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October 12, 2017

Master gardeners create demonstration garden in Ebensburg By Megan Riner of Mainline Newspapers

Cambria County’s Penn State Master Gardeners are cultivating a previously unused patch of land behind the Young Peoples Community Center in Ebensburg into a demonstration garden. Here, the master gardeners can use a hands-on approach to educate the community about planting and growing techniques, all the while supporting the outreach mission of Penn State Extension, which is education on the best practices in sustainable horticulture and environmental stewardship through the utilization of unbiased research-based information. The demonstration garden, the land for which was donated by the borough, will be comprised of many smaller gardens that exhibit a variety of techniques and feature a medley of plants and flowers. As the garden grows, the master gardeners will conduct classes on these techniques. For example, Gina Tusing will demonstrate vertical gardening, which is ideal for small spaces and/or people who live in town. By next year, the cattle panels she has arranged in the garden will be lush with life. A pole bean archway and snap pea trellis are just two of the vertical gardens she has planned. Donna Krise has adopted the pollinator garden, which will be comprised of two larger beds that she will plant with native perennials that attract the butterflies and insects necessary for pollination. A lasagna — or no-till — gar-

Master gardeners (from row, from left) Donna Krise, Kathleen Saller, Gina Tusing, Katie Respet, Joyce Long; (back row) Bob Strittmatter, Ed Korzi, and Skip Stiles will conduct various seminars at their new demonstration garden, located behind the Young Peoples Community Center in Ebensburg, to help growers in the community learn new gardening techniques. Absent from photo is John Wenturine Jr., who was instrumental in bringing the demonstration garden to life. Photo by Megan Riner.

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PAGE 2 - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

History Shorts offers diverse topics Oct. 18

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Have you ever heard about the escape of the miners in Mine 77 during the 1977 flood? What about a young man’s reflections on the ghost town at Beulah? Little is known about the influence a Quaker women had on the story of the Underground Railroad. On the other hand, the murder of architect Stanford White by Pittsburgh millionaire Harry K. Thaw was known as the crime of the century, but what are the local connections to this turn-of-the-century scandal? All these questions will be answered during this month’s History Shorts program presented by the Cambria County Historical Society at the Kimball Conference Center on West High Street in Ebensburg on Wednesday, Oct. 18, at 7 p.m. On a previous flyer issued by the historical society, this

event was mistakenly listed as occurring on Oct. 20. History Shorts is a popular evening of brief lectures by various speakers. This month’s speakers are Jerry Huber, Nicholas Lasinsky, Jim Hostetler, and Suzanna Long. “We are really looking forward to hearing some of these stories this month because they are untold histories,” said Dave Huber, vice president of the society. “For instance, I had never heard the story of the coal miners in the 1977 Flood.” The next and final lecture for the autumn series will occur on Wednesday, Nov. 15, and will be presented by Jim and Suzanne Gindlesperger featuring their latest book, “Arlington Cemetery.” In his talk, Jim Gindlesperger will include those interred at the national cemetery site from Cambria County.

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den and a handicap-accessible raised bed are also planned for the space. “We’re having a field day with this,” Tusing shared. “It’s just a big playground for some of us.” Krise agreed. She said she hopes this garden will show the public that gardening is not difficult. “Lots of techniques ... make gardening easier,” Krise said, “particularly if you only have a small area to work in.” Bob Strittmatter is looking forward to the knowledge that can be shared from this endeavor, not just from the master gardeners to the public, but from the public to the master gardeners — the learning goes both ways. The produce harvested from the garden will be donated to local food banks that can accommodate fresh vegetables. Cambria County has 35 master gardeners on the rolls and is currently training a new class of growers. These volunteers hail from all corners of the county, from Ashville to Johnstown. They host classes in composting and container gardening, to name a few, and conduct a popular “garden line” from April through September. Growers can call the garden hotline and talk to a master gardener about any questions they may have. The master gardeners also host plant sales, a summer tea, and garden symposiums. The fall garden days symposium will take place on Saturday, Oct. 14, at the Manor Drive Conference Room. For more information, search for Penn State Master Gardeners of Cambria County on Facebook. A week later, on Saturday, Oct. 21, join the master gardeners at the demonstration garden from 10 a.m. to noon as Tusing shows the community how to grow garlic. The master gardeners will also show the public how to create a lasagna garden bed, plant an herb garden, set up a compost plan in the city, and start a perennial flower garden. Keep an eye out for other demonstrations as the garden comes to life next spring.

St. Francis University to host Candlelight Saints Tour A Candlelight Saints Tour will be held at St. Francis University on Friday and Saturday, Oct. 27 and 28, from 6-10 p.m. Tours leave every 20 minutes and go through the grotto, with actors portraying various saints. Tickets are $9 for adults and $7 for students and children. Proceeds benefit Dorothy Day Outreach Center. Food will be available to purchase. Meet at Campus Ministry on St. Francis Campus or call 814472-2877 or 814-472-2878 with questions.

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PAGE 4 - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

Carrolltown Borough council approves snow ordinance By Amber Stich of Mainline Newspapers

On Monday, Oct. 2, the Carrolltown Borough council finally approved an ordinance that had been in the works for many months. The council had been working with the borough’s solicitor to update its outdated parking and snow removal ordinance to bring the requirements and fine fees into a more modern equivalent, and after a few drafts, the council was finally ready to approve it. A motion was made and the ordinance was passed unanimously. During the visitor section of the

meeting, the council heard from Darlene Lutch, who was representing the Carrolltown Library. She said that the library was planning to replace eight windows for better insulation and wanted the board’s approval. She said the library would be paying for the replacement, but she wanted to make sure the borough was on board with the project. The borough gave the library permission to look into the replacements. Lutch also asked the board if it could approve a Halloween family day the library was planning on Oct. 28, which would include spooky decorations, a food ven-

dor, crafts, and other events for the children at the borough building. The council approved the use of the building on that date. Next, the council moved on to discuss bids. The town trash collection bids were opened at this meeting, but after opening each bid, the council decided it needed more time to accurately compare the pricing and tabled the vote on the bids until the next meeting. The council also opened bids on the borough’s 2009 Ford Crown Victoria, but since there was only one bid, it decided to advertise the car again before awarding a bid. Councilman Jim McCann then

10th novena announced The 10th novena of 2017 to Our Lady of Mount Carmel and St. Thérèse (the Little Flower) offered by the Discalced Carmelite Nuns of Loretto will open on Sunday, Oct. 22, and end on Monday, Oct. 30. All intentions submitted to the nuns will be remembered with the special novena prayers following the daily Holy Sacrifice of the Mass in the sisters’ beautifully renovated chapel. Benediction of the Most Blessed Sacrament is held

every Sunday at 4 p.m. and every first Friday of the month. Everyone is welcome to attend the benediction, followed by the veneration of the relic of St. Thérèse of the Child of Jesus of the Holy Face. Those who desire to share in the graces and blessings of these nine days of prayer, and in the private prayers of the Carmelite Nuns during the novena, are requested to send their petitions to Mother Prioress, Discalced Carmelite Monastery, Post Office Box 57, Loretto, PA 15940.

gave the council an update on the planned trail running from Carrolltown to Patton. He said the agreement with the borough was approved, and the group is working toward meeting with landowners and getting funding for surveys. “We are on the way to getting it done,” McCann said. Lastly, the council heard from borough secretary Bernetta Julick on the borough’s progress with

Muni-Link, a system to handle billing and information for municipalities. Julick said there is a lot of data to transfer, but they hope to be using the system by the end of October. The system will help with information that can be printed on customers’ bills as well as the added bonus of online and credit card payments, which Julick noted many residents have been anxious to use.


MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - PAGE 5

PennDOT holds open house to discuss 219 improvement project By Amber Stich of Mainline Newspapers

On Tuesday, Oct. 3, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation conducted an open house and plans display at the Carrolltown Fire Company Social Hall to inform the public about the proposed Route 219 Roadway Improvement Project in East Carroll Township and Carrolltown Borough. Construction for the project addresses needed improvements to a 2.5-mile section of Route 219, including resurfacing, drainage improvements, crosswalks, speed control, and more. James Pruss, a district portfolio manager for PennDOT, said the construction and new setup of the section will be an adjustment for the locals, but the main aim of the project will be to improve the safety of the area. “The whole key to this project is to make it safer for the people who live here, not just the motorists but the pedestrians,”

Pruss said. The efforts to do this will include the addition of cement rumble strips in the center of the lanes to slow traffic in town; wider intersections for safer truck and bus turns; crosswalk areas with lit signs at Flick, Cameron, and Mill streets; sidewalks for pedestrian safety; and changes to on-street parking. Pruss said the change to the parking will be one of the bigger adjustments those in Carrolltown will have to make. Currently, residents park perpendicular to the road, which causes them to back out onto the road. This is a big safety concern for PennDOT. The new project, Pruss said, designates parallel parking areas in the borough to address the issue. Pruss said PennDOT has been working closely with the borough and residents to address areas of concern and to create the best solutions for them in the project. He said because of the community’s input, they

Native E’burg firefighter responds to Hurricane Maria in Puerto Rico A firefighter who got his start with the Dauntless Fire Company in Ebensburg recently responded with the Virginia Task Force 2 Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) Team to the island of Puerto Rico in response to Hurricane Maria. Scott Springer, a master firefighter with the Virginia Beach Fire Department and a member of the Virginia Task Force 2 USAR Team, deployed with approximately 60 other team members to Puerto Rico on Monday, Sept. 18, in preparation for the high-end Category 4 Hurricane Maria that made landfall on Sept. 20 with sustained winds of 155 mph. Team members sheltered-in-place before the hurricane at their see responds, page 6

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will also be addressing the curve at the intersection of Brick Road (Route 553 to the Old Gray Mare) to achieve a safe 45 mph design. This part of the project will include a detour on Brick Road of roughly 4.4 miles. Construction is slated to begin in early summer of 2019, and the project should be completed in the fall of that same year. Pruss said PennDOT plans to tackle the project in sections, working on one lane at a time with signal lights to help manage traffic. He said PennDOT will also be working to allow access to all businesses during construction. Borough council members were at the open house to talk with residents and PennDOT officials and provide input and answers to questions on the project as well. Councilman Luke Baker said he thinks the event was good for sharing information and feedback on the project. “It was really a good night for the community to come in and express their feelings and see what the scope of the project really is,” Baker said. “It is a major change in the borough

that will affect everyone, but in a good way.” He also said the attitude of residents who have seen the project has been pretty positive and many are excited for the safety improvements. “It will really help a lot of people who walk in town and help pedestrian safety with the increased sidewalks and curbing,” Baker said. Pruss said this is along the scope of a normal project for

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PennDOT but has some additional challenges and solutions that make it different than others the department has worked on. “This is a unique project because we usually just deal with resurfacing and bridge replacement projects, but this one will transform the community and make it more consistent throughout town,” Pruss said. “It is exciting to be a part of it.”

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PAGE 6 - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

Courthouse grounds to be improved By Ron Portash of Mainline Newspapers

In conjunction with Cambria County President Judge Norman Krumenacker’s effort to improve the courthouse, master gardeners from Penn State University’s Cambria County Extension Office have designed and overseen the planting of new shrubs and plants in front of the building in Ebensburg. According to Gina Tusing, a courthouse employee, she was approached by Krumenacker about improving the beauty and quality of plants around the courthouse. The judge asked Tusing about recommendations to improve the decorative plants in front of the courthouse. Tusing took the project back to her fellow master gardeners, who approved the program. The Penn State Master Gardener Volunteer Program supports the outreach mission of Penn State Extension by utilizing unbiased research-based information to educate the public and the communities on best practices in sustainable horticulture and environmental stewardship, according to the county extension office’s website. The master gardeners reviewed the existing plants and shrubs and determined a total replanting was the best option. The master gardeners, in cooperation with Stuvers Nursery, determined which native species would work in the soil and the weather conditions around the courthouse. Krumenacker approved the use of a work crew from the county jail to provide the labor needed to plant and fertilize the new landscape plants and shrubs. Placards to identify the species and list information about the plants will be placed. The work this fall planting season will be limited to the right front of the courthouse. A month ago, the commissioners approved a construction bid to rebuild the north side steps and window wells on that side of the courthouse, which will delay the replanting of the left front and side. According to master gardener Bob Strittmatter, that side will be planted in the spring after the construction is completed. The master gardeners aim to ultimately have the landscape around the courthouse certified by Penn State as a pollination garden. There is strict criteria to meet this designation in education and natural resource use. The landscape needs to be able to provide food, water, and shelter for bees and other pollen-bearing insects. Certified pollination gardens are a way to help restore the number of bees that pollinate the local farm crops and flowers. Bees have taken a major drop in numbers nationwide in the past several years due to pesticides and weather. Without bees and other pollinating insects, food crops will be threatened.

Responds continued from page 5

assigned base of operations in San Juan to ride out the storm. Immediately following the storm, the USAR team initiated its established search and rescue operational tasks. Day 1 required the team to remove large obstructions and trees that blocked access to areas requiring reconnaissance and rescue actions. During the following days, civilian rescues and the evacuation of others trapped by flood waters as high as 8 feet were conducted using inflatable boats and high-water vehicles. Throughout the USAR response, community needs were assessed as operations progressed from the initial search and rescue phases to those phases addressing humanitarian needs. The Virginia TF-2 Team operated in St. John, Toa Baja, San Juan proper, and in rural areas of western Puerto Rico.

Reconnaissance and rescue operations were hampered by catastrophic damage that caused the near-total loss of island communications and electrical power. Major flooding and mountainous terrain also added challenges to the USAR tasks. The Virginia Task Force 2 USAR Team demobilized on Sept. 25 and arrived back at the Norfolk International Airport late that day and the next. Springer began his fire service career as a junior volunteer firefighter at the age of 14 with the Dauntless Fire Company. He is a 2004 graduate of Bishop Carroll Catholic High School and attended the safety science program at the Indiana University of Pennsylvania. He accepted a position of firefighter with the Altoona Fire Department for five years before taking a career position with the Virginia Beach Fire Department in 2012.


MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - PAGE 7


PAGE 8 - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

$1 million available for planting trees along streams $250,000 for snowmobile/ATV trails State representative Frank Burns reminds landowners that the state is making $1 million in grant money available for planting trees along streams to improve water quality, while another $250,000 is being expended for snowmobile/all-terrain vehicle trails and projects. Burns said applications are being taken now through Dec. 20 for these Community Conservation Partnership Program grants through the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. He urged anyone who needs help applying to contact his Ebensburg office at 814-472-8021. “Pennsylvania has a goal of planting nearly 100,000 acres of streamside buffers by 2025, to improve water quality, slow down runoff and reduce sedimentation and fertilizer pollution,” Burns said. “Eligible snowmobile/ATV trail projects include acquisition, planning, development, rehabilitation or maintenance of designated routes on land for motorized recreation activities – including the purchase of related equipment.” Burns said individual landowners, businesses, nonprofit organizations, local governments, and educational institutions are all eligible for the buffer grants, but must be prequalified. Information about how to prequalify is available online on the DCNR grant portal, available at https://www.grants.dcnr.state.pa.us/Dashboard/ Grants. Funding for snowmobile/ATV projects is through the ATV Management Restricted Account and the Snowmobile Management Restricted Account, both of which are supported by registration fees, Burns said. Funding for the grants is coming from the Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority.

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In conjunction with the month-long food drive being held at his constituent service offices, state representative Frank Burns will sponsor a food collection event from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 15, at the Ebensburg Walmart, 300 Walmart Drive. Burns and his staff will be collecting nonperishable food donations, which will be added to items collected throughout October at his four offices, located at: · 535 Fairfield Ave., Johnstown (Lower Yoder Township). · 119 S. Center St., Ebensburg. · 112-A Munster Road, Portage. · 405 Park Ave., Patton. “This is an opportunity for folks in the 72nd Legislative District to help their neighbors who aren’t as fortunate,” Burns said. “All donations will be forwarded to an outreach center located at St. Francis University that is dedicated to serving local families who are in need.” Please call the Ebensburg office at 814-472-8021 for more information.

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MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - PAGE 9

Central Cambria students help spread winter safety message By Megan Riner of Mainline Newspapers

With winter just around the corner, a group of Central Cambria High School students is creatively reminding motorists to take it slow on snow-covered roads by taking part in the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation’s “Paint the Plow” project. Participating school districts in PennDOT’s District 9 paint snowplows bearing winter safety messages. These plows are then used for snow removal in their respective districts. PennDOT dropped off a plow for Chris Irwin’s sixth-period painting class at the end of August, and the students set to work on a design following PennDOT’s 2017 theme, “Ice and Snow, Take it Slow.” Each student presented a design, and elements from each of the top designs as voted by the class were incorporated into the final blueprint.

Central Cambria’s plow depicts a winter road as seen by the driver, as if the plow is the windshield. A deer leaps into view on the left-hand side of the plow, while a stoplight changes colors on the right. A crack in the “windshield” ties the piece together. The phrase “Ice and Snow, Take it Slow” is adhered to the bottom of the plow in vinyl letters that middle school technology education teacher John LaMark cut for the project. Irwin, whose classes have been participating in Paint the Plow for the past three years, said she and the students learn something new from the project each year that makes the following year easier. However, each year also presents a new set of challenges. One of those challenges, student Katie Harrison said, was initially agreeing on a design. The plow’s rough surface created another obstacle in getting the vinyl letters to lay flat. Overall, though, Harrison explained, the project taught the students teamwork. Logan and Izzy Tremel said it gave

them the experience of working under pressure as well as with different styles of art. Irwin expressed gratitude for principal Dr. Tricia Murin’s support of the endeavor and for supplementing supplies, as well as to LaMark for his assistance with the project, and she was pleased with the compliments the faculty members from the different buildings delivered throughout the process. PennDOT picked up Central Cambria’s plow on Tuesday. A panel of judges will select a Best in Show for each county, and PennDOT Facebook fans can vote for their favorite plow online soon. The winners will be announced later in the fall. Watch for more information about voting for Central Cambria’s plow on the district’s website, cencam.org, and keep an eye out for Central Cambria’s painted plow when its used to plow the roads in the Ebensburg area this winter.

Jackson Water Authority questions interconnect timeline By Allie Garver of Mainline Newspapers

The Jackson Township Water Authority signed an agreement with the East Taylor Municipal Authority more than a year ago to construct an emergency interconnection between the two entities if either of them ever needed water. At the Sept. 26 meeting, water authority member Robb Piper questioned the timeline on that project. “I haven’t heard nothing from East Taylor,” said foreman Karl Smith. “Concerning what? Them helping do it? The agreement?” asked Piper. Engineer Pat Mulcahy said the parties involved have been tied up

in other projects, thus causing the long wait time on the interconnect. “It won’t take long to install the interconnect,” said Mulcahy. “Everything is permitted, everything is ready to go.” Smith said he has all the parts he needs to build the tap on Jackson’s side of the interconnect. The vault, the meter arrangement, and the backflow preventer are supposed to be built by East Taylor’s workers, according to Smith. Mulcahy said he believes the goal is to get the interconnect built this month. According to Mulcahy, it should only take approximately one week to complete. The other ongoing project the

authority has is the replacement of the water meters in 200 homes in the township. Between the September and October meetings, 51 more meters were installed, according to Smith, for a total of 176.

Both Smith and authority worker Fred Meier said that the remaining 24 meters are mostly meter pits that need done. Smith said when he and Meier decide to replace meter pits, it can take a little bit more work because they are unsure as to the

amount of digging needed to install them. Sometimes other problems can arise with water levels as well, said Smith. On average, Smith said it takes between 30 and 45 minutes to install a meter pit.


PAGE 10 - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

BVMA reviews finances on water systems improvement project By Allie Garver of Mainline Newspapers

As of the Sept. 27 meeting, the Blacklick Valley Municipal Authority’s water systems improvement project is almost complete, according to engineer Richard Wray. “The primary thing here is finances,” said Wray. Wray said he spoke with a representative from First National Bank regarding the extension of the line of credit term. Wray reviewed the timeline from the last six months on the reimbursement efforts with the

Pennsylvania Infrastructure Investment Authority. “I told him some of the hurdles we had to overcome on that particular request for payment and the unfortunate timeliness of PENNVEST upgrading their computer system,” said Wray. At the time, explained Wray, requisition No. 16 was just passing the 30-day period, and only when that passed could he submit the next request for payment. “We have a projected difference in reimbursables versus non-reimbursables, that’s what we can’t get out of PENNVEST, if you recall this is the telemetry

on the water tank, the drain, we have the water well samples at $900, and some fees that were assessed from the banking,” said Wray. Wray added that the total for the non-reimbursables is $7,666.62. Wray continued the explanation to First National Bank, stating the authority needs, at least, until the end of the year to get the “last request from PENNVEST in, finaled out, and all of the money back to the bank that is reimbursable from PENNVEST.” Throughout Wray’s research and review, he and chairman

Mike Pisarcik have had one objection, which is the “lack of reimbursement status of the water samples” that the authority took for supporting the project. “It would be one item that should be questioned one more time before we do a final request and allow for about three calendar days to do it, maybe four,” said Wray. “I think it’s worth going after one more time.” “I agree,” Pisarcik said. “They [PENNVEST] requested it, now they’re saying they won’t pay it.” Wray said the sample taking happened so early in the project that it slipped his mind until he went

back to review the paperwork. Pisarcik added that there is one extra expense on the project: a force main that was installed for the township, which they should pay for when tying into the line. Pisarcik said it was installed because it was cheaper to do it during the project than to come back in later and install it. “It’s probably worthwhile, us writing a letter to the township saying that when you tie in [you need to pay],” said solicitor William Barbin. “But at least document it in writing now so at least you have a letter to pull out four or five years from now.”

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Jaguars pick off Steelers in ugly affair, 30-9 By Jake Oswalt of Mainline Newspapers

Clinging to a 9-7 lead in the third quarter, the Pittsburgh Steelers aimed to take full control against Jacksonville on Oct. 8 at Heinz Field. But the game completely changed for the worse on the next two series. Ben Roethlisberger dropped back and looked for All-Pro receiver Antonio Brown on a slant pattern. Defensive tackle Arby Jones leaped up to tip the ball into the waiting hands of linebacker Telvin Smith, who raced 28 yards for a touchdown. In an effort to make amends for his previous mistake, Roethlisberger only made the damage worse on the following possession. Roethlisberger set his sights again on Brown on thirdand-17. Brown ran a dig route, where he drew three Jaguars defenders to the area. Cornerback Jalen Ramsey knocked the ball away from Brown as safety Barry Church picked it off and sprinted 51 yards for another score. Roethlisberger threw a careerhigh five interceptions as Pittsburgh dropped a disheartening 30-9 decision to Jacksonville, which scored 27 of its points off of Steelers’ turnovers, to fall into a tie for first place with a 3-2 record. “We turned the ball over. We did not take care of it,” Steelers coach Mike Tomlin said. “We participated in what happened. It’s how we respond to it — I’m using my words really carefully there because we don’t need to react to it. We get in the lab tomorrow, we get back to work, and we work on our response. We’re going to be defined individually, collectively, on how we respond to an outing like that.” Roethlisberger, who has posted most of his best games in recent memory at home, tossed four of his five interceptions in what became a second-half meltdown. The 14-year veteran finished 33of-55 for 312 yards and no touchdowns to finish with an uncharacteristically low rating of 37.8. “I’m not playing well enough,”

said Roethlisberger, who became the first Steelers quarterback to throw five interceptions in a game since Mark Malone in 1987. “There were some unusual things that happened on some of those interceptions. That’s the way the ball bounces sometimes. You play this game long enough, you are going to get those games.” A sour third quarter followed what looked like a promising start. Roethlisberger hit Brown for 49 yards on the Steelers’ first play, but the drive bogged down in the red zone, as Pittsburgh had to settle for the first of three Chris Boswell field goals on the after-

noon. A 29-yard boot gave the Steelers a 3-0 lead after the first quarter, but the tenor quickly changed. “We just got to score touchdowns. The red zones are killing us, they really are,” Steelers guard David DeCastro said. “We got the talent and we have the potential. I wish I could explain it to you.” Pittsburgh finished the day with just 16 yards on nine snaps inside the Jacksonville 20-yard line. Curious play calling fed into the unit’s struggles. Facing the league’s worst run defense, running back Le’Veon Bell finished the day with 47 yards on 15 car-

ries. “There’s no one to blame, we just didn’t play well as an offense,” Steelers center Maurkice Pouncey said. “We didn’t do well in the red zone. The offense didn’t play as well as we thought we should have played today.” Late in the first, Ramsey stepped in front of tight end Vance McDonald to pick off Roethlisberger for the first time. Jacksonville turned the miscue into seven points. Out of the eight plays, seven came on the ground. Rookie running back Leonard see steelers, page 11

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RegulaR season Sun., Sept. 10......at Cleveland..........W 21-18 Sun., Sept. 17 ....MInnesota ........W 26-9 Sun., Sept. 24 ....at Chicago ..........L 23-17 Sun., Oct. 1 ........at Baltimore ........W 26-9 Sun., Oct. 8 ........JaCksonvIlle ....L 30-9 Sun., Oct. 15 ......at Kansas City ....4:25 p.m. Contest Rules 1. Complete the coupon of the folowing page by guessing the winning team and the total number of points you think will be scored in the Steelers vs. Bengals game and enter the guesses in the spaces provided on the coupon. 2. Find the advertisement with the hidden Steelers jersey number (see coupon for this week’s player) and list the business on the entry coupon. One coupon will be chosen at random from all

Sun., Oct. 22 ......CInCInnatI..........1:00 p.m. Sun., Oct. 29 ......at Detroit ..............8:30 p.m. Sun., Nov. 5 ........bye Sun., Nov. 12 ......at Indianapolis ....1:00 p.m. Thurs., Nov. 16 ..tennessee ..........8:25 p.m. Sun., Nov. 26 ......gReen bay ..........8:30 p.m. Mon., Dec. 4 ......at Cincinnati ......8:30 p.m. Sun., Dec. 10 ......baltIMoRe ..........8:30 p.m. Sun., Dec. 17 ......new england ..4:25 p.m. Mon., Dec. 25 ....at Houston ..........4:30 p.m. Sun., Dec. 31 ......Cleveland ..........1:00 p.m. Support the merchants on these pages!

entries to win an additional $25 merchandise certificate. 3. Enter one of the participating advertisers on these contest pages in the space provided to redeem your coupon should you be one of the two contest winners. There will be two $25 contest certificates given away each week. 4. Clip and forward the coupon to: ‘Steelers Football Contest,’ c/o Mainline Newspapers, P.O. Box 777, Ebensburg, PA 15931. 5. All entries must be received at

the Mainline Newspaper office by 4 p.m. Fri., October 20. No purchase necessary to participate. All entries must be original (no photocopies). 6. In the event two or more contestants correctly pick the winning team and total number of points, one winner will be randomly selected and awarded the winning prize. In event two or more contestants tie for closest to the total score, one winner will be randomly selected to win the $25 certificate.


MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - PAGE 11

Steelers continued from page 10

Fournette, who finished with 181 yards on 28 carries, leaped over the pile for a 2yard touchdown to give the Jaguars a 7-3 lead. Steelers linebacker Ryan Shazier gave the hosts a jolt late in the first half by coming up with a crucial interception. As tight end James O’Shaughnessy was falling to the ground, Shazier stole the ball away. Six plays later, a 34-yard field goal from Boswell trimmed the lead to 7-6 at halftime. Pittsburgh was able to move the chains and log a 14-play drive, but the lengthy march ended in another disappointing 20-yard field goal from Boswell. On third-and-goal,

Roethlisberger locked in on Brown, who caught 10 passes for 157 yards, on an outand-up route. The pass sailed high as Brown was blanketed by corner A.J. Bouye. Pittsburgh led 9-7. The tenor of the game changed drastically on Pittsburgh’s following series with the first of two pick sixes. Roethlisberger shouldered the blame after the game. “Me playing better,” Roethlisberger said of how the vaunted offense can reach its vast potential. “This improvement needs to come from me before next week.” Jacksonville went ahead 20-9 late in the third on Church’s interception return. The

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That’s on us. We have to be more stout. It’s unacceptable.” Despite his rough afternoon, Roethlisberger’s teammates stood up for him. “He’s a competitor. He’s a general. He’s going to come to work this week with a lot of intensity,” Brown said. “He’s going to hit the film room and make everyone around him escalate their level of play. He’s going to bring the best out of all of us, especially after a week like this.” Improvement in all areas will be a must next week as Pittsburgh travels to take on the only undefeated team left in the NFL: the 50 Kansas City Chiefs.

following Pittsburgh series ended in a sack. Tasked with stopping the run, Pittsburgh failed to slow down Jacksonville’s downhill and punishing attack led by Fournette and Chris Ivory. The Jaguars chewed off 8:17 of time on 13 plays to extend its lead to 23-9 with 6:43 left in the fourth. After two more interceptions, Fournette raced 90 yards untouched to go ahead 30-9 to pour more salt into the wound. “We just need to play better. Technique and missed tackles,” said Steelers defensive end Cameron Heyward of the run defense struggles. “We talk about it every week. We get a failing grade on that. I don’t know how long they had the ball, but they bled the clock.

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2 Ways to Win one of tWo $25 merchandise certificates! Name:________________________________Phone:______________ Address:__________________________________________________ CouPon foR gaMe of sunday, oCtobeR 22 1) Guess the Winning Team of the featured game: _____Steelers vs. _____Bengals 2) Guess the Total Points that will be Scored in this Game: _______ Total Points

— bonus $25 gIft CeRtIfICate — 3) Hidden in one of the steelers contest advertisements on these pages is alejandro Villanueva’s jersey number. list the name of the business in which the number appears:_______________________________ 4) Should I win either of the two $25 merchandise certificates, I would like to redeem my certificate at: (List business from these pages)___________________________________________________________________ Mail to: Steelers Football Contest c/o Mainline Newspapers, P.O. Box 777, Ebensburg, PA 15931

All entries must be received at the Mainline Newspaper office by 4 p.m. Friday, October 20. Must be at least 18 years of age to enter. One coupon per person.

Rt. 22, Ebensburg (West of 219 across from airport)

(814) 472-2203

Rt. 271, 1894 Wm. Penn Ave. Johnstown, PA

(814) 322-3200

M-F 5-11; Sat.& Sun. 6-11


PAGE 12 - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - MAINLINE EXTRA

‘Kountry’ every Wednesday & Friday BINGO PORTAGE MOOSE HALL

DOORS OPEN: 5 PM *Admission: $15 Early Birds: 6:40 *REG. GAMES: 7 PM

FREE each Fri. & Wed.: (other foods & drinks “Cook’s Choice” Dinner & Coffee available for purchase)

FREE giveaway 3rd Wed. of the month: 200

For info call: 736-3339 before 4 p.m. or 736-4151 after 4 p.m.

(Each admission gives you a chance to win.)

LAST JACKPOT 500 IN 55 NUMBERS MYSTERY #’S EVERY WED. & FRI.

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& % Johnstown’s William Polacek (second from right) accepts the Mount Aloysius College Honorary Alumni Award for 2017 at the college’s recent alumni reunion and homecoming weekend. From left are: Brad Mikitko, ’12, ’14, vice president of the Mount Aloysius College Alumni Board of Directors; Polacek; Mount Aloysius College president Tom Foley; and Mount Aloysius vice president for institutional advancement Jennifer Dubuque. Submitted photo.

Mount Aloysius College recognizes Polacek as honorary alumnus The Mount Aloysius College Alumni Association selected Johnstown native William C. Polacek as an honorary alumnus of the college. The alumni association awarded the special recognition to Polacek the 2017 alumni recognition luncheon. The event, held in the Bertschi Center and Technology Commons, was the highlight of the college’s 2017 homecoming/alumni weekend festivities. Mount Aloysius College president Tom Foley commended the alumni association’s choice of Polacek as the 2017 honorary alumnus. “Bill Polacek has given this college valuable service on our Board of Trustees,” said Foley, “But in a much broader sense, his service and that of his family to our southern Allegheny Mountain community, and to

our nation, is truly profound. The story of Bill Polacek and of the entire Polacek family is a bootstrap epic that is leavened only by the humanity and the humility of the man and his family. Indeed, when you take the hand of any one of the Polacek clan, you cannot help but feel generational strength, generosity, and profound good will.” In 1957, Polacek’s father, John, found himself working for Bethlehem Steel and providing for his nine children. To help make ends meet, he put a welding machine on the back of his pick-up truck and started Johnny’s Welding. When John Polacek passed away in 1987, his welding company was located in a two-car garage and had one employee — his son, Bill Polacek. Bill Polacek bought the company from his mother and started Johnstown Welding and Fabrication. After a few years of growth, Bill Polacek shortened the company name to JWF Industries to reflect its continuing diversity. From those humble beginnings in 1987, Bill Polacek has grown the business from a two-man shop to a company with nearly 500 employees in two states. In addition, Bill Polacek owns Johnstown Machining and Fabrication, Inc., Flexosonic, Atlantic Welders, Inc. of

Baltimore, Md., Anderson Cutting Systems, Laurel Automated Painting, and WCP Erectors. In 2007, Bill Polacek started JWF Defense Systems, a business specifically focused on supplying Department of Defense prime contractors with reliable, on-time, fabrications and subassemblies. Since his humble beginnings, Bill Polacek has led this small-town company into a thriving business. Today, JWF Industries has annual sales more than $120 million, operates three facilities encompassing more than 900,000 square feet, and employs 450 men and women in Johnstown. For nearly 20 years, the Polacek family has cared for the region’s needy through their nonprofit, Polacek Family Human Needs Foundation, which was founded in 1998. Bill Polacek’s service commitments include Junior Achievement, Mom’s House, Johnstown YMCA, Johnstown Area Regional Industries (JARI), Mount Aloysius College, Southern Allegheny Regional Planning and Development Committee, The Chamber of Commerce Advisory Board, Johnstown Area Heritage Association, Geistown-Richland Pee Wee Football League, and Venture Quest.

Trunk-or-treat at First Baptist Church The First Baptist Church of Ebensburg is holding trunk-or-treat on Sunday, Oct. 29, from 1-4 p.m. at the corner of A-Frame and Winterset roads in Ebensburg. Featured will be trunks with candy, a bounce house, cotton candy, and hot dogs, all for free.

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St. Francis Xavier Super Bingo Sunday Sunday, October 22 • Admission $30 ( )-* " + ,# $ ,+ (& ,( (' / #!", #'!( (* "-* " ( # #&#, '-& * ( ,# $ ,+ 0 + *. + ,#'! ('%/

#'' * %% !-% * & + ) # % $)(, - * ', 0 ((*+ () ' , & Chance to win one of 15 prizes! 10 Monday Night Bingo Packages Include: Earlybirds, reg. games, specials, wristband, dinner & drink 5 Monday Night admissions ' (*& ,#('

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Saturday & Sunday October 14 & 15 Courtyard Marriott, Altoona, Nittany Room 1275 Indian Springs Rd.

10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Daily Pay $30 & up • Nice AU/BU pre ‘21 dollars


MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - PAGE 13

PennDOT accepting unsolicited partnership proposals until Oct. 31 The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation Office of Public-Private Partnerships (P3) announced that it is accepting unsolicited proposals for transportation projects from the private sector through Oct. 31. The submission period applies to PennDOT-owned projects and infrastructure. During this period, the private sector can submit proposals offering innovative ways to deliver transportation projects across a vari-

ety of modes including roads, bridges, rail, aviation, and ports. Proposals can also include more efficient models to manage existing transportation-related services and programs. The private sector may also submit applications for non-PennDOT owned assets directly to the P3 board during this time. Transportation entities outside of the governor’s jurisdiction, such as transit authorities, may establish their own timelines or accept

proposals year-round. Unsolicited proposals are being accepted through 11:59 p.m. on Oct. 31. Instructions on how to submit a project and information on the unsolicited proposal review process can be found on the state’s P3 website,www.P3forPA.com. The state’s P3 law allows PennDOT and other transportation authorities and commissions to partner with private companies to participate in delivering, maintaining and financing transportation-related projects.

As part of the P3 law, the seven-member Public Private Transportation Partnership Board was appointed to examine and approve potential public-private transportation projects. If the board determines a state operation would be more cost-effectively administered by a private company, the company will be authorized to submit a proposal and enter into a contract to either completely or partially take over that operation for a defined period of time.


Thursday, October 12, 2017 • Page 14 APArTMENTS FOr rENT

APArTMENTS FOr rENT

COMMErCiAl FOr rENT

lANd/lOTS FOr SAlE

HElP WANTEd

CASSANDRA: Large 3 bedroom, 1 bath. Stove, fridge, sewage, washer/ dryer hookups included. No pets. $550/ month. 814-979-7426.

EBENSBURG: Private 1 bedroom, 2nd floor, deck and yard. Stove/ fridge included. Off street parking. $475/ month plus electric. No smoking. 472-5919.

EBENSBURG: A little over 4000 sq. ft. 601 W. Lloyd St. Call Kevin 4727707.

PORTAGE: 1.5 acres. Twin Lakes Rd. Call 814-736-4212.

DETAIL/ RECON PERSON/ PARTS RUNNER: Must have good driving record. Apply at Stager’s Chevrolet, 528 Main St., Portage. 814-7369686.

COLVER: 2 bedroom. Water/ sewage/ garbage included. $350/ month. 814-691-8247. CRESSON: 1 bedroom, 1 bath. 2nd floor. All utilities included. $600/ month. 814-590-9165. CRESSON: 2 bedroom townhouse. 97 High St. Fully equipped kitchen. Laundry room. Full bath 2nd floor, 1/2 bath 1st floor. Central air. No pets. $575/ month +utilities. Security deposit. 886-5436, 505-5216. EBENSBURG: 2 bedroom. Includes heat, water, sewer, garbage, refrigerator and stove. Over 1000 sq. ft. Large closets. Coin operated laundry. Off street parking. No pets/ smoking. Available Nov. 1st. $650. 472-8440. EBENSBURG: 3 bedroom apartment at 510 W. Highland Ave. 3rd floor. $675/ month, includes heat, water, sewer, garbage. Laundry on-site. Lots of storage. 814-659-1302. EBENSBURG: First class 2 bedroom, 2 bath, all new construction, located downtown, appliances, washer, dryer, gas fireplace, secured elevator access & off-street parking. $675/ month. Call 814-421-0059. EBENSBURG: One bedroom apartments and two bedroom apartments. No pets and no smoking. Call 4727850.

NORTHERN CAMBRIA: Commercial store/ office front. Great location. Water, sewage, garbage, heat included. $500/ month. 814-691-8247. PATTON: Medical office for rent. Completely remodeled. Excellent high visibility location. 814-674-5806.

EBENSBURG: Small and large 1-2 bedroom, 2-bedroom townhouse with 1.5 bath, all include heat/water/sewage/garbage, off-street parking. No pets. Storage available. $460$850/month. 471-0462. MARKET STREET COMMONS IN JOHNSTOWN: 1-2 bedroom apartments available. Utilities included. 814-536-6122 for details. Equal Housing Opportunity. NORTHERN CAMBRIA: 1 & 2 bedroom apts. Heat, water, garbage, sewage included. No pets. 948-8392. NORTHERN CAMBRIA: 1 bedroom, 1 bath. Water, garbage, sewage, washer/ dryer hookups included. No pets. $410/ month. 814-979-7426. NORTHERN CAMBRIA: 1 bedroom, all utilities included except water & electric. No pets. 814-951-3976. PORTAGE: 1st floor. 1 bedroom. Totally remodeled. Water, sewage, stove, refrigerator included. 814-3225849. PORTAGE: 2 bedroom apartments. 251 Church Rd. and 921 Sonman Ave. 814-341-9154.

HOuSES FOr rENT CASSANDRA: 3 bedroom, 2 full baths, kitchen includes stove and fridge, living room, dining room, nice size porch and yard. Call for info 3417045. COLVER: Remodeled 2 bedroom, 2 bath, large garage. No pets. 814-4726188, leave message. COLVER: Some remodeling, 2 or 3 bedroom, 2 bath, 1st floor laundry, no pets. 814-472-6188, leave message.

HOuSES FOr SAlE NEW GERMANY: Country living. FHSD. 1.5 story colonial. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths. 1.5 acres. Attached 2 car garage. Wood stove. Gas fireplace. $179,000. 814-322-2365.

GArAGE/YArd SAlES CRESSON: 622 Fourth St. 10/13, 10/14. 8-? Something for everyone! ROARING SPRING: Barn sale! 580 Brumbaugh Rd. Sat., 10/14, 8-? Barn vents, primitives, tools, furniture, kayak, Dewalt radial arm saw, toolbox for pickup truck, 1830’s-5 door iron wood stove, much, much more! TEN FAMILY GARAGE SALE: Oct. 13, 14. 8-3. Five miles west of Ebensburg, turn up Ogden St. off Rt. 22, fourth house. Huge sale. Rain or shine.

HElP WANTEd CAREGIVERS AGENCY: Background check and TB test required. All shifts. EOE. 814-266-5337. CDL DRIVER: Hospitalization, MSHA required. 5 years experience. Call Ron 814-322-7412.

We accept cash, check, Visa and Mastercard

Phone: 814-472-4110 Fax: 814-472-2275 Email: mainlinenews@verizon.net

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DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONALS for intellectually disabled adults. Competitive hourly wage. Part-time and full-time available. All shifts. 814-410-6197. EOE. DRIVERS: Immediate openings. $80,000 yearly average! BC/ BS/ UPMC, dental, vision, 401k, etc. 1yr. Class A & B Tanker End. EXPERIENCED BARTENDER: Evening shift. Must be available Fri. & Sat. evenings. Apply in person at Penn Gables Restaurant in Ebensburg. EXPERIENCED CLEANING PERSON needed weekend shifts. 3228472. FT MASSAGE THEREAPIST OR PTA to assist with manual therapy and/ or rehab. If interested email resume to chirotip@aol.com.

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MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - PAGE 15

HElP WANTEd

HElP WANTEd

HElP WANTEd

FULL-TIME DRIVER: Propane delivery, CDL license with HAZMAT and Tank endorsements. Call ALGAS 886-8451.

MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONAL: Mental Health Resources of Central PA located in Ebensburg is seeking a Mental Health Professional primarily for the weekends. MHCPA provides direct care to adults with mental health issues. The candidate should possess the ability to work in a supportive and effective manner within a challenging population. Job Requirement: Master’s Degree in a clinical human services field. Applicant must have a valid Driver’s License and Act 34 clearance. Competitive salary and benefits package provided. EOE. To apply, please email cover letter and resume to: Carol@ccltsr.com.

STEPPING STONES located in Cresson is seeking a part-time third shift Aide/ Support Staff. Candidate should possess the ability to work in a supportive and effective manner within a challenging population. Qualifications include HS Diploma or equivalency, valid PA Driver’s License and Act 34 clearance. EOE. To apply, email cover letter and resume to Wprostejovsky@comcast.net or call 886-4220 or stop in at 429 Keystone Ave., Cresson.

MENTAL HEALTH RESOURCES OF CENTRAL PA located in Ebensburg is seeking a part-time, second shift LPN. MHCPA provides direct care to adults with mental health issues. Candidate must possess a state nursing license and 6 months experience with individuals with disabilities. In addition, you must be able to work in a supportive and effective manner within a challenging population. Must have a valid Driver’s License and Act 34 clearance. Competitive salary and benefits package provided. EOE. To apply, please email cover letter and resume to carol@ccltsr.com. NEED SOME EXTRA CASH? LABORERS NEEDED for X-mas Tree Harvest in Strongstown, PA. Must be over 18 w/valid drivers license & able to lift over 50 lbs. $10/ hr. Pineton Tree Farms. Calls only. Leave name, number. 814-948-4990. WAITRESS & COOK: Beaver St. Cafe, Hastings. Apply within.

Classified Ad Rates: $7 for the first 10 words 50¢ for each additional word

JOHN CARROLL AMBULANCE CARROLLTOWN is accepting applications for Full-time Paramedic, Part-time Paramedics and EMT’s. Full-time Paramedic $15.00 hr./ Health Care Part-Time Paramedic $13.00 hr. Part-Time EMT $10.50 hr. For applications please stop by the station at 239 N. Main St., Carrolltown or call (814) 344-8933. LAB TECH WANTED: Full or parttime technician needed for evening shifts. Benefits and overtime available. Basic math and computer skills. Will train. Reply to SLI, 554 Gallitzin Rd., Cresson, PA 16630. 814-8867400. LABORER: $9.50 to start. Raise and benefits after 90 days. Full-time, M-F, 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Must be reliable, have own transportation. 814-3448290. LANDSCAPE MATERIAL SALES ATTENDANT NEEDED: Clymer, Johnstown locations. Knowledge in retail sales, estimates and Quickbooks bookkeeping is preferred. Management and accounting skills is a plus. Please complete an application at Krevel Supply, 265 Swamp Road, Clymer, PA 15728.

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Classified Deadline: Tuesday at 10 a.m.

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THE PORTAGE AREA SEWER AUTHORITY is accepting applications for a full-time laborer that would be willing to get operator certified. Some other requirements include: a valid PA driver’s license, pass a mandatory drug test and be able to get to the WWTP within 30 minutes when on call. Applicant shall be willing to work 7 days a week and outside work will be required. Send letters of interest, along with education, qualifications and salary requirements to Portage Area Sewer Authority, 606 Cambria St., Portage, PA 15946 by Monday, October 16, 2017.

PARTIES, WEDDINGS, SEMINARS, SPECIAL EVENTS: Cresson American Legion ballroom. 886-8567.

SErviCES BOOKKEEPING/ PAYROLL: Quickbooks. 20+ years experience. Kathy 814-846-5909. COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SNOW PLOWING, SALTING & SHOVELING: R&S Cleaning. We will plow in any town. Fully insured. 814330-0150. GREG PETRISKO MASONRY & REMODELING: Brick work, chimneys, block work, foundations, siding, metal roofing & shingle roofing, decks, electrical work, new electrical services. Free estimates. 814-322-7535. HARBAUGH ELECTRIC: Quality workmanship at affordable rates. Fully insured. 814-743-6166.

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R&S CLEANING: We haul anything! Cleanouts! Houses, apartments, garages, storage bins, $50 to $75. Lawn care. Fully insured. PA contract #080816. 330-0150. RICK’S REMODELING/ HANDYMAN: All home improvements and paint, wallpaper, siding, decks/ ramps. PA#045341. 814-886-5504. SHAFFER TREE SERVICE, LLC: Tree removal, tree/shrub trimming, stump grinding, fertilizing, landscaping. Free estimates, fully insured. Owner Rick Shaffer 736-4168. TREE TRIMMING, REMOVAL, STUMP GRINDING: Free estimates. Veteran owned and operated. Jake Miller: 814-937-5318 or 814-9373851.

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Support cancer patients by giving blood During Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the American Red Cross encourages eligible donors to give blood to support cancer patients and others. Mary Alice Donofrio gave blood for the first time in memory of her mother who received several blood transfusions while being treated for breast cancer. “I had no idea what to expect, but the experience was very easy and quite rewarding,” Donofio said. “Ever since then, I try and give blood as often as I can, and every time it gives me a good feeling in my heart. It is so nice to know that taking just an hour or so out of my day can help save the lives of others.”

According to the American Cancer Society, nearly 1.7 million new cases of cancer are expected in the U.S. this year. Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women, with nearly 253,000 women expected to be diagnosed in 2017. Cancer patients may need blood products during chemotherapy, surgery or treatment for complications. Upcoming blood donation opportunities Oct. 16-31: Carrolltown Oct. 25 from 1-6:30 p.m. at St. Benedict Church.

Ebensburg Oct. 16 from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Lakeside Community Church of the Nazarene; Oct. 23 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Bishop Carroll Catholic High School. Hastings Oct. 19 from 2:30-7 p.m. at St. Bernard’s Church. Northern Cambria Oct. 20 from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Northern Cambria High School; Oct. 25 from 12:30-6 p.m. at St. John’s United Methodist Church.

Prince Gallitzin State Park offers programs Survival Skills for Teens Youth ages 14 and up are invited to join the park naturalist to learn some hands-on survival skills during this program on Saturday, Oct. 14. Build a shelter, practice some basic navigation, learn what to pack on a daytrip, and play a round of Survival Challenge. This special event is for teens only. Please contact Beth at 814-674-1000, extension 105 or princeprogramssp@pa.gov to register. Program is limited to 12 participants, so reserve your space today. Meet at the Organized

Group Camping area at 1 p.m. “Walk with Me” Wednesday On Wednesday, Oct. 18, join the park naturalist on a walk in the park. The walk will feature Old Glendale Road Trail. Along the way watch for signs of wildlife and learn a little history about the park. This hike is relatively easy with moderate inclines and non-paved trail conditions, and is approximately 3 miles roundtrip. Please wear sturdy shoes and bring drinking water. Meet at 10 a.m. at the Bater Patch Trailhead (turn onto

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the gravel road at the Fiske intersection, across from the church).

for some fun nature learning! on Friday, Oct. 20. Children will enjoy a story, participate in a game, activity, or demonstration, and make a fun craft to take home. Activities are designed for children ages 3-6, but all ages are welcome! Please RSVP by contacting Beth Garner at 814-674-1000, extension 105 or princeprogramssp@pa.gov. Meet at 10:30 a.m. in the lower level of the park office, which can be accessed at the rear of the building.

Family Science Night Families are invited to join the park naturalist as we explore some hands-on autumn science on Thursday, Oct. 19, Participate in activities, games, and crafts as we learn about fall leaves, seeds, squirrels, and migration. This program is bestsuited for children ages 4-12, but all ages are welcome. No RSVP is required for this program. For more information, contact Beth Garner at 814-6741000, extension 105 or princeprogramssp@pa.gov. This program will be held outdoors at the pavilion at Pickerel Pond at 5:30 p.m. Please dress for the weather and wear clothes and shoes that can get dirty.

These park programs are free of charge and open to the public. For more information, contact Beth Garner, environmental education specialist, at 814-6741000, extension 105 or by email at princeprogramssp@pa.gov. An online calendar of events with information on all upcoming programs can also be found at www.visitPAparks.com.

Nature Story Time Bring your children to the park

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The following students have completed requirements for graduation from Indiana University of Pennsylvania as of August: Ebensburg Anthony John Berzonsky, Municipal Road, B.A. in criminology; Michael John Jubas, West Sample Street, B.S. in communications media; Kiersten Lorditch, Wilmore Road, M.S. in sport science; and Marcus John Sheehan, Parks Street, B.S. in safety, health, and environmental applied sciences. Mineral Point Brooke Elizabeth Smay, Hilltop Street, B.S. in safety, health, and environmental applied sciences Nicktown Demi Mychael Hoover, Log Road, B.S. in physical education and sport/exercise science Northern Cambria Matthew P. Eckenrode, Crawford Avenue, B.S. in physical education and sport/sport administration Portage Ashleigh Nicole Hanna, Sherman Street, B.S. in physical education and sport/exercise science Revloc Scott Matthew Ranck, Highland Avenue, B.S. in safety, health, and environmental applied sciences Saint Michael Bonnie Eileen Berkebile, 2nd Street, M.Ed. in math ed/secondary math ed South Fork Cheyenne R. Lang, Railroad Street, B.A. in sociology Summerhill Nancy Louise Ondesko, Sierra Street, M.Ed. in literacy

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IUP August graduates

Twin Rocks Lucas George Tatarko, Station Road, M.S. in safety sciences

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Mount Aloysius to host silent HealthSouth Altoona celebrates physical therapy month lunches on Wednesdays in fall ASL students to benefit from social interaction with Deaf community Mount Aloysius College will once again host monthly deaf gatherings on campus, offering the region’s Deaf community and the college’s American Sign Language English Interpreter students opportunities to interact. Deaf community members are also invited to enjoy a complimentary lunch with Mount Aloysius students, faculty, and staff in Cosgrave every Wednesday during the semester. The college’s silent lunches are served every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. The Mount Aloysius College Deaf Gatherings offer the region’s Deaf community a unique social opportunity while also providing Mount Aloysius College American Sign Language and English Interpreting students a real-life learning opportunity to hone their signing skills. The college’s ASL Interpreting program is one of only a few in the United States accredited by the Commission of Collegiate Interpreter Education (CCIE). Mount Aloysius College has a long history of teaching sign language and interpretation. Sign language and interpreting students excel due to small classes, a high-tech interactive lab, a vibrant student-run club, and the uniqueness of the major where students work closely with one another and with faculty, developing strong supportive relationships. At Mount Aloysius College students graduate with a bachelor’s degree in American Sign Language/English Interpreting and are well-prepared to find careers working as interpreters in educational, medical, business, religious, and a variety of other settings. To learn more about these events, email Frank Sankey at fsankey@mtaloy.edu. To learn about the Mount Aloysius College American Sign Language/Interpreter program, visit the college’s web site at www.mtaloy.edu.

The month of October has been set aside as National Physical Therapy Month, and the 2017 rendition, labeled #ChoosePT, seeks to raise awareness to the risks of opiod use and the benefits of physical therapy as a safe and effective alternative for long-term pain management. According to the American Physical Therapy Association, “National Physical Therapy Month (NPTM) is an annual opportunity to recognize the physical therapy profession's efforts to ‘transform society by optimizing movement to improve the human experience.’” HealthSouth Altoona’s Joint Commission Accredited Disease-Specific Orthopedic program has been focusing on educating its patients to the importance of utilizing alternative means of pain relief following surgery. “As physical therapists, we know that exercise can play a key role in pain control,” Mark Garrett, HealthSouth Altoona’s director of therapy operations stated. “We work to identify the underlying reasons for pain and address these issues in a safe and effective way.” Physical Therapy and exercise, in general, are not only important when recovering from orthopedic surgery, but should be an important consideration when using pain medications in any way. National Physical Therapy Week was

established in 1981 and became National Physical Therapy Month in 1992. Over the course of National Physical Therapy Month, HealthSouth Altoona will recognize and reward its Physical Therapists for Outcomes and Excellence. “Exercise can aid in maintaining strength and improve functional mobility,” Garrett added. “When done with a friend or in a group, exercise can also help keep individuals engaged both physically and mentally.” About HealthSouth Altoona HealthSouth Altoona is an 80-bed inpatient rehabilitation hospital that offers comprehensive inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation services. Serving patients throughout Central Pennsylvania, the hospital is located at 2005 Valley View Blvd, Altoona PA and on the Web at www.HealthSouthAltoona.com. About HealthSouth HealthSouth is one of the nation’s largest providers of post-acute healthcare services, offering both facility-based and home-based post-acute services in 36 states and Puerto Rico through its network of inpatient rehabilitation hospitals, home health agencies, and hospice agencies. HealthSouth can be found on the web at www.healthsouth.com.


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MAINLINE EXTRA - Thursday, October 12, 2017 - PAGE 19

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mammogram can detect breast cancer in its earliest, most treatable stages, and many major health organizations recommend annual mammogram screenings for women beginning at age 40. Experts also recommend clinical breast exams and breast self-exams to check for breast abnormalities on a regular basis. Any woman noticing unusual changes in her breasts should contact her healthcare provider immediately. Women of all ages should speak to their doctor about his or her personalized recommendations for breast cancer screening.


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