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5. Conclusions In conclusion it can be said that Origen does not wish to suggest any close similarity between his view on divine names and any of the Greek philosophical schools. This has to do with the altogether different views on the divine and the functions of names in the Jewish-Christian and Greek tradition. Whereas in the latter case, it is generally assumed that most peoples know the same gods to which they happen to refer by different names, just as they refer to the same things by means of different words. Divine names, furthermore, reflect human attempts to theologize. In the former perspective, not all peoples know the same gods. Divine names are a form of divine revelation. Origen’s main argument for the divine origin of these names is that they have magical powers. Against Celsus’ charge that the Jews and the Christians do not adhere to the alêthês logos, he claims the support of the magicians, the wise, of all nations. He deploys their authority against that of Celsus’ Greek philosophers who appear to be hopelessly divided among themselves. On the basis of similarities between Origen and later Neoplatonists, such as Iamblichus and Proclus, it has been concluded that Origen constitutes ‘the best available evidence for contemporary Platonist doctrine’.25 There is good reason to doubt this. Even though these Neoplatonists acknowledge the existence of magically powerful revealed divine names, they also maintain, in keeping with the Greek tradition, that other magically powerful names are expressions of human knowledge concerning the divine. Similarities between Origen and these Neoplatonists can be explained from this common interest in magic, their difference from the fact that Origen was not a Platonist. Bibliography Borret, M. 1967. Origène: Contre Celse, i: Livres I et II, Paris. Boys-Stones, G.R. 2001. Post-Hellenistic Philosophy: A Study of its Developments from the Stoics to Origen, Oxford. Burkert, W. 1985. ‘Herodot über die Namen der Götter: Polytheismus als historisches Problem’, Museum Helveticum 42 (1985) 121–32. Chadwick, H. 1953. Origen: Contra Celsum, Cambridge. Dillon, J. 1985. ‘The Magical Power of Names in Origen and Later Platonism’, in: R. Hanson & H. Crouzel (eds), Origeniana Tertia, Rome, 203–16 (reprinted as 25

Dillon 1985, 216.

The Revelation of the Name YHWH to Moses - George H. van Kooten  

The Revelation of the Name YHWH to Moses: Perspectives from Judaism, the Pagan Graeco-Roman World, and Early Christianity (Themes in Biblica...

The Revelation of the Name YHWH to Moses - George H. van Kooten  

The Revelation of the Name YHWH to Moses: Perspectives from Judaism, the Pagan Graeco-Roman World, and Early Christianity (Themes in Biblica...

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