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M A I NLI NE newspapers







Inspection agency explains responsibilities to Tunnelhill Borough Vol. 119 No. 32

USPS 326-480

Cresson, Pa.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Since 1898

email: mainlinenews@verizon.net www.mainline-news.com

Newsstand Price 75¢

(814) 472-4110

32 Pages

By Joshua Byers

of Mainline Newspapers

At the request of the council, representatives of Laurel Municipal Inspection Agency attended the Aug. 7 Tunnelhill Borough meeting to further explain what the agency does for the borough. Andrew Holodnik and Barb Frantz distributed packets containing information on the properties that have been investigated over the years to the council. “The first paper you’ll see is a detailed itemized list,” Holodnik said. This list was for one particular property with which the company is having some difficulty. Holodnik said the document didn’t list the phone calls he made to council president Michael Taddei; however, it did explain the correspondence the company has had with SEE INSPECTION, PAGE 6A

Special agents

Gallitzin Township schedules asbestos Washington Township supervisors removal for building approved for paving project loan

By Joshua Byers

of Mainline Newspapers

For the last few months, the Gallitzin Township supervisors have been discussing when to have the asbestos removed from their current building in Coupon so it can be demolished. The board has had to keep postponing the removal because the new building, which is adjacent to the current one, hasn’t been finished. “I don’t know if you want me to go ahead and set up — because he said he needed three weeks notice,” secretary Susan Balzano said. The initial quote for the removal of the hazardous substance came from R.L.

Bateman. It’s set to cost around $2,100. Supervisor Larry Grimes raised a concern about the board being completely moved in to the new building, but Balzano assured him that the board will be moved by September. Supervisor Joe Benzie asked Balzano if there would be any “wiggle room” with the crew from R.L. Bateman in the event the move wasn’t complete and the work had to be pushed back a bit. “Yeah, I mean, I can wait a week to call him,” Balzano said. She then requested authorization from the board to per-

SEE ASBESTOS, PAGE 13A

Annaliese Niebauer (left), Lexie Reighard, and Lydia Sorchilla use the clipboards assigned to them to collect information about evidence while investgating the crime scene set up by FBI special agent Michael Hochrein during the state police-run Camp Cadet on Friday, Aug. 4. Photo by Joshua Byers.

By Joshua Byers

of Mainline Newspapers

In April, the Washington Township supervisors approved a motion allowing solicitor Thomas Swope to begin the paperwork for the township to borrow money for this year’s paving project. On Aug. 1, the board received word that the municipality had been approved. “That’s approved as of yesterday. We’ll be moving forward with our project here soon,” chairman Jaime Hartline said at the Aug. 2 meeting. Once supervisor and roadmaster Raymond Guzic Jr. meets with Pennsylvania Department of Transportation municipal specialist Michael Bowser, the project can be put out to bid. Swope explained to the board at the April meeting that in order to borrow the money necessary to complete the paving, the township would have to go through the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development due to the Local Government Unit Debt Act. The three stipulations to the act, according to the DCED website, are that the principal mature within five years, the amount of debt issued under Section

8109 not exceed $125,000 or 30 percent of the nonelectoral debt limit at any one time (whichever is less), and that the debt not exceed the debt limits imposed in Section 8022 of the act. The board’s plan is to pay off the upward of $175,000 over the course of four or five years. Guzic said he plans on meeting with Bowser as soon as possible. He added that he’d like to get the project out to bid as soon as possible. Because of this, Guzic and Hartline agreed that it would be beneficial for a special meeting to be scheduled to open the bids. Moving on, Guzic said the new township truck has been completed, it just needs to have the bed installed. The truck should be back in a short period of time. On a similar topic, the former truck needs to be sold. The vehicle is a 2000 Ford 550, and Hartline explained that the board plans on advertising the truck in the newspaper and on municibid.com. However, the bids cannot be advertised at the same time. “There’s a 10-day window after the advertise-

FBI agent reflects on career, uses training to teach cadets By Joshua Byers

of Mainline Newspapers

In April 1987, the remains of a teenage girl from Butler, Pa., were unearthed in the charred rubble of a house in Slippery Rock Township. She had been missing for 22 years. Law enforcement was led to the grave of Patricia Desmond from an informant’s tip and excavated the site with the help of graduate students studying archeology at Mercyhurst College. According to an article from the Pittsburgh Post Gazette titled “Mercyhurst College professor gets the call to examine plane crashes and crime scenes,” the

trio of graduate students used “techniques typically employed at archaeological digs to lay down a grid and examine every inch of the site.” With the students’ help, the investigation led to the arrest and conviction of Desmond’s killer, Conrad E. Miller, and was the beginning of a 30-year career in forensic investigation for FBI special agent Michael Hochrein. “It’s been a fascinating — just a fascinating career,” Hochrein said. Before the investigation, Hochrein was simply a student studying archeology. After assisting on the Desmond case, he said he became interested in law enforcement and began the process of joining the FBI. He went through the proper training with the agency and came out a special agent. Hochrein has had the chance to travel all over the world and SEE AGENT, PAGE 4A

SEE LOAN, PAGE 13A

FBI special agent Michael Hochrein (middle) shows cadets Eric Berkihiser (left), Jacob Flynn-Long, and Jill Montag how to sight in one of the pieces of equipment he brought for the investigation during the state police-run Camp Cadet on Aug. 4. Photo by Joshua Byers.

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