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Ehrenfeld Borough explores ordinance enforcement options

Vol. 115 No. 19

USPS 439-000

By Ron Portash

of Mainline Newspapers

The empty chair of recently deceased Ehrenfeld mayor Ray Plummer weighed heavily on the Ehrenfeld Borough council at its May 1 meeting. This was the first meeting since Plummer’s passing April 21. The discussion opened with an update on the Civil War reenactment and encampment that the borough holds in cooperation with South Fork Heritage Days, to be held June 20-22 this year. A few civil war re-enactors attended the meeting to update the council on the planned activities for this year. According to the representatives, the encampment will be bigger and better than last year. This year, the re-enactment band will be playing at the borough’s gazebo Saturday, June 21. They also are hoping to bring in several Civil War artillery pieces and have more re-enactors participating in the

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Remembers deceased mayor

battles. Plummer was a big advocate for the Civil War reenactment, and his family has picked up his mantle and is working on the project in cooperation with the council. In other matters, Cambria County Court of Common Pleas Judge Norman President Krumenacker issued a ruling several months ago that severely limited how code enforcement agencies could file ordinance violations. The judge’s ruling requires that summary criminal complaints must contain some form of personal identification, such as date of birth, Social Security number or driver’s license or PennDOT ID card number. Laurel Municipal The Inspection Agency (LMIA), which is the appointed building code enforcement agency for Ehrenfeld Borough and 42 of the county’s 64 municipalities, in

discussion with Krumenacker developed several options for filing these ordinance violations. Before the threat of identity theft became a focal issue with the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts, code enforcement could request the information from the local police department. Law enforcement officers have routine access to this information through the CLEAN/NCIC and JNET systems. CLEAN, or the Commonwealth Law Enforcement Assistance Network, provides access to criminal records and intelligence material in Pennsylvania. NCIC is the National Criminal Information Center, which is a federal government computer network linking federal and state criminal records systems. JNET is the Pennsylvania

A Night of Gold and Glitz

SEE OPTIONS, PAGE 4A

Philip Yuhas was crowned king and Avery Cummings queen at Forest Hills’ “A night of gold and glitz” prom, held May 4 at the Pasquerilla Center. Submitted photo.

Forest Hills High School alumna Alissa Damian (right), calling herself the prom elf, has fun helping Chance Kmetz and Kelsey Josephson before the Forest Hills Prom May 4. Photo by Ron Portash.

Paige Giebfried and Donovan Faith look forward to the Forest Hills Prom May 4. Photo by Ron Portash.

Prom elf

Prom night

Portage Township drops fire insurance fee schedule

By Ron Portash

of Mainline Newspapers

At the May 1 meeting of the Portage Township supervisors, the township solicitor’s recommendation to renew a fee schedule concerning fire insurance was on the agenda, and the supervisors unanimously agreed not to take action on the matter. “Residents pay enough fees already, why add extra costs?”

said supervisor Ben Selapack. “It’s another way to unnecessarily burden local residents,” replied chairman William Cooper. The fee schedule was established by the Pennsylvania leg-

islature in 1992 as Act 98, which imposed a fee on fire insurance proceeds. The state established that municipalities should receive and hold in escrow a portion of any insurance payout for a property fire.

The money would be held by the municipality in the event of costs the municipality would encounter if a structure would suffer fire damage. The fee established by the state was $2,000 for every

$15,000 of insurance payout. The money would be held by the municipality to cover back property taxes or fees associated with making the property

SEE FEE, PAGE 5A

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