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PORTFOLIO MAINI KE


EDUCATION

May 2013 to present

University of Virginia | Charlottesville, VA B.S. in Architecture | GPA 3.65

July 2012

Duke University | Durham, NC Leadership | Talent Identification Program

WORK EXPERIENCE August 2016 to present

Maini Ke

architect+designer+artist Date of Brith: August 19th 1995 Nationality: Chinese

Apt7, 112 Montebello Circle, Charlottesville, VA 434-326-8124 mk9af@virginia.edu

SKILLS Rhinoceros Grasshopper AutoCAD SketchUp Revit

May 2016 to August 2016

Atelier And I (Sakamoto Kazunari) | Tokyo, Japan Architectural Intern Participated in a ferry terminal design competition for the entire process and won the second prize out of 100 competitors. Made a 1:50 scale model and several exterior and interior renders. Other tasks include making concept models, digital models and analytical diagrams on various projects. May 2015 to August 2015

Benoy | Shanghai, China Architectural Intern Participated in a commercial complex design competition from site analysis to preparing presentation documents, creating presentation books and participated in client meeting. Other tasks include contributing in various infrastructure and public space design in large-scale urban projects; cooperating with various design teams to amend construction drawings.

Vray Maxwell Photoshop Illustrator InDesign Microsoft Office

July 2014

Design Duncan Miller Ullmann | Shanghai, China Interior Design Intern Organized material library, collected and labeled materials for interior design material presentation board. Chose furniture and decorations for luxury hotels and created presentation documents.

Laser Machine 3D Printing Woodshop Tools

LEADERSHIP

December 2015 to present

LANGUAGES

Mandarin

3-D Geometrical Modeling and Visualization Class | UVa Teaching Assistance Mentor and review submissions for assigned group of students, participate in workshops, and attend periodic lectures. Investigate new technology, lead group tutorials and guest lecture.

English

Japanese

HONORS 2014 Fall and 2015 Spring

Dean’s List | UVa

2015 Spring

Work for Publication | UVa

2015 Spring

Model selected for cover UVa Alumni Magazine

LingXi Drama Club | University of Virginia Actress and Publicity Officer Create posters and publicity materials as well as film documentary for drama production Octocber 2015 to present

Cavalier Daily | University of Virginia Translator Translate and publish school magazine articals through various channels

September 2013 to December 2015

Chinese Corner | University of Virginia Treasure Chair Raised fund for activities and managed weekly reimbursement January 2014 to May 2014

Habitat for Humanity | Madison House Volunteer Assembled furniture and furnished house


Information Hub

Centre for the Creative Arts

3D Metropolis

Hybrid Housing

Sketches

Spring Settlement


Information Hub 2016 Spring Professor: Seth McDowell China Town, New York City

The Information Hub establishes new formats and spaces for design education and research. It re-imagines the library as an institution no longer exclusively dedicated to books, but a dynamic space for communication and urban design. All forms of media are presented openly and flexibly with maximum accessibility for the public and the academic.


Spatial Exploration

Seesaw

Succession

Subterranean

Design Lab that requires ample light and generous space is located on the upper floors. Spaces with various functions shift along the library space in the middle vertically. Moving down the ramps, pin-up space for studio review and teachers’ offices are arrayed on the east side. Students and teachers could reach out to the material and information they need any time they want.

Design Lab

Library

Auditorium

Private: Workroom Office Storage

Public: Gallery Workstation Reading Area

Pagoda

The west side of the building is exposed under strong sunlight in the afternoon but weak sunlight in the morning. In order to accommodate to different solar conditions, operable louvers attached to a system of levers and push rods, which link to a control system that rotates louvers according to time, day and weather.


Jungle

Barricade

The library space on the ramps is the heart of the project, linking upper design lab to the teachers’ offices, review space and lower public reading area.


Ground Floor

Second Floor

Two and Half Floor

Third Floor

Fifth Floor

Five and Half Floor

Seventh Floor

Eighth Floor


The stacks are accessible by a continuous ramp divided into stairs for seating and slopes for shelfing and circulation. Various types of furnitures are placed for reading and studio working. It becomes a playground for students to explore knowledge and a communication center for the academics and the general public to exchange ideas.

Ground Floor

Four and Half Floor Fifth Floor

Ninth Floor Eighth Floor


Centre for the Creative Arts 2015 Fall Professor: W. G. Clark Philadelphia, PA


The Virginia Center for the Creative Arts provides work spaces and living quarters for artists in Philadelphia and in several international locations. Painters, writers and musicians apply for four week residencies. Artists could disseminate their ideas to public by presenting work in gallery while cooperate and communicate with each other to generate cross-disciplinary works. The Center seeks an urban location for a new community by researching the relationship between public and private programs.


Geometry Development

1.Studio 2.Gallery 3.Traditional Theatre 4.Modern Theatre 5.Dinning 6.Single Room 7.Storage

1.Studio 2.Gallery 3.Classroom

5

3

4

3

2

2

2

1

1/8”=1’-0’’


6

3

1

7

1/8”=1’-0’’


1.Gallery 2.Box Office 3.Traditional Theatre

1.Studio 2.Gallery

1

2

1

1

Ground Floor 1/16”=1’-0’’

1.Classroom 2.Dinning 3.Kitchen 4.Single Room 5.Loft Space

1.Gallery 2.Classroom 3.Dance Studio 4.Music Studio 5.Modern Theatre

3 2 1

1 5

4

3

Third Floor 1/16”=1’-0’’

Exhibition space is accessible through the main entrance on the street while traditional and modern performance space where visitors are invited to watch shows or concerts could be approached by the secondary entrance facing the back alley. The long hallway on the first floor is an axis between gallery and studio. Visitors could steal a glance at how artists work while appreciate their works at the same time. Two types of working space are provided for artists who prefer either working alone or working in a cooperative environment. Each floor comes with a classroom with a garden open to sky. These rooms could be used as individual meditation space or group working lounge. There are kitchen, dining space and common areas in the upper residential area, which inherits the spatial concept on the lower floors.

1.Longe 2.Single Room

1


2

3

Second Floor

Studio

1/16”=1’-0’’

2

4

5

Fourth Floor

Classroom with Garden

Fifth Floor

Public Lounge

1/16”=1’-0’’

2

1

1/16”=1’-0’’


3D Metropolis 2016 Fall Professor: Lucia Phinney Baltimore, MD

Seed Pod (Bell Pepper) Geometry Construction and Adaption

Seed Pod (Bell Pepper) Light Study


A 1

Exhibition 6000 sqft

A

Small Classroom 480 sqft

1

2

Green House 15200 sqft

B

Big Classroom 900 sqft

2

3

Classroom 3000 sqft Lecture Hall 2400 sqft

4

Maintainence A 6000 sqft Circulation B 4200 sqft Parking C 13800 sqft

3

4

C

Stair x 1 280 sqft Loading 880 sqft

1

3 2

2 1

3

4

C

B

4

3

A

Shop 660 sqft

5

5

B

Bathroom x 1 500 sqft

Library 6400 sqft Herbarium 4400 sqft Herbarium Studio 5300 sqft Laboratory 1900 sqft

Transf

Bus Stop

Light Rail Stop Metro Stop

2 1

Metro Stop

3 2 1

B

A

5 4 3 1

2

Pedestrain Flow

1

Education Office A 2500 sqft

Meeting Room 555 sqft

2

Facility Office 2000 sqft Library Office 4200 sqft Research Office 3400 sqft

B

Big Office 280 sqft

C

Small Office 165 sqft

3 4 5

Administration Office 9960 sqft

Shadow

Transformation 1

Transformation 2

Bus Stop

Light Rail Stop Metro Stop

Metro Stop

Site Observation Pedestrain Flow

Shadow

Transformation on Site

Seed Pod (Bell Pepper) Structural System

Highly articulated seed pod (bell pepper) provides an initial geometrical construct for analysis and spatial testing. Following a speculative construction of the Baltimore site, the pod is transformed in relation to this new context. The internal logics and the responsive nature of these organisms can be systematically transformed, scaled, and other wise hybridized to form spatial prototypes that are new and more capable of dealing with the complex conditions of the contemporary world.


This residential community is a large scale hybrid housing program that ties UVa undergraduate students, graduate students and faculty members. The physical form of the building complex reflects the concept of engaging social life and academic life together as well as providing space that stimulates interaction between different university members.


Hybrid Housing 2015 Spring Professor: Teddy Slowik University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA


Top Floor Site Plan

Ground Floor Site Plan


Second Floor

Average Unit Area: Residential Area: Retail Area: Amenity Area: Sports Area: Existing Parking: New Parking:

693 sf 293,455 sf 75,699 sf 39,162 sf 82,798 sf 750 spaces 420 spaces

AMENITY SPORTS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL PARKING

Fourth Floor

Total Number of Units: Total Land Area Used: Total Building Area: Density: Building Site Coverage:

528 425,255 sf 179,325sf 54 units/acre 42.17%


Atrium opens up ground floor to sky to meet sunlight. Each building has a walkway going through the ground floor with shops and restaurants on both sides. The walkway eliminate the massiveness of the building and also attracts people to walk through the building to the plaza and the sports fields behind. Buildings are connected to each other with suspended bridge rotated in angle to maximize solar exposure and introduce expanse view for library and dinning hall inside. The bridges are the main gathering space between buildings for different university members. To accommodate different residents’ conditions, three types of housing units are designed. Undergraduate students in double bed rooms share public balcony every three rooms. Graduate students have suites with three single bedrooms, and faculty have single or family apartments.

AMENITY SPORTS RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL PARKING


Sketches

Charlottesville, Virginia


Spring Settlement 2014 Spring Professor: Nicholas Knodt University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA Teammates: Benjamin DiNapoli, Remy Moorhead


This living pod reflections the fundamental notion of human inhabitation while negotiate the peaceful occupation of the public realm. The recycled wooden planks that compose the frame also rotate on dowels, aggregating to become a covering that fully integrates surface and structure. Pod’s design is fueled by a passion for sustainability, alongside a desire for the spatial and physical integration of nature.


[1] OPEN

Sitting, relaxing - the same wooden p frame also rotate on dowels, aggreg ing that fully integrates surface and s coverings provide shade when seate Planks also fall into place as back res meets the ledge and one that looks o for watching the sun rise and set.

[2] FOLDING

Eating, congregation - the sister unit planks fold down to create a central side and outside of the structure, thi private space or as an invitation for b this form, both porch overhangs are the possibility of outdoor eating.

[3] CLOSED

Sleeping, storage - the sister unit rem table takes on a new purpose, becom overnight storage. The adjacent mini as a critique of the toxic “more is mo Its small, densely covered design add shelter while a sparse frame emphas large experience of the landscape.


planks that compose the gating to become a coverstructure. Selective dense ed beneath an overhang. sts, forming a seat that out on the horizon, perfect

t folds into itself and table accessible from inis has the ability to act as a borough congregation. in maintained, allowing for

mains folded and the ming a sheltered space for imal sleeping space serves ore� American mindset. dresses a basic need for sizes openness, providing a

FRAME the skeleton of structure, the frame should define form based on site, inhabitants, and projected program

wood planks from construction sites THE HUMAN BODY acting as an extension of the human body, design should first reflect the body’s proportions, curvature, movement, and sensations cut into favorable sizes INSIDE / OUTSIDE openness within the space as well as continuity between the structure and landscape are critical for freedom of movement and thought alike drill holes for connection

STRUCTURE / NATURE the built and natural environment should work in collaboration, maintaining a relationship which reflects material origins, influences material choices, and demands a minimal environmental footprint

LIGHT / ABSENCE OF LIGHT windows of changeable transparency should adjust to varying temporal conditions, their forms dictated by material density

SURFACE / AGGREGATION modular aggregation should form a surface adaptable to various conditions

connect with wood dowels

reinforce with straw rope knots

assemble on site

assemble on site


MAINI KE mk9af@virginia.edu (434)-326-8124 @2016

MArch portfolio 2016  
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