader performance and opportunities. Czech Village/New Bohemia District • ESRI Retail MarketPlace Report 2010 | Surplus/Leakage Factors Summary Sales Surplus/Leakage Factors – Select Categories

0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

NAICS Code: Business Description

Factor

# Biz

Factor

# Biz

Factor

# Biz

448: Clothing & Clothing Accessories Stores

(100.0)

0

(23.6)

4

(48.5)

13

4512: Book, Periodical and Music Stores

(100.0)

0

(100.0)

0

(75.9)

1

452: General Merchandise Stores

(100.0)

0

(53.8)

1

(52.0)

4

4531: Florists

(100.0)

0

(65.4)

1

(39.2)

2

441: Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

(96.9)

0

(28.9)

8

(6.4)

26

7222: Limited-Service Eating Places

(92.4)

1

(41.9)

4

(4.7)

23

4511: Sporting Goods/Hobby/Musical Instrument Stores

(82.8)

0

19.4

2

1.1

7

4451: Grocery Stores

(3.2)

1

33.9

7

38.5

18

4452: Specialty Food Stores

(0.7)

0

50.5

2

48.0

4

7223: Special Food Services

87.1

2

75.5

5

18.1

6

4453: Beer, Wine, and Liquor Stores

83.1

0

85.6

1

41.8

1

7224: Drinking Places (Alcoholic Beverages)

74.3

4

71.6

11

46.4

27

4533: Used Merchandise Stores

66.7

2

59.2

5

4.4

8

4421: Furniture Stores

64.6

1

88.6

6

61.4

7

4532: Office Supplies, Stationery, and Gift Stores

50.2

2

19.1

3

(11.1)

7

4422: Home Furnishings Stores

48.6

1

47.3

4

12.5

10

446/4461: Health & Personal Care Stores

47.5

2

89.7

12

66.6

24

7221: Full-Service Restaurants

46.6

4

29.8

19

3.4

47

443/4431: Electronics & Appliance Stores

5.8

1

61.0

10

45.8

27

Data Note: The polarity of surplus/leakage factors shown in this report (as compared to those shown in the original ESRI reports) have been reversed to show a surplus factor as a positive value, and to show a leakage factor as a negative value.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 30


Community Participation The process behind the completion of this study was orchestrated to provide opportunities for Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District stakeholders and Cedar Rapids area residents and visitors the chance to provide ideas and input that form the basis for this study’s findings and directions. Public participation opportunities included: ► The performance of an online consumer survey conducted as part of the concurrent Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District revitalization strategy planning process, completed by 309 respondents. ► The conduct of a consumer intercept survey administered by the CV/NB Main Street organization and completed by 107 visitors to the District. ► The performance of a business survey completed by 33 CV/NB Main Street District businesses. Following is a categorized, capsule summary of key results and findings relevant to Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District economic development topics and initiatives.

Market Region The Cedar Rapids regional market and the tertiary markets are viewed as an important part of the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District economy and efforts geared toward enhancing visitor and tourist-related attractions in the District stand to benefit area businesses. The “pull” and widespread appeal of the District as a regional destination is evident in survey respondent origin results. While survey participants living in the Northeast and Southeast quadrants of Cedar Rapids accounted for 47% of all survey respondents, more than 30% of survey respondents indicated they live in the surrounding communities of Hiawatha, Marion, Iowa City or Coralville, or an “other” place. Where do you live? Place of Residence

Intercept Survey

Online Survey

Total Sample

A. Cedar Rapids - NE

24

24.2%

49

19.7%

73

21.0%

B. Cedar Rapids - NW

10

10.1%

25

10.0%

35

10.1%

C. Cedar Rapids - SE

20

20.2%

71

28.5%

91

26.1%

D. Cedar Rapids - SW

15

15.2%

25

10.0%

40

11.5%

E. Hiawatha

2

2.0%

5

2.0%

7

2.0%

F. Marion

5

5.1%

17

6.8%

22

6.3%

G. Iowa City / Coralville

6

6.1%

11

4.4%

17

4.9%

17

17.2%

46

18.5%

63

18.1%

99

100.10%

249

100.00%

348

100.0%

H. Other* Total * Other Location

Intercept - Other

Online - Other

Total - Other

North Liberty, IA

2

2.0%

3

1.2%

5

1.4%

Solon, IA

4

4.0%

0

0.0%

4

1.1%

Robins

0

0.0%

3

1.2%

3

0.9%

Mt Vernon

0

0.0%

3

1.2%

3

0.9%

Anamosa, IA

1

1.0%

1

0.4%

2

0.6%

Ely, IA

2

2.0%

0

0.0%

2

0.6%

Atkins

0

0.0%

2

0.8%

2

0.6%

Fairfax

0

0.0%

2

0.8%

2

0.6%

Swisher

0

0.0%

2

0.8%

2

0.6%

Walford

0

0.0%

2

0.8%

2

0.6%

All Others

8

8.1%

28

11.2%

36

10.3%

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 31


The destination and attraction-oriented nature of the district, and its role and potential as part of the community’s and region’s tourism industry, is also displayed in intercept survey responses showing that 28% of visitors from outside the area included an overnight lodging stay at a Cedar Rapids area lodging facility as part of their itinerary. Notably, the intercept survey was conducted in February – a month not typically associated with high levels or tourist activity. If you are a visitor from outside the Cedar Rapids area, does your visit include an overnight stay at a Cedar Rapids area lodging facility? Stay at Area Lodging Facility?

Intercept Survey

A.

Yes

7

28.0%

B.

No

18

72.0%

C.

Not Applicable (I live in the Cedar Rapids area)

61

--

86

100.0%

Total Data Note: Percentages based on responding sample selecting Yes or No.

Still, District businesses appear to recognize the critical role that Cedar Rapids residents play in the sustainability of the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District economy and their businesses, with 90% of business survey respondents identifying local/regional Cedar Rapids residents as their primary customer base. Business development, marketing and promotion strategies should continue to recognize the Cedar Rapids city and regional markets as a dominant force, while public improvements, special features and enhancements might be designed with both area residents and visitors in mind.

Appeal and Attraction More than 43% of all survey respondents indicated they visit the District daily or one or twice a week – a level that seems to illustrate the hometown neighborhood qualities of the district and mix of businesses that is nurturing a loyal client base. How often do you come to the Czech Village / New Bo Main Street District? Frequency of visits

Intercept Survey

Online Survey

Total Sample

A.

Daily

8

7.5%

48

15.5%

56

13.5%

B.

Once or twice a week

38

35.5%

85

27.5%

123

29.6%

C.

Once or twice a month

24

22.4%

100

32.4%

124

29.8%

D.

A few times a year

23

21.5%

68

22.0%

91

21.9%

14

13.1%

8

2.6%

22

5.3%

107

100.0%

309

100.0%

416

100.0%

E. Total

This is my first visit to the District

(IS)

(OS)

/ Never

The findings could be directly related to business survey results that showed 30% of respondents cited “Reputation” as the top reason for customers to do business with them. A business’ reputation is a value-based quality which, as opposed to commodities, is nurtured through time, experience, messages and frequent interaction. Business Survey: Which one of the following best describes the main reason for customers to do business with you? Response Count Percentage A. Selection & variety 9 27.3% B. Customer service 6 18.2% C. Convenience 0 0.0% D. Price of goods & services 5 15.2% E. Reputation 10 30.3% F. Other* 3 9.1% TOTAL 33 100.0%  “Other” responses: All the above; Product is top of the line, fixes a lot of their problems; and Tradition – Ethnic History.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 32


Notably, 13% of intercept survey respondents indicated this was their first visit to the district, an indication that the District is still undiscovered territory for a segment of the population, but also showing an ability to lure first-time visitors. Less than 3% of online survey participants indicated they never visit the district and largely cited a lack of awareness as the reason for not visiting the District. Online survey respondents who never visited the district, when asked what might bring them to the District, selected shopping (retail), restaurants/bars, shopping (food) and festivals as top draws. What might bring you to the District? Potential Draws A. Shopping (retail) B. Shopping (food) C. Restaurants / Bars D. Bars / Nightlife E. Businesses F. Services G. Live Music H. Festivals I. Museums J. Art Total

Online Survey 7 5 6 2 3 1 4 5 2 4 39

17.9% 12.8% 15.4% 5.1% 7.7% 2.6% 10.3% 12.8% 5.1% 10.3% 100.0%

The findings point to the continued need to build awareness through marketing, advertising and messages that promote the complete and abundant mix of businesses, attractions and experiences offered in the District. Marketing and public relations efforts might seek to expand on the sense of the District as a historic and culturally diverse hometown neighborhood business district, and nurture an even stronger sense of brand-loyalty by encouraging crossmarketing efforts which promote the District’s full range of products, services, attractions and experiences. The diverse nature and “draw” of the district is illustrated in the wide distribution of responses to the question, “What brings you to the district?” Restaurants and bars were selected by the largest segment of all survey respondents (64%), followed by shopping – food (47%), live music (38%), festivals (37%) and shopping – retail (31%). What brings you to the District? Purpose/Attraction

Intercept Survey

Online Survey 5.8%

Total Sample

A.

I live in the District

13

12.1%

18

31

7.5%

B.

I work in the District

13

12.1%

23

7.4%

36

8.7%

C.

Shopping (retail)

36

33.6%

93

30.1%

129

31.0%

D.

Shopping (food)

58

54.2%

137

44.3%

195

46.9%

E.

Restaurants / Bars

58

54.2%

210

68.0%

268

64.4%

F.

Museums

16

15.0%

60

19.4%

76

18.3%

G.

Festivals

16

15.0%

139

45.0%

155

37.3%

H.

Live Music

24

22.4%

134

43.4%

158

38.0%

I.

Art

18

16.8%

91

29.4%

109

26.2%

J.

Services

0

0.0%

18

5.8%

18

4.3%

K.

Businesses

10

9.3%

52

16.8%

62

14.9%

L.

Other*

24

22.4%

22

7.1%

46

11.1%

Data Note: Multiple responses allowed. Percentages based on survey samples. Percentages do not equal 100%. * “Other” Responses (IS): Son; gift certificate to NewBo, otherwise I wouldn't come back. There's nothing special and it's all expensive!; xmas gift, given newbo gift cert; the market; I’m from CR; family; Chrome; hair cut; NewBo Market; Picking up meat order; Dr appt; NewBo; and Volunteer at the NCSML.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 33


The findings point to the never-ending need to build awareness through marketing, advertising and messages that promote the complete and abundant mix of businesses, attractions and experiences offered in the District. Marketing and public relations efforts might seek to expand on the sense of the District as a historic and culturally diverse hometown neighborhood business district, and nurture an even stronger sense of brand-loyalty by encouraging crossmarketing efforts which promote the District’s full range of products, services, attractions and experiences. The design of effective marketing strategies and messages for the District might take cues and direction from survey results highlighting what respondents like most about the district. While tangible assets, businesses and various features were cited frequently, the largest concentration of survey respondents pointed to more intangible features and qualities related to the District’s character and environment, including its historic character and heritage, its feel, its uniqueness, its potential, its urban flair, and the sense that the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District is an area on the rise. IS: What do you like most about the District? / OS: What do you like most about the District today? Category/Topic

Impressions – Character and Environment

Intercept Survey

Online Survey

Total Sample

38

46.3%

71

34.0%

109

37.5%

9

11.0%

39

18.7%

48

16.5%

14

17.1%

22

10.5%

36

12.4%

Attractions and Activities

Businesses; Business Mix/Variety

Eating and Drinking Places

4

4.9%

24

11.5%

28

9.6%

Changes and Improvements

4

4.9%

21

10.0%

25

8.6%

Arts and Culture

4

4.9%

16

7.7%

20

6.9%

Design Features

7

8.5%

10

4.8%

17

5.8%

Other/Undefined

2

2.4%

6

2.9%

8

2.7%

82

100.00%

209

100.10%

291

100.0%

Total

Data Note: Responses categorized for summary purposes. Complete list of categorized raw data responses provided as supplemental data.

Additional direction for the design of District marketing and promotion strategies and messages is provided in descriptors offered by online survey respondents who were asked to list three words that describe the district today. Messages and images capturing the most popular “buzz words” offer a chance to build on qualities, features and attributes that are already recognized, known, accepted and attached to the District – and could offer the best chance for the District to deliver on a brand promise. List three words that describe the District today. Words/Word Groups

Online Survey

Fun

31

10.0%

Growing

27

8.7%

Historic, Historical, History

20

6.5%

Vibrant

20

6.5%

Art, Artistic, Arts, Artsie, Artsy

19

6.1%

Exciting, Excitement

16

5.2%

Eclectic

14

4.5%

Potential

13

4.2%

Cultural, Culture

12

3.9%

Emergent, Emerging

10

3.2%

New

10

3.2%

Data Note: Words and word variations with highest frequency shown. Percentages based on total survey sample. Complete raw data listing of responses provided as supplemental data.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 34


Event Attraction Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District events appear to be effective, to varying degrees, in drawing traffic and attention to the District. More than 40% of all survey respondents indicated attend NewBo Fest, 28% attend Houby Days, and 20% attend Czech Fall Festival. The three least attended events according to cumulative survey figures are Woody Fest (4.6%), Landfall Festival (8.9%) and 2x2xU (10.6%). Which annual events do you attend? Events

Intercept Survey

Online Survey

Total Sample

A.

2x2xU

4

5.8%

40

12.9%

44

10.6%

B.

BrewNost

9

13.0%

55

17.8%

64

15.4%

C.

EcoFest

8

11.6%

60

19.4%

68

16.3%

D.

Czech Fall Festival

26

37.7%

57

18.4%

83

20.0%

E.

Houby Days

35

50.7%

80

25.9%

115

27.6%

F.

Landfall Festival

3

4.3%

34

11.0%

37

8.9%

G.

NewBo Fest

27

39.1%

141

45.6%

168

40.4%

H.

Old Prague Christmas Market

15

21.7%

50

16.2%

65

15.6%

I.

St. Joseph’s Day Parade

--

--

38

12.3%

38

12.3%

J.

Very Cherry Holiday

9

13.0%

63

20.4%

72

17.3%

K.

Walk / Run Races

13

18.8%

49

15.9%

62

14.9%

L.

Woody Fest

6

8.7%

13

4.2%

19

4.6%

Data Note: Multiple responses allowed. Percentages based on responding sample. Percentages do not equal 100%.

District festivals and special events, as demonstrated throughout the survey, are an important drawing card for the District and likely contribute to the District’s “fun factor.” Activities and qualities associated with top-ranked festivals and events should be identified and, where practicable and appropriate, translated and adapted to events which might be underperforming, and considered in the course of planning new events.

Media Preferences and Effectiveness Survey findings on the media preferences of consumers in the Cedar Rapids area and sources considered most effective by District businesses can provide direction for effective business and District marketing, promotion and cooperative advertising strategies. The information can also provide direction for communicating news and proposals for changes and improvements in the District.

Media and Information Sources

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K.

Newspaper Shoppers Guide Television AM/FM Radio Yellow Pages Direct Mail Internet Websites Email / News Feeds Social Media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.) Other None

Of the following, which two (2) media and information sources do you use most often to get local area news and information about local events and businesses? Consumer Intercept Survey 43 41.0% 2 1.9% 54 51.4% 25 23.8% 1 1.0% 4 3.8% 45 42.9% 18 17.1% 25 23.8% 6 5.7% 3 2.9%

Of the following media and direct marketing resources, which two (2) are most effective for your business? Business Survey 4 1 4 5 3 1 11 1 18 8 0

12.1% 3.0% 12.1% 15.2% 9.1% 3.0% 33.3% 3.0% 54.5% 24.2% 0.0%

Data Note: Multiple responses allowed. Percentages based number of participants responding to question; percentages do not equal 100%.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 35


Results from survey questions identifying media and information sources used most frequently or considered most effective reveal interesting dynamics and trends in the marketplace: ►

Television was selected by the largest concentration of consumers (51%) as a source used most often to get local area news and information, but was selected by only 12% of business survey respondents and one their most effective media and marketing resources. Likewise, newspaper was selected by 41% of consumers, but by only 12% of businesses.

Internet websites and social media were selected with high frequencies by both consumer and business survey participants, illustrating a dynamic shift and trend to Internet-based tools and resources.

Email and news feeds, tools which are complimentary and compatible as add-ons to Internet websites and social media applications, were cited by 17% on consumers as being a top source for news and information, but by only one business as being an effective media and advertising resource.

Nearly one-fourth of businesses selected “other” as one of the two most effective marketing and advertising resources, with “other” responses further specified as: City Revealed; Word of mouth (6); and Referrals.

The comparison of consumer and business survey rankings for media, marketing and information sources show both some stark inconsistencies, and some common trends, between media sources that consumers rely on for news and information as compared to those deemed most effective for marketing and advertising by District businesses. The emergence of Internet websites and social media as an effective resource for both consumers and businesses could, in particular, lead to some intriguing and creative possibilities for District marketing, public relations, and even business development. The ranking of media preferences demonstrates the growing influence of the Internet and social media applications as a news resource, for researching products and services, and for communicating with clients. The Internet can be a particularly valuable resource for businesses because it provides the potential for businesses to expand their trade area well beyond local or regional geographies. Businesses with collectible, specialty, and custom merchandise lines, in particular, can use the Internet to market to the entire United States or even globally. Even traditional retailers and business carrying “staple” products are reaping benefits as, more and more, consumers use the Internet to “shop and compare” products and services, and then use the Internet – in much the same way previous generations used the Yellow Pages – as a resource to find a local outlet or vendor where they can make their purchase. The District appears to be well positioned to capitalize on these trends. The vast majority of District business survey participants have established a presence on the Internet, with 27 businesses (82%) indicating that their business has an Internet website, and 28 businesses (85%) indicating they have a Facebook page for their business. Eighteen businesses (55%) identified social media, and 11 businesses (33%) identified their website, as being among the most effective tools for marketing their businesses. District marketing and cooperative advertising efforts should consider how the Internet and various E-commerce, online directories and social media and mobile applications might be most effectively used to communicate with consumers and to further District promotional goals. Business development efforts must also consider how the growing influence of Internet e-commerce and social media might impact local business retention, expansion and recruitment strategies – both positively and negatively. Specialty businesses that otherwise might not be sustainable if left to rely exclusively on the local trade area, but that have product lines conducive to e-commerce, may be candidates for expansion and recruitment. Conversely, consideration must be afforded as to how e-commerce might pose competition for existing and targeted businesses. The results and trends could provide direction for certain businesses and the District as they consider possibilities for reaching new audiences through both individual and cooperative marketing & advertising efforts. Notably, 42% of business survey respondents selected “Yes” when asked if they would consider participating in a Czech Village / New Bohemia District cooperative advertising or marketing program, suggesting that the timing for a concerted campaign that utilizes and experiments with various medium and applications could be opportune.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 36


Values and Priorities Consumer and business survey respondents tend to have disparate views in considering priorities for possible District enhancement efforts. Results from the consumer intercept survey place the highest priority on possible efforts to create incentives for new and expanding businesses, and to restore and preserve the District’s historic character. Business survey results show respondents, collectively, placing the highest priority on possible efforts to stage additional festivals and special events in the District, and to improve streets, sidewalks, lighting, furnishings, green spaces, trails, etc., in the District. Would you place a high, moderate or low priority on possible District enhancement efforts to: Consumer Intercept Survey

Business Survey

High

Moderate

Low

High

Moderate

Low

Restore and preserve the District’s historic character?

60% (2)

34%

4%

59% (3)

38%

0%

Improve streets, sidewalks, lighting, furnishings, green spaces, trails, etc., in the District?

58% (3)

37%

3%

69% (2)

28%

3%

Stage additional festivals and special events in the District?

43% (4)

43%

11%

72% (1)

25%

3%

Create incentives for new and expanding businesses in the District?

60% (1)

36%

1%

59% (4)

31%

9%

Improve and/or create more housing in the District?

27% (5)

40%

29%

34% (5)

28%

28%

Notes: Ranking of “High” value frequency among survey group/items shown in parentheses. “No Opinion” responses omitted from table.

The consumer intercept survey group’s high ranking of possible efforts to restore and preserve the District’s historic character is consistent with the value placed on the District’s historic character by the online survey group. More than 91% of online survey participants indicated they “Agree” or “Strongly Agree” with the statement, “The historic character of the District is important.” Evaluate the following statement: The historic character of the District is important. Historic Character of District is Important A. Strongly Agree B. Agree C. Disagree D. Strongly Disagree E. No Opinion Total

Online Survey 148 83 6 5 10 252

58.7% 32.9% 2.4% 2.0% 4.0% 100.0%

The views regarding priorities for possible enhancements expressed by consumer intercept survey respondents tend to be consistent with the tangible and intangible qualities of the district that are most liked by consumers, and that make it a special place. Priorities emphasized by business survey participants appear to recognize the effectiveness and success of existing festivals and special events – and a desire for still more – and are more focused on improvements to the streetscape and public spaces. While the divergence in opinions expressed by the consumer and business groups is not immense, it does reinforce the value of the comprehensive Main Street Four Point Approach being implemented by the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street organization. Survey results also provide direction for communicating plans, progress and changes in ways that respond to the values and priorities identified by each group. So, too, simply sharing consumer survey results with District business owners and stakeholders might help to align perspectives via an enhanced awareness of the market’s values, desires and priorities.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 37


Input regarding priorities for possible District enhancement efforts is generally consistent with suggestions offered by business and consumer intercept respondents when asked, “What is the first thing that should be done to improve the Czech Village / New Bo District?” Design-oriented subjects and topics topped the list compiled by both groups. Business Improvement/Development initiatives were also cited frequently and largely revolved around a desire for new and additional businesses. Consumers: What is the first thing that should be done to improve the Czech Village / New Bo District? Category/Subcategory

Intercept Survey

Business Survey

Category: Design

37

56.1%

11

45.8%

Historic Preservation and Planning

13

19.7%

Parking and Transportation

13

19.7%

4

16.7%

Maintenance and Cleanliness

7

10.6%

--

--

Flood Recovery/Remediation

--

--

5

20.8%

Streetscape and Public Spaces

4

6.1%

2

8.3%

13

19.7%

5

20.8%

Category: Business Improvement

Business Development; Add/Recruit Business

9

13.6%

3

12.5%

Business Operations

3

4.5%

--

--

Redevelopment/Infill

--

--

2

8.3%

Housing

1

1.5%

--

--

Category: Promotion

9

13.6%%

3

12.5%

Marketing

8

12.1%

1

4.2%

Festivals and Events

1

1.5%

2

8.3%

Category: Organization – Advocacy & Public Relations

--

--

5

20.8%

Advocacy and Public Relations

--

--

4

16.7%

General/Other

--

--

1

4.2%

7

10.6%

--

--

Category: Other/Undefined

Data Note: Responses categorized for summary purposes. Percentage shown based on responding sample. Complete list of categorized raw data responses provided as supplemental data.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 38


Opportunities Surveys were among a number of tools used to help identify and gauge the potential for possible business expansion and recruitment prospects in the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District, and for other features, attractions and activities that might increase the volume and frequency of visits to the District. The information is helpful in assessing opportunities and in identifying possible gaps in the District’s business mix. Suggestions compiled from online consumer survey responses to the question, “What do you think is missing from the District?” could provide additional insight and help to gauge how the market might respond to various types of new and expanded businesses, attractions and features. The following table displays a categorized listing of online consumer survey responses which might offer direction for District business development and enhancement strategies. What do you think is missing from the District? Category/Subcategory

Online Survey

Businesses  Retail – General/Other

38

19.3%

Businesses  Eating and Drinking Places

26

13.2%

Housing

25

12.7%

Design – Parking and Transportation

24

12.2%

Businesses – General/Mix

18

9.1%

Design – Streetscape and Public Spaces

15

7.6%

Other/Undefined

10

5.1%

Design – Historic Preservation and Planning

9

4.6%

Promotion  Activities, Events and Entertainment

9

4.6%

Promotion  Marketing

8

4.1%

Businesses  Entertainment, Amusements and Gaming

7

3.6%

Businesses  Clothing and Clothing Accessories

6

3.0%

Organization  Policy and Planning

6

3.0%

Businesses  Food and Beverage Stores

4

2.0%

Businesses  Hobbies, Arts and Crafts

3

1.5%

Businesses  Other/Undefined

3

1.5%

Design – Maintenance and Cleanliness

3

1.5%

Businesses  Gifts, Floral, Novelties and Stationery

2

1.0%

* Categorized listing of responses shown. More than one response accepted. Percentages based on responding sample (197); percentages do not total 100%. Complete list of categorized raw data responses provided as supplemental data.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 39


Consumer intercept survey responses to the follow-up, open ended question, “Is there a particular type of business or attraction that would make you visit the District more often?” yielded a similar list of businesses, attractions, activities and features. Is there a particular type of business or attraction that would make you visit the District more often? New businesses and attraction opportunities

Intercept Survey

A.

Yes (Please specify):*

54

56.8%

B.

No

41

43.2%

95

100.0%

Total

* Yes (Please specify): Category/Subcategory

Intercept Survey

Businesses  Eating and Drinking Places

14

26.4%

Businesses  Food and Beverage Stores

9

17.0%

Promotion  Activities, Events and Entertainment

8

15.1%

Other/Undefined

5

9.4%

Businesses  Amusements and Gaming

4

7.5%

Businesses  Hobbies, Arts and Crafts

3

5.7%

Businesses  Retail – General/Other

3

5.7%

Businesses  Clothing and Clothing Accessories

2

3.8%

Design – Special Features and Amenities

2

3.8%

Businesses  Sporting Goods

1

1.9%

Businesses  Used Merchandise and Antiques

1

1.9%

Promotion  Marketing

1

1.9%

Data Note: Multiple responses allowed. Categorized listing of responses shown. Complete list of categorized raw data responses provided as supplemental data.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 40


Business Climate and Opportunities Certain business survey results provide a general indication of the existing business climate in the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District and the potential for existing businesses to expand. Survey findings, along with ESRI data, can provide direction for business retention and expansion efforts, including possibilities for providing business assistance and programs that could catalyze private reinvestment and positive changes in the District. The business survey questionnaire was completed by 33 businesses.

Business Type, Ownership and Tenure A breakdown of businesses completing the business survey, by business type, displays the diverse nature of the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District. Food & Beverage (27%), Retail (24%) and Service (21%) business types comprise more than 72% of the survey sample and appear to provide a fair representation of the District’s existing business mix. What is your primary business type? Response

Count

Percentage

A.

Retail

8

24.2%

B.

Service

7

21.2%

C.

Professional/Office

3

9.1%

D.

Financial/Banking

0

0.0%

E.

Food & Beverage

9

27.3%

F.

Entertainment

0

0.0%

G.

Manufacturing

0

0.0%

H.

Non-profit

2

6.1%

I.

Other*

4

12.1%

33

100.0%

TOTAL 

“Other” responses: Food/beverage that offers entertainment; Art Gallery/Studio; Retail/service; and Real Estate.

Ownership status and the tenure of businesses in the District provide an indication of its stability, the market’s ability to sustain businesses, and the District’s appeal as a place for investors and entrepreneurs. Based on business survey results, two-thirds of Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District businesses rent their existing location. About one-third of businesses participating in the survey have been located in the District for ten or more years – a figure that could be viewed as an indicator of stability in the business mix, but that could also suggest a need, now or in the near future, for succession planning. Results are also suggestive of an area that attracts new entrepreneurs and investors as evidenced by the fact that 16 respondents (50%) indicated their business has been located in the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District for 4 years or less. How long has your business been located in the Czech Village/New Bohemia District? Response

Count

A.

Less than 1 year

B.

Percentage 6

18.8%

1 to 4 years

10

31.3%

C.

5 to 9 years

5

15.6%

D.

10 to 20 years

7

21.9%

E.

21+ years

4

12.5%

32

100.0%

TOTAL

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 41


Potential Business Expansion and Assistance The retention and expansion of existing businesses is a key to successful business development and recruitment efforts. Business survey results suggest that Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District business owners are generally optimistic regarding their potential for expansion within the next one or two years, with 71% indicating some or a high likelihood for expansion. Which of the following best describes the potential for your business to expand within the next 1 or 2 years? Response

Count

Percentage

A.

High likelihood

9

29.0%

B.

Some likelihood

13

41.9%

C.

Low likelihood

7

22.6%

D.

No likelihood

2

6.5%

31

100.0%

TOTAL

Business survey participants also provide insight on possible near term changes that could occur within the District based on affirmative responses to a list of possible changes or modifications. The frequency of businesses indicating plans to increase marketing (59%), expand their business (48%), increase their number of employees (41%), expand hours of operation (41%), expand store inventory (37%), and start or complete building improvements within the next year or two (33%) are positive economic indicators for the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District. Only one business indicated plans to sell their business, and no businesses indicated plans to move out of the District or close their business in the next year or two. In the next year or two, do you plan to change or modify your business in any of the following ways? Response

Count

A.

Expand your business

B.

Down-size your business

C.

Expand hours of operation

D.

Decrease hours of operation

E. F. G.

Expand store inventory

H.

Decrease store inventory

I.

Percentage 13

48.1%

0

0.0%

11

40.7%

1

3.7%

Increase marketing

16

59.3%

Decrease marketing

0

0.0%

10

37.0%

0

0.0%

Increase number of employees

11

40.7%

J.

Decrease number of employees

1

3.7%

K.

Start and/or complete building improvements

9

33.3%

L.

Relocate your business in the district

1

3.7%

M. Move your business out of the district

0

0.0%

N.

Sell your business

1

3.7%

O.

Close your business

0

0.0%

P.

Other

0

0.0%

Data Note: Multiple responses allowed. Percentages shown based on 27 participants responding to question. Percentages do not equal 100%

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 42


Guidance for possible Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District business assistance and development efforts that could help to promote positive changes and catalyze investment is provided by business survey respondents indicating whether they would be inclined to use various types of programs and incentives. Of those surveyed, 50% indicated an interest in business marketing consultations, 45% in tax credits, 40% in business assistance seminars, and 35% in business management consultations, low-interest line of credit/payment, and free or low cost building improvement design services. Would you be inclined to use any of the following business programs and incentives? Response

Count

A.

Business management consultations

B.

Business marketing consultations

C.

Percentage 7

35.0%

10

50.0%

Business assistance seminars

8

40.0%

D.

Low-interest line of credit/payment

7

35.0%

E.

Low-interest building improvement loans

3

15.0%

F.

Tax credits

9

45.0%

G.

Free/low-cost building improvement design services

7

35.0%

H.

Assistance to sell your building and/or business

1

5.0%

I.

Other

1

5.0%

Data Note: Multiple responses allowed. Percentages shown based on 20 participants responding. Percentages do not equal 100% “Other” response: Bring building back to original storefront.

The results show comparatively high levels of interest on the part of District business owners to participate and access business assistance programs and services – and a real opportunity for the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District organization to play a pivotal role in shaping the District’s future. The organization should continue to work closely with Main Street Iowa and other economic development partners and agencies to access and deliver training, services and technical assistance directly related to these identified areas of need and interest.

Complementary Business Opportunities Business survey participants were provided an opportunity to identify complementary business opportunities for the District by listing up to three types of new business that, located near them, would help their business generate more revenue. The categorized results are displayed in the following table. What type of new businesses, located near you, would help your business generate more revenue? Category

Count

Percentage

Eating and Drinking Places

13

39.4%

Amusements, Gaming and Entertainment

11

33.3%

Specialty and Miscellaneous Retail

11

33.3%

Food and Beverage Stores

6

18.2%

Services – Health and Fitness

6

18.2%

Retail – General/Undefined

4

12.9%

Hobbies, Arts and Crafts

3

9.1%

Clothing and Clothing Accessories

2

6.1%

Office/Professional

2

6.1%

Lodging and Accommodations

1

3.0%

Data Note: Summary of most frequent responses, categorized for tabulation purposes and shown based on frequency. Up to three responses allowed per questionnaire. Percentages based on total sample. Complete list of categorized raw data responses provided as supplemental data.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 43


Leasing and Sales Data Data on Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District leasing rates and sales volume collected through the business survey provides key economic data that can be shared with potential business prospects and investors considering opportunities in the District. The data should also be used as a benchmark to measure changes and progress stemming from District enhancement and economic development initiatives. Survey results indicate that annual rent per square foot expenses for ground level commercial spaces in the District tend to be concentrated in a range of $6 to $10 per square foot, not including utilities. Based on a survey sample of 20 businesses reporting by subjective calculations, median annual rents are estimated to lie in a range $8 to $10 per square foot, and average annual rental rates are estimated to range from about $8.10 to $10.85 per square foot, not including utilities. Just three survey respondents reported an annual rate of $12 or more per square foot. What is your annual rent per square foot expense? ([Monthly Rent x 12] ÷ Square Feet Occupied) Response

Count

Percentage

A.

Less than $6 per square foot

3

10.7%

B.

$6 to $8 per square foot

5

17.9%

C.

$8 to $10 per square foot

7

25.0%

D.

$10 to $12 per square foot

2

7.1%

E.

$12 to $15 per square foot

1

3.6%

F.

$15 to $20 per square foot

1

3.6%

G.

$20+ per square foot

1

3.6%

H.

Not Applicable

8

28.6%

28

100.0%

TOTAL

Survey results show that annual sales per square foot are concentrated in a range less than $50 to $150 per square foot, with 10 businesses (67% of respondents, not including “Not Applicable” respondents) reporting sales figures within that range. The total responding sample reported figures spanning the range of less than $50 to more than $300 per square foot. Based on the limited survey sample and by subjective calculations, median annual sales per square foot are estimated in a range of $100 to $150 per square foot, and average annual sales per square foot for all business types reporting are estimated at approximately $157 per square foot. The figures appear comparatively low based on industry thresholds and it is possible that a broader survey sample could yield a different result.

What is your annual sales volume per square foot? (Gross Annual Sales/Revenues ÷ Square Feet Occupied) Response

Count

Percentage

A.

Less than $50 per square foot

4

15.4%

B.

$50 to $100 per square foot

3

11.5%

C.

$100 to $150 per square foot

3

11.5%

D.

$150 to $200 per square foot

1

3.8%

E.

$200 to $250 per square foot

1

3.8%

F.

$250 to $300 per square foot

0

0.0%

G.

$300+ per square foot

3

11.5%

H.

Not Applicable

11

42.3%

26

100.0%

TOTAL

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 44


Opportunities Retail Uses Market research findings provide general direction for various retail business types and merchandise lines that could be prime candidates and appropriate for expansion and recruitment in the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District. Analysis of ESRI retail data and sales surplus & leakage estimates reveals areas of retail strength, and other areas that might represent prime opportunities for expansion and/or complementary product and service lines. Retail categories and subcategories which, based strictly on the analysis of ESRI Retail MarketPlace report data and calculated sales surplus/leakage factors, appear to be areas of relative strength in the District and surrounding area – and which could offer opportunities for expansion and complementary products and services lines – include: ►

Special Food Services

Beer, Wine and Liquor Stores

Drinking Places (Alcoholic Beverages)

Used Merchandise Stores

Furniture Stores

Office Supplies, Stationery and Gift Stores

Home Furnishings Stores

Health & Personal Care Stores

Full-Service Restaurants

Electronics & Appliance Stores

Retail categories, subcategories and product lines which, based solely on the analysis of ESRI data, might represent some of the best and most immediate opportunities for growth and expansion based on underperformance include: ►

Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores

Book, Periodical and Music Stores

General Merchandise Stores

Florists

Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers

Limited-Service Eating Places

Sporting Goods/Hobby/Musical Instruments

Grocery Stores

Specialty Food Stores

Retail MarketPlace report data and findings provide a good starting point for the design of an effective, market-driven business development strategy for the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District. Still, retail categories and subcategories showing potential for expansion and growth based on ESRI data must be further analyzed and, with the contribution of local input and expertise, interpreted to better understand the local and regional conditions and factors that could be driving the results and possible implications for the district. Identified areas of retail strength must also be further assessed to better understand and identify potential opportunities for complementary businesses and uses; opportunities for existing business to expand or introduce new product and service lines; potential opportunities for location-neutral businesses and enterprises; and potential business niche/clustering opportunities that capitalize upon existing retail sector strengths, retail and non-retail anchors, and area attractions.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 45


Business types and merchandise lines that might be considered primary targets and candidates for expansion and recruitment, based on the District’s existing business mix, trends in the marketplace and related findings from local input, consumer and business surveys, and ESRI retail data and the accompanying sales surplus & leakage analysis performed as part of this study include: Food Services & Drinking Places (NAICS 722) Study Area Sales Surplus/(Leakage) Estimates 722: Food Services & Drinking Places ►

7221: Full-Service Restaurants

7222: Limited-Service Eating Places

7224: Drinking Places (Alcoholic Beverages)

Indicates targeted subcategory/lines

7223: Special Food Services

0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

$2,383,404

$5,128,329

$4,047,874

$1,249,034

$2,576,863

$1,131,432

($1,019,571)

($2,669,414)

($2,146,414)

$1,562,208

$3,044,787

$1,157,816

$591,734

$2,176,093

$3,905,041

Survey Frequency

Intercept

Online

Business

Count – Percentage

14 – 26.4%

26 – 13.2%

13 – 39.4%

Notes: The District has or is gaining a reputation, and displays destination-oriented qualities, characteristics and features, as a destination for eating, drinking and entertainment. Concepts would be compatible and complementary to existing category entries and might include additional ethnic specialties. Opportunities and concepts for limited-service eating establishments might cater to the District/Downtown employee populations and feature order-ahead, pick-up, delivery and catering services. Evening and nighttime establishments might feature various genres of music and venues for local artists. Décor and themes might feature local art, history and heritage.

Miscellaneous Store Retailers (NAICS 453) Study Area Sales Surplus/(Leakage) Estimates 453: Miscellaneous Store Retailers

0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

$190,679

$1,000,326

$431,889

4531: Florists

($20,959)

($67,198)

($260,413)

4532: Office Supplies, Stationery, and Gifts

$141,060

$139,168

($311,830)

4533: Used Merchandise Stores

$50,767

$157,452

$26,773

4539: Other Miscellaneous Store Retailers

$19,811

$770,904

$977,359

Indicates targeted subcategory/lines

Survey Frequency

Intercept

Online

Business

Count – Percentage

1 – 1.9%

2 – 1.0%

11 – 33.3%

Notes: Consumer survey results indicate a support for certain subcategories, and generalized responses indicating a preference for general retail and/or unspecified “boutique” and “specialty” shops, suggest this category should be targeted for expansion and recruitment. Used quality home furnishings, collectible and quality clothing stores, specializing in lines such as maternity wear, children’s wear, t-shirts, vintage clothing, etc., might offer an opportunity to take advantage of “green” rewearing/recycling of trends and also help, via more well-defined niches, to fill demand in the Clothing & Clothing Accessories and General Merchandise categories. Cards, Gifts & Stationery lines might help to fill demand for specialty and boutique retailers and might incorporate handcrafted products and art.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 46


Food & Beverage Stores (NAICS 445) Study Area Sales Surplus/(Leakage) Estimates

0.5 Mile

445: Food & Beverage Stores 4451: Grocery Stores ►

4452: Specialty Food Stores

4453: Beer, Wine, and Liquor Stores

Indicates targeted subcategory/lines

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

($15,512)

$10,763,343

$64,516,880

($138,716)

$10,011,388

$63,569,078

($174)

$115,285

$540,785

$123,378

$636,670

$407,017

Survey Frequency

Intercept

Online

Business

Count – Percentage

9 – 17.0%

4 – 2.0%

6 – 18.2%

Notes: Survey results show demand in the Food & Beverage Stores category and subcategories. The best and most immediate opportunities may revolve around the continued expansion of an evolving specialty foods cluster that capitalizes on the “foodies” trend, NewBo Market (and potential incubator “graduates), and other recent District entries. Other concepts could include a smaller-scale market carrying limited lines of staple grocery items and prepared foods, and emphasizing select lines of specialty foods (i.e., craft beverages and wines, organic and natural foods, etc.) with appeal for both the local residential market and District visitors. Display production kitchens and confectionery-oriented themes and concepts should be encouraged to build on the fun and entertaining qualities of the district.

Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book and Music Stores (NAICS 451) Study Area Sales Surplus/(Leakage) Estimates 451: Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, and Music Stores

0.5 Mile

1.0 Mile

2.0 Miles

($106,052)

$83,348

($412,731)

4511: Sporting Goods/Hobby/Musical Instmts

($82,379)

$183,597

$43,872

4512: Book, Periodical, and Music Stores

($23,674)

($100,249)

($456,603)

Indicates targeted subcategory/lines

Survey Frequency

Intercept

Online

Business

Count – Percentage

4 – 7.6%

3 – 1.5%

3 – 9.1%

Notes: The most immediate opportunities might be focused in hobby, arts & crafts related merchandise lines and galley-style uses to capitalize upon the history, arts & culture and environment recognized by survey respondents; the growing arts movement; and arts & culture oriented uses and attractions. Expressed demand for arts, hobbies and crafts-related businesses, uses and lines might provide opportunities for new entries, or opportunities for existing businesses and attractions to expand or add complementary merchandise lines. Opportunities in the sporting goods category would likely capitalize on the health and fitness movement (and might include health and fitness services and facilities) and the existing and expanding trail systems (i.e., bicycles – rentals, sales and service – and bicycling, running and walking gear). Music and musical instrument product lines would capitalize on the District’s existing attractions and venues and its growing reputation as a destination and venue for a variety of live performances and entertainment. Product lines offered in tandem with services and performances (i.e., music lessons, voice lessons, acting lessons, open mic events, storytelling events, etc.) might offer the best opportunities for sustaining Music and Musical Instruments-related entries.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 47


Office and Service Uses The office and services sectors play an important role in generating consistent traffic for the District. Trends and projections pointing to growth in population and the number of households in the area surrounding the District and the Cedar Rapids region through 2016 will likely bring increases demand for services. So, too, certain trends could also serve to essentially change the behavior of the market and generate demand for additional office and service uses including: 

Continued transition to a service-oriented society.

Increasing demand for personal care and medical services related to the “Graying of America” phenomenon.

An increase in both the “live here” and “work here” populations that could result in the long-term from new development and the adaptive re-use of District and downtown commercial buildings for residential and office uses.

The District’s appeal to office and service businesses that will continue to grow as success is realized from Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District enhancement efforts – and the possibility that existing office and service businesses currently located in other parts of the community and region will seek to relocate in the District.

Office and services uses in the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District already play an important role in the district’s economy and sense of vitality and, predictably, will continue to do so in the future. These uses should continue to be encouraged to locate within the District and, where appropriate and applicable, Main Street and community development partners should work to locate these uses in buildings and spaces that are conducive to maintaining a strong sense of retail vibrancy throughout the District.

Housing Consumer survey results lend support for prospects to develop new housing of various styles in the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District. In all, 214 consumer survey respondents (60%) indicated “Yes” or Maybe” when asked if they would consider living in the District. Would you live in the District? Consider living in District

Intercept Sample

Online Sample

Total Sample

A. Yes

22

22.9%

83

31.8%

105

29.4%

B. Maybe

26

27.1%

83

31.8%

109

30.5%

C. No

48

50.0%

95

36.4%

143

40.1%

96

100.0%

261

100.0%

357

100.0%

Total

Those indicating that they would consider living in the District with a “yes” or “maybe” responses expressed interest in a variety of housing styles and in both rental and owned units. Of those who expressed interest in living in the District, approximately 35% indicated they would like to rent and 67% would like to buy. Loft and condo units were the most popular styles, selected by 54% and 44% of the responding survey sample, respectively. Would you like to: Rent or Buy

Intercept Sample

Online Sample

Total Sample

A. Rent

13

29.5%

61

36.7%

74

35.2%

B. Buy

31

70.5%

110

66.3%

141

67.1%

Data Note (OS): Multiple responses allowed. OS and Total percentages based responding sample and do not total 100%.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 48


What kind of housing would you look for? Housing options considered

Intercept Sample

Online Sample

Total Sample

A.

Apartment

13

30.2%

49

29.5%

62

29.7%

B.

Loft

24

55.8%

89

53.6%

113

54.1%

C.

Condo

22

51.2%

70

42.2%

92

44.0%

D.

Townhouse

12

27.9%

51

30.7%

63

30.1%

E.

Single-family detached

13

30.2%

64

38.6%

77

36.8%

F.

Senior housing

3

7.0%

3

1.8%

6

2.9%

Data Note: Multiple responses allowed. Percentages based responding sample. Percentages do not total 100%.

The trends and overwhelming interest expressed by consumer survey respondents appear to bode well for the development and expansion of housing options in the District. The best prospects for new District housing might be directed toward the development of units that are quite different from typical cookie-cutter housing styles and options– including styles that might take advantage of the unordinary dimensions, layouts and materials found in the upper levels of District commercial buildings to create distinguishable and even “funky” living and/or live & work spaces; and for higher-density condo, townhouse and mixed-use development at potential (and appropriate) redevelopment sites in the District and surrounding area. Isolated demographic data for respondents indicating interest with a “yes” or “maybe” responses when asked if they would live in the District is displayed in the following tables and can be helpful in developing a profile for the current and prospective Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District housing market. Demographic Profile for Potential Downtown Housing Market Gender of “Yes” and “Maybe” respondents asked, “Would you live in the District?” Gender

Intercept Survey

Online Survey

Total Sample

A. Female

29

60.4%

95

57.9%

124

58.5%

B. Male

19

39.6%

69

42.1%

88

41.5%

48

100.0%

164

100.0%

212

100.0%

Total

Age of “Yes” and “Maybe” respondents asked, “Would you live in the District?” Intercept Sample - Age

Intercept Survey

Online Survey - Age

Total Sample

A. Less than 20 years

2

4.2%

A. Under 18

17

10.4%

B. 20 to 24

6

12.5%

B. 19 to 25

19

11.6%

C. 25 to 34

15

31.3%

C. 26 to 35

61

37.2%

D. 35 to 44

5

10.4%

D. 36 to 45

29

17.7%

E. 45 to 54

8

16.7%

E. 46 to 55

17

10.4%

F. 55 to 64

8

16.7%

F. 56 to 65

20

12.2%

G. 65 to 74

3

6.3%

1

0.6%

H. 75 or older

1

2.1%

48

100.0%

164

100.0%

Total – Intercept Sample

G. 66+

Total – Online Sample

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 49


Household Size of “Yes” and “Maybe” respondents asked, “Would you live in the District?” Household Size

Intercept Survey

A.

1

10

21.3%

B.

2

19

40.4%

C.

3

4

8.5%

D.

4

11

23.4%

E.

5

3

6.4%

F.

6 or more

0

0.0%

47

100.0%

Total

Presence of Chidren of “Yes” and “Maybe” respondents asked, “Would you live in the District?” Children in Household?

Online Survey

A.

Yes*

66

40.5%

B.

No

97

59.5%

163

100.0%

Total

* Age of Chidren of “Yes” and “Maybe” respondents asked, “Would you live in the District?” Age of Children? A. 0 – 5 B. 6 – 10 C. 11 – 18 D. 18+

Online Survey 27 12 15 30

40.9% 18.2% 22.7% 45.5%

Data Note: Percentages based on responding sample indicating children present (133). Percentages do not total 100%.

Estimated Gross Household Income of “Yes” and “Maybe” respondents asked, “Would you live in the District?” Household Income

Intercept Survey

A.

Less than $15,000

5

11.1%

B.

$15,000 to $24,999

2

4.4%

C.

$25,000 to $34,999

6

13.3%

D.

$35,000 to $49,999

7

15.6%

E.

$50,000 to $74,999

10

22.2%

F.

$75,000 to $99,999

7

15.6%

G.

$100,000 to $149,999

5

11.1%

H.

$150,000 to $199,999

1

2.2%

I.

$200,000 and greater

2

4.4%

45

100.0%

Total

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 50


First Steps Implementation Strategy The Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District Market Study provides a snapshot of the District today and explores opportunities for the future. The time frame for planning and implementing projects based on findings and opportunities identified as part of this study could extend up to ten years – or even more. Because commercial business district redevelopment occurs within a dynamic environment, no set of specific implementation steps can remain valid for such a long time. Even in the short term, changing economic, social, political and cultural conditions may dictate a different sequence of events. Some projects might be implemented earlier if the right set of opportunities present themselves, or the community may determine that a project should be tabled as new opportunities emerge and others take priority. Because of these limitations, an implementation strategy can only be a general guide for implementing key aspects of the study. The First Steps Implementation Strategy summarizes and prioritizes projects and activities that, undertaken as part of a comprehensive and incremental approach to the District’s enhancement, will advance long-term goals for Cedar Rapids’ Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District. Key market study findings and implications are summarized and potential Action Steps are organized in the areas of Business Improvement, Promotion, Design and Organization – a format consistent with the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District organization’s structure and its 4-point approach. By the very nature of the market study, implementation strategy actions are primarily focused in the areas of business improvement and promotion. The list of potential projects and actions contained in this summary report is neither exhaustive nor exclusive. In fact, potential projects and actions compiled in the following tables might quite simply resemble “the obvious.” Realistically, the notion of compiling a comprehensive Implementation Strategy based on the mere analysis of market data and a single site visit is impractical. The suggestions and recommendations for action appearing here, then, should be viewed in that context and considered as a “starting point” for the development of a more comprehensive and meaningful strategy that is the product of market analysis findings, local knowledge, and the continued participation of Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District organization staff and volunteers, local business persons, community leaders and residents working together.

Priority Action Steps – Organization Action Description

Priority Level

1

Continue to encourage participation in the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District strategy plan process and use information and direction gained from the market study, where applicable and appropriate, to refine evolving strategies and concepts, and to fine tune and prioritize organization operations and advocacy efforts.

0

2

Work with Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District committees to disseminate the findings – and proposed projects – related to this study, to identify project funding needs, and to pursue funding sources and implement projects adopted as a result of this study

0

3

Work with committees to review volunteer requirements, identify potential sources for volunteers, and assist the committees in the recruitment and training of volunteers necessary to implement projects adopted as a result of this study

0

4

Work to involve residents, business persons, elected officials, community leaders and representatives from other community organizations in all phases of District planning, implementation and management

0

5

Maintain an aggressive, ongoing public relations program to publicize plans, projects and results stemming from the market study, the strategy plan, and the annual work plan.

0

Priority Level Key: 0 = Immediate and/or Ongoing

1 = Within 1 Year

2 = Within 2 Years

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

3 = Within 3 Years

• 51


Business Improvement Action Steps Action Description

Priority Level

1

Distribute the four-page summary version of the market study to existing District business and property owners, and to potential business prospects and investors.

0

2

Update and maintain a District property and business inventory; maintain a current list of available properties and businesses and distribute the list to area realtors and brokers as changes occur.

0

3

Using information compiled as part of this market study, collect, maintain and track information on District real estate, market conditions and trends; and repeat the business survey on an annual or bi-annual basis and track economic trends in the District.

0

4

Work in partnership with the City of Cedar Rapids and other community & economic development organizations as part of the strategy plan process – and on an ongoing basis – to assess land use plans and to promote and pursue appropriate redevelopment opportunities; consider opportunities for, and the appropriateness of, higher-density mixeduse development and other housing styles as a means of growing the area’s residential market and population. Devise and update a business clustering strategy which is compatible with resulting land use plans and strategies, which serves to build on existing and evolving niches, and which provides guidance for the preferred placement of business types and uses targeted for expansion and recruitment.

0

5

Augment market study data and information with traffic and/or pedestrian counts, collected at various locations and times throughout the year, to benchmark and track activity in the District; and re-administer the consumer intercept survey, possibly using a condensed version of the questionnaire and conducted semi-annually and/or during select events, to track District tourism trends and perspectives of various District audiences.

0

6

Devise fact sheets or similar written materials that can be readily updated to describe and promote available business programs and incentives, such as façade design assistance, façade improvement loans and grants, management and marketing consultations, and property and client referrals.

1

7

Organize and maintain a programmed Business Visitation Program as part of an ongoing business assistance program that engages District businesses, promotes available resources, facilitates the delivery of business assistance resources, and helps to identify business expansion candidates.

1

8

Continue to develop business promotional materials and to enhance the crmainstreet.org website as a tool for passive and active recruitment of targeted business prospects.

1

9

Identify and assist businesses that may be candidates for expansion based on product lines identified in the market study and interest discovered through the Business Visitation Program.

1

10

Identify and actively recruit specific business types and prospects based on business types identified in the market study and the availability of appropriate spaces.

2

11

Conduct field trips to communities and commercial businesses districts displaying similar characteristics and market demographics to examine the business mix and make contact with potential business expansion candidates.

2

12

Facilitate cooperative advertising and marketing efforts that involve property owners and agents to market available space and potential infill and redevelopment opportunities.

3

13

Identify and assist businesses in succession planning by using resources and facilitating access to assistance available through Main Street Iowa and other local, regional and state resources.

3

Priority Level Key: 0 = Immediate and/or Ongoing

1 = Within 1 Year

2 = Within 2 Years

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

3 = Within 3 Years

• 52


Promotion Action Steps Action Description

Priority Level

1

Study promotion and marketing-related information and findings resulting from the market study and assess events and marketing activities for consistency and effectiveness. Incorporate “buzz words” in marketing headlines and messages and use images that capitalize on those features most liked and identifiable with the District.

0

2

Continue to work closely with local, regional and state tourism organizations to promote the District as a visitor attraction; work with the Business Improvement Committee to track tourism-related activity and trends.

0

3

Review the existing events calendar. Work and support efforts to enhance and maintain existing District festivals and events and to introduce new events and activities – or new event components – which are consistent with District marketing strategies.

0

4

Continue to “freshen” and maintain feature content for the crmainstreet.org website and to share links and content with other community and visitor-oriented websites and social media applications.

0

5

Build on the District’s Iowa Cultural District designation, through business community cooperative advertising, cross-marketing, and internet marketing efforts, in an ongoing effort to enhance awareness of the District as a destination for culture and entertainment.

0

6

Create/update and distribute print and/or online general and targeted business guides (i.e., Shopping & Dining Guide, Entertainment & Sights, etc.), to capitalize on existing and evolving business clusters and to enhance awareness of available products and services.

1

7

Support, promote and facilitate District cooperative advertising, cross-marketing, and Internet and social media marketing efforts.

1

Design Action Steps Action

Description

Priority Level

1

Work with the City to ensure adequate and proper maintenance of the District’s streetscape, furnishings and public spaces; use input and direction from survey results to address potential maintenance needs and problem properties.

0

2

Continue efforts to incorporate pedestrian-oriented and intermodal transportation features in the design and implementation of future District improvements.

3

Address parking issues in an attempt to best meet the needs of the District’s many users (customers, residents, visitors, employees, etc.); focus first on the management of the existing parking supply (i.e., time limits, signage, shared parking opportunities, etc.).

0

4

Maintain ongoing historic preservation education efforts designed to enhance the community’s awareness of, and appreciation for, the preservation of downtown historic architecture and resources. Share results of surveys regarding the perspectives of consumers and business owners as a step toward aligning viewpoints and values related to the historic and cultural features of the District.

0

5

Assemble, package and promote available incentives and District building improvement assistance programs. Continue to promote assistance available from and through Main Street Iowa, especially design assistance available to owners contemplating changes and improvements to District buildings.

0

6

Continue to work with the City and other organizations as part of the strategy plan process – and beyond – to integrate and maximize natural resources and features as part of the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District experience.

0

Priority Level Key: 0 = Immediate and/or Ongoing

1 = Within 1 Year

2 = Within 2 Years

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

3 = Within 3 Years

• 53


Conclusion For Cedar Rapids and the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District organization, the completion of this market study is not an end but rather the beginning of a new phase in the community’s Main Street District enhancement initiative. This summary report serves to highlight only a small sample of the knowledge and direction that can be synthesized from analysis of data collected during the market analysis process. Similarly, the implementation strategy outlined in the document is only a starting point for a more comprehensive slate of projects that is likely to emerge as local leaders continue to study the market. As the Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District organization moves forward it must continue to involve local community leaders, business persons and residents in efforts to analyze and interpret the information collected through the market analysis process in order to develop a complete understanding of the findings and results – and the implications for the District. The ensuing process should seek to “dig deep” into the results and their meanings and to incorporate local knowledge into the analysis and interpretation of the study’s findings. Such a process will serve to aid in the development and implementation of strategies that are both market-driven and intrinsic to the community’s goals and aspirations for the District. Indeed, the detailed market analysis process orchestrated to date, along with the current, highly public strategy plan process, may be, in and of itself, one of the most important “results” to emerge. While the process has served to help identify present-day priorities, existing and looming challenges, and immediate and emerging opportunities, it can not, and does not pretend to, anticipate tomorrow’s priorities, next year’s unexpected challenges, or exciting and unanticipated opportunities still over the horizon. The diligent efforts undertaken by Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District organization staff and volunteers to gather the input, to study the data, and to initiate the development of a market-driven implementation strategy have prepared the organization and the community well by providing a public framework and a strong basis upon which the community can plan and act for the future. It is within this framework that the community will continue to marshal the resources and knowledge necessary to meet new challenges and to capitalize upon fresh opportunities.

Czech Village / New Bohemia Main Street District | Market Study Summary • March 2013

• 54


City of

CEDAR RAPIDS NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING PROCESS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY JLG Architects Stanley Consultants JMS Communications & Research Conservation Design Forum Parsons Brinckerhoff ARUP Anderson-Bogert Institute of Cultural Affairs

September 2009


Many Cedar Rapids neighborhoods are in a Many Cedar Rapids neighborhoods are in a unique unique position to make drastic improvements position to make dramatic improvements as the city as Cedar Rapids plans, reinvests and rebuilds plans, reinvests and rebuilds from the 2008 flood. from the flood. These plans and reinvestments These plans and reinvestment strategies will rewill impact the entire city and all neighborshape the whole city. All neighborhood residents hood residents were encouraged to actively were encouraged to participate in the process. participate.


This letter is to recognize all those who participated in the Neighborhood Planning Process (NPP) and made it successful. A critical element in disaster recovery is to create a plan to follow. Between the months of January and May 2009, over 1,200 of the City’s residents dedicated 6,000 hours of their time planning for their kids and their kids’ kids futures; some, while still rebuilding from the flood. Over 70 members of the City’s staff, from administrative assistants to department directors, volunteered their weekends and evenings to facilitate discussions and organize the meetings. I would like to thank all of you who took the time to make such an incredible contribution to the future of our City. The City of Cedar Rapids began the Neighborhood Planning Process in January 2009 immediately following a comprehensive planning process for a new flood management strategy. Both planning processes were a result of the record flooding that occurred in June 2008. The NPP was designed based on benchmark communities recognized for their high quality neighborhood planning activities and was tailored to incorporate elements specific to Cedar Rapids’ unique situation. Under normal circumstances, a community commits to creating one neighborhood plan in a four to six month period. The NPP, through the dedication of residents and staff, was able to create a plan for 10 neighborhoods in four short months. The process ensured transparency and secured broad public participation in the development of the framework plan for reinvestment. A citizen-led Steering Committee was appointed to ensure the process remained focused on the goals that were originally established. By the end of the NPP, the Community had created a framework plan for reinvestment and action steps to accomplish this plan that will be implemented over the next 10 to 15 years. Recovering from a natural disaster of the magnitude experienced by the City of Cedar Rapids and its residents is neither a quick or easy process. However, Cedar Rapids residents have shown their dedication to a successful future for the City through the tireless effort in the creation of this plan. We thank all of those who helped to ensure a great future for our City. Sincerely,

Kay Halloran, Mayor City of Cedar Rapids

Office of the Cedar Rapids Mayor and City Council City Hall • 3851 River Ridge Drive NE • Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52402 • (319) 286-5051 • FAX (319) 286-5144


TA BLE O F CONTENTS The Neighborhood Planning Process Framework Plan

1

City Vision and Purpose of the Plan

3

Public Participation Timeline and Key to Specific Content

4

Organization of the Neighborhood Planning Process

6

City-wide Plans

9

Transportation and Connectivity

11

Open Space and Recreation

13

Arts and Culture

15

Neighborhood Reinvestment

17

Business Reinvestment

19

Implementation Strategy

21

Neighborhood Planning Process Framework Map

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The Neighborhood Planning Process Framework Plan


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Cedar Rapids Neighborhood Planning Process


THE NEIGHBORHOOD PLANNING PROCESS FRAMEWORK PLAN City Vision In June 2008 an extreme flood inundated the City of Cedar Rapids, cresting nearly 12 feet above the prior flood of record, impacting many neighborhoods and a significant portion of downtown. The flood inundated 10 square miles of the city, damaged 7,200 parcels, and caused the evacuation of 20,000 people. Since that time, the City and its citizens have mobilized to create a plan for reinvestment and recovery. At the heart of the planning process is a desire to ensure that Cedar Rapids will not only recover from the flood and be better, but greater. The City’s vision statement underscores the unique nature of the Neighborhood Planning Process that brought the community together:

“Cedar Rapids is a vibrant urban hometown—a beacon for people and businesses invested in building a greater community for the next generation.” This document describes the efforts of the City of Cedar Rapids, its residents and its business people, to craft a vision for neighborhood reinvestment following the flood and a plan to make this vision possible.

Purpose of the Plan

Building Community Governance

Building an Action Plan

Building an Evaluation Framework

Flood recovery planning began in June 2008 to create a Framework Plan for Reinvestment and Revitalization. Since the adoption of the plan in November 2008, the fourmonth Neighborhood Planning Process (NPP) has built on the Reinvestment and Revitalization Plan by developing Area Plans and Action Plans for each of the flood-impacted neighborhoods. The process grouped the ten flood-affected neighborhoods by geographical area: North, Central, and South. The objective of delineating the three overlapping areas was to keep the river as the heart of the community, accommodate shared interests, and effectively coordinate a cohesive plan. The goal of the process was to: •

Promote leadership and neighborhood governance: Encourage leadership building and improved communication between the City and community to create stronger neighborhoods

Establish Area Plans and Action Plans for each neighborhood (North, Central, South): Create a detailed set of actions for reinvesting in our neighborhoods and meeting our vision

Develop community goals and an evaluation framework: Create a framework for evaluating proposals and plans to ensure adherence to community goals

Ultimately, these plans will guide the City and its partners in reinvestment over the next ten to fifteen years.

Introduction

3


Public Participation Timeline City-wide Workshops and Area Meetings brought the community together to create the Framework Plan

Kick-off th

January 31

st

Sustainability

Great Neighborhoods

Community Goals

Visual Preferences

Community Governance

Barriers to Housing

Area Meeting 1 th

February 10

Area Meeting 2 February 24th

Neighborhood Opportunities

Confirmation of Opportunities

Barriers to Opportunities

Evaluation Criteria

To introduce the Neighborhood Planning Process, identify desired goals and outcomes, and to discuss how planning for sustainability can benefit Cedar Rapids.

To share and discuss ideas about rebuilding each neighborhood; learn about neighborhood connectivity and housing options and determine the opportunities and constraints of rebuilding each neighborhood.

To focus on key characteristics of each area, and identify assets and opportunities for improvements in each neighborhood.

To establish evaluation criteria for the reinvestment plan and to discuss neighborhood connectivity, open space, housing and business revitalization expectations.

COMMUNITY GOALS

ELEMENTS OF A GREAT NEIGHBORHOOD

ASSETS AND OPPORTUNITIES

CONFIRMATION OF OPPORTUNITIES

CON CEPT S

PURPOSE

TOP I CS

January 10

Workshop 1

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Workshop 2 st

March 21

Transportation Scenarios

Evaluation Criteria

Area Meeting 3 March 31

st

Scenario Evaluation

Preferred Scenarios

Workshop 3 th

Area Meeting 4 May 5th

April 25

Preferred Framework

Action Plan Confirmation

Action Plan

Community Governance

To focus on key characteristics of each area, identify assets and opportunities for improvements in each neighborhood, discuss scenarios for future development and determine evaluation criteria to assess them.

To evaluate scenarios developed using sustainbility best practices and feedback on the previous opportunities and scenarios. Preferred scenarios were refined for each area based on feedback from the revised scenarios.

To review the preferred framework plan and introduce urban design principles and the action plan.

To review feedback and confirm the final framework plan; introduce the action plan concept as a draft; review the Neighborhood Planning Process and its results; and provide an overview of the next steps.

REINVESTMENT SCENARIOS

REFINED AREA-SPECIFIC SCENARIOS

PREFERRED PLAN AND URBAN DESIGN PRINCIPLES

INITIATIVES AND ACTION ITEMS

Cedar Rapids Neighborhood Planning Process

5


Organization of the Neighborhood Planning Process 1 GOALS Identification of Issues On January 10th and 31st, the community participated in a series of goal setting exercises to identify and confirm the issues for the plan to address. Eleven common goals were identified and then synthesized into the “five key elements of a great neighborhood,” which served to guide the Neighborhood Planning Process. These key elements are Sustainability, Connectivity, Identity, Diversity, and Vibrant Centers. SUSTAINABILITY* (FAIRVIEW, PA)

CONNECTIVITY (CLEVELAND, OH)

IDENTITY (GREENVILLE, SC)

DIVERSITY (INDIANAPOLIS, IN)

VIBRANT CENTERS (BOSTON, MA)

2 IDEAS and Opportunities On February 10th and 24th the community explored the assets and opportunities for change in their neighborhoods. They agreed that the final plan should build on community strengths, including distinctive people and places, a diversity of businesses, the family-friendly character of the neighborhoods and a variety of open spaces. Evaluation Criteria were then established: The March 21st presentation highlighted planning “best practices” as a means to develop evaluation criteria. These criteria would allow the community to assess how scenarios fulfilled the stated goals.

Evaluation Criteria Established On February 24th, evaluation criteria were established. Evaluation criteria are a benchmark or standard against which the community can measure future proposals for development. Building upon the City’s five keys to successful development, the criteria that will be used to evaluate future projects was created from a combination of the community’s goals, area feedback priorities, and elements of great neighborhoods. The community will use the evaluation criteria to assess the benefits and challenges associated with future projects.

COMMUNITY GOALS

AREA FEEDBACK PRIORITIES

Evaluation Criteria

ELEMENTS OF GREAT NEIGHBORHOODS

*SUSTAINABILITY - WIND TURBINES AT SOMERSET WIND FARM, EXELON COMMUNITY ENERGY, FAIRVIEW, PA, BY JEFF KUBINA; USED UNDER A CREATIVE COMMONS LICENSE, ACCESSED ON FLICKR JUNE 3, 2009. HTTP://WWW.FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/KUBINA/2890670927/SIZES/L/IN/SET-72157607531460119/

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Cedar Rapids Neighborhood Planning Process


3 SCENARIOS Combinations of Ideas On March 21st, three alternative scenarios were introduced that explored different ways to meet the Community Goals. These scenarios tested how and where to focus reinvestment along the river, strengthen the connections between neighborhoods and reinforce connections across the River. On March 31st refined scenarios were presented that integrated community feedback, market projections and sustainability best practices for each area. On March 31st, the community applied the evaluation criteria to assess scenarios and their adherence to community goals.

4 AREA PLAN Preferred Scenario On April 25th, residents selected a preferred alternative that merged the strongest elements of each scenario to create a unified vision for future reinvestment. With a roadmap for the future, the community sat down once more to outline which actions would be necessary to bring their vision to life.

SCENARIO A

SCENARIO C

SCENARIO B

5 ACTION PLAN Prioritized Actions and Funding On May 5th, members of the community reviewed the final Area Plans and discussed implementation of the Action Plan. The Action Plan is a living document that will adapt over time for the changing needs of the community, and will require the cooperation of public agencies, residents and businesses. It is organized by the five over-arching plan elements and describes how action items will support each of the goals and initiatives. On May 13th, the City Council approved the Area Plans and supporting Action Plan, marking the beginning of a new phase in Cedar Rapids’ history. TRANSPORTATION AND CONNECTIVITY

OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION

ARTS AND CULTURE

BUSINESS REINVESTMENT (PORTLAND, OR)

HOUSING REINVESTMENT (SOUTHWOOD, FL)

Introduction

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ART, CULTURE AND COMMUNITY ASSETS MEDICAL DISTRICT

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BUSINESS REINVESTMENT COMMUNITY LANDMARK

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Cedar Rapids Neighborhood Planning Process

MIXED-USE REINVESTMENT ACTIVITY CENTER/BUILDING PRESENCE

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HOUSING REINVESTMENT FLOOD WALL


C IT Y WIDE PL ANS

A summary of the Framework Plan by area

Collectively, the three Area Plans—North, Central and South —embody a compelling vision for reinvestment and recovery in Cedar Rapids over the next fifteen years. They envision a sustainable Cedar Rapids characterized by strong pedestrian, transit and vehicular connections between downtown, the neighborhoods and the Cedar River, with a network of diverse open spaces in between. The Plans also envision reconstructed neighborhoods that promote diversity and vibrancy, and provide a variety of housing types for a range of ages. Finally, they envision a City that provides a wide range of economic opportunity for its residents, as well as thriving arts, culture and entertainment destinations.

These 11 goals were grouped into five overarching categories — the plan elements listed below—to be used to support the community goals throughout the process.

The following section outlines the goals and the initiatives for each of the five major plan elements shown at right. The goals emphasize the high-level vision for the plan, while the initiatives represent tangible steps which the City and the community can take to realize these goals.

Ultimately, successful reinvestment will depend on the continued collaboration of public and private sectors and the community, and will meet the City’s five keys to successful development: •

Consistent with Community Goals

Neighborhood Support

Financial Feasibility

Market Feasibility

Experienced Development Team to Implement Projects

Plan Elements Transportation and Connectivity

Goals and Evaluation Framework

1.

Goals are general guidelines that direct the long-term vision for the Cedar Rapids community.

COMMUNITY GOALS The community and the City worked together to develop the following goals for the Neighborhood Planning Process:

To create accessible transportation options

Open Space and Recreation 1.

To promote green space as a central amenity for all residents

2.

To construct sustainable infrastructure

Provide accessible transportation options

Promote green space as a central amenity

Construct sustainable infrastructure

Maintain vibrant neighborhoods

Meet multi-generational needs

Provide affordable housing

Neighborhood Reinvestment

Encourage economic vitality

1.

To maintain vibrant neighborhoods

Support art, culture and entertainment opportunities

2.

To meet multi-generational needs

Create exciting downtown destinations

3.

To provide affordable housing

Encourage citizen-directed planning

Uphold economically feasible planning

Arts and Culture 1.

To support art, culture and entertainment opportunities

2.

To create exciting downtown destinations

Business Reinvestment 1.

To maintain vibrant neighborhoods

2.

To encourage economic vitality

City-wide Plans

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TRANSPORTATION AND CONNECTIVITY 0

STREET IMPROVEMENTS

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Cedar Rapids Neighborhood Planning Process

TRAIL

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Transportation and Connectivity Goals 1.

Create accessible transportation options

Initiatives Enhance the pedestrian environment through active and pleasant building storefronts as well as streetscape improvements such as complete street standards and street amenities such as trees, signage and lighting. Increase use of public transit by making bus service more accessible and comfortable—particularly by improving bus routes, schedules and amenities—and by creating an Intermodal Transportation Facility (ITF) downtown. Change the public mindset through education about transit and study other future mass transit options such as commuter rail. Relieve circulation challenges and congestion through improved street connections. Amongst others, this will include reconnecting Ellis Boulevard and Sixth street, converting some downtown one-way streets to allow two-way traffic, and extending Fifth Street across the river toward C Street. Further study of traffic flows is needed. Conduct a comprehensive downtown parking management plan to manage the parking supply, address concerns about parking needs for all users and the poor condition of the parkades, and to assess the amount of land dedicated to surface parking.

TRANSIT

CIRCULATOR

ITF

BUS CONNECTION

STOP

STREETSCAPE IMPROVEMENTS (PORTLAND, OR)

CIRCULATION IMPROVEMENTS ARE PROPOSED ON THIRD STREET TO CONNECT DOWNTOWN TO NEW BOHEMIA

City-wide Plans

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OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 0

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BIKE ROUTE

NEW TRAIL

Cedar Rapids Neighborhood Planning Process

TRAIL

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Open Space and Recreation Goals 1.

Promote green space as a central amenity for all residents

2.

Construct sustainable infrastructure

Initiatives Design the greenway and start implementation by acquiring property and constructing the levee and floodwall. Prioritize a continuous trail system to stitch together neighborhoods and green spaces. Conduct detailed studies to plan for trails and bike lanes, and define relevant design standards. Raise funding for trail implementation and the purchase of amenities such as lighting and benches. Develop new parks and community facilities to serve the City residents and the regional population, including new community centers, major regional indoor and outdoor recreation facilities, an amphitheater, as well as continued support for new neighborhood parks and playgrounds.

LEVEE WALK (INDIANAPOLIS, IN)

Develop a long term comprehensive park strategy by updating the Parks and Recreation Master Plan and by implementing park projects. Engage the public through collaboration, communication and community volunteer events. Strategically maintain and improve existing parks with landscaping, restrooms, picnic facilities and parking. Celebrate the Cedar Rapids community by hosting riverfront and neighborhood outdoor events throughout the year.

EXTEND AND CONNECT EXISTING TRAILS, LIKE THE ELLIS TRAIL

NATURAL AREAS (ARLINGTON, TX)

COMMUNITY EVENTS (ADDISON, TX)

City-wide Plans

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ARTS AND CULTURE 0

ARTS, CULTURE AND COMMUNITY ASSETS BIKE ROUTE

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NEW TRAIL

ARTS CORRIDORS TRAIL

Cedar Rapids Neighborhood Planning Process

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Arts and Culture Goals 1.

Support arts, culture, and entertainment opportunities

2.

Maintain vibrant neighborhoods

3.

Create exciting downtown destinations

Initiatives

Complement the Third Avenue corridor by devoting Third Street to the community arts and connecting downtown assets to New Bohemia by building on existing arts programs and encouraging a more grassroots feel of unique galleries, studio spaces, and eclectic shops.

Ellis Park Cedar Lake Park

Time Check Park

Greenway

Strengthen Third Avenue as a civic arts corridor capitalizing on the existing Museum of Art, rehabilitation of the Paramount Theater, and use the expanded Greene Square Park for a variety of civic events.

May’s Island and 2nd Ave Bridge Greene Square Park

West Side Park and Amphitheater

Expand Greene Square Park between Third Avenue and Fifth Avenue with a complementary civic focus and new development opportunities on the South and Southeast sides.

Reed Park Sokol Park and 16th Ave Bridge

Greenway

Enhance the New Bohemia historic district and nearby Czech Village by strengthening bridge connections across the river and implementing plans for improvements. Protect the City’s existing community assets through public awareness campaigns, signage and restoration of existing facilities.

EVENT SPACES THROUGHOUT THE CITY

Plan for new art and cultural events and additional event space venues for all generations.

ARTS DISTRICT (PORTLAND, OR)

ST. WENCESLAUS WILL BE CONNECTED TO THE NEW BOHEMIA ARTS DISTRICT

City-wide Plans

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NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER FOCUS AREA

Cedar Rapids Neighborhood Planning Process

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Neighborhood Reinvestment Goals 1.

Maintain vibrant neighborhoods

2.

Meet multi-generational needs

3.

Provide affordable housing

Initiatives Preserve the existing character of each neighborhood through housing reinvestment, protection of historic buildings, use of traditional materials and creation of affordable housing. Focus housing reinvestment near neighborhood centers including along Ellis Boulevard, Sixth Street in Taylor, Czech Village, New Bohemia and Sinclair, Third Street and the West Bank. Leverage the inherent potential and widespread community support for infill housing on underutilized land to achieve a significant residential increase in the Downtown. Develop a multi-pronged strategy for implementation that is transparent and communicative, encourages reinvestment and prioritizes public safety and well being.

PRESERVE THE NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTER ALONG ELLIS BOULEVARD

Create urban design principles that support a diversity of uses, multi-generational neighborhoods and appropriate character as new development occurs. Provide incentives for reinvestment that have a demonstrated public purpose by minimizing risk to developers, identifying funding sources, streamlining the permitting process and balancing neighborhood and developers’ desires.

REINVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR FLOOD-DAMAGED HOMES

DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR NEIGHBORHOODS (SOUTHWOOD, FL)

City-wide Plans

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BUSINESS FOCUS AREA

Cedar Rapids Neighborhood Planning Process

HOUSING FOCUS AREA

MEDICAL AREA

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Business Reinvestment Goals 1.

Maintain vibrant neighborhoods

2.

Encourage economic vitality

Initiatives Strengthen neighborhood centers by promoting a diverse array of local businesses that would be accessible to all modes of transportation, and where possible, housed in “live-work” mixed-use buildings. Enrich the Downtown core by introducing active uses along the Downtown Riverfront and by diversifying the West Bank with a mix of business uses that complement its residential character. Create a cohesive vision for the Medical District by focusing on the synergies between the existing uses and by encouraging new development to be pedestrian friendly. CZECH VILLAGE IS AN EXISTING NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER

Target the development of new specialty venues that draw in a regional population. Determine necessary zoning and land use changes and adopt urban design principles that clarify standards for new and existing businesses, improve the public realm and integrate green infrastructure. Provide incentives for reinvestment by minimizing risk to developers, identifying funding sources, streamlining the permitting process, keeping lines of communication open and balancing neighborhood and developers’ desires.

THE DOWNTOWN CORE FEATURES HIGH RISE COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

MAKE DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR A COMFORTABLE PEDESTRIAN ENVIRONMENT (PORTLAND, OR)

City-wide Plans

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Implementation Strategy The Implementation Strategy for the Neighborhood Planning Process includes the finalization of the Action Plan, Community Updates, the ongoing work with the Army Corps of Engineers on the Flood Management Strategy, the Public Facilities and Parks and Recreation Master Plan, and the advancement of the Urban Design Principles. Throughout the implementation process, the public will be invited to give input at Open Houses, some of which are listed below.

The Action Plan The Neighborhood Reinvestment Plan provided a vision for the future of the neighborhoods, whereas the Action Plan will continually refine the Area Plan elements into initiatives, and assign a timeline for implementation. On May 13th, 2009 the Cedar Rapids City Council unanimously voted to adopt the Neighborhood Reinvestment Plan. Moving forward, the refined Action Plan developed by the City and the community will act as the tool to guide the implementation of the Neighborhood Reinvestment Plan. On June 15th, the initial Action Plan was unveiled to the community. The Action Plan will be finalized by City Departments over the coming months. The Action Plan includes the following elements:

Overview of Action Plan Elements

Area Plan Elements ... were established during Phase 1 and in Focus Groups.

Initiatives ... were developed from community feedback throughout the Neighborhood Planning Process (January through April 2009)

Action Items ... came from community feedback and a brainstorming session on April 25 and May 5, 2009 (a combined 700 ideas were generated); the City has grouped these ideas and condensed them into action items

Timetable ... is developed by City Departments for the condensed action items. Timing may be dependent on factors such as funding or phasing where some actions must occur before others

Roles ... were gathered from Community input at the April 25 and May 5th work sessions; City Departments will continue to develop the list of roles

List of overall Area Plan Elements

List of Initiatives within each Area Plan Element

List of individual Action Items to achieve Initiatives

Status

Timetable for completion of each action item

Roles and responsibilities for each action item

...will be updated by City Departments on a continual, on-going basis

Status of each action item

The community provided input on each of these elements, including roles and responsibilities, while the City developed a timetable for the condensed action items. Timing may be dependent on factors such as funding or phasing where some actions must occur before others. The status of an action item will be updated by City Departments on an on-going basis.

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Cedar Rapids Neighborhood Planning Process


What is an Action Plan?

Action Plan Timeline

An Area Plan provides the overall vision for the future of the neighborhoods, whereas an Action Plan breaks the Area Plan elements into a set of initiatives to accomplish community goals, and assigns a timeline for implementation. The community’s ideas and feedback are summarized into groups and then into action items.

May 13th, 2009 – City Council will consider the extending the Steering Committee to provide outreach and oversight

June 15th – Action Plans publicized online

November 2009 – Open house to show progress to date

May 2010 – Open house to show progress to date

The Action Plan will be a living document which will constantly evolve as items are completed or new needs arise. A preliminary plan was ratified at the May 13th presentation to the City Council.

Community Updates The community will be invited to participate in regularly scheduled Open Houses on the progress of the Neighborhood Planning Process and Action Plan.

How ideas are grouped into Action Items Area Plan Elements

Community-wide Open House

Community-wide Open House

Find funding for trails

November 2009

November 2010

Provide safe trails from homes to schools

Status update

Status update

Identify public financing for the trail system

Seed funding for trails

Combined into Action Item: •

Create a citywide Comprehensive Trails Plan to address needs

Implementation

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Public Facilities and Parks and Recreation A series of Open Houses are scheduled through the summer and fall of 2009 to plan for the future of the City’s flood-impacted public facilities as well as the Parks and Recreation System. The City has combined these public participation processes to guide the most efficient use of community facilities and parks and recreation facilities and programs to meet the needs of the community today and for the next generation. More than 300 City facilities were damaged in the flood, including many large customer service buildings such as the Veterans Memorial Building, main library, public works building, central fire station and the animal control facility. During this series of Open Houses, residents will be able to examine several options for rebuilding public facilities. Cedar Rapids Parks and Recreation department needs input to review its master plan findings to date and assist with making recommendations for future growth of the parks and recreation system. The Greenway Master Plan is being developed as a part of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan. The public will envision the Greenway in the context of creating sustainable open space and recreation in Cedar Rapids. Feedback gathered in the Open Houses will help to refine the action plans developed during the Neighborhood Planning Process.

VIEW FROM THE LANDFILL, LOOKING NORTH. FUTURE PLANS INCLUDE CLEANING AND NATURALIZING THE LANDFILL, OR CONVERTING IT TO A PARK.

Community Facilities and Parks & Recreation Open Houses 1.

June 23, 2009, Crowne Plaza, 4-7 PM: Overview of Process, fir public feedback

2.

August 18, 2009, Crowne Plaza, 4-7 PM, and August 19, 11 AM-1 PM: Options for Public Facilities and Parks and Recreation, for public feedback

3.

October 6, 2009, Crowne Plaza, 4-7 PM, and October 7th, 11:30 AM - 1:30 PM: Draft Master Plan, for public feedback AS PART OF IMPROVING CONNECTIVITY AND INCREASING RECREATION OPTIONS, THE EXISTING TRAIL NETWORK WILL BE EXTENDED.

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Army Corps Feasibility Study The Army Corps of Engineers are now in the process of a feasibility study to test the economic, cultural and environmental impacts of the City’s preferred Flood Management Strategy developed during Phase One of the River Corridor Redevelopment Plan. In addition to ongoing review of progress with the City and County, the Army Corps of Engineers are also holding a series of public Open Houses throughout the Summer and Fall of 2009 and the Spring of 2010.

Urban Design Principles Develop Urban Design Principles to guide development in reinvestment areas, and lead to updated zoning and Comprehensive Plan Update Schedule for Urban Design Principles

THE GREENWAY WILL INCLUDE RECREATION FIELDS SIMILAR TO THE EXISTING SOCCER FIELDS AT TUMA PARK.

To create a cohesive feel and identity for the city, the next piece of the Neighborhood Planning Process will be Urban Design Principles. The vision for Cedar Rapids includes a mix of uses and housing types to serve a wide population, so a range of types and scales of housing and business structures will be considered. For residential, standard types could include detached residential, attached residential, and mid-rise urban housing. Neighborhood Centers can include low-scale commercial, mixed-use (commercial and residential), and mid- to high-rise commercial and residential. •

The process will be determined over the summer of 2009

Meetings to determine needs and topics, solicit public feedback, and approve the Guidelines will occur in the fall and winter of 2009

VIBRANT URBAN DISTRICTS LIKE THE CLIFTON GASLIGHT DISTRICT IN CINCINNATI, OHIO COULD BE MODELS FOR CEDAR RAPIDS’ URBAN AREAS.

Implementation

23


Neighborhood Planning Proces Framework Map

EXISTING PARK GREENWAY LEVEE FLOOD WALL ACTIVITY CENTER/BUILDING PRESENCE COMMUNITY LANDMARK REINVESTMENT FOCUS: BUSINESS MIXED-USE HOUSING

ART, CULTURE AND COMMUNITY ASSETS MEDICAL DISTRICT

0

1,000

2,000


CZECH VILLAGE / NEW BOHEMIA MAIN STREET DISTRICT

STRATEGIC REVITALIZATION PLAN POTENTIAL FUNDING SOURCES Tax Increment Financing (TIF) https://www.legis.iowa.gov/DOCS/Central/Guides/urbannew.pdf

Administered by the Iowa Economic Development Authority (IEDA) of the State of Iowa “An urban renewal plan may contain several projects to be undertaken in the urban renewal area. Urban renewal projects are typically financed by a division and reallocation of property taxes collected in the urban renewal area. This is called tax increment financing. Under tax increment financing, the property taxes collected from the consolidated tax rate levied against the increase in taxable valuation over the base valuation of property in the urban renewal area are segregated. Those segregated property tax receipts are deposited in a special fund of the municipality and used to pay obligations incurred for urban renewal purposes. The consolidated tax rate is the sum of all property tax levies certified to the county to be collected as property taxes in the urban renewal area. In order to determine the portion of property tax receipts available to the urban renewal area and to the other tax-certifying bodies, the property valuation assessments are frozen in a particular assessment year. The increase in assessed value after that year is considered the incremental value, and revenues from taxes collected on that portion of the value, i.e., the increment, are available to the municipality to fund urban renewal projects.” – Excerpt from document at the website address referenced above.

Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/HUD?src=/program_offices/comm_planning/communitydev elopment/programs

Funded through the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and administered locally by the City of Cedar Rapids Community Development Department “The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program is a flexible program that provides communities with resources to address a wide range of unique community development needs. Beginning in 1974, the CDBG program is one of the longest continuously run programs at HUD. The CDBG program provides annual grants on a

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CZECH VILLAGE / NEW BOHEMIA MAIN STREET DISTRICT

STRATEGIC REVITALIZATION PLAN formula basis to 1209 general units of local government and States.” – Excerpt from the HUD website referenced above.

New Market Tax Credits (NMTC) http://cdfifund.gov/what_we_do/programs_id.asp?programID=5

Funded and administered through the United States Department of the Treasury “The New Markets Tax Credit Program (NMTC Program) was established by Congress in 2000 to spur new or increased investments into operating businesses and real estate projects located in low-income communities. The NMTC Program attracts investment capital to low-income communities by permitting individual and corporate investors to receive a tax credit against their Federal income tax return in exchange for making equity investments in specialized financial institutions called Community Development Entities (CDEs). The credit totals 39 percent of the original investment amount and is claimed over a period of seven years (five percent for each of the first three years, and six percent for each of the remaining four years). The investment in the CDE cannot be redeemed before the end of the seven-year period.” – Excerpt from the Department of the Treasury website referenced above.

Enterprise Zones http://www.cedar-rapids.org/government/departments/communitydevelopment/economicdevelopmentservices/pages/stateprograms.aspx

Funded by the Iowa Economic Development Authority (IEDA) of the State of Iowa and administered locally by the City of Cedar Rapids Community Development Department “Provides State funded assistance for qualified businesses locating within a designated distressed area as approved through the local Enterprise Zone Commission that is appointed by the City Council. Assistance includes a number of sources including an investment state tax credit, a research/development state tax credit, and refund of sales tax on materials for construction. Enterprise Zones also provide for property tax exemptions subject to City Council approval. It should be noted that Enterprise Zone assistance also applies to qualified residential development. For the purpose of this declaration, the following objectives/criteria only apply to economic development projects.” – Excerpt from the City of Cedar Rapids website referenced above. 2|Page


CZECH VILLAGE / NEW BOHEMIA MAIN STREET DISTRICT

STRATEGIC REVITALIZATION PLAN

Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/transportation_enhancements/

Funded by the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and replaces the Transportation Enhancement Program (TEP). The funds are administered by the Iowa Department of Transportation (IDOT). “Transportation Enhancement (TE) activities offer funding opportunities to help expand transportation choices and enhance the transportation experience through 12 eligible TE activities related to surface transportation, including pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure and safety programs, scenic and historic highway programs, landscaping and scenic beautification, historic preservation, and environmental mitigation. TE projects must relate to surface transportation and must qualify under one or more of the 12 eligible categories.” - Excerpt from the FHWA website referenced above. Refer to the website for the list of 12 qualified activities, program brief, guidance, legislation, funding data and other links to further resources offered by the USDOT/FHWA. “Transportation enhancement activity.--The term "transportation enhancement activity" means, with respect to any project or the area to be served by the project, any of the following activities as the activities relate to surface transportation: 1.

Provision of facilities for pedestrians and bicycles.

2.

Provision of safety and educational activities for pedestrians and bicyclists.

3.

Acquisition of scenic easements and scenic or historic sites (including historic battlefields).

4.

Scenic or historic highway programs (including the provision of tourist and welcome center facilities).

5.

Landscaping and other scenic beautification.

6.

Historic preservation.

7.

Rehabilitation and operation of historic transportation buildings, structures, or facilities (including historic railroad facilities and canals).

8.

Preservation of abandoned railway corridors (including the conversion and use of the corridors for pedestrian or bicycle trails).

9.

Inventory, control, and removal of outdoor advertising.

10. Archaeological planning and research. 11. Environmental mitigation-a.

to address water pollution due to highway runoff; or,

b.

reduce vehicle-caused wildlife mortality while maintaining habitat connectivity.

12. Establishment of transportation museums.”

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CZECH VILLAGE / NEW BOHEMIA MAIN STREET DISTRICT

STRATEGIC REVITALIZATION PLAN State Historic Tax Credits http://www.iowahistory.org/historic-preservation/tax-incentives-for-rehabilitation/statetax-credits/index.html

Funded by the State of Iowa. Administered locally by the State Historical Society of Iowa (SHSI), a division of the Department of Cultural Affairs of the State of Iowa. The State Historic Preservation Office is part of SHSI. “The State Historic Preservation and Cultural & Entertainment District Tax Credit Program provides a state income tax credit for the sensitive rehabilitation of historic buildings. It ensures character-defining features and spaces of buildings are retained and helps revitalize surrounding neighborhoods. The Program provides an income tax credit of 25% of qualified rehabilitation costs.” – Excerpt from the State Historical Society of Iowa website referenced above. Refer to the website for additional information on eligibility requirements, availability of funding, the application process, forms and other considerations.

Federal Historic Tax Credits http://www.iowahistory.org/historic-preservation/tax-incentives-for-rehabilitation/federaltax-credits.html

Funded by the United States Department of the Treasury. Administered locally by the State Historical Society of Iowa (SHSI), a division of the Department of Cultural Affairs of the State of Iowa. The State Historic Preservation Office is part of SHSI. “The Federal Historic Preservation Tax Incentives Program provides a federal income tax credit for the sensitive rehabilitation of historic buildings. It ensures that characterdefining features of buildings are retained and helps revitalize surrounding neighborhoods. The federal tax credit program provides either a 20% historic tax credit or a 10% nonhistoric income tax credit, based on the qualified rehabilitation expenditures and dependent upon the type of building as described below. For both tax credit amounts, the buildings must be used for income-producing purposes and the rehabilitation must be ‘substantial’.“ – Excerpt from the State Historical Society of Iowa website referenced above. Refer to the website for additional information, forms and links to other resources.

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CZECH VILLAGE / NEW BOHEMIA MAIN STREET DISTRICT

STRATEGIC REVITALIZATION PLAN Commercial New Construction (CNC) Program – MidAmerican Energy http://www.midamericanenergy.com/ee/ia_bus_comm_new_construction.aspx

Funded and administered by MidAmerican Energy. “MidAmerican Energy's Commercial New Construction program encourages the design and construction of new – as well as the renovation or conversion of existing – energyefficient commercial buildings in Iowa. Rebates are available to help offset the higher initial costs associated with the design and installation of energy-efficient options. The new, renovated or converted building must receive its primary electricity from MidAmerican Energy. Where applicable, the direct supply of natural gas also must be provided by MidAmerican Energy.” – Excerpt from the MidAmerican Energy website referenced above.

Commercial New Construction (CNC) Program – Alliant Energy http://www.alliantenergy.com/SaveEnergyAndMoney/Rebates/BusMN/030555

Funded and administered by Alliant Energy. “Alliant Energy’s Commercial New Construction program offers free energy design assistance, design team incentives and customer incentives through two unique options. Track I is an option targeting the construction of commercial buildings smaller than, or up to 15,000 square feet in size that are primarily design/build or design/bi/buil construction. Track II targets buildings larger than 15,000 square feet that are straightforward in design and may be on a faster design schedule. Track II provides evaluation of efficiency options of one type of mechanical system solution. Track III targets buildings larger than 15,000 square feet and is ideal for projects with energy savings goals in mind and enough time to integrate new ideas and strategies into the design. Buildings designed in this track are typically modeled to achieve energy savings of 30 to 40% greater than Energy Code. Track IV offers incentives and assistance to help building owners or developers achieve energy savings of 40 to 60% better than current energy code. This track also provides technical and certification support for participants to meet the requirements of LEED Eac1, ENERGY STAR, EPAct, 2030 Challenge and other initiatives.” – Excerpt from the Alliant Energy website referenced above.

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6.

Czech Bohemia Overlay District a.

Intent The Czech Bohemia Overlay (“CB-O�) District is hereby created. The Council finds that the CB-O District contains unique architecture that illustrates the history of urban development in the core of Cedar Rapids. The CB-O District contains a wide variety of architectural styles which reflect the first Czech settlements in Cedar Rapids, the Third Street commercial area, Czech Village, and the historic residential areas of the Oak Hill Jackson and the Czech Village neighborhoods. The purposes of the CB-O District are to ensure that the future development and reconstruction of commercial and multi-family buildings is compatible with the unique character of the CB-O District and to preserve its economic viability.

b.

District Boundaries The CB-O District shall be an overlay for the entire area designated in Figure 32.03-1.

c.

Application of CB-O Standards and Guidelines The CB-O Standards and Guidelines shall apply to new construction, additions to existing buildings and/or the exterior rehabilitation of buildings located within the boundaries of the CB-O District and that are submitted after January 24, 2012. The CB-O District Standards and Guidelines shall not apply to:

d.

i.

Single-family and two-family dwellings;

ii.

Repair, maintenance, and replacement with comparable materials or the same color of paint.

Design Review Technical Advisory Committee The Design Review Technical Advisory Committee is hereby created. It shall consist of seven (7) members to be appointed by the Mayor upon the advise and consent of the City Council. The Design Review Technical Advisory Committee shall examine applications for rezonings, preliminary and administrative site development plans, conditional uses, building permits, and variances within the CB-O District.

e.

Development Approval Process The approval of new construction, additions to existing buildings and/or the exterior rehabilitation of buildings for commercial or multi-family uses within the CB-O District shall occur through the following process: i.

City staff shall refer applicable development projects within the CB-O District to the Design Review Technical Advisory Committee. The Design Review Technical Advisory Committee shall be referred applications for rezonings, preliminary and administrative site development plans, conditional uses, building permits, and variances. Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Code of Ordinances

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ii.

f.

The Design Review Technical Advisory Committee shall review any commercial or multi-family development project within the CB-O District for compatibility with District standards and guidelines. The Committee shall provide recommendations to the appropriate decision-making body following its review of a development project.

CB-O District Standards and Guidelines All new construction, additions to existing buildings and/or the exterior rehabilitation of buildings located within the boundaries of the CB-O District shall meet the following Standards and Guidelines: i.

Site Development Plan A site development plan and building elevations shall be required as part of the approval of a development project within the CB-O District. The site development plan shall comply with all provisions of Chapter 32.

ii.

Size, Form and Volume (A) Facade heights for new buildings and additions must fall within the height range of the surrounding block. (B) Floor-to-floor heights for new buildings and additions shall appear similar to those within the range of the surrounding block. (C) Proposed façades wider than the established historic range of the block upon which the proposed development is to be located may be permitted, but design features shall be included to mimic traditional building widths of 50 feet or less. Changes in façade material, building height, window style or architectural detail are examples of techniques that may be permitted to break up a façade.

iii.

Building Orientation and Parking (A) Commercial buildings shall be constructed to the edge of the sidewalk with zero setbacks. (B) Multi-family buildings shall be constructed with setbacks that lie within the established setback range of the block. (C) Principal building entrances shall be a prominent feature of the building’s façade and should face the primary street serving the development. (D) Parking should be located behind buildings when feasible. Parking lots adjacent to sidewalks are discouraged.

iv.

Architectural Details All new construction shall include architectural façade elements and composition as follows: (A)

The façade should have a vertical orientation and maintain the Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Code of Ordinances

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traditional proportions of height and width found in existing historic buildings in the CB-O District. (B) The top edge of the building shall be defined by a cornice line or similar articulation. (C) Windows and doors shall be located, spaced and aligned on the building faรงade in a manner consistent with the established context of the block. (D) The sizes of windows and doors shall be consistent with the proportions of historic buildings in the District. (E) Highly reflective, opaque or darkly tinted glass shall not be used for windows or doors. v.

Building Materials (A) All new construction shall use compatible and traditional building materials such as brick, limestone and metalwork. A creative mix of materials consistent with the historic character of the area may be considered. (B) Materials shall be used in a manner that incorporates architectural details, complementary textures and small scale elements, especially on the first floor of the primary faรงade.

vi.

Signage (A) New signage shall respect the size, scale and design of the building to which it is attached, and the buildings of the surrounding District. (B) New signage shall not obscure significant architectural details of a historic structure. (C) Acceptable forms of signage include signs integrated into or affixed flat against a building faรงade, wall signs, projecting signs and monument signs. Other types of signage may be considered if compatible with the unique character of the District.

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Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Code of Ordinances >> CHAPTER 32B - FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT ORDINANCE >>

CHAPTER 32B - FLOODPLAIN MANAGEMENT ORDINANCE 32B.01 - LEGAL AUTHORITY, FINDINGS OF FACT AND PURPOSE. 32B.02 - DEFINITIONS. 32B.03 - GENERAL PROVISIONS. 32B.04 - FLOODWAY, FLOODPLAIN AND FLOOD-PRONE AREA REQUIREMENTS. 32B.05 - STRUCTURES IN FLOODPLAIN. 32B.06 - EXCEPTIONS. 32B.07 - ADMINISTRATION. 32B.08 - VARIANCE. 32B.09 - APPEAL PROCESS. 32B.10 - ENFORCEMENT. 32B.11 - NON-CONFORMING USES. 32B.12 - AMENDMENTS.

32B.01 - LEGAL AUTHORITY, FINDINGS OF FACT AND PURPOSE. (a)

(b)

Legal Authority. Chapter 364 of the Code of Iowa grants cities the authority, except as expressly limited by the Constitution and if not inconsistent with the laws of the General Assembly, to exercise any power and perform any function it deems appropriate to protect and preserve the rights, privileges, and property of the city or of its residents, and to preserve and improve the peace, safety, health, welfare, comfort, and convenience of its residents. Findings of Fact. 1. The flood hazard areas of the City of Cedar Rapids are subject to inundation which can result in loss of life and property, health and safety hazards, disruption of commerce and governmental services, extraordinary public expenditures for flood protection and relief, and impairment of the tax base, all of which adversely affect the peace, safety, health, welfare, comfort, and convenience of its residents. 2.

(c)

These flood losses, hazards, and related adverse effects are caused by: A. The occupancy of flood hazard areas by uses vulnerable to flood damages which create hazardous conditions as a result of being inadequately elevated or otherwise protected from flooding. B. The cumulative effect of development in the floodplain causing increases in

flood heights and velocities. 3. This chapter relies upon engineering methodology for analyzing flood hazards which meet or exceed standards established by the National Flood Insurance Program. Statement of Purpose. It is the purpose of this chapter to protect and preserve the rights, privileges and property of the City of Cedar Rapids and its residents and to preserve and improve the peace, safety, health, welfare, and comfort and convenience of its residents by minimizing those flood losses with provisions designed to: 1.

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2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Maintain or reduce flood peaks, flood stage, flood velocity, erosion, and sedimentation in public works projects, development, and other activities. Restrict or prohibit uses which are dangerous to health, safety or property in times of flood or which cause excessive increases in flood heights or velocities. Require that uses vulnerable to floods, including public utilities which serve such uses, be protected against flood damage at the time of initial construction. Protect individuals from buying lands which are unsuited for intended purposes because of flood hazard. Assure that eligibility is maintained for any property owner in the City to purchase flood insurance through the National Flood Insurance Program. Maximize the benefits of floodplain lands, such as natural flood and erosion control, ecological productivity, and recreation.

(009-10)

32B.02 - DEFINITIONS. Unless specifically defined below, words or phrases used in this chapter shall be interpreted so as to give them the meaning they have in common usage and to give this chapter its most reasonable application. 100-Year Flood: The flood having a one percent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any given year. 500-Year Flood: The flood having a two-tenths percent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any given year. Base Flood: The flood having a one percent chance of being equaled or exceeded in any given year. Also see "100-Year Flood". Base Flood Elevation (BFE): The water surface elevation of the 100-year flood. Basement: Any enclosed area having its floor below grade level on all sides. City: The City of Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Community Rating System: A FEMA program that provides discounted flood insurance premiums to policyholders in communities actively partaking in creditable floodplain management activities. Design Standards Manual: The latest edition of the Cedar Rapids Metropolitan Area Engineering Design Standards as approved by the City Council. Development: Any man-made change to improved or unimproved real estate, including but not limited to, buildings or other structures, mining, dredging, filling, grading, paving, excavation or drilling operations, or storage of equipment or materials. "Development" does not include "minor projects" or "routine maintenance of existing buildings and facilities" as defined in this section. It also does not include gardening, plowing, and similar practices that do not involve filling and/or grading. Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM): A Flood Insurance Rate Map with floodplains delineated using digital elevation data.

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Existing Urban Area: Improved real estate inside and outside the corporate limits of the City of Cedar Rapids, on the effective date of this ordinance. Existing Factory-Built Home Park or Subdivision: An existing factory-built home park or subdivision for which the construction of facilities for servicing the lots on which the factory-built homes are to be affixed (including at a minimum, the installation of utilities, the construction of streets, and either the final site grading or the pouring of concrete pads) that is completed before the effective date of the first floodplain management regulations adopted by the City. Factory-built Home: Any structure, designed for residential use, which is wholly or in substantial part, made, fabricated, formed or assembled in manufacturing facilities for installation or assembly and installation, on a building site. For the purpose of this chapter factory-built homes include mobile homes, manufactured homes and modular homes and also include park trailers, travel trailers and other similar vehicles places on a site for greater than 180 consecutive days. Proposed Factory-Built Home Park or Subdivision: A proposed factory-built home park or subdivision for which the construction of facilities for servicing the lots on which the factory-built homes are to be affixed (including at a minimum, the installation of utilities, the construction of streets, and either the final site grading or the pouring of concrete pads) that was or is to be completed after the effective date of the first floodplain management regulations adopted by the City. FEMA: The Federal Emergency Management Agency. Flood: A general and temporary condition of partial or complete inundation of normally dry land areas resulting from the overflow of streams or rivers or from the unusual and rapid runoff of surface waters from any source. Flood Elevation: The elevation floodwaters would reach at a particular site during the occurrence of a specific flood. For instance, the 100-year flood elevation is the elevation of floodwaters related to the occurrence of the 100-year flood. Flood (or Floodway) Fringe: The FEMA-mapped floodplain outside of the Floodway. Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM): The Flood Insurance Rate Map effective April 5, 2010 and any revisions thereto, on which FEMA has delineated both the areas of special flood hazards and the risk premium zones applicable to the community. Flood Insurance Study: The Flood Insurance Study for Linn County Iowa, including Cedar Rapids, published by FEMA in conjunction with the FIRM and containing background data such as base flood discharges and water surface elevations used to prepare the FIRM. Floodplain: Lands which are subject to a one percent or greater chance of flooding in any given year shown as Zones A and AE on the Flood Insurance Rate Maps issued by FEMA for Linn County, Iowa and incorporated areas, as amended. Also referred to as the "100-year floodplain". Floodplain Management: An overall program of corrective and preventive measures for reducing flood damages and promoting the wise use of floodplains, including but not limited to emergency preparedness plans, flood control works, flood-proofing and floodplain management regulations.

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Flood-prone: Lands subject to a one percent or greater chance of flooding in any given year, as determined by hydrologic and hydraulic studies completed by the City or other government agency, or other acceptable source as approved by the City where this is the best available information. Flood-proofing: Any combination of structural and nonstructural additions, changes, or adjustments to structures which reduce or eliminate flood damage to real estate or improved real property, water and sanitary facilities, structures and their contents. Floodway: The channel of a river or other watercourses and the adjacent land areas that must be reserved in order to discharge the base flood without cumulatively increasing the water surface elevation more than one foot. Historic Structure: Any structure that is: 1.

2.

3.

Listed individually in the National Register of Historic Places, maintained by the Department of Interior, or preliminarily determined by the Secretary of the Interior as meeting the requirements for individual listing of the National Register; Certified or preliminarily determined by the Secretary of the Interior as contributing to the historical significance of a registered historic district or a district preliminarily determined by the Secretary to qualify as a registered historic district; Individually listed on a state inventory of historic places in states with historic preservation programs which have been approved by the Secretary of the Interior; or

4.

Individually listed on a local inventory of historic places in Cedar Rapids with historic preservation programs that have been certified by either (i) an approved state program as determined by the Secretary of the Interior or (ii) directly by the Secretary of the Interior in states without approved programs. Letter of Map Change (LOMC): A determination document issued by FEMA that officially revises the FIRM based on updated information, whether improved data or topography changes created by fill placement. This includes Letter of Map Amendment (LOMA), Letter of Map Revision (LOMR), Letter of Map Revision Based on Fill (LOMR-F), Conditional Letter of Map Revision (CLOMR), and Conditional Letter of Map Revision Based on Fill (CLOMR-F). Lowest Floor: The floor of the lowest enclosed area in a building including a basement except when all the following criteria are met: 1.

The enclosed area is designed to flood to equalize hydrostatic pressure during floods with walls or openings that satisfy the provisions of Section 32B.05 (d) 1; and

2.

The enclosed area is unfinished (not carpeted, drywall, etc.) and used solely for low damage potential uses such as building access, parking or storage; and Machinery and service facilities (e.g., hot water heater, furnace, electrical service) contained in the enclosed area are located at least one foot above the 100-year flood level; and The enclosed area is not a "basement" as defined in this section. In cases where the lowest enclosed area satisfies criteria 1, 2, 3, and 4 above, the lowest floor is the floor of the next highest enclosed area that does not satisfy the criteria above.

3.

4.

Market Value: The value established by the City Assessor for that property. Minor Project: Small development activities (except for filling, grading and excavating) valued at less than $500.

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NAVD: The North American Vertical Datum of 1988. New Construction (New Buildings, Factory-built Home Parks): Those structures or development for which the start of construction commenced on or after the effective date of the ordinance codified in this chapter. Non-substantial improvement: Any improvement that does not meet the definition of substantial improvement, as defined in this section. Qualified engineer: A licensed professional engineer in the State of Iowa who, by reason of training and experience, is considered knowledgeable and has demonstrated competence in hydrology and hydraulics and their application to the flood insurance study. Recreational Vehicle (under Chapter 32B only): A vehicle which is: (a) (b)

Built on a single chassis; 400 square feet or less when measured at the largest horizontal projection;

(c) (d)

Designed to be self-propelled or permanently towable by a light duty truck; and Designed primarily not for use as a permanent dwelling but as temporary living quarters for recreational, camping, travel, or seasonal use. Regulatory Flood Protection Elevation (RFPE): An elevation at least one foot above the Base Flood Elevation plus any increases in flood elevation caused by encroachments on the flood plain that result from designation of a floodway. Routine Maintenance of Existing Buildings and Facilities: Repairs necessary to keep a structure in a safe and habitable condition that do not trigger a building permit, provided they are not associated with a general improvement of the structure or repair of a damaged structure. Such repairs include: (a) (b)

Normal maintenance of structures such as re-roofing, replacing roofing tiles and replacing siding; Exterior and interior painting, papering, tiling, carpeting, cabinets, counter tops and similar finish work;

(c) (d)

Basement sealing; Repairing or replacing damaged or broken window panes;

(e)

Repairing plumbing systems, electrical systems, heating or air conditioning systems and repairing wells or septic systems.

Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA): The land in the floodplain subject to a one percent or greater chance of flooding in any given year. Start of construction: The first placement of permanent construction of a structure on a site, such as the pouring of slabs or footings, the installation of piles, the construction of columns, or any work beyond the stage of excavation, or the placement of a manufactured home on a foundation. Permanent construction does not include land preparation, such as clearing, grading, and filling; nor does it include the installation of streets and/or walkways; nor does it include excavation for a basement, footings, piers or foundations or the erection of temporary forms; nor does it include the installation on the property of accessory buildings, such as garages or sheds not occupied as dwelling units or not as part of the main structure. For a substantial improvement, the actual start of construction shall mean the first alteration of any wall, ceiling, floor, or other structural part of a building, whether or not that alteration affects the external dimension of the building.

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Structure: Anything constructed or erected on the ground or attached to the ground, including, but not limited to, buildings, factories, sheds, cabins, factory-built homes, storage tanks, and other similar uses. Substantial Damage: Damage of any origin sustained by a structure whereby the cost of restoring the structure to a before-damaged condition would equal or exceed fifty percent of the market value of the structure before the damage occurred. Substantial damage also means floodrelated damages sustained by a structure on two separate occasions during a 10 year period for which the cost of repairs at the time of such flood event, on the average, equals or exceeds 25 percent of the market value of the structure before the damage occurred. Substantial improvement: Any improvement to a structure which satisfies one or more of the following criteria: 1.

2.

3.

Any reconstruction, rehabilitation, addition or improvement of a structure, the cost of which equals or exceeds fifty percent of the market value of the structure either before the "start of construction" of the improvement whether or not that alteration affects the external dimensions of the structure. This term includes structures which have incurred "substantial damage" regardless of the actual repair work performed. The term does not, however, include either: A. Any project for improvement of a structure to correct existing violations of state or local health, sanitary, or safety code specifications which have been identified by the local code enforcement officer and which are the minimum necessary to assure safe living conditions; or B. Any alteration will not preclude the structures continued designation as a "historic structure." Any addition which increases the original floor area of a building by 25 percent or more. All additions constructed after June 1, 1987, shall be added to any proposed addition in determining whether the total increase in original floor space would exceed 25 percent. The cumulative cost of any repairs or improvements undertaken over a period of five years equals or exceeds fifty percent of the market value of the structure.

Variance: A grant of relief from the terms of a floodplain management regulation. Violation: Failure to be fully compliant with the floodplain management regulations as set forth in this chapter. A structure or other development without an elevation certificate, other certifications, or other evidence of compliance as required is presumed to be in violation until such time as that documentation is provided. Watershed Plan: A plan prepared by the City or in cooperation with other agencies, which includes hydrologic and hydraulic modeling for the 100-year event, including 100-year floodplain elevation and limits. (009-10)

32B.03 - GENERAL PROVISIONS. (a)

Lands to Which Regulations Apply. These floodplain management regulations shall apply to Special Flood Hazard Areas. The Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) for Linn County and Incorporated Areas, City of Cedar Rapids, Panels 0279, 0280, 0284, 0287, 0290, 0291,

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0295, 0311, 0313, 0385, 0405, 0410, 0415, 0420, 0430, 0435, 0440 and 0535, dated April 5, 2010, which were prepared as part of the Linn County Flood Insurance Study shall be used to identify such flood hazard areas and all areas shown thereon to be within the boundaries of the 100-year flood shall be considered as having significant flood hazards. Where uncertainty exists with respect to the precise location of the 100-year flood boundary, the location shall be determined on the basis of the 100-year flood elevation at the particular site in question. The Linn County Flood Insurance Study is hereby adopted by reference and is made a part of this chapter for the purpose of administering floodplain management regulations. (b)

Compliance. No structure or land shall hereafter be used and no structure shall be located, extended, converted or structurally altered without full compliance with the terms of this chapter and other applicable regulations which apply to uses within the jurisdiction of this chapter.

(c)

Review and Approval. Any proposed development within the floodplain shall be reviewed and approved by the City as part of the Floodplain Development Application process. Abrogation and Greater Restrictions. It is not intended by this chapter to repeal, abrogate or impair any existing easements, covenants, or deed restrictions. However, where this chapter imposes greater restrictions, the provisions of this chapter shall prevail. All other ordinances inconsistent with this chapter are repealed to the extent of the inconsistency only. Interpretation. In their interpretation and application, the provisions of this chapter shall be held to be minimum requirements and shall be liberally construed in favor of the governing body and shall not be deemed a limitation or repeal of any other powers granted by state statutes.

(d)

(e)

(f)

Warning and Disclaimer of Liability. The degree of flood protection required by this chapter is considered reasonable for regulatory purposes and is based on engineering and scientific methods of study. Larger floods may occur. Flood heights may be increased by manmade or natural causes, such as ice jams and bridge openings restricted by debris. This chapter does not imply that areas outside the regulated areas or that uses permitted within the regulated areas will be free from flooding or flood damages. This chapter shall not create liability on the part of Cedar Rapids or any officer or employee thereof for any flood damages that result from reliance on this chapter or any administrative decision lawfully made hereunder.

(009-10)

32B.04 - FLOODWAY, FLOODPLAIN AND FLOOD-PRONE AREA REQUIREMENTS.

(b)

Development of any land in the floodway shall cause no increase in the water surface elevation of the 100-year flood. Development of any land in the floodplain, flood-prone area, or floodway shall not: 1. Result in any new or additional expense to any person or agency other than the

(c)

developer for flood protection or for lost environmental stream uses or functions; 2. Pose any new or additional increase in flood velocity or impairment of the hydrologic and hydraulic functions of streams and floodplains; Analysis and design of floodplain development shall consider existing and ultimate watershed and land use conditions, with and without the proposed development. The analysis of floodway, floodplain, and flood-prone areas shall utilize the most current flood studies, hydrologic and hydraulic models provided by FEMA, the City, or other source

(a)

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(d)

(e)

(f) (g)

(h) (i)

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approved by the City. If a study of the affected area does not exist, the land developer shall submit an analysis prepared by a qualified engineer for City review. The location, grade, and flood-proofing of all proposed utilities which are to be extended into or through any portion of the floodplain or flood-prone area to serve the proposed development shall be approved by the City, prior to the extension of such utilities into the floodplain or flood-prone area. Watercourse alterations or relocations (channel changes and modifications) must be designed to maintain the flood-carrying capacity within the altered or relocated portion. In addition, such alterations or relocations must be approved by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Any fill allowed in the floodway must be shown to have some beneficial purpose and shall be limited to the minimum amount necessary. Pipeline river or stream crossings shall be buried in the streambed and banks or otherwise sufficiently protected to prevent rupture due to channel degradation and meandering or due to the action of flood flows. No use shall affect the capacity or conveyance of the channel or floodway or any tributary to the main stream, drainage ditch, or any other drainage facility or system. Special Provisions for Shallow Flooding Areas: In addition to the General Floodplain Standards, uses within shallow flooding areas must meet the following applicable standards. 1. In shallow flooding areas designated as an AO Zone on the Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), the minimum floodproofing/flood protection elevation shall be equal to the number of feet as specified on the FIRM (or a minimum of 2.0 ft. if no number is specified) above the highest natural grade adjacent to the structure. 2. In shallow flooding areas designated as an AH Zone on the Flood Insurance Rate Map, the minimum floodproofing/flood protection elevation shall be equal to the elevation as specified on the FIRM.

(009-10)

32B.05 - STRUCTURES IN FLOODPLAIN. (a)

All structures shall be: 1. Adequately anchored to prevent flotation, collapse or lateral movement of the 2.

structure resulting from hydrodynamic and hydrostatic loads, including buoyancy. Constructed with materials and utility equipment resistant to flood damage.

3. 4.

(b)

Constructed by methods and practices that minimize flood damage. Issued all other necessary permits from federal, state and local government agencies including approval when required from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. All new or substantially improved residential structures shall have the lowest floor, including basement, elevated a minimum of one foot above the 100-year flood level. Construction shall be upon compacted fill which shall, at all points, be no lower than one foot above the 100year flood level and extend at such elevation at least 18 feet beyond the limits of any structure erected thereon. Alternate methods of elevating (such as piers) may be allowed, where existing topography, street grades, or other factors preclude elevating by fill. In such cases, the methods used must be adequate to support the structure as well as withstand the various forces and hazards associated with flooding. All new residential structures shall be provided with a means of access which will be passable by wheeled vehicles during the 100year flood.

(c)

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(d)

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All new or substantially improved non-residential buildings shall have the first floor (including basement) elevated a minimum of one foot above the 100-year flood level, or together with attendant utility and sanitary systems, be flood-proofed to such a level. When flood-proofing is utilized, a licensed professional engineer or licensed professional architect registered in the State of Iowa shall certify that the flood-proofing methods used are in accordance with accepted standards of practice for withstanding the flood depths, pressures, velocities, impact and uplift forces and other factors associated with the 100-year flood; and that the structure, below the 100-year flood level, is watertight with walls substantially impermeable to the passage of water. A record of the certification indicating the specific elevation (in relation to North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 1988) to which any structures are floodproofed shall be maintained by the Administrator. New and Substantially Improved Structures. 1. Fully enclosed areas below the lowest floor that are usable solely for parking of vehicles, building access, or low damage potential storage in an area other than a basement and which are subject to flooding shall be designed to automatically equalize hydrostatic flood forces on exterior walls by allowing for the entry and exit of floodwaters. Designs for meeting this requirement must either be certified by a licensed professional engineer registered in the State of Iowa or meet or exceed the following minimum criteria: A. A minimum of 2 openings having a total net area of not less than 1 square inch B. C.

2.

3.

(e)

for every square foot of enclosed area subject to flooding shall be provided. The bottom of all openings shall be no higher than one foot above grade.

Openings may be equipped with screens, louvers, valves, or other coverings or devices provided that they permit the automatic entry and exit of floodwaters. New and substantially improved structures must be designed (or modified) and adequately anchored to resist flotation, collapse, or lateral movement of the structure resulting from hydrodynamic and hydrostatic loads, including the effects of buoyancy. New and substantially improved structures must be constructed with electrical, heating, ventilation, plumbing, and air conditioning equipment and other service facilities that are designed and/or located so as to prevent water from entering or accumulating within the components during conditions of flooding.

Factory-built Homes. 1. Factory-built homes placed or substantially improved inside or outside of new, existing, or expanded factory-built home parks or subdivisions shall be ground anchored to resist flotation, collapse, or lateral movement. Specific requirements are that: A. Over-the-top ties provided at each of the 4 corners of the factory-built home with 2 additional ties per side at intermediate locations for factory-built homes 50 feet or more in length or one such time for factory-built homes less than 50 feet in length. B. Frame ties provided at each corner of the home with 5 additional ties per side at intermediate points for factory-built homes 50 feet or more in length or 4 such ties for homes less than 50 feet in length. C. All components of the anchoring system capable of carrying a force of 4800 D. E.

pounds. Any additions to the factory-built home shall be similarly anchored.

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2. (f)

(g)

(h)

(i) (j)

(k)

Chassis is supported by reinforced piers or other foundation elements of at least equivalent strength that are no less than 36 inches in height above grade. Factory-built homes shall be elevated on a permanent foundation such that the lowest floor of the structure is a minimum of 1 foot above the 100-year flood level.

Utility and Sanitary Systems. 1. All new and replacement water and wastewater systems shall be designed to minimize and eliminate infiltration of floodwaters into the system as well as the discharge of effluent into floodwaters. Water and wastewater treatment facilities shall be provided with a level of flood protection equal to or greater than 3 feet above the 100-year flood elevation: A. On-site waste disposal systems shall be located or designed to avoid impairment to the system or contamination from the system during flooding. B. Utilities such as gas or electrical systems shall be located and constructed to minimize or eliminate flood damage to the system and the risk associated with such flood damaged or impaired systems. Existing or future storage of materials and equipment that are flammable, explosive or injurious to human, animal or plant life is prohibited unless elevated a minimum of 1 foot above the 100-year flood level. Other material and equipment must be either be similarly elevated or: (1) Not be subject to major flood damage and be anchored to prevent movement due to floodwaters or (2) Be readily removable from the area within the time available after flood warning. Flood control structural works such as levees, flood walls, etc. shall provide, at a minimum, protection from a 100-year flood with a minimum of 3 feet of design freeboard and shall provide for adequate interior drainage. In addition, structural flood control works shall be approved by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. No use shall affect the capacity or conveyance of the channel or floodway of any tributary to the main stream, drainage ditch, or other drainage facility or system. Subdivisions (including factory-built home parks and subdivisions) shall be consistent with the need to minimize flood damages and shall have adequate drainage provided to reduce exposure to flood damage. Subdivision development (including the installation of public utilities) shall meet the applicable performance standards. If a subdivision proposal or other proposed new development is in a flood-prone area, any such proposals shall be reviewed to assure that all public utilities and facilities, such as sewer, gas, electrical and water systems are located and constructed to minimize or eliminate flood damage. Subdivision proposals intended for residential development shall provide all lots with a means of vehicular access that will remain dry during occurrence of the 100-year flood. Proposals for subdivisions greater than five (5) acres or fifty (50) lots (whichever is less) shall include 100-year flood elevation data for those areas located within the area of significant flood hazard. Detached Accessory Structures. 1. New detached accessory structures are prohibited in the floodway. Accessory structures shall meet the following standards if constructed or placed in the floodplain: A. Accessory structures shall not be used for human habitation. B. Accessory structures and uses shall be designed to have a low flood damage C.

potential. Accessory structures shall be placed on the building site and constructed so as to offer the minimum resistance to the flow of floodwaters.

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D. E.

Accessory structures shall be firmly anchored to prevent flotation which may result in damage to other structures. A Structure's service facilities such as electrical and heating equipment shall be elevated or flood-proofed to at least one foot above the 100-year flood level.

F.

(l)

The structure shall not exceed 600 gross square feet in area. Recreational Vehicles 1. Recreational Vehicles are exempt from the requirements of Section 32B.05 (e) of this Ordinance regarding anchoring and elevation of factory-built homes when the following criteria area satisfied: A. The recreational vehicle shall be located on the site for less than 180 consecutive days; and B. The recreational vehicle must be fully licensed and ready for highway use. A recreational vehicle is ready for highway use if it is on its wheels or jacking system and is attached to the site only be quick disconnect type utilities and security devices and has no permanently attached additions. 2.

(m)

(n)

Recreational vehicles that are located on the site for more than 180 consecutive days or are not ready for highway use must satisfy requirements of Section 32B.05 (e) of this Ordinance regarding anchoring and elevation of factory-built homes.

Where floodway data has been provided in the Flood Insurance Study, such data shall be used to define the floodway limits. Where no floodway data has been provided, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources shall be contacted to provide a floodway delineation. In addition to the general floodplain standards, all uses within the floodway shall meet the following applicable standards. 1. Consistent with the need to minimize flood damage. 2. 3. 4.

5. 6.

Use construction methods and practices that will minimize flood damage. Use construction materials and utility equipment that are resistant to flood damage. Structures, buildings and sanitary and utility systems, if permitted, shall meet the applicable general floodplain standards and shall be constructed or aligned to present the minimum possible resistance to flood flows. Buildings, if permitted, shall have low flood damage potential and shall not be for human habitation. Storage of materials or equipment that are buoyant, flammable, explosive or injurious to human, animal or plant life is prohibited. Storage of other material may be allowed if readily removable from the floodway within the time available after flood warning.

(009-10)

32B.06 - EXCEPTIONS. (a)

Exceptions are provided to Section 32B.04 for the following: 1. Residential non-substantial improvements. 2. Flood proofing of existing buildings, other than filling. 3. Minor projects clearly having negligible impact, such as street resurfacing and rehabilitation, certain utility infrastructure and appurtenances (e.g. hydrants, poles, manholes, underground pipes), bridge/culvert rehabilitation projects, landscaping, stream rehabilitation, and minor water quality features which typically pose no increase fill or flood potential that would increase flood elevations are not required to

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4. 5. 6.

submit study information to document no net rise unless specifically required by the Public Works Department. Public stream crossing structures. Storm water detention/retention facilities, ponds, streambank stabilization, and wetlands. A historic structure is not required to meet elevation or flood-proofing requirements when it is substantially improved, provided the modifications do not preclude the structure's continued designation as a historic structure.

(009-10)

32B.07 - ADMINISTRATION. (a)

Duties and Responsibilities of Administrator. 1. The Floodplain Manager of the City of Cedar Rapids shall administer and enforce the provisions of this chapter and will herein be referred to as the Administrator. 2. Duties and responsibilities of the Administrator shall include, but not necessarily be limited to the following: A. Review all floodplain development permit applications to ensure that the provisions of this Ordinance will be satisfied. B. Review all floodplain development permit applications to ensure that all necessary permits have been obtained from federal, state or local governmental agencies. C.

D.

E. F. G.

(b)

Obtain and maintain a record of: (1) The NAVD elevation of the lowest floor of all new or substantially improved buildings. (2) The elevation to which new or substantially improved structures have been flood-proofed. Notify adjacent communities and/or counties and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources prior to any proposed alteration or relocation of a watercourse and submit evidence of such notifications to the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Assure that the flood carrying capacity within the altered or relocated portion of any watercourse is maintained. Keep a record of all permits, appeals, variances and such other transactions and correspondence pertaining to the administration of this ordinance. Charge and receive such reasonable fees, as set forth by the City Council by resolution from time to time, to help defray administrative costs related to floodplain/floodway development permits, variances and amendments.

Floodplain Development Permit Required. 1. A floodplain development permit issued by the Administrator shall be secured prior to initiation of any floodplain development (any manmade change to improved or unimproved real estate, including but not limited to buildings or other structures, mining, filling, grading, paving, excavation or drilling operations) including the placement of factory-built homes. 2. Application for a floodplain development permit shall be made on forms supplied by the Administrator and shall include the following information: A.

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B.

Description of the work to be covered by the permit for which application is to be made. Description of the land on which the proposed work is to be done (i.e., lot, block, tract, street address or similar description) that will readily identify and locate the work to be done.

C. D.

Indication of the use or occupancy for which the proposed work is intended. Elevation of the 100-year flood.

E.

NAVD Elevation of the lowest floor (including basement) of buildings or of the level to which a building is to be flood-proofed. For buildings being improved or rebuilt, the estimated cost of improvements and market value of the building prior to the improvements. Such other information as the Administrator deems reasonably necessary for the purpose of this ordinance.

F. G. 3.

4.

5.

The Administrator shall, within a reasonable time, make a determination as to whether the proposed floodplain development meets the applicable standards of this chapter and shall approve or disapprove the application. For disapprovals, the applicant shall be informed, in writing, of the specific reasons therefore. Floodplain Development Permits based on approved plans and applications authorize only the use, arrangement, and construction set forth in such approved plans and applications and no other use, arrangement or construction. Any use, arrangement, or construction at variance with that authorized shall be deemed a violation of this chapter. The applicant shall be required to submit certification by a licensed architect, licensed engineer or licensed land surveyor, as appropriate, registered in the State of Iowa, that the finished fill, building floor elevations, flood-proofing, or other flood protection measures where accomplished in compliance with the provisions of this chapter, prior to the use or occupancy of any structure. All other necessary permits required by Federal or State Law, including Section 404 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972, 33 U.S.C. 1334 shall be received prior to the Administrator's approval of Floodplain Development Permits, including approval when required from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

(009-10)

32B.08 - VARIANCE. (a)

The Building Code Board of Appeals may authorize, upon request in specific cases, such variances from the terms of this chapter that will not be contrary to the public interest where, owing to special conditions, a literal enforcement of the provisions of this chapter will result in unnecessary hardship.

(b)

No variance shall be granted for any development within the floodway which would result in any increase in flood heights during the occurrence of the 100-year flood. Consideration of the effects of any development on flood levels shall be based upon the assumption that an equal degree of development would be allowed for similarly situated lands.

(c)

Variances shall only be granted upon: 1. A showing of good and sufficient cause. 2. A determination that failure to grant the variance would result in exceptional hardship to the applicant. 3.

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(d) (e)

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A determination that the granting of the variance will not result in increased flood heights, additional threats to public safety, extraordinary public expense, create nuisances, cause fraud on or victimization of the public. Variances shall only be granted upon a determination that the variance is the minimum necessary, considering the flood hazard, to afford relief. In cases where the variance involves a lower level of flood protection for buildings than what is ordinarily required by this chapter, the applicant shall be notified in writing over the signature of the Administrator that: 1. The issuance of a variance will result in increased premium rates for flood insurance. 2.

(f) (g)

Such construction increases risks to life and property.

All variances granted shall have the concurrence or approval of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. In passing upon applications for variances, the Building Code Board of Appeals shall consider all relevant factors specified in other sections of this chapter and: 1. The danger to life and property due to increased flood heights or velocities caused by 2.

encroachments. The danger that materials may be swept on to other land or downstream to the injury of others.

3.

The proposed water supply and sanitation systems and the ability of these systems to prevent disease, contamination and unsanitary conditions.

4.

The susceptibility of the proposed facility and its contents to flood damage and the effect of such damage on the individual owner. The importance of the services provided by the proposed facility to the City.

5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

The requirements of the facility for a floodplain location. The availability of alternative locations not subject to flooding for the proposed use. The compatibility of the proposed use with existing development and development anticipated in the foreseeable future. The relationship of the proposed use to the comprehensive plan and floodplain management program for the area. The safety of access to the property in times of flood for ordinary and emergency vehicles. The expected heights, velocity, duration, rate of rise and sediment transport of the floodwater expected at the site. The cost of providing governmental services during and after flood conditions, including maintenance and repair of public utilities (sewer, gas, electrical and water systems), facilities, streets and bridges.

13. (h)

Such other factors which are relevant to the purpose of this chapter. Upon consideration of the factors listed above, the Building Code Board of Appeals may attach such conditions to the granting of variances as it deems necessary to further the purpose of this chapter. Such conditions may include, but not necessarily be limited to: 1. Modification of waste disposal and water supply facilities. 2. Limitation of periods of use and operation. 3. 4.

Imposition of operational controls, sureties, and deed restrictions. Requirements for construction of channel modifications, dikes, levees, and other protective measures, provided such are approved by the Iowa Department of Natural

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5. (i)

Resources and are deemed the only practical alternative to achieving the purpose of this chapter. Flood-proofing measures.

Variances will not be granted for the following circumstances: 1. Perceived loss in property value. 2. Requirements inconvenience the property owner. 3. 4.

Lack of funds to bring property into compliance. Property will look different from other nearby properties.

(009-10)

32B.09 - APPEAL PROCESS. (a)

(b)

(c)

Appeal to City Council. Any person adversely affected by any decision made under this Ordinance may appeal to the City Council by filing a written notice of such appeal with the City Clerk setting forth the issues within 20 days of said decision. Appeal to District Court. Any person adversely affected by any decision of the City Council may appeal to the Iowa District Court for Linn County by filing a petition with said court and serving a copy thereof on the City of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in the same manner as the service of process in a civil action within 30 days of said decision. Review by Other Agency. If any decision by the City needs the review or approval of any State and/or Federal agency, then the times for appeal herein shall not begin to run until such review or approval has been received by the City of Cedar Rapids, Iowa.

(009-10)

32B.10 - ENFORCEMENT. (a)

In addition to any other actions, the Administrator, upon determination of a violation, shall request a denial of flood insurance from the Federal Insurance Administration. The request shall consist of: 1. Name of the property owner and address or legal description of the property sufficient to confirm its identity or location. 2. A clear and unequivocal declaration that the property is in violation of a cited State or 3. 4. 5.

local law, regulation, or ordinance. A clear statement that the public body making the declaration has authority to do so and a citation to that authority. Evidence that the property owner has been provided notice of the violation and a prospective denial of insurance. A clear statement that the declaration is being submitted pursuant to Section 1316, National Flood Insurance Act of 1968, as amended.

(009-10)

32B.11 - NON-CONFORMING USES. (a)

A structure or the use of a structure or premises which was lawful before the passage or amendment of this Ordinance, but which is not in conformity with the provisions of this Ordinance, may be continued subject to the following conditions: 1. If such use is discontinued for six (6) consecutive months, any future use of the building premises shall conform to this Ordinance.

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2. (b)

Uses or adjuncts thereof that are or become nuisances shall not be entitled to continue as nonconforming uses. If any nonconforming use or structure is destroyed by any means, including flood, it shall not be reconstructed if the cost is more than fifty (50) percent of the market value of the structure before the damage occurred, unless it is reconstructed in conformity with the provisions of this Ordinance. This limitation does not include the cost of any alteration to comply with existing state or local health, sanitary, building or safety codes or regulations or the cost of any alteration of a structure listed on the National Register of Historic Places, provided that the alteration shall not preclude its continued designation.

(009-10)

32B.12 - AMENDMENTS. (a)

The regulations and standards set forth in this chapter may periodically be amended, supplemented, changed, or repealed. No amendment, supplement, change, or modification shall be undertaken without prior review of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources.

(009-10)

(Note: Chapter 32B adopted by Ordinance No. 81-87, passed September 30, 1987, published October 5, 1987 and reenacted by Ordinance No. 009-10, passed March 9, 2010 and published March 15, 2010)

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Revitalization Strategy Appendix  

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