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February 16, 2017

Revloc continuing centennial plans

By Megan Riner

of Mainline Newspapers

According to livingplaces.com, “Revloc is a typical example of coal mining communities in southwestern Pennsylvania,� and its historic district is “an intact, well-preserved community� at that. It’s this history that residents of Revloc wish to showcase during the town’s centennial celebration this July. “It’s a town celebration, but it’s not just for the town,� said Jody Sloan. “It’s for everyone.� Everyone — residents, former residents, neighbors in surrounding communities, out-ofstaters, etc. — is invited into Revloc for the three-day event recognizing its 100 years. Besides enjoying the activities, small-town atmosphere, and good company of Revloc residents, event-goers can explore an example of an historic mining town, which should appeal to history buffs or anyone with an interest the mining days of old. The town was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995. Progress is being made to finalize the details for the event. Tentative plans include music and bands, a mug night, children’s bike safety and seat SEE PLANS, PAGE 3

Doing the most good

Leigh Ann Terndrup’s fifth-grade class at Cambria Elementary School stands around the food items they collected for the food drive challenge held between several local school districts. This class collected the most food items in the entire school and won an ice cream party. Items will be donated to the local food pantry. Photo by Joshua Byers.

     



   

       

                                                

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Ebensburg Rotary’s WineTime in the Mainline set for Feb. 25 PAGE 2 - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

By Ron Portash

of Mainline Newspapers

Although this is the ninth year for WineTime in Mainline, the Rotary Club of Ebensburg always finds a way to keep the event fresh and fun. Nearly 500 people attended last year’s WineTime at the Young Peoples Community Center, making the event a resounding success. This year, the event will be held on Saturday, Feb. 25. There are two sessions to chose from: an afternoon session from 1-4 p.m. and an evening session from 5-8 p.m. The event will be held at the Crystal Hall, located at 3133 New Germany Road in Ebensburg. Five wineries will be on site for testing and purchase: B&L Wine Cellars of Johnstown, Bee Kind Winery of Curwensville, Briar Valley Winery of Bedford,

Tickets available online or from any Rotarian

Germantown Winery of Portage, and Seven Mountains Winery of State College. According to Rotary Club member Becky DeYulis, “It will be an afternoon and evening that everyone can enjoy.� WineTime in the Mainline is a fundraiser for the Rotary Club of Ebensburg to fund its Lease a Flag program and to provide scholarships to local high school students and donations to local food banks, as well as other local Rotary programs. “All the money stays locally and helps funds the programs the Rotary provides to the Ebensburg area,� explained DeYulis. Coal Country Brewing will be there to provide samples of brews for those interested in their beer

Correction

In the article “Carrolltown opens office remodeling bids� published on Feb. 9, council member Ron Gwizdak was quoted as stating that contractor Tony Boloskey had a license and was bidding on the same project as Platt Construction, so the quality should be up to code. Although it was not stated in the article, Platt Construction also has a license.

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lines. A number of food and craft vendors will be on scene to provide goods and crafts for the crowds. The vendors include Martin’s Kettle, Candy’s caramels and other sweet specialties, Faranda Farms Garlic Festival, and Woods Country Decor. Food is also available for purchase from the Crystal Hall and vendors. The chef for the Crystal Hall will have sliders and

wraps available, along with meat and cheese platters. To keep the event fresh and different, this year features live music. Mike Reed will perform for the afternoon session and Andy Lubert will be performing at the evening session. The Rotary will have its Lease a Flag program available for sign-ups at the festival. The program is available to residents of

Cambria Township and Ebensburg Borough. A United States flag with a 10-foot pole will be placed in the lessee’s yard before holidays beginning with Memorial Day and ending on Veterans Day. Pre-event tickets are $20 per person and $25 at the door. There is also a non-drinking ticket available for $10. Tickets are available from any Rotarian, Mid’s Candy in the Mini Mall, or online at https://www.eventbrite. com.


Plans

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

belt checks, and a car show. Baked goods and traditional foods will be for sale, as will Revloc centennial shirts and memory books. For the memory books, residents and former residents are asked to search their photo albums or camera cards for any and all photos that showcase life in

MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - PAGE 3

Revloc. Pictures taken before renovations were made to different buildings and sights around town would be appreciated, but any photos are welcome. Residents are asked to submit only copies of the photographs, no originals. Recipes are also requested for a Revloc recipe book, a compilation of residents’ favorite dishes for sharing with friends, neighbors, and visitors. To submit photos and

recipes or for any questions, contact Lois Banfield at 814-615-5405 or Jody Sloan at 814-525-4087. Another meeting will be held on Monday, Feb. 27, to continue planning for the centennial. The meeting will take place at 6:30 p.m. at the fire hall. Any resident interested in helping out or contributing in any way is invited to attend, even if a resident is just curious as to what is going on.


Burns: spending cuts better than sales, income tax hikes PAGE 4 - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

A 2017-18 state budget proposal that achieves $2 billion in cuts and savings is conceptually preferable to one that relies on sales and income tax hikes, said state representative Frank Burns, who has consistently opposed new taxes. Burns said he believes that Gov. Tom Wolf, who introduced his latest budget this week, has grasped a well-documented reality in the 72nd Legislative District that also applies to wide swaths of Pennsylvania. “The working people of my district have made it known time and again — to me and anyone else who will listen — that they don’t want higher taxes, period,� Burns said. “The reality is, they are working and they are tired of carrying people who aren’t working. That’s why I refused to support the governor’s prior attempts to raise the sales and income taxes.� Two years ago, Burns was one of 13 House Democrats who broke party ranks to end a ninemonth state budget impasse between Democrat Wolf and

Representative says cracking down on welfare fraud could yield new savings

Republicans who control the state House and state Senate. That dispute centered on Wolf’s desire to raise the sales or income tax, or a combination thereof, to close a $1.2 billion shortfall. “The irony is, if the governor had promoted this $2 billion in cost savings and spending cuts two years ago, instead of holding out for higher taxes, we could have avoided a big fiasco — and the state would have had an $800 million surplus each of the last two years,� Burns said. While regarding the current budget proposal as a step in the right philosophical direction, Burns said he intends to get the opinion of folks back home before deciding how he will vote on it in Harrisburg. In particular, Burns said he wants to

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gauge their support for Wolf’s plan to assess a $25-per-person fee for state police coverage. Burns also believes further savings can be found through fair-minded and practical reforms in the public welfare system, such as requiring photographs on ACCESS cards and cracking down on fraud like that documented by state Auditor General Eugene DePasquale, who discovered 2,000 dead people’s accounts getting state benefits. “News stories revealing the woman who got nearly $60,000 in public benefits for twins no one has seen in 10 years, or the woman who got $100,000 for kids who don’t exist, or the sale and fraudulent use of SNAP benefits are not only an embarrassment to the state, they are an affront to the working people who foot the bill,� Burns said. “I share my constituents’ values

on this matter, which is why I will continue supporting meas-

ures to make the welfare system as fraud-free as possible.�

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Jackson Twp. approves CPV Fairview project items

MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - PAGE 5

By Allie Garver

of Mainline Newspapers

Bruce Baker called the Feb. 9 Jackson Township Board of Supervisors meeting to order at 7:30 a.m. Supervisor John Wallet was in attendance, while Eric Dreikorn had a prior engagement and could not attend. Since there were no public comments to be made, Baker moved the meeting on to discuss the new business portion of the agenda. A motion was made by Baker to approve the Cambria Somerset Authority Industrial water supply and reclaimed water line project for the new Competitive Power Ventures (CPV) Fairview Energy Center. Due to Dreikorn being absent from the meeting, Wallet seconded the motion but had to make a statement because the company he works for is in negotiations with CPV Fairview to do some

work. The statement read: “Because there is not another supervisor here, Eric Dreikorn is absent, I just want to state that the company I work for, my other job other than the supervisors, is currently working with CPV in negotiations to do some potential work with them — the contract, and the section of the law reads: ‘Any public official or public employee who in the discharge of his official duties would be required to vote on a matter that would result in a conflict of interest shall abstain from voting and prior to the vote being taken, publicly announce and disclose the nature of his interest as a public record in a written memorandum filed with the person responsible for recording the minutes for the meeting at which the vote is taken.’ On the advice of our solicitor [William Barbin], because supervisor

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Dreikorn is not present, I will second that motion.� Barbin said that the rest of the section reads that if the motion cannot pass because of the abstention, the person abstaining is allowed to take action after the statement is read and signed. Wallet did sign the written statement during the meeting. Another motion was made by Baker to approve the consent to assignment of the CPV Host Community Benefits agreement. Wallet seconded the motion with the same statement as the first motion attached to it and signed a second statement. This agreement is one of the final steps before the township receives the money from CPV. The bank is now asking for the contracts that

have been signed and assembled over the last year relating to the host benefits agreement. The resignation of part-time police office Andrew Montaina was approved with a motion made by Wallet. Baker seconded the motion. The final item to be approved, with a motion made by Wallet, was the annual contribution of $1,500 to the East Taylor-Jackson Township baseball boosters. The motion was seconded by Baker. Before the meeting came to a close, Barbin explained a letter that was sent to the supervisors on behalf of the Nanty Glo Sewer Authority. The sewer authority letter expressed interest in constructing a sewer line on Finntown Road due to its operator’s suggestion and its customers inquiring about a line.

   

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The letter was sent to the supervisors because the Nanty Glo Sewer Authority wants to see if it’s possible to use Community Development Block Grant money, through the township. A feasibility study needs to be done on the area before any concrete decisions can be made.



                

                 

               

                 

 

                

                 

               

                   



                

                 

               

                 

 

 

    

  

      

      

    


Burns announces nearly $250,000 in fire department, EMS grants PAGE 6 - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

State representative Frank Burns has announced the award of $248,975 in state grants to 19 fire and ambulance companies in the 72nd Legislative District. The grants are made possible by the Fire Company and Volunteer Ambulance Service Grant Program, and can be used toward repairing, building, or renovating facilities. The money also can be applied toward the purchase of new equipment, training and certification of staff, or it may go to repay debt related to equipment purchases or facility building and maintenance. “Our fire departments and EMS providers perform vital work in our communities,” Burns said. “It’s also hard and dangerous work, as I found out

Money can be used for repairs, renovations, training, new equipment

when suiting up for a Cambria County Fire School training session. As someone who’s stood shoulder-to-shoulder with them for a taste of what they go through, I am proud to announce this funding to aid their continued operations.” Burns noted that recipients still need to complete and return original signed copies of their grant agreements by May 31 in order to receive their money. He urged any department that needs help with this requirement to contact his nearest district office. The grant list is as follows. Ashville Fire Company, $14,159. Cambria Township Volunteer

Fire Company, $14,417. Carrolltown Fire Company, $12,101. Cresson Area Ambulance Service Inc., $7,448. Cresson Volunteer Fire Company, $15,000. Dauntless Fire Company, $15,000. Gallitzin Fire Company No. 1, $14,417. Jackson Township Volunteer Fire Company – Fire Company, $15,000. Jackson Township Volunteer Fire Company – EMS, $7,448. John Carroll Area Ambulance Service, $7,448. Loretto Fire Company, $12,873. Patton Area Ambulance

Association Inc., $7,448. Patton Fire Company No.1, $15,000. Portage Area Ambulance Association, $7,448. Portage Volunteer Fire

Company, $28,490. Reade Township Volunteer Fire Company, $11,188. Summerhill Township Volunteer Fire Company, $14,159.


MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - PAGE 7


Commissioners approve agreements, appointments PAGE 8 - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

By Megan Riner

of Mainline Newspapers

The Cambria County commissioners approved a number of agreements at their Feb. 9 meeting. The first of these agreements was for precast concrete inspection services for the Carney Bridge project. TRC Engineers, Inc., which solicitor William Barbin said specializes in this kind of inspecting, will perform the examination at an amount not to exceed $9,000. The commissioners also approved an agreement with the

Pennsylvania Department of Corrections to conduct K-9 searches at the county prison. These searches are to be carried out unannounced three times a year at no cost to the county. An agreement with the county’s conservation district and the Pa. Fish and Boat Commission for habitat and restoration work at Glendale Lake was next approved, and after that, a settlement stipulation with regard to the Pax Mall Realty Company, LLP tax assessment appeal was approved. This was a reduction in taxes for Boscov’s, as it was val-

       

 

         

  

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ued higher than fair market value. The final agreement was with Nutrition, Inc., for the management of the county’s nine senior activity centers at a rate of $716,933 per year for a period that began on Feb. 1 and will end on June, 30, 2018. The rate is less than last year’s rate by about $39,000. The commissioners then approved election supplies and services from William Penn

Printing in Pittsburgh for the 2017 elections at a cost of $45,338, and grave flags and grave flag holders at a cost of $24,624 and $20,002.50, respectively. The three-member board also approved the resignation of Kathy Rigby from the Cambria County Children and Youth Advisory Board and appointed Donna Cauffiel to fill the unexpired term on that same board.

Melissa Komar was appointed to the Drug and Alcohol Planning Council for a three-year term, which will end on Dec. 31, 2019. The Cambria County commissioners will conduct their next meeting out in the community. It will take place at 6:05 p.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 22, at the Susquehanna Township municipal building at 508 Hillcrest Street near the Barnesboro side of Northern Cambria.


Students, teachers invited to take part in bookmark design contest

MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - PAGE 9

The Children’s Book Festival of Johnstown is an annual event that connects top-selling, critically-acclaimed children’s authors, illustrators, and storytellers with area kids. To kick off the festival, The Learning Lamp is calling on local students to use their imaginations and create a bookmark that tells a story focused around the theme of “Read, Rock, and Roll.” Their hand-drawn creations will be featured at the ninth annual Children’s Book Festival

of Johnstown, which takes place April 1-2. “The bookmark contest has been a staple of the Children’s Book Festival since we started in 2008,” said Ingrid Kloss, development director at The Learning Lamp. “Last year, we received over 600 entries from local students, and this year we hope to receive even more! Plus, the kids love the friendly competition and always turn in great work.” The bookmark design contest is divided

into four age brackets: preschool and kindergarten, first and second grade, third and fourth grade, and fifth and sixth grade. Book festival attendees each get one vote per age bracket. Each division winner receives a prize package that includes a personal library of books. Teachers can enter to win a classroom set of books by submitting their students’ bookmarks together. Rules and entry forms have

been delivered to area schools. Any child from preschool to sixth grade can take part, even if their school is not participating in the contest. Only one bookmark entry per child. Visit thelearninglamp.org for a printable entry form. Completed bookmarks can be sent to The Learning Lamp at 2025 Bedford St., Johnstown, PA 15904. The deadline to submit is March 18 by 5 p.m.


Loretto Borough council focuses on water, roads PAGE 10 - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

By Ron Portash

of Mainline Newspapers

The first items on the agenda for the Loretto Borough council at its Feb. 13 meeting were several water matters. The first was the unexpected resignation of water meter reader, Woody Clapper. Due to changes in schedules at his full-time job, Clapper is no longer able to work for Loretto Borough as a part-time meter reader. The council accepted his resignation with regret and thanked Clapper for his service with the borough. The borough hired a water system operator. It is required to have

a system operator to ensure water quality, perform certain sampling, and ensure necessary and timely submission of paperwork to the Pa. Department of Environmental Protection (DEP). Even though the borough does not have a water treatment plant, wells, or reservoirs and buys its water from another municipality that has a licensed water system operation, the state requires Loretto Borough Water Authority to have a licensed operator. The borough has been without a licensed water system operator for a number of months and was not fined by DEP. The borough has a commercial laboratory conducting most of the

necessary testing. Time-sensitive testing, like pH, must be performed at the water system site. Without an operator, the borough has struggled with submitting the massive amount of DEP paperwork. To ensure the borough comes into compliance with DEP regulations, an independently licensed water system operator was hired at the cost of $200 per month. With the impending closure of the local S&T Bank office, First National Bank presented the borough council with information concerning the services it could provide to the borough. Joyce Knopp and Cathy O’Neil, representatives of First National

Bank, explained to council that the bank currently has two ATMs on the St. Francis University campus and has been approached by several local businesses about placing an ATM in the town itself. O’Neil stated the bank is exploring that option, but no decision has been made. Council requested the bank representatives provide several investment options for borough funds that comply with state and federal guidelines for municipal governments. Council held lengthy discussions on the paving of borough streets using the state liquid fuels funds and county aid money. The bor-

ough had researched some possible cost estimates for St. Florian, St. Paul, and St. Peter streets, along with repair work on St. Elizabeth Street. Council entered talks with the university concerning its assistance in paving St. Peter Street where it enters campus property. According to council president Ward Prostejovsky, there have been talks with the Loretto Volunteer Fire Company concerning its participation in the paving of St. Florian Street that runs between the fire hall and the borough building. The total cost for the St. Florian Street work was estimated SEE LORETTO, PAGE 13

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MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - PAGE 11


PAGE 12 - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

IRS “Dirty Dozen� list includes falsely padding deductions Taxpayers are legally responsible for what is on their return

Avoid the temptation to falsely inflate deductions or expenses on tax returns, the IRS warned in its 2017 “Dirty Dozen� list of tax scams. Doing so may result in paying less than is owed or receiving a larger refund than is due. The majority of taxpayers file honest and accurate tax returns each year. However, each year some taxpayers “fudge� their information. This is why falsely claiming deductions, expenses or credits on tax returns remains on the “Dirty Dozen� list of tax scams. Taxpayers should think twice before overstating deductions such as charitable contributions, padding business expenses or including credits that they are not entitled to receive – like the Earned Income Tax Credit or Child Tax Credit. Each year, increasingly efficient automated systems generate most IRS audits. The IRS can normally audit returns filed within the last three years. Additional years can be added if substantial errors are identified or fraud is suspected. Although there is no way to entirely avoid an audit, preparing an accurate tax return is a taxpayer’s best defense. Significant penalties may apply for taxpayers who file incorrect returns including: 20 percent of the disallowed amount for filing an erroneous claim for a refund or credit.

$5,000 if the IRS determines a taxpayer has filed a “frivolous tax return.â€? A frivolous tax return is one that does not include enough information to figure the correct tax or that contains information clearly showing that the tax reported is substantially incorrect. In addition to the full amount of tax owed, a taxpayer could be assessed a penalty of 75 percent of the amount owed if the underpayment on the return resulted from tax fraud. Taxpayers may be subject to criminal prosecution and be brought to trial for actions such as: • Tax evasion. • Willful failure to file a return, supply information, or pay any tax due. • Fraud and false statements. • Preparing and filing a fraudulent return. • Identity theft. Criminal prosecution could lead to additional penalties and even prison time.

File an accurate return Using tax software is one way for taxpayers to ensure they file an accurate return and claim only the tax benefits they’re eligible to receive. Question and answer formats lead taxpayers through each section of the tax return. IRS Free File is an option for taxpayers to use software to prepare and e-file their tax returns for free.

         

              

    

        

Community-based volunteers at locations around the country also provide free face-to-face tax assistance to qualifying taxpayers. Volunteers help taxpayers file taxes correctly, claiming only the credits and deductions they’re entitled to by law. Taxpayers should know that they are legally responsible for what is on their tax return, even if it is prepared by someone else. The IRS offers important tips for choosing a tax preparer. More information about IRS audits, the balance due collection process and possible civil and criminal penalties for non-

compliance is available at the IRS website. Taxpayers can also learn more about the Taxpayer Bill of Rights at IRS.gov. This is a set of fundamental rights each taxpayer should be aware of when dealing with the IRS, including when the IRS audits a tax return.

To find tips about choosing a return preparer, better understand the differences in credentials and qualifications, research the IRS preparer directory, and learn how to submit a complaint regarding a tax return preparer, visit www.irs.gov/chooseataxpro.

              

          

  

 

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Mount Aloysius College’s mock trial team stands proud

MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - PAGE 13

The Mount Aloysius College Mock Trial team, inaugurated just last semester by Attorney Dave Andrews, went up against some fierce national competition at the recent American Mock Trial Association’s National Regional Tournament held at Penn State University. Going

Loretto

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10

nose-to-nose against such historically successful teams as Georgetown University, Carnegie Mellon University, Fordham University, and Lafayette College in four trials over three days, the Mounties stood proud. In the prior weekend, Mount

at $7,720. Prostejovsky indicated that the paving of St. Florian Street will hopefully be split between the borough and the fire company. According to Prostejovsky, the fire company is pursuing grant money to assist in the paving project. A motion was made and passed to move forward with the paving projects, with the limit being placed for total costs to

Aloysius’ mock trial team competed in New York at the St. Bonaventure University PreSeason Tournament. They competed against Ithaca College, Allegheny College, and St. John Fisher College. Mock trial is an exciting educational opportunity for students to

emulate and learn about the actual proceedings of court cases. Mount Aloysius College’s team splits the duties of portraying both attorneys and witnesses during the mock trial proceedings. Members of the Mount Aloysius College mock trial team include: Rachel Cain (cap-

be under $41,000. The next move will be to develop specifications for the paving and issue bid requests for paving and repair of those streets. Prostejovsky stated, “The borough has been preparing for this project for several years now.” Council passed a resolution to support the St. Francis University redevelopment grant efforts with the Commonwealth Financing Authority for a $1 million grant for a multi-million dollar renovation project of Sullivan Hall.

tain), of Cresson; Lucas Mearkle, of Altoona; Maggee Carrera, of Freeport; John Branick, of Ebensburg; Tessa Boyles, of South Fork; Nastasja Banks of Driftwood, Pa.; Josh Devlin of Southend-on-Sea, England; and Carol Zheng of Summerhill.

St. Francis University has been in a long capital fundraising campaign for the revocations. According to the university’s website, “Sullivan Hall will become home to the School of Health Sciences with modern classroom and lab space specifically tailored to the needs of our health sciences students, who, of course, will also be spending a great deal of time pursing coursework in the new science center.” Loretto Borough will act as a pass-through agency for the funding from the state.


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Thursday, February 16, 2017 • Page 14

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

CRESSON: 2 bedroom, 2nd floor. Utilities not included. $350/ month. Additional pet security. 814-2420869.

CRESSON: 2 bedroom. No pets. Call 886-2377, 8am-5pm. EBENSBURG: 2 bedroom, 1&1/2 bath, 2 story townhouse/ loft, basement. Elegant. No pets. 814-4728536. EBENSBURG: 207 W. Crawford St. Nice 2 bedroom. $650. Landlord pays heat, water, sewer, garbage. 814659-1302. EBENSBURG: 207 W. Crawford St. 1 bedroom. $450. Landlord pays water, sewer, garbage. 814-659-1302. EBENSBURG: First class 2 bedroom, 2 bath. All new construction. Located downtown. Appliances, washer, dryer, gas fireplace, secured elevator access & off-street parking. $675/ month. Call 814-421-0059. EBENSBURG: Lovell Park Village. 2 bedroom townhouse. $725/ month plus utilities. Plus deposit. 472-6267. EBENSBURG: New listing. 1 bedroom. Heat, water, sewage, garbage included. No smoking/ pets. Call Kevin 472-7707. EBENSBURG: New, remodeled, large 2 bedroom, laundry, outside porch, w/s/g, electric, gas heat incl. $825/ month, 2 units available. 814241-8384.

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

EBENSBURG: Small and large 1-2 bedroom, 2-bedroom townhouse with 1.5 bath, all include heat/water/sewage/garbage, off-street parking. No pets. Storage available. $460$850/month. 471-0462.

GALLITZIN: 2 bedroom, heat & appliances included. Off street parking. No pets. $475/ month. 886-4715. HASTINGS: Very small 1 bedroom. First floor. Includes heat, water, sewage, garbage, and appliances. No pets. $325/ month. 814-247-8676. LORETTO RD: 2 bedroom apt. All utilities included except electric. Security deposit. $525/ month. No pets. 330-6294. LORETTO: 1 bedroom, above garage. Mostly furnished. Call 2435849, leave message. MARKET STREET COMMONS IN JOHNSTOWN: 1-2 bedroom apartments available. Utilities included. 814-536-6122 for details. Equal Housing Opportunity. NANTY GLO: 2 bedroom. Includes heater, water, sewage. No smoking/ pets. Security deposit. 814-749-9433. NEW GERMANY: Townhouse style. 2 bedroom, kitchen appliances, laundry hookups, basement. $640. Includes heat, water, sewage and garbage. No pets/ no smoking. Call 4959426.

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

NORTHERN CAMBRIA: 1 1 bath. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. frigerator, washer/ dryer water/ garbage included. 7426.

bedroom, Stove, rehookups, 814-979-

NORTHERN CAMBRIA: Spacious 3 bedroom, 2nd floor above Star Courier office. Close to downtown, washer/ dryer hook-up, no smoking/ pets, must have references, $600/ month includes heat/ water/ sewage. One month security deposit required. Available soon! 948-6210. PATTON: 1 bedroom. Water/ sewage/ garbage/ heat included. $450/ month. No pets. 814-691-8247. PORTAGE: 1003 Main St. 1 bedroom. No pets. Completely renovated. $620/ month, all utilities included. Washer/ dryer. 322-7487 or 3225609. PORTAGE: 1026 Gillespie Ave. First floor, 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Spacious. Stove & refrigerator. Laundry hookups in basement. Fenced-in back yard. Security and references. $550/ month plus utilities. 724-354-2007.

APARTMENTS FOR RENT

PORTAGE: 2 bedroom, $310/ month, credit check, security deposit. 814691-3203.

TWIN ROCKS: 2 bedroom. $450/ mo. Includes heat, water, sewage, garbage, stove and fridge. Private parking, washer dryer hook-up. No pets. 749-6958.

COMMERCIAL FOR RENT

EBENSBURG: A little over 4000 sq. ft. 601 W. Lloyd St. Call Kevin 4727707.

EBENSBURG: Office space. 300 sq. ft. Includes off street parking and utilities. $300/ month. 814-472-8440.

HOUSES FOR RENT

GALLITZIN: 2 bedroom, $400/ month. Water, sewer, trash included. Pets OK. SD, background check. Archie 886-2100.

Mainline Newspapers P.O. Box 777 Ebensburg, PA 15931

  

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MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - PAGE 15 SERVICES

KOSABER GENERAL CONTRACTORS: Home Improvements, professional handyman service, over 25 yrs in business. All work guaranteed. PA# 100978 495-4785.

MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT

PRINCE GALLITZIN PARK: (Glendale Area) Very nice manufactured cabin & efficency apt. Furnished, includes water, garbage, cable TV. Reasonable rent. 687-4247.

BUILDINGS FOR SALE

PORTAGE: 3 unit apartment building. Main Street. Owner financing available. Great price. 322-5849.

LAND/LOTS FOR SALE

EBENSBURG: Winterset Road. Central Cambria School District. Perc approved. Surveyed. Driveway permit. 2.8 acres. $39,000. 814-241-9003, after 6.

HELP WANTED

AEROTEK is now hiring GENERAL LABORERS with a construction background, FORKLIFT OPERATORS, WAREHOUSE WORKERS, WELDERS, and MACHINISTS. Positions are available in Blair, Cambria, and Bedford Counties. Please contact 814-285-3700 for consideration. BARTENDERS, SERVERS, & COOKS: Lake Inn is now hiring for all shifts. Apply in person at 1001 Rowena Dr., Ebensburg. EOE.

Classified Deadline: Tuesday at 10 a.m.

   

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HELP WANTED

CAREGIVER: Agency. All shifts. Need TB test & clean criminal background. EOE. 814-266-5337.

DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS for intellectually disabled adults. Competitive hourly wage. Part time and full time available. All shifts. 814-410-6197. EOE. DRIVERS: Getting home is easier. Nice pay package. BCBS +other benefits. Monthly bonuses. No-touch. Chromed out trucks w/ APUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S. CDLA. 855-200-4631. FULL TIME LICENSED HAIR STYLIST: Rebecca Rockerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hair Salon. 1005 Main St., Portage. 814-7138259. HEAVY EQUIPMENT MECHANIC: CDL required for working in Indiana and Cambria Counties. Experience in Caterpillar equipment preferred. Welding experience a plus. Competitive salary. 401K and benefits package. Please send resume to the following: Amerikohl Mining, Inc. 202 Sunset Drive, Butler, PA 16001. JUST LIKE HOME IN CRESSON is currently seeking applications for part time second shift. Applicants must have HS diploma or GED and be able to pass drug test, clean, cook, do laundry and care for geriatric population. Please apply within at 506 Gallitzin Rd., Cresson 16630. Looking for an exciting job with flexible schedule? Italian Village Pizza is now hiring DELIVERY DRIVERS, CASHIERS, AND SERVERS! Applicants must possess high energy and a friendly attitude. Restaurant experience is a plus but not required. If interested in a job with GREAT earning potential, please inquire within or call 472-2202.

 

     

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SERVERS/ BARTENDER: Part time, evening shift. Fridays & Saturdays required. No Sunday or Monday hours. Apply in person at Penn Gables Restaurant, Ebensburg.

SERVICES

GREG PETRISKO MASONRY: All brick, block, chimney, concrete work, electrical. Also various types of remodeling. Free estimates. 814-3227535. Ask for Greg.

HARBAUGH ELECTRIC: Quality workmanship at affordable rates. Fully insured. 814-743-6166. PARTIES, WEDDINGS, SEMINARS, SPECIAL EVENTS: Cresson American Legion ballroom. 886-8567.

WANTED

PROPERTY YOU NAME IT WE BUY IT! Want to sell your Property? Then give us a call, we will buy your House, Apartment Building, Warehouse, Land. 814-979-7426.

WE SELL YOUR STUFF: High Street Emporium Antiques & Collectibles. 814-472-6990.

Phone: 814-472-4110 Fax: 814-472-2275

      

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SCHOOL BUS & VAN DRIVERS NEEDED: Penn Cambria School District. To apply stop in at Wilkinson Bus Lines, Inc., or call 886-4600.

PART TIME NURSE AIDES: Must be knowledgeable, compassionate AND able to pass a background check and drug screen. $9.50/ hour for CNAs and $8.50/ hour for non-certified Nurse Aides. Apply in person at Saint Benedict Manor, Inc., 600 Theatre Road, St. Benedict, PA 15773. EOE. SALES REPRESENTATIVE needed for company located in Ebensburg area. Travel out of town to cover multi-state area required half of the time. Prefer some industrial, electrical, or mining sales experience. Good working conditions. EOE. Send resume to: Sales Representative, P.O. Box 777, Ebensburg, PA 15931.

   

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PART TIME HOUSEKEEPING/ DIETARY STAFF: Must be knowledgable, compassionate AND able to pass a background check & drug screen. Apply in person at Saint Benedict Manor, Inc., 600 Theatre Road, St. Benedict, PA 15773. EOE.

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HELP WANTED

RICKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S REMODELING/ HANDYMAN: 15% spring discount. All home improvements and paint, wallpaper, siding, decks/ ramps. PA#045341. 814-886-5504. SHAFFER TREE SERVICE, LLC: Tree removal, tree/shrub trimming, stump grinding, fertilizing, landscaping. Free estimates, fully insured. Owner Rick Shaffer 736-4168.

   

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PAGE 16 - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

Poâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Peek at the Past

Now, why did I say that?

wife returned and unloaded groceries from a shopping trip. She had just purchased some snacks, candy, and other nonessential food items from a local bulk grocery store and started to unpack them. I knew what goodies our family usually purchased at that store, so I quickly announced, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;dubsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; on the red licorice sticks.â&#x20AC;?

You didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to be a meteorologist to notice the dark thunderhead clouds on the western horizon one summer day many years ago. My entire family was with me in our car as I proclaimed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wow, that sky looks deafening!â&#x20AC;? No, that is not a typo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; I actually said that the â&#x20AC;&#x153;sky looks deafening.â&#x20AC;? Another time, years later (and many times in between) it happened again. This next flub occurred as my

Family takes comments in strideâ&#x20AC;Ś That declaration drew a loud giggle from my daughter-in-law, who heard that announcement from another room. The rest of my family had become accustomed to hearing my flubs, but for her the experience was new. She quickly got acclimated, though, as I followed that up with many more verbal slips through the years. Not long after that flub, I was watching a football game and took notice that when a player removed his helmet he had an odd haircut. As much as I should have known that the name for that hairstyle was a

        

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Mohawk, it did little to curb my quick tongue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The league should outlaw those Iroquois hairstyles,â&#x20AC;? I declared to those around me. Now, chances are good that you too have produced your fair share of blunders. For me, however, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just say that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had an extra allocation in my lifetime. For instanceâ&#x20AC;Ś A local pharmacist once asked for my opinion concerning gifted education. He knew that I was a former teacher and that my own children were part of the gifted program in our local school. He worried that the other children in his childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class might resent those who received supplemental instruction. I spoke with certainty, saying, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh my, yes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; there is definitely an astigmatism associated with some kids in the gifted program.â&#x20AC;? To make matters worse, I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t realize just what I said until later that night. I sheepishly apologized to him the next day. My wife agrees with my analogy regarding my propensity to proclaim pratfalls. I have always admitted that my mouth is cruising at an interstate speed of 70 mph, while my brain is laboring along at a school zone speed of 15. Not a silver-tongued oratorâ&#x20AC;Ś A good example of my mouth motoring a mile a minute occurred at a local jewelry store. I wanted to inquire as to whether some inherited earrings, bracelets, and necklaces were of any monetary value. Meaning to ascertain if they were made of precious metals or just costume jewelry, I instead asked if a particular piece was â&#x20AC;&#x153;real silver or just cosmetic jewelry.â&#x20AC;? Later, as I told that story to my sister, I realized that I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even comprehend that I had made a mistake. When I explained my conversation with the jeweler to her, over the phone, there was dead silence on the other end. After what seemed like

By Dave Potchak many minutes, she asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Did you really say â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;cosmeticâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; jewelry to that woman?â&#x20AC;? When I answered affirmatively, she howled like a coyote during a full moon, laughing hysterically. She also was all too familiar with my verbal embarrassments. To exemplify: imagine my humiliation as I once attempted to refer to the cortex of a woody stem in my biology class. A number of 10thgrade students caught the mistake when I used the term Kotex of a stem instead. I would love to cast blame on my advancing age regarding my tendency to speak too quickly and incorrectly. However, in honesty, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made slip-ups like these as far back as I can remember. Take my great uncleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s looks, for example. I hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen him in years and when I finally did see him, I observed age lines located in the outside corners of his eyes. I affirmed my observation to my aunt when I said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wow, Uncle Frank has fish tails on the sides of his eyes.â&#x20AC;? Of course, I meant to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;crowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feet.â&#x20AC;? My Aunt Bee almost wet herself when she realized what I just said. Oh, as a coach, I had many slips during athletic practice, too. At times, either in a hurry or when I was angry, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d let verbal assaults fly like the wind. In many instances, the other coaches would have to cover their faces in a futile attempt to hide their amusement. One football player turned his head away from me as I began to chastise him. I meant to say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I talk to you, you look at me!â&#x20AC;? But what came out was, â&#x20AC;&#x153;When I look at you, you look at me back.â&#x20AC;? That line has been repeated by my colleagues more than I care to count. You can take Gomer out of the country... At times, a quick retort can possibly get you into some real trouble, too. Such was the case as my wife and I were leaving on foot, after a nighttime Pittsburgh Steelers home game. We were on the way to meet

        

      

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our hotel shuttle bus, which was to pick us up a few blocks away from Heinz Field. Another important component of this story is the fact that I was still recuperating from two open-heart surgeries, could barely breathe as I walked, and both of my knees were shot. Not only could I not defend myself very well, but I also could not walk away from trouble with any quickness, either. I can only surmise that my behavior that night and gimpy gait gave others the distinct impression that I was a visitor to the city. A young man boldly walked up to me and asked me for a few bucks. Not trusting the stranger, I quickly replied, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sorry, but no.â&#x20AC;? His pleading continued, though, as he uttered something like, â&#x20AC;&#x153;You look like a blue-collar, hard-working man of Pittsburgh. I bet youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a union man who would gladly do a favor for someone in need. Come on, help a guy out.â&#x20AC;? Again, I replied. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sorry, but I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help you.â&#x20AC;? His barrage was relentless as he then gave me a sob story. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My car is broken down just down the street and if you and a few other people would kindly spot me a few dollars, I could call a tow truck and get the car hauled to a garage.â&#x20AC;? This time, I gave him a tacit reply by slowly moving my head side-toside indicating a negative answer. And we kept walking, albeit slowly. The dialogue continued as we purposely worked our way closer and closer to a traffic cop, who was stationed at the intersection directing drivers from all directions. Both my wife and I felt a tad safer as we got nearer to the corner. In a final desperate effort to hoodwink some cash, the begging man loudly asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;To show that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m telling you the truth, do you want to see my disabled car? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parked just down that alley.â&#x20AC;? He pointed emphatically to a small street nearby. But, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take the country out of Gomer... â&#x20AC;&#x153;Look, buddy,â&#x20AC;? I said, as I raised my voice in disgust, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any bills smaller than a $50 in my wallet, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no way Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to give you a $50 bill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And I doubt, too, that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll give me change,â&#x20AC;? I retorted with a scofflike accent enhancing my words. I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make eye contact with the stranger as those words came out of my mouth at speeds that broke the sound barrier. I did happen to glance at my wife, though, and without uttering one word, her expression spoke volumes. Her eyes, wide open, declared, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What in the world are you saying?â&#x20AC;? I think Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll check with the Guinness World Record Book. I may have set a communicative blooper record, at least for words never to be uttered on a city street late at night. As upset as I was with myself, I was also pleased that we were now positioned too near to the policeman for the con man to continue his scam. He finally disappeared quickly â&#x20AC;&#x201D; no doubt to search for another target. Appropriate conclusionâ&#x20AC;Ś As I approach the climax to this story, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m reminded yet again of another blunder. During a life science lesson in my classroom many years ago, I meant to ask the students to define an organism. Thank goodness my seventh-graders were too young to catch my slip-up when I asked for a definition of another word, so close in spelling to organism, that I felt I had to end my lesson a few minutes early. I guess that lesson had reached its crescendo and there was little sense in continuing any further.


MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - PAGE 17

Julian: from humble beginnings to a life assisting his community By Joshua Byers

of Mainline Newspapers

An older gentleman fixes himself a cup of coffee in the morning at his home on St. Thomas Street in Gallitzin. He grew up in this town, spending his summers sorting through the boney piles for coal to store for the winter and picking huckleberries to sell in Altoona. He raised a family here and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loved every aspect of the small town environment. Arthur â&#x20AC;&#x153;Artâ&#x20AC;? Julian is 90 years old now, and he spent his younger years not only teaching, but also giving back to the community he adores. He served on the alumni association, the heritage society, and the industry board, as well as the tourism board, and he is the last original member of the Gallitzin Public Library board. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you belong to one, you belong to them all,â&#x20AC;? Julian said about his service to so many organizations. Additionally, he served as a firefighter and with the Lions Club. Julian graduated from the Greater Gallitzin Joint High School in 1944 and was the first one in his family to go to college. Julian comes from a fairly large family, growing up with six brothers and two sisters, but he said there was so much love in his family and that they were â&#x20AC;&#x153;very caring.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s because of the family I am what I am,â&#x20AC;? Julian said. He explained that his parents and older brothers and sisters saved up their money to send him off to college, and he wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allowed to say

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no. His father and a couple of his brothers worked in the mines, while others worked in the shops in Johnstown. His sisters worked in the shirt factory. Julian received a bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree from St. Francis University in physics and math. He earned his masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree from the University of Pittsburgh and his doctorate from Pennsylvania State University. Not long out of school, Julian taught at a small â&#x20AC;&#x153;country school,â&#x20AC;? as he put it, in Nicktown. After that, he taught sixth grade at the Gallitzin school for six years before returning to his alma mater at St. Francis, where he worked in the

education department. He retired 18 years ago. Julian had three children, Richard, Beth and John, with his wife, Ann. However, he said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been widowed now for 20 or so years, and he jokes that he hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had to cook since then because of his caring neighbors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They take good care of me,â&#x20AC;? Julian said, mentioning his refrigerator is stocked with home-cooked meals. Julian is pretty well known around town for the endeavors he was involved in throughout the years, one of them being the library in town. Julian said the establishment, which just celebrated its 60th

year, had â&#x20AC;&#x153;meagerâ&#x20AC;? beginnings at the old building across the train tracks from the current location. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a humble beginning,â&#x20AC;? Julian said. But thanks to a donation from Mary and John Olenik, the library was able to expand. Eventually, it expanded to the point that more space was needed, especially since the small brick building housed the borough and police offices as well. It was Julian and a couple more residents who suggested the current location as a possibility and got the ball rolling. He explained that they

raised money for the renovations of the old company store and thanks to a large donation by the DeGol family, the project was completed. Julian said he never did any of the things he did for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;glory of it.â&#x20AC;? He did it for the sake of the town he loves and because he wanted to. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I wanted to blow my horn I could, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to,â&#x20AC;? Julian said. These days, he takes it easier than before when he was always moving around. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had a good life, honest to God,â&#x20AC;? Julian said.

    

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PAGE 18 - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

Some Benefits of Growing Older

Many people are quick to think of growing older in a negative light. Although there certainly are some side effects of aging that one may wish to avoid, people may find that the benefits of growing older outweigh the negatives. Here are some great benefits to growing old.

Higher self-esteem: The insecurities of youth give way as one ages, and older people have less negativity and higher self-esteem. A University of Basel study of people ranging in ages from 18 to 89 found that regardless of demographic and social status, the older

one gets the higher self-esteem climbs. Qualities like self-control and altruism can contribute to happiness.

Financial perks: Seniors are entitled to discounts on meals, museum entry fees, movies, and other entertainment if they’re willing to disclose their ages. Discounts are available through an array of venues if one speaks up. Seniors also can enjoy travel perks, with slashed prices on resorts, plane tickets and more. The U.S. National Park Service offers citizens age 62 and older lifetime passes to more than 2,000 federal recreation sites for just $10 in per-

son ($20 online or via mail).

Reasoning and problem-solving skills: Brain scans reveal that older adults are more likely to use both hemispheres of their brans simultaneously — something called bilateralization. This can sharpen reasoning skills. For example, in a University of Illinois study, older air traffic controllers excelled at their cognitively taxing jobs, despite some losses in short-term memory and visual spatial processing. Older controllers proved to be experts at navigating, juggling multiple aircrafts simultaneously and avoiding collisions.

HOW TO PROMOTE HEALTHY KIDNEYS

Kidney disease is a widespread issue made all the more disconcerting by the fact that many people are unaware they have it. According to the National Kidney Foundation, 26 million American adults have kidney disease, and most don’t know it. And the problem of kidney disease is not exclusive to the United States, as the Canadian Kidney Foundation notes that the number of Canadians being treated for kidney failure has tripled over the last quarter century. Healthy kidneys are something many people take for granted. But those who want to do everything they can to keep their kidneys healthy can consider the following tips, courtesy of the Cleveland Clinic.

• Stay hydrated, but avoid overhydration. Many people are familiar with the benefits of drinking water each day, and adequate hydration definitely promotes healthy kid-

neys. But overhydrating has not been proven to enhance kidney function. The Cleveland Clinic recommends adults drink between four and six glasses of water per day.

• Exercise. Regular exercise benefits various parts of the human body, including the kidneys. High blood pressure and diabetes are two of the biggest risk factors for kidney disease, and regular exercise can reduce a person’s risk of both conditions. However, overexertion can strain the kidneys, so adults who exercise, especially novices who need to improve their conditioning, should avoid going too hard at the gym.

• Speak with a physician before taking vitamin supplements or herbal remedies. Vitamin supplements and herbal remedies have become very popular in the 21st century, but excessive supplementation can harm the kidneys. Discuss any supplements or herbals reme-

dies with a physician before taking them.

• Quit smoking. Just as exercise benefits the body in myriad ways, smoking harms the body in myriad ways. Smoking decreases the blood flow in the kidneys, decreasing their ability to function at optimal capacity. Smoking also increases a person’s risk of high blood pressure and cancer of the kidneys. • Eat healthy. A healthy diet decreases a person’s risk for high blood pressure and diabetes. Adhering to a healthy diet and controlling portion sizes can help control weight and blood pressure and contribute to healthy kidneys as well.

• Get screened. Adults who have been diagnosed with high blood pressure or diabetes should make sure their physicians screen for kidney dysfunction during routine appointments.

Less stress: As people grow older, they are able to differentiate their needs from wants and focus on more important goals. This can alleviate worry over things that are beyond one’s control. Seniors may realize how little the opinions of others truly mean in the larger picture, thereby feeling less stress about what others think of them. Growing older may involve gray hair or wrinkling skin, but there are many positive things associated with aging.


MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - PAGE 19

Eat Healthy at 50 and Beyond

A balanced diet is an integral element of a healthy lifestyle for men, women and children alike. But while kids and young adults might be able to get away with an extra cheeseburger here or there, men and women approaching 50 have less leeway. According to the National Institute on Aging, simply counting calories without regard for the foods being consumed is not enough for men and women 50 and older to maintain their longterm health. Rather, the NIA emphasizes the importance of choosing low-calorie foods that have a lot of the nutrients the body needs.

But counting calories can be an effective and simple way to maintain a healthy weight, provided those calories are coming from nutrient-rich foods. The NIA advises men and women over 50 adhere to the following daily calorie intake recommendations as they attempt to stay healthy into their golden years.

WOMEN • Not physically active: 1,600 calories • Somewhat active: 1,800 calories • Active lifestyle: between 2,000 and 2,200 calories MEN • Not physically active: 2,000 calories • Somewhat active: between 2,200 and 2,400 calories • Active lifestyle: between 2,400 and 2,800 calories

When choosing foods to eat, the NIA recommends eating many different colors and types of vegetables and fruits. Phytochemicals are substances that occur naturally in plants, and there are thousands of these substances offering various benefits. The Produce for Better Health Foundation notes that a varied, colorful diet incorporates lots of different types of phytochemicals, which the PBH says have disease-preventing properties. The NIA also advises that men and women over 50 make sure at least half the grains in their diets are whole grains. Numerous studies have discovered the various benefits of whole grains, which are loaded with protein, fiber, antioxidants and other nutrients. Whole grains have been shown to reduce the risk for diseases such as type 2 diabetes, heart disease and some types of cancer.

Another potential hurdle men and women over 50 may encounter is a change in their sense of smell and taste. A person’s sense of smell may fade with age, and because smell and taste are so closely related, foods enjoyed for years may no longer tantalize the taste buds. That can be problematic, as many people instinctually add more salt to foods they find bland. According to the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, older adults should consume no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium per day. That equates to roughly 3⁄4 teaspoon of salt. Older men and women should resist the temptation to use salt to add flavor to

foods, instead opting for healthy foods that they can still smell and taste. In addition, men and women should mention any loss of their sense of smell to their physicians, as such a loss may indicate the presence of Parkinson’s disease or

Alzheimer’s disease.

Maintaining a healthy diet after 50 may require some hard work and discipline. But the long-term benefits of a healthy diet make the extra effort well worth it.


PAGE 20 - Thursday, February 16, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA


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