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Ashtangasana Z 200 hr. Yoga Teacher Training Curriculum Y by Adriana Wright


Ashtangasana: 200 Hr. Yoga Teacher Training Curriculum

Student Manual Rev. Ed. #1

 

Yogic  Timeline     Vedic  Period  Begins  

 

 

 

 

 

1500  BCE  

Rig  Veda  revealed  

 

 

 

 

 

1500  BCE  –  1200  BCE  

Flourishing  of  the  Vedas    

 

 

 

 

1200  BCE  –  500  BCE  

The  Buddha  b.  Prince  Siddhartha  Gautama  

 

 

600  BCE  –  500  BCE  

Upanishads  written,  end  of  Vedas    

 

 

 

600  BCE  –  300  BCE  

Sanskrit  codified  by  Panini  

 

 

 

500  BCE  

 

The  Mahabarata  (with  the  Bhagavad  Gita)  is  written.     Major  developments:  theism  –  movement  of  devotional     Faith  in  development  of  Patanjali’s  (Yoga  Sutra’s)  Hindu     Deities,  especially  Vishnu,  Shiva  and  Devi.     Patanjali’s  Yoga  Sutra’s  written,  probably  around  200  BCE    

500  BCE  –  300  BCE     800  BCE  –  200  BCE  

 

The  Origins  of  Yoga   The  history  of  yoga  stretches  back  to  the  Vedic  Period,  which  begins  about  1500  BCE.    But  the   term  yoga,  as  a  vast  body  of  spiritual  beliefs,  physical  techniques  and  scholarly  philosophy  was   first  developed  over  5,000  years  ago,  in  India.     During  the  Veda  period  there  was  a  significant  amount  written  on  the  philosophical  and  spiritual   aspects  of  Hinduism.  The  Vedas  were  the  collected  scriptures  of  the  Vedic  Age/Sciences  and   branched  off  into  four  different  categories:  Samhita,  Brahmanas,  Aranyakas  and  lastly  Upanishads.   The  first  category  was  called  Samhita.  The  Samhita  was  comprised  of  four  hymns,  one  being  the   Rig  Veda,  which  is  considered  to  be  the  oldest  and  most  important  collection  of  hymns.  The  Rig-­‐ Veda  really  represented  the  true  essence  of  Vedic  philosophy.     The  Vedas  represent  poetic  cognitions  of  enlightened  sages  on  the  origins  of  the  universe  and  the   evolution  of  life.  Yoga  is  the  practical  aspect  of  the  Vedic  Sciences  and  is  the  written  expression  of   the  Sage’s  wisdom.  It  is  a  system  that  helps  students  gain  access  to  their  wisdom.  The  guiding  ideal   of  this  philosophy  is  liberation  and  the  pure  consciousness  with  no  fluctuations  of  the  mind.   (Which  will  later  appear  in  the  Patanjali’s  Yoga  Sutras).     Towards  the  end  of  the  Vedic  period,  was  the  pre-­‐classical  yoga  period  (1000  BCE-­‐100  BCE),   where  the  Upanishads  (600  –  300  BCE)  were  the  dominant  philosophy  literature  of  Hinduism.  The   Upanishads  is  the  fourth  category  in  the  collected  Vedic  Scriptures.    There  were  some  200  texts,   that  were  written  and  gathered  over  hundreds  of  years,  focusing  on  the  foundation  of  the  Hindu   belief  system.  They  were  written  in  poetry  and  prose  as  epic  tales.  

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Ashtangasana: 200 Hr. Yoga Teacher Training Curriculum

Student Manual Rev. Ed. #1

This  area  of  Hindu  philosophy  centered  around  the  nondualist  interpretation  of  existence:  there  is   only  one  reality,  which  appears  to  the  unenlightened  mind  but  which  reveals  itself  as  singular  and   nondual.  Yogic  practice  and  study  appeared  in  these  texts.     “This  work  propounds  what  is  called  adhatma-­‐yoga,  the  ‘yoga  of  the  inmost  self,”  by  which  the   sage  may  come  to  know  the  great  god  hidden  in  the  cave  of  the  heart.”  Citation  Written  were  core   concepts  that  have  traveled  through  time  to  contemporary  yoga  philosophy.  The  supreme   Brahman  (God)  and  atman  (the  self),  karma  (action),  and  moksha  (liberation),  and  liberation   through  dhyana  (meditation)  and  jhana  (knowledge),  are  all  concepts  and  terms  which  later   developed  into  the  discipline  of  yoga.     500-­‐400  BCE  The  Bhagavad  Gita  –  New  Testament  of  Hinduism.  This  writing  attempts  to  integrate   the  various  yogic  approaches  of  the  day.  It  is  a  text  that  came  from  a  larger  body  of  text,  called  the   Mahabharata.  It  is  considered  an  Upanishad,  significant  Hindu  literature.     It  was  written  during  a  time  in  Hinduism  history  where  “theism”-­‐  the  devotion  to  a  particular   deity,  became  popular.  This  is  where  Shiva  and  Vishnu  were  the  central  deities.  This  is  where  the   element  of  devotion,  or  Bhakti,  to  the  Divine  was  introduced.  The  Bhagavad-­‐Gita  praises  yoga  and   illustrates  the  divine  relationship  between  mortal  and  supreme  consciousness.  This  is  where   philosophically,  dharma  (religious  duty),  non-­‐attachment  and  karma,  the  soul  is  immortal,  and   that  the  Lord  is  reached  through  bhakti  (devotion)  was  integral.   While  the  Bhagavad-­‐Gita  praises  yoga  and  stresses  the  divine  relationship  between  mortals  and   Supreme  Consciousness,  the  Yoga  Sutras  of  Patanjali,  are  the  road  map  to  enlightenment  or   spritual  freedom.  Classical  Yoga  is  defined  by  Patanjali’s  Yoga  Sutras.     Patanjali  systematized  the  yogic  teachings  from  the  Vedas  into  something  more  accessible.  It  was   passed  down  as  an  oral  tradition  and  became  the  6th  philosophical  viewpoint  in  Hinduism  (the  six   systems  were  called  Darasanas,  with  the  other  5  being:  Nyaya,  Vaisesika,  Samkhya,  Purva   Mimimsa  and  Vendata).     The  Sutras  provide  practical  instructions  on  how  to  achieve  yoga’s  promises  –  liberation  and   freedom  from  the  ego.  The  Sutras  are  brief  aphorisms  (proverb,  short  statement),  with  exact  and   complex  meanings  that  require  contemplation.  There  are  195  aphorisms  that  are  taught  and   memorized  in  chant.     The  Sutras  set  down  a  practical  set  of  rules  which  include  a  moral  code  of  behavior  towards   oneself  and  others,  postures,  breathing  and  meditation.  Patanjali  called  these  rules  the  path  of   Ashtanga  Yoga,  the  8  Fold  Path.  (Some  people  call  this  path,  Raja  Yoga).  The  8  Principles  are  what   we  know  as  the  8  Limbs  of  Yoga.   The  Sutras  are  divided  into  4  sections  or  chapters.  The  first  chapter,  Samadhi-­‐pada,  introduces  one   to  the  concepts  of  yoga,  its  characteristics,  lays  of  a  framework.  The  second  section,  Sadhana-­‐pada,   explains  how  we  obtain  the  previously  unabtainable.  Practicing  yoga  will  reduce  mental  and   physical  impurities,  develop  self  reflection.  It  stresses  that  we  need  to  go  deeper  into  our   understandings  of  everything.  Vibhuti-­‐pada  and  Kaivalya-­‐pada,  stresses  the  lifestyle  of   contemplation  and  introspection.  Teaches  that  we  need  to  develop  this  through  yogic  postures,   breath  work  and  sense  control.  This  is  what  we  know  today  as  mind/body  interaction  and  control.     Jan-16

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Understanding  the  Teacher-­Student  Relationship   Sutra  1.1  atha  yoganusasanam   Here  begins  the  authoritative  instructions  on  yoga   Yoga  is  an  oral  tradition  –  teacher  needs  student  and  student  needs  teacher   As  we  know  from  our  own  history  of  being  students,  teachers  have  an  amazing  role,  one   that  can  inspire  and  one  that  can  uninspired!  Our  role  as  teacher  has  responsibilities  attached  yet,   with  wonderful  rewards!!!   We  want  to  create  an  inspiring  and  safe  environment  to  allow  our  students  to  tap  into  their   inner  wisdom  and  beauty.     What  is  a  Yoga  Teacher?   As  yoga  is  a  spiritual  tradition,  a  science  and  an  art,  we  are  teaching  a  multidimensional,   complex  system  that  has  it’s  origins  in  the  8  Limbs  of  Yoga.     We  are  not  just  asana  teachers,  we  are  facilitators  and  may  be  even  the  catalysts  to  our   student’s  deeper  understanding  of  themselves  and  their  place  in  the  continuum  of  life  and  the   universe.     Unlike  other  professions,  we  cannot  have  a  professional  role  and  personal  role.  We  must   practice  what  we  preach.  How  often  do  you  see  a  smoking,  junk  food  eating  yoga  teacher?  But   practicing  what  we  teach  comes  rather  easy  because  we  love  the  model,  the  practice  and  want  to   share  our  wisdom  and  love.     The  beauty  of  the  8  limbs  is  the  more  we  live  and  breath  it,  the  more  our  inner  beauty   shows  thru  and  teaching  becomes  our  passion….you  want  to  share  it.     Buddhism  states  as  their  guiding  principal,  to  remove  suffering  of  all  beings.  We,  as   teachers,  want  our  students  to  be  free  of  suffering,  truly  happy  and  yoga  just  might  help  them.   Whether  as  a  great  way  to  exercise,  or  maybe  creating  calmness  that  allows  them  to  be  a  little   48


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kinder  and  gentler  to  the  next  person  they  interact  with.  Maybe  it  gives  them  tools  to  be  more   stress  free,  or  becomes  a  stepping  stone  to  other  things,  other  explorations  into  themselves.     You  want  to  share  with  your  students,  your  path,  your  journey.  Share  your  successes  and   failures  on  your  path.  As  students  have  their  own  challenges,  you  are  there  to  share  and  support   them.  But  as  you  share,  the  more  human  you  become,  the  more  they  feel  it  is  attainable.  As  they   look  at  you,  as  yoga  teacher,  who  most  definitely  must  be  vegetarian,  adhere  to  all  the  8  limbs,  all   the  time,  you  never……eat  meat…….scream  at  the  kids…..get  stressed  out…..   As  you  become  more  confident  and  mature  as  a  teacher,  you  may  eventually  evolve  into   more  of  a  mentor  versus  asana  teacher.  This  is  where  the  role  clearly  shifts  towards  trying  to   bring  out  the  beauty  that  is  in  them.  This  happens  when  you  establish  the  deep  trust,  close   relationship,  and  there  is  a  mutual  respect  for  that  relationship.     This  is  where  you,  as  mentor,  encourages  the  student  on  their  personal  exploration  and   path.  You  share  your  knowledge  and  encourage  their  trust,  in  their  own  inner  knowledge  and   voice.  The  mentor  has  the  ability  to  see  and  celebrate  other’s  successes  as  their  own.  One  needs  to   be  in  a  place  free  of  ego,  that  the  relationship  has  become  equal,  not  a  place  of  superior  and   inferior  roles.     Another  component  to  our  role  as  Yoga  Teacher,  is  that  often  times,  since  our  knowledge   base  spans  across  many  disciplines,  we  get  questions  one  would  ask  a  doctor,  psychiatrist,   physical  therapist,  nutritionist,  pharmacists,  etc.  We  may,  over  time  have  a  broad  knowledge  base,   with  varied  experiences  but  have  to  be  a  bit  reserved  in  our  “scope  of  practice.”  Be  clear  to  offer   over  advice  with  the  understanding  you  are  not  an  expert  in  the  area.  If  you  have  this  great  detox   diet  to  suggest….be  sure  to  give  it  with  disclosure  that  you  are  not  a  nutritionist.  For  physical   issues,  such  as  back  or  knee  complaints,  be  sure  to  suggest  getting  it  check  out  by  a  doctor  and   maybe  having  them  skip  poses  that  might  effect  that  area.  Not  only  are  you  doing  what’s  in  the   best  interest  of  your  student  but  also  in  the  best  interest  of  you!   There  is  also  the  emotional  role  we  may  play  in  our  student’s  lives-­‐  one  that  is  again,   teacher,  doctor,  cheerleader,  parent,  spiritual  guide.  We  may  never  know  what  role  we  play  in  our   student’s  lives,  but  it  is  there.  Do  not  ever  underestimate  the  power  of  this  connection  a  student   might  have  with  you.  You  could  be  their  lifeline  through  a  difficult  time  in  their  lives,  you  could  be   49


Ashtangasana: 200 Hr. Yoga Teacher Training Curriculum

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the  catalyst  in  transforming  their  health,  you  may  be  giving  them  movement  back,  so  their  can   engage  and  be  active,  in  their  lives  again.  You  have  no  idea,  but  respect  the  power  of  your  words   and  actions  as  teachers.       So,  enjoy  your  new  role,  but  hold  the  role  itself  with  honor  and  respect.  Appreciate  that  you   have  this  ability  to  touch  so  many  lives  positively  and  possibly  profoundly.      

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Ashtangasana: 200 Hr. Yoga Teacher Training Curriculum

Student Manual

What  Makes  Up  a  Pose?       There  are  many  elements  to  consider  when  teaching  an  individual  pose.  The  following  will   discuss  the  various  components  of  what  makes  up  a  pose.     • Alignment  -­‐     • Adjustment  –  entering  into  someone’s  personal  space  slowly,  carefully,  and  without   hesitation.  4  phases:  Approach,  Touch,  Manipulation,  Release   • Benefits   • Contraindication   • Counter  Poses   o FF  ⇔BB/Twist   o BB  ⇔  FF   o Twist  ⇔  FF  BB   o Inversion  ⇔  FF  BB   o Lateral  ⇔  FF   o Headstand  ⇔  Shoulderstand,  knees  to  chest   o Shoulderstand  ⇔Cobra  Fish   o Uttanasana  ⇔  Utkatasana  (awk  chair)  or  Cat   o Cobra  ⇔  Child’s  Pose   o FF  ⇔  Bridge  or  Incline  Plane   o Warrior  I  ⇔  Uttanasana  (forward  bend)   o Locust  ⇔  Knee’s  to  Chest   • Dristi   o Nasagrai  –  Tip  of  the  nose  (Lotus-­‐Padmasana)   o Broomadhya  –  Third  Eye  (Up  Dog-­‐Urdhva  Dhanurasana)   o Nabi  Chakra  –  Navel  (DD-­‐Adho  Mukha  Svanasana)   o Hastagrai  –  Hand  (Triangle-­‐Trikonasana)   o Padhayoragrai  –  Toes  (Wide  Angle  FF-­‐Paschimottanasana)   o Parsva  Dristi  –  Far  to  the  left  and  right  (Ardha  Matsendrasana  –  spinal   twists)   o Angusta  Ma  Dyai  –  Thumbs,  start  of  SS   o Urdhva  Dristi  or  Antara  Dristi  –  Up  to  the  sky  (Virabhadrasana  –  WI)   o Horizon  –  straight  ahead   • Energy  Lines   • Sequencing/Cycling   o Introduction   o Breath  Awareness/Meditation   o Opening  Postures   o Surya  Namaskara   o Standing  Poses   o Cycling:  Backbends,  FF,  Twists,  Inversions,  Lateral     o Closing  Postures   o Savasana     106


Ashtangasana: 200 Hr. Yoga Teacher Training Curriculum

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Sequencing  Poses  More  Effectively  -­  Categorize  these  Poses  

  1.  What  does  a  pose  do?   2.  How  is  the  pose  used?   3.  Where  would  you  place  it  in  a  sequence?     For  a  sequence  to  be  effective  and  to  allow  the  student  to  progress  in  a  way  that  allows  them  to  be  prepared   for  the  more  challenging  poses,  understanding  the  types  of  poses  is  the  first  step  in  the  learning  process.  If  a   teacher  understands  the  type  of  pose,  they  will  understand  more  easily,  where  these  poses  are  most   effectively  placed  in  a  sequence.  Poses  have  different  intentions  and  uses  for  the  body.  The  beginning  of  a   practice  usually  starts  with  poses  that  flow  to  warm  up  the  body  and  proceed  with  standing  poses  to  develop   strength.  Teachers  can  choose  poses  to  facilitate  spinal  mobility  through  twists  and  folds.  Poses  can   encourage  balance,  which  can  lead  to  a  stillness  and  focus  in  the  practice.  When  we  look  at  a  pose,  we  think   about  the  type  of  pose  it  is  and  where  that  might  be  placed  in  a  sequence.       Select  the  type  of  pose,  based  on  where  this  might  be  in  a  sequence.  This  exercise  is  to  think  about   progression  in  regards  to  type  of  pose.  A  standing  pose  might  be  also  a  “Twist”,  such  as  prayer  spinal  twist.   But,  the  category  of  pose,  based  on  where  in  the  sequence  should  be  “Standing”.  Another  example  would  be   Pyramid  or  Runner’s  Pose-­  it  is  certainly  a  “Forward  Fold”,  but  when  thinking  about  progression  in  a  class,  the   primary  role  with  Pyramid  is  as  a  “Standing”  pose.        

St  =  Standing  B  =  Balancing  FF  =  Forward  Fold  S  =  Seated   BB  =  Backbend  T  =  Twists  I  =  Inversions  R  =  Supine/Relax     _____Sirsasana  -­  Headstand   _____Vasisthasana  –  Cross  (Side  Plank)   _____Supta  Parivartanasana  –  Reclining  Twist   _____Parivrtta  Janusirsasana  –  head  to  knee  one  leg,  side  bend   _____Virabhadrasana  1  –  Warrior  1   _____Adho  Mukha  Svanasana  –  Down  Dog   _____Parsva  Bakasana  –  Side  Crow   _____Parivrtta  Utkatasana  –  Twisting  Awk  Chair   _____Halasana  -­  Plow   119


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_____Utthita  Parsvakonasana  –  ext.  side  angle   _____Bhujangasana  –  Sphynx   _____Ardha  Baddha  Padma  Paschimottanasana  –  1/2bound,    

 

lotus,  ff  

_____Baddhakonasana  –  Butterfly   _____Virasana  –  Hero   _____Uttanasana  –  standing  forward  fold   _____Upavistakonasana  –  seated  wide  angle   _____Garudasana  –  Eagle   _____Kumbhakasana  –  Plank  

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Variations     There  is  so  much  wonderful  creativity  in  every  pose.  As  a  new  teacher,  there  are  so  many  poses  to  learn  and   become  familiar  with,  but  in  time  they  become  second  nature.  As  leading  a  class  through  poses  becomes  fluid   and  easy,  you  can  start  to  become  creative  in  adding  variety  to  the  individual  poses.  Not  only  does  your   sequence  reflect  who  you  are,  your  style  as  a  teacher,  but  also  in  the  fun,  playful  ways  we  can  change  a   sequence  and  a  pose.  Adding  variation  to  an  individual  pose  or  changing  the  predictable  nature  of  sun   salutation  with  a  twisting  down  dog,  or  a  cobra  instead  of  up  dog.  This  can  be  refreshing  to  a  predictable   sequence.       Another  reason  to  have  a  collection  of  variations  in  your  bag  of  poses,  is  for  safety  or  physical  limitations.   There  may  be  issues  of  stamina,  variety  of  level  of  students  in  class,  injuries,  or  the  one  advanced  yogi  who   happened  upon  your  level  1  class!  You  want  to  be  able  to  offer  alternatives  to  the  individual  pose  you  have   chosen  in  that  moment.  If  you  see  someone  struggling,  it  is  wonderful  to  suggest  that  they  can  put  a  knee   down,  when  in  high  lunge,  or  the  hand  to  the  inside  of  the  leg  in  prayer  spinal  twist,  making  it  easy  twist   instead.  Paying  attention  to  those  students  and  being  able  to  adapt  the  class  for  them  makes  you  class  special.   You  are  creating  a  safe  environment,  one  that  addresses  the  needs  of  each  of  its  students  and  makes  you  an   attentive,  mindful  instructor.    

 

Warrior  1    

Lift  heel  

 

Arm  extension  variations  

 

Arms  spread  shoulder  width  

 

Back  hand  on  back  inner  thigh,  top  arm  extends  you  into  backbend  

Up  Dog    

Cobra  

 

Block  between  legs  

 

Knees  down  versus  up  

Chaturunga    

On  knees  

 

Come  down  less  

Half  Moon    

Lower  hand  on  block  

 

Lean  and  support  against  a  wall  

 

Extend  back  leg  WAY  up  

 

Grab  back  foot  for  side  backbend  

 

Wrap  and  bind  to  arm  

Prayer  Spinal  Twist  Lunge    

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Progression  of  a  Class   Here  is  the  overall  general  progression  of  a  Western  Style  Vinyasa  class.  This  progression  is  a   fundamental  framework  that  allows  for  a  nicely  balanced  class.  If  you  have  a  45,  60,  90,  120   minute  class,  this  progression  is  still  relevant.  Your  times  in  each  area  might  vary,  but  the   progression  through  the  types  of  poses  will  be  within  this  model.       Your  introduction  helps  to  transition  the  student  from  their  day,  into  the  quiet  and  calm  of  class.   Within  your  introduction,  breath  awareness  or  meditation  can  be  used  to  bring  the  energy  of  the   group  together.  Opening  postures  can  be  seated  or  standing.  This  alerts  their  body  to  the   beginning  of  class.  Suyra  Namaskara  and  Standing  Poses  create  heat,  strength  and  stamina.  This   will  prepare  us  for  the  more  challenging  poses,  poses  that  might  involve  deeper  ranges  of  motion,   greater  focus,  more  joint  mobilization,  such  as  backbends,  certain  balance  poses,  or  inversions.   The  student  is  then  ready  to  lower  to  the  floor,  often  expression  much  appreciation  for  this  phase   of  the  class.  Forward  folds  and  twists  are  wonderfully  reflective  and  calming  after  a  challenging   practice.  Cooling  and  closing  postures  prepare  the  body  for  savasana.    

 

• Introduction   • Breath  Awareness/Meditation   • Opening  Postures   • Surya  Namaskara  A,  B,  C   • Standing  Poses   • Backbends/Balance/Laterals/Inversions   • Forward  Folds/Twists   162


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• Closing/Cooling  Postures   • Savasana   •   Go  through  graphed  progressions  (next  page)       1.  The  first  series  of  class  progressions  show  the  difference  between  a  Beginner,  Level  1,  Level  1-­‐2,   Level  2  and  Level  2-­‐3.  Notice  the  differences  in  how  fast  the  slopes  (intensity  of  the  class)  increase   at  the  beginning  of  the  class  and  how  they  peak  and  where  they  peak  in  relationship  to  where  you   are  time-­‐wise(duration)  in  the  class.    The  center  numbers  (1.5,  2,  3,  4.5)  are  number   representations  of  how  the  intensity  increases.  Beginner  highest  level  of  intensity  is  only  1.5,   whereas  advanced  is  at  4.5,  significantly  more  intense  at  the    middle  of  the  class.       2.  Notice  how  high  the  different  classes  peak,  this  is  how  intense  the  class  becomes.  The  difference   between  a  beginner  and  level  2-­‐3  class  is  significant,  not  only  in  how  intense  the  class  gets,  but   how  long  the  intensity  lasts.  Beginner  class  peaks  for  a  very  short  period  of  time,  yet  this  peak  is   not  an  intense  peak  compared  to  the  Level  2-­‐3  class.         3.  Study  the  differences  of  these  sequences.  This  will  help  you  form  an  effective  progression  for   the  level  class  you  are  to  lead.   ��  

   

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Practice  Sequencing  

 

In  what  order  should  these  poses  appear  in  a  class?       •

Think  about  the  Progression  of  a  class-­your  opening,  sun  salutations,  standing,  etc.    

Incorporate  the  concepts  of  Categorizing  the  Poses,  thinking  of  the  individual  poses   and  what  they  are,  how  they  are  used.  

 Lastly,  think  about  the  concepts  of  preparing  the  muscles  and  joints  for  the  pose.  Put   poses  before  and  after  to  prepare  and  wind-­down  the  area.      

 

Standing   Order  1-­  7   GREEN   _____  Trikonasana  –  Triangle   _____  Tadasana  –  Mountain   _____  Virabhadrasana  3  –  Warrior  3   _____  Adho  Mukha  Svanasana  –  DD   _____  Uttanasana  –    Standing  FF   _____  Urdhva  Prasarita  Eka  Padasana  –  Standing  Splits   _____  Prasarita  Padottanasana  –  Foot  Spreading     Order  1  -­  7   PINK   _____  Hasta  Padagustasana  –  Hand  To  Big  Toes   _____  Parsvottanasana  –  Runner’s   _____  Natarajasana  –  Dancer   185


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_____  Virabhadrasana  1  –  Warrior  1   _____  Vrksasana  –  Tree   _____  Parsvakonasana  –  Side  Angle   _____  Anjaneyasana  –  Low  Crescent  Lunge    

Twists   Order  1-­6   BLUE   _____  Parvrtta  Parsvokonasana  –  Twisting  Side  Angle   _____  Sitting  Vajrasana  –  hero  twisting   _____  Parvrtta  Trikonasana  –  Twisting  Triangle   _____  Parvritta  Paschimottanasana  –  Twisting  forward  fold  seated   _____  Prasarita  Padottanasana  –  Foot  Spreading  with  twist   _____Parsva  Sarvangasana  –  Twisting  Shoulder  Stand     Order  1  –  6   EGGPLANT   _____  Parvrtta  Utkatasana  –  Twisting  Awk  Chair   _____  Easy  Twisting  Lunge   _____  Parvrtta  Adho  Chandrasana  –  Twisting  half  moon   _____  Suhkasana  –  Seated  Easy  Twist   _____  Supta  Parivartanasana  –  Reclining  Twist   _____  Parsva  Bakasana  –  Side  Crow  

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Overall  Sequence   Order  1  –  9   ORANGE   _____Backbends   _____Inversions   _____Warm-­ups   _____Corpse  Pose   _____Forward  Folds   _____Sun  Salutations   _____Twists   _____Shoulder  Stand   _____Standing  Poses    

Order  1  –  10   GREY   _____Eka  Pada  Sarvangasana  –  1  Leg  Shoulder  Stand   _____Uptavistakonasana  –  Seated  Wide  Angle   _____Baddhakonasana  –  Butterfly   _____Adho  Mukha  Svanasana  –  Down  Dog   _____Urdhva  Dhanurasana  –  Wheel   _____Utkatasana  –  Awkward  Chair   _____Paritta  Pasrvakonasana  –  Prayer  Spinal  Twist   _____Pincha  Mayyurasana  –  Forearm  Balance   _____Ardha  Matsyendrasana  –  Seated  Spinal  Twist  

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  RED   Order  1  –  10   _____Supta  Baddhakonasana  –  Reclining  Butterfly   _____Bharadvajasana  II  –  Half  Bound  Lotus  Twist   _____Viparita  Karani  –  Legs  up  the  wall   _____Marichyasana  1  –  1  Leg  Knee  Up,  Bound   _____Eka  Pada  Adho  Mukha  Svanasana  –  1  Leg  Down  Dog   _____Chatturanga  Dandasana  –  Lower  plank   _____Ustrasana  –  Camel   _____Balasana  –  Child’s     _____Virabhadrasana  II  –  Warrior  2   _____Suhkasana  –  Seated  Easy  Twist  

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Level  of  Classes       Complexity of Joints Level of Pose = How Physically Demanding

mix of level of poses Level of Poses the number of poses

Level of Class Sequencing of the poses

build up of sequence of pose

 

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  Level  of  Classes    

This  is  always  a  challenge  for  students  to  master.  This  takes  time  and  experience.  This  is  also  why   writing  out  your  sequences  is  a  wise  process.  Poses  are  used  with  various  intentions:  warming,   grounding,  energizing,  creating  sense  of  lightness,  mobilizing  the  spine,  etc.  When  thinking  about     sequences,  we  must  know  the  level  of  class  we  are  creating.  With  that  we  use  the  actual  pose   choices  and  the  sequence  or  order  at  which  we  place  the  poses  in  the  sequence,  to  determine  the   level  of  our  classes.       To  properly  prepare  students  for  deeper  and  more  advanced  poses,  the  body  needs  to  be  open  and   prepared  for  this.  The  complexity  of  the  pose  and  how  it  impacts  the  joints  and  how  physically   demanding  the  pose  is  on  the  body,  determine  the  Level  of  the  Pose.     We  add  the  Level  of  the  Pose  with  how  we  Sequence  the  Poses  in  the  class,  to  determine  the  level   of  the  class.  A  level  1  class  should  have  Level  on  and  Beginner  level  poses  throughout  the   sequence.  The  way  we  then  sequence  these  poses  will  also  determine  the  level  of  the  class.         Sequencing  the  poses  needs  to  be  thought  through.  We  need  to  mix  poses  with  different  levels  into   the  sequence.  A  level  2  class  should  have  some  level  1  and  beginner  poses  threaded  throughout   the  sequence,  to  allow  for  “Breather”  poses.  The  number  of  poses  in  a  class  needs  to  be  considered.   A  beginner  class  should  have  fewer  poses  to  allow  for  the  education  of  the  pose  to  occur.  This  is   where  they  learn  the  foundation  of  the  poses  and  how  alignment  effects  the  pose  and  the  body.     Having  fewer  poses  in  a  beginner’s  class  is  also  appropriate  because  stamina  might  be  a  factor  for   many  participants.       The  other  issue  with  number  of  poses  is  how  many  poses  are  being  loaded  onto  one  side  of  the   body.  Standing  sequences  this  is  an  issue.  Having  5  right  side  poses,  stacked  on  top  of  each  other   might  be  effective  yet  might  not.  Maybe  you  are  working  towards  strengthening  and  stamina,  but   we  need  to  cognizant  of  the  effects  on  the  knee.    But  5  right  side  standing  poses,  back  to  back,   would  probably  be  too  much  for  a  level  1  class.       Lastly,  how  you  build  up  all  the  poses,  one  by  one,  throughout  the  sequence  will  effect  the  level  of   the  pose.  Do  you  build  your  class  unrelentingly  or  do  you  give  a  vinyasa  and  long  down  dog  to   slow  things  down?  Or  do  you  give  them  a  childs  pose  once  in  a  while?  Or  is  this  a  group  that  wants   intensity  and  sweat,  thus  lots  of  vinyasa.  Depending  on  how  you  layer  your  sequence  will   determine  the  heat  building  or  the  restorative  nature  of  the  class  and  influence  the  Level  of  class   too.       You  see  how  there  are  many  aspects  to  how  to  create  a  Class  Level.  Thus,  writing  out  sequences  is   important.  How  can  one  take  all  these  important  aspects  of  pose  order,  cycling,  layering  and   building  and  create  it  spontaneously  off  the  cuff!  This  must  be  thought  through  to  safely  lead   students.  

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