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December 2016

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ynics may dismiss it merely as a marketing gimmick, but there is a very good chance that Hoya’s foray into 3D printing could herald ‘the next big thing’ in the optics industry. The use of 3D printers to create frames is relatively novel but hardly unique. However, Hoya’s recently announced Yuniku claims to be the first system to cater for each person’s individual features as it tailors both lenses and frames to a 3D scan of the wearer’s face. Coupled with questionnaire input on how the wearer uses their glasses, the data from the scan is then used to determine the best position for the lenses in relation to the wearer’s eyes, with the frame designed around the optimised position of the lenses. Only once this process has been completed does the wearer set about customising the spectacles by choosing the colour, shape and style of frame. Hoya explain that their software adjusts each style to match the data they have captured on lens placement and ideal fit. As might be expected, the customer can ‘try’ the various options through the use of virtual images on a screen; a system similar to that already now in wide use throughout the industry. It is still very early days, and we have yet to see the system in operation and gauge how well it performs, but if Yuniku takes off, and is inevitably imitated by other industry players, we may see a revolution in our industry. The impact would not just be on wearers, demanding individually tailored eyewear, but on distributors and an obviation of the need to hold wide inventories and stock. Much will depend on the cost of the Yuniku kit and the entry cost for opticians in installing the 3D scanners needed to capture each wearer’s unique physical features. We will await with interest to see how Hoya rolls out and promotes its exciting new system, and how the Japanese company’s competitors respond.

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21 CONTENTS December 2016 Volume 45 · Number 386

INTERNATIONAL SCENE 2 · Globalisation: the downside

OUTLOOK 4 · London welcomes back 100% Optical 5 · International Vision Expo West 2016 6 · Cotec’s new UK office 7 · FDA clearance for Contamac lens material 8 · Mido Eyewear Show 2017

FEATURES 9 · Are all lenses good? Consultant Editor Richard Chaffin 12 · Silmo 2016 14 · GfK survey European optical spending 16 · Survey Vocational lenses

OPTIPRODUCTS 21 · Folding sunglasses

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MARKETPLACE 22 · A to Z of optical websites 23 · International Suppliers Guide

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December 2016

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InternationalSCENE

Globalisation: the downside s this issue of Optical World goes to press, the most momentous decision in the Western world has been taken by the American people with the election of Donald Trump as the countries 45th President, scheduled to take office early in 2017. In the run-up to the election we all looked on in fascinated horror as the most acrimonious, accusatory and bizarre presidential campaign ever (or so it was characterised) was played out. Not just the campaign but the candidacy itself of Republican Donald Trump represented a departure from past norms. It began with the promise – or threat – to build ‘a great big wall’ all the way along the frontier between Mexico and the USA to deter immigrants. Later came the threat – or promise – to prosecute and imprison his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton if he won (and if he did not, he suggested, it would be because the election had been rigged; protest would follow). Such political unrest and upheaval is always a manystranded string. There is little doubt, though, that one strand is a backlash against globalisation among people who feel left out and left behind: hence the rapturous reception among Trump supporters of the immigrant ‘big wall’. 2

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The USA is not the only homeland where this force is being felt. It was surely a major influence on the UK’s decision to ‘Brexit’ from the European Union. Next year France is widely expected to register a similar disaffection from the ‘insider’ approach to politics and economics at a General Election. Even strongwoman Angela Merkel, it is thought, may find her motherly dominance undermined when Germany also goes to the polls in 2017, following her open-armed policy to refugees. Hungary has already voted in a referendum against welcoming migrants in, albeit with a lower national turnout than expected. Inward looking protectionist attitudes have been spreading. Economic migrants Meanwhile, the tide of economic migrants from Africa and the Middle East flows relentlessly onwards; the sense of displacement is felt ever more widely. It could even be argued that the terror groups driving refugees across the world owe their existence, in part, to this sense of disempowerment under the onslaught of globalisation. It is a real downside of a constructive modern trend. Jobs, life skills, identities, are felt to have been lost in the service of this new industrial and social revolution … and as some see it, there have been arguably more losers than winners.


InternationalSCENE The ophthalmic industry, perhaps the lens industry above all, has been a textbook example of the globalisation process in action. Little over a century ago – just three generations! – lens and frame making in the west were just sloughing off handcraft status, related variously to the scientific instrument, photographic and jewellery sectors, to become industries in their own right. When, for example, the UK’s Federation of Manufacturing Opticians was founded 100 years ago next year, this industry was still, relative to its niche status, a major employer of more or less skilled craftsmen and women, some of them very skilled and specialised indeed, carrying out the multiple manual operations involved in lens prime manufacture, then surfacing, fining, smoothing, polishing and edging and in frames, routing or wire rolling, milling, soldering, polishing and assembly. (Not to mention, of course, the design, building, maintenance and servicing of the machines needed to make the frames and lenses, or the supply and management of the consumables those machines needed, or the cleaning of factories ‘ankle-deep in swarf’ as workers of the era recall.) As recently as 30 years ago, the time to process an individual prescription order could on average take well over a week (bifocals or those pesky new progressives might take longer), work flow systems were wildly innovatory, and the very first modems to link labs with practitioners were headline news in Europe. Globalisation was already making itself known: witness those progressives, those modems, and the hard and anti-reflective coating units adding to industry capacity and complexity – computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems were transforming the frame industry too. Pace of change Since then, the pace of change, driven by globalisation, has quickened still more. The ophthalmic industry’s development internationally has made it economic for more producers in more places to instal the machines and utilise the materials that streamline and speed production, cut unit costs, cut wastage and meet the ever growing expectations of the retail optician and the consumer. Globalisation has made possible achievements the frame and lens makers of even the recent past could not have dreamt of, certainly not on such a scale as here in the West today. Automation has greatly reduced, if not yet eliminated, the scope for human error. But in reducing human error, it has also reduced the need for human job input – and need for the human skills, the sense of

identity jobs in the industry generated. In the lens sector, it could be argued that the coming of freeform is pushing this progression further, with its reduction in the significance of skilled and semi-skilled stock room functions. The frame industry meanwhile remains somewhat of a bastion of traditional skills. But even that may now be changing as globalisation spreads new technologies like 3D printing. Until spectacles themselves are finally superseded (after an astonishing 800 + years so far!) the ophthalmic and sunglass industries will surely always have a need for designers, innovators, engineers. It will need quality monitors, inspectors, marketing managers, IT designers, logistics officers, number-crunchers, maintenance specialists. But for how many human beings beyond these happy few? It is important that organisations like the USA’s OLA, France’s GIFO, Germany’s Spectaris, the UK’s FMO, Italy’s ANFAO, should continue to recognise and nurture the industry echelons of support staff at all levels – not just that of the genius innovator, the polymath – as well as the educational interface between the industry and its retail optician customers. The more industries worldwide take up this challenge, the better the challenge will be weathered, for the tide of globalisation cannot be turned back. The Drones Club As with other industries across the world, ophthalmics in due course will surely give rise to a clutch of new job categories, un-guessed at today. Could one of these be Delivery Drone Operative? (Or Drone Services Co-ordinator?) Your writer has long thought that someone, somewhere, soon, was bound to think of the drone as a spectacle (or contact lens package) delivery vehicle. Despite the hyper-revolution of our crowded skies, at least one global giant – Amazon – is now droning some of its deliveries. Unit cost is said to be well under £1. Now the ophthalmic goods delivery drone may have come a step closer. Rwanda in Central Africa is looking to overcome its land infrastructure disadvantages by employing a US firm’s fixed-wing catapult-launched drones for delivery of medical supplies such as samples and vaccines. Satnav guided, they have the advantage of not needing to land; deliveries are by parachute drop and are said to be cheaper as well as faster than the motor bikes currently used. Total range, 75km. One limitation: if your country-living writer’s experience is anything to go by, reliance on Satnav could have all too interesting consequences. W

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UNITED KINGDOM

London welcomes back 100% Optical Thousands of optical professionals are being promised an

As announced earlier this year, the most important awards

experience like no other as the UK’s largest optical trade

event in the optical calendar, the AOP Awards, is now part

event, 100% Optical, sees market leaders Shamir, Specsavers,

of the 100% Optical schedule. The awards will take place in

Zeiss and Silhouette join its growing 2017 line-up.

the evening of Sunday February 5 at ExCeL London, giving

Organiser Media 10 is promising visitors a prestigious and packed event – with new exhibitors, fashion shows, a new-

visitors an opportunity to celebrate with their industry peers and make their visit to the show more rewarding.

look Dispensing Workshop and VIP hosted buyers programme,

‘We’re really excited to be in our fourth year of

in addition to the world-leading CET education and speaker

100% Optical,’ said event director, Nathan Garnett. ‘The re-

programme.

sponse to last year has been incredible, proving that whether

The show will attract global brands from across the

you’re an optometrist, eye surgeon, dispensing optician, as-

optical industry, and is expected to welcome 8,000 UK and

sistant buyer, practice manager, or a manufacturing optician

international visitors to London on February 4-6, 2017.

you will find everything you need at 100% Optical.’

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Bausch + Lomb continue to invest Bausch + Lomb, a company of Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc. and specialists in eye care for over 160 years, having earlier in 2015 acquired Innovative Sclerals Ltd, have since successfully integrated this business into the Speciality Lens portfolio. Bausch + Lomb continue investment into the development of speciality lenses both in terms of product development, dedicated resources and practice growth support. Amy Rothwell, business unit head at B+L UK, commented: ‘As a leading provider of eye care products and services to build a vision for the future, we are dedicated to partnering with eye care practitioners across the UK and Ireland. We continually invest to bring practice growth opportunities through the introduction of new contact lens materials backed by professional training and business support. I am delighted to announce that in addition to our highly experienced team of professional relations consultants led by Andy Elder Smith, B+L welcomes Graham Avery, owner of Six Six Contacts to lead the speciality lens business in the UK.’ Graham Avery, new commercial lead for B+L Speciality Division, says: ‘The growing speciality contact lens business has attracted a lot of attention from UK practitioners as they look to differentiate their business and offer contact lens vision correction for all their patients.’

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UNITED STATES

PPG, Thai Optical and Global Optics join to offer Tribrid lenses Thai Optical Group and Global Optics Inc announce the

1.23 grams per cubic centimeter, thinness with refractive

availability of Tribrid lenses in North America, where the

index of 1.60, impact resistance with the ability to with-

high-performance high-index lenses are being offered in

stand more than 160 times the energy of the US Food

semi-finished single vision clear lenses, compatible with

and Drug Administration drop ball test, and 100 per cent

digital free-form processing and antireflective coatings.

protection from ultraviolet radiation material, and it

Tribrid lens material was developed by PPG, using an

continues that collaboration in the development of Tribrid

advanced hybrid material approach incorporating chemistry

lenses.

for Trivex lens material with traditional high-index lens

‘We are proud to collaborate with PPG and Global

material chemistry. The result is a high-index lens that

Optics to bring Tribrid lenses to North American laborato-

offers the combination of vision comfort, protection and

ries,’ said Torn Pracharktam, managing director, Thai

performance with enhanced thinness.

Optical Group. ‘We are confident that the lenses will

Suited to patients with higher prescriptions, Tribrid

exceed the expectations of eye care professionals by pro-

lens material features include optical clarity with an

viding a greater balance of lens performance features in

Abbe number of 41, lightweight comfort with density of

a thinner, high-index format.’

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UNITED STATES

International Vision Expo West 2016 International Vision Expo West 2016 has officially been labelled a success with increased attendance and reports of strong sales from exhibitors. This year’s event was held September 14-17 in Las Vegas, Nevada. In addition to over 320 hours of education, this year’s event offered 180,000 sq ft of exhibit space with more than 100 new fashion brands debuting, accessories and new eyewear trends throughout the high-end fashion pavilions. ‘Exhibitors reported strong buying activity in the exhibit hall, with high levels of traffic and a sense of vibrancy,’ said Ashley Mills, the Vision Council vice president of trade shows and meetings. This year’s show played host to over 65 events and parties, including a full slate of events for young professionals and over 370 show specials including exhibitor and entertainment discounts.

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Hilco Vision join forces with Optiplus and Proteye Hilco Vision confirm the ongoing execution of their European growth strategy through two acquisitions in the Netherlands. Optiplus is the market leader for accessories, professional tools and lens-care serving major chains and the independent market. Proteye is the market leader for frame design and in-house lens edging, catering to the Rx needs of the industrial safety and swim markets. Ross Brownlee, CEO of Hilco Vision, commented: ‘This is an important strategic step for Hilco Vision to continue bringing comprehensive solutions to our customers on a global basis. The establishment of Hilco Benelux follows on from the acquisition made last year of Breitfeld and Schliekert in Germany — the combination of our companies brings not only scale but also greater opportunities to share innovation.’

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UNITED KINGDOM

New Cotec office Cotec GmbH, a major supplier for coating materials and consumables, special coating equipment for various industries as well as printing systems for the ophthalmic market, is opening a new sales office and warehouse in the Chesterfield area. Following the expanding business in the UK, Cotec will support its customers with a local service team providing shortest delivery times for coating material and consumables. ‘The UK is one of the key-markets for optics and coating solutions and it’s playing an important part in our company strategy’, comments Michael Fliedner, Cotec managing director. ‘For this reason we believe it’s the right time to expand towards the UK. The new office will support the demand of the growing UK market and the launch of Cotec’s new products over the coming years’.

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INDIA

New Dehli exhibition

The 13th edition of the In-Optics 2017 International Trade Fair and Exhibition will take place from January 21-23 at Hall No. 7, Pragati Maidan, New Delhi. In-Optics 2017 is going to be a one-stop event showcasing all facets of the eye care industry. Over the last few years, the event has proven instrumental to the development of the industry, providing professionals and businesses the exposure to promote their products, launch new concepts and seek out new business channels.

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ITALY

New corporate headquarters for MEI The new corporate offices of MEI, manufacturer of machinery for processing ophthalmic and sunglass lenses, officially opened the weekend of September 24, 2016. The new headquarters are located in Ponte San Pietro (Bergamo), just a few kilometers from the former corporate offices in Valbrembo, and boast 10,500 sq m of covered space, 8,000 of which are dedicated to production and warehousing, and 2,500 set aside for offices, demonstration labs and training rooms. The project for the new headquarters grew out of the need to address the company’s constantly growing manufacturing output and the number of company employees — currently 85 — who required more and more space. In the words of Stefano Sonzogni, MEI president and technical director: ‘Above all, the focus of the new headquarters is to ensure even greater production and therefore to be able to offer even faster delivery of the machines on order’. The building features a solar PV plant, a system of self-adjusting LED lights, in-floor heating, its own restaurant and a 10,000 sq. meter outdoor parking area.

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New corporate headquarters for MEI


UNITED KINGDOM

FDA clearance for Contamac lens material Contamac Ltd, manufacturer of the Optimum line of GP materials, have received FDA clearance of Tangible Hydra-PEG (K161100), a novel contact lens coating technology that encapsulates the Optimum GP material in an ultra thin layer of a PEG-based polymer (polyethylene glycol), creating a lens surface that is extremely wettable and very lubricious. Recognising the need for a new technology that could help end the frustrations caused by contact lens discomfort, Tangible Science LLC (formerly Ocular Dynamics) sought to develop a technology that would reduce the disruption to the ocular surface caused by placing a lens on the eye to create a more comfortable wearing experience. This disruption can be characterised or exacerbated by non-wetting lens surfaces, surface water evaporation, decreased tear break-up time (TBUT), deposits, and friction, which have all been identified as contributors to contact lens discomfort. Tangible Hydra-PEG seeks to tackle those issues by creating a surface that is highly wettable, with increased surface water retention due to the high water content (90 per cent) of the PEG-based polymer.

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Study finds that professional dispensing beats online supply A study commissioned by The College of Optometrists

cause it’s the first of its kind, but also because of the rise

found that, when comparing spectacles bought online and

in online purchasing. It’s important that optometrists

those bought and fitted in optometric practices, customers

explain to patients that someone trained in dispensing

preferred shop bought spectacles.

can guide on the shape, fit and appropriateness of a

The study, published in the leading American journal Optometry and Vision Science, found that customers preferred shop-bought spectacles fitted by practice staff, ranking them higher overall than those bought online. Researchers from the University of Bradford and Cardiff University compared 154 pairs of spectacles bought online

certain pair of spectacles over another, which is particularly important for the elderly. ‘As a sector, we need to prepare for the changing ways in which customers are shopping and ensure that consumers are getting a high quality service from whatever platform they choose to purchase.’

with 155 pairs from UK optometric practices. Participants

Professor David Elliott, Professor of Clinical Vision Science

completed a questionnaire on vision, comfort, fit, and

at the University of Bradford and principal investigator in

how acceptable and safe the spectacles felt and all par-

the study said: ‘The results of this research should help

ticipants and spectacles were assessed at the University

patients understand the possible adverse effects of spec-

of Bradford eye clinic for clarity of vision, ocular muscle

tacles not being supplied correctly. This is particularly im-

balance and fit and quality of the spectacle frames and

portant for older patients wearing bifocals and varifocals,

lenses.

as frail, elderly patients need their multifocal spectacles

Mike Bowen, director of research for the College of Optometrists, told OW: ‘This study is important, not just be-

to be fitted carefully due of the increased risk of falls in this group.’

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ITALY

Mido Eyewear Show 2017 After a record edition last year, with over 1200 exhibitors and 52,000 professional operators from all over the world, Mido 2017 is preparing for a repeat performance from February 25 to 27, 2017. The 2017 campaign encompasses Livethewonder, a combination of art, architecture, tradition and modernity just like Made in Italy. For edition 47, the Mido communication focuses on ‘great beauty’ that is all Italian. Evoking De Chirico, spatial geometries and light are made even more precious by elements that sym-

2016 Mido Tech Hall

bolise Italian design.

Last year Mido doubled, with 100 per cent more social media contents and interactions during the show. While waiting for probable surprises and new additions, the theme areas that characterised the last edition of Mido have been reconfirmed: Fashion District, where a large and very dynamic piazza hosts the best players in the world and the small and medium-sized companies that are inspired by the world of fashion: Design Lab, the unquestionable realm of the most visionary creatives, where they have the luxury of experimenting and being ‘daring’; Lab Academy, reserved for young start-ups. Also being featured: Lenses, for the leaders of the lens sector; Tech, the world’s largest exhibition area dedicated to machinery, raw materials and components; and the FAiR East Pavilion, the exclusive area dedicated to the most important companies in Asia.

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In Brief Essilor has been named by Forbes as one of 100 of the world's ‘Most Innovative Companies’ for 2016. This is the sixth year in a row Essilor has earned a spot on this prestigious list, which recognises publicly traded companies that have been identified by investors as being innovative now and in the future. ★ Mondottica International has acquired from Italian inventor Guido Medana all worldwide patents and trademarks relating to the SPINE hinge technology. ★ MEI S.r.l. have moved to new offices in Via Ing. G.B. Caproni 50,24036 Ponte San Pietro, Bergamo, Italy. ★ Tickets for Optometry Tomorrow 2017, The College of Optometrists’ annual two-day conference which takes place at the Hilton Birmingham Metropole Hotel from March 19-20 2017, are now on sale. Visit www.optometrytomorrow.org ★ Optometry Giving Sight have announced that CooperVision Inc has renewed its commitment as a Global Gold Sponsor for another three years, effective January 2017.

FRANCE

Essilor and Gladwin agree to settle IP infringement litigation Essilor International, Essilor of America, Satisloh and DAC Vision, on one side, and JDP Holdings, and Yangzhou Gladwin M&E Tech. Co., Ltd., on the other side have agreed to settle pending intellectual property infringement litigation leading to the withdrawal of accused Gladwin products from the market and dismissal of the lawsuit pending in US district court. In recognition of the validity and scope of Essilor’s and Satisloh’s asserted patents and trademarks, the parties were able to reach settlement. The terms of the out-ofcourt settlement are confidential.

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ARE ALL LENSES GOOD? asks Consultant Editor Richard Chaffin f you can see with your glasses they must be good, but that may not be the end of the story. Other things, including how well you see and whether you get headaches, are also factors. Spectacle lenses go back a long way in history and have changed significantly over time. Wherever people first found transparent glass or other transparent materials with curves on the front and back sides that changed vision there were glasses. Apparently people who were far sighted, hyperopic, were helped the most, though the near sighted could read up close but not see as well in the distance. Since most Europeans are traditionally hyperopic, lenses seem to have developed first in that geographic area (possibly Italy, Holland, and later Germany). Lenses were at first hand held, a single lens in a holder, held up to the eye magnifying what was viewed. Some time later in the 18th Century frames made of various metals were used to hold two lenses. There were also the monocle and the pince-nez that held lenses in front of the eyes by pinching onto the nose. Lenses, even in the early 20th Century, were made on 1.25 base curves. One side of the lens, either front or back, was 1.25 dioptres while the

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other side was either a plus or a minus curve. These lenses corrected vision and worked. However, it soon became apparent that flat lenses were not as efficient optically as lenses that were made with a 6.00 dioptre curve. 6.00 dioptres was determined to generally match the curvature of the human eyeball. At that point, near and far sighted lenses were all made with a front curve of 6.00 and the plus or minus power obtained by the curve on the concave side of the lens. A vast improvement for lenses and they worked quite well. Corrected curve lenses Research and further thinking on the part of optical scientists brought about what has been known as ‘corrected curve’ lenses, an idea of Zeiss/ Bausch & Lomb, the Orthagon lens series. American Optical also produced its design of corrected curve, Tilliyer lenses. Corrected curve lenses use a series of base curves according to the lens corrective power. High minus lenses are ground on base curves less than 6.00 dioptres from as low as 2, 3, or 4 dioptres. High plus powers are ground with base curves above 6.00 dioptres, 7, 8, 9 or more dioptres. The theory of corrected curve lenses is W

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still meaningful today. Lenses produced using corrected curves work well. Minus cylinder lenses were another development in optics. Originally minus cylinder lenses that moved the astigmatic correction from the convex curve side of the lens to the minus side of the lens were something the laboratory did when it ground a prescription using a semi finished spherical lens blank. In mass production, factory finished lenses were a marketing idea for an additional line of finished lenses. There was very little if any empirical data to show that minus cylinder lenses made a difference. Plastic lens casters decided that minus cylinder lenses were a better way to go. They were consistent with laboratory produced lenses. Minus cylinder plastic lenses are cast using glass moulds with a plus or convex cylinder. Benjamin Franklin invented multifocal lenses when he took two halves of single vision lenses and mounted them over each other. That worked well for both near and far vision. Later there were other ideas such as pasting a part of one lens onto another to make a multifocal lens. The idea of grinding two different curves in one lens is still being done. Glass lenses fused two or three different indices in a lens to produce curve top, flat-top and trifocal lenses. Plastic lenses simply cast different curves in one lens to accomplish the same result. There were also aspheric or variable curve lenses of different varieties to produce more than one focal length. Progressive lenses All of these worked for better or worse until progressive lenses came along. Progressive lenses are the latest of the variable focus lenses and far and away the most successful design so far. Progressive lenses, with no visible line or separation across the lens showing them to be a multifocal, were originally marketed for their cosmetic value. They are good lenses with some reservations. Technically, progressive lenses make use of unique new processes in lens grinding and surfacing. They are aberrated in the peripheral and upper portions. Optics are sacrificed for cosmetics but progressive lenses do work as noted by their great popularity in an aging world population. Although they have advanced significantly since first appearing, progressive lenses depend 10

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on the wearer to decide whether or not they are satisfactory. Coatings What about lenses with coatings? Polycarbonate lenses would not be usable without a hard coating that is applied when they are manufactured. Other coatings have become a very important part of most lenses. Coating technology has advanced from simply a scratch resistant layer for plastic lenses to very sophisticated layers of colour, anti-reflection and water resistant coatings. There are also other treatments for lenses such as photochromic and polarisation. All of these add to lenses’ transmission and clarity, allowing them to do special things. Coatings and treatments can make a good lens better. Another example of lenses today are the digitally designed and surfaced lenses that are produced in the laboratory. Digital lenses are an outgrowth of the technology available through computers and advanced laboratory surfacing equipment. Lenses can be ground and polished on one or two sides to exact dimensions of thousands of points on a lens surface. Digital surfacing makes a lens that is unique for every individual need. There are plastic higher index lenses that are now available in indices up to 1.74. Higher index lenses in plastic save very little in thickness and curve except for high minus or plus prescriptions. However most prescriptions are in the range of plus and minus two dioptres sphere and cylinder worldwide. In the United States these lenses are 80 per cent of the volume. In Asia strong myopia is common and high index is a good choice of materials. High index is also very good where strong plus powers are prevalent. Abbe value, coating and transmission are drawbacks in high index lenses but they are good lenses. Are all lenses good? Yes, if they help people to see. But there are choices good, better, and best. No question glass lenses are optically the best lenses you can buy. Plastic lenses weigh less than half of glass and in some respects are safer. Lenses have come a long way. Throughout history lenses have been helping people improve eyesight. With all the advances in lenses there will always be more for the optical world to accomplish.


mido.com

Milano Eyewear Show February 25, 26, 27 | 2017


Silmo 2016 celebrates technologies and trends C

haracterised by a posi5ve business climate, the latest Equipment category) have developed a 3D soware program Silmo exhibi5on in Paris welcomed 33,771 visitors, 56.5 that guarantees a perfect tailor-made product: a digital scan per cent from abroad. Over the four days of the fair, the is taken of the wearer’s face using an op5cal system that creaisles were crammed with bustling stands and visitors cap5- ates an avatar by capturing thousands of data points; then vated by s5mula5ng products, all enhanced by the balmy with the op5cian’s assistance, it creates a customised frame atmosphere of the con5nuing Indian summer. Favourable by scrolling through thousands of combina5ons of faces, weather reflec5ng a promising trade fair too! frame arms, colours, paerns etc., aer which the glasses are As a plaorm to launch an made up in acetate in the array of brands and collectradi5onal fashion in a Jura 5ons, but also a place to region workshop within two explore innova5ons, the weeks. Mondial de L’Op5que Japanese concept (World Op5cal Fair) showThe new Yuniku concept by cased a prolifera5on of Hoya Vision Care goes even innova5ons combining the further, outsourcing the exper5se of eyewear and en5re prin5ng process to its lens manufacturers with partners, Materialise and new technologies. The focal Hoet design studio. With the points of the exhibi5on: cushelp of the op5cian, a scantomisa5on, support for visuEssilor’s busy stand ner creates a 3D model of ally impaired people, and point-of-sale digitalisa5on, not forgeng training in the form the wearer’s face and calculates their visual requirements of the Silmo Academy and a warm welcome for the op5cians with extreme precision. Then, using a choice of frames (styles, colours and textures of materials) which are also 3D of tomorrow. modelled, the soware calculates the lens parameters based Customisaon trend on the frame chosen, with an accuracy highligh5ng the inexCustomisation is a key consumption issue, irrespective of tricable links between all the various facets. the actual product. In the optics sector, the MOF (Best ArtiLow vision is also at the forefront of research and developsans in France) attending the exhibition demonstrated ment within the sector, with the development of remarkable their virtuosity in working with horn and acetate, assisted (and remarked on) equipment. Visiole, a specialist in Braille by new technologies such as CAD vector drawing software. and low vision products for visually impaired people, showed In the bespoke field, new players are making a valuable GoVison (2016 Silmo d’Or award, Low Vision category), a contribution. voice-ac5vated TV enlarger that is excep5onally ergonomic NETLOOKS (2016 Silmo d’Or award winner, Material/ and easy to use.

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The OrCam My Eye device from Essilor (2016 Silmo d’Or joint winner, Low Vision category) consists of a pair of glasses fi ed with a miniature camera and speaker, with integrated so ware that reads text to a visually impaired wearer and can recognise people, objects, banknotes, etc. A wearable low vision device reminiscent of NuEyes, autonomous smart glasses developed by Ceciaa (2016 Silmo d’Or joint winner, Low Vision category) which incorporates the func ons of an electronic magnifier, reading unit and TV enlarger.

Digitalisa on trend Silmo 2016 unveiled The Experience Store, an area dedicated to digital solu ons that create a brand new customer experience, enhancing the cross-channel and now interac ve client-op cian rela onship. Designed around six points of contact – store window, recep on, waiting area, shelf layout, measurement and tests, sales – this digital pathway has highlighted the benefit of incorpora ng immersive technologies, via the ACEP interac ve touchscreen window display with dynamic func onality which grabs the a en on of passers-by and presents a 24/7 personalised product offering. A holographic steward created by Seedertech interfaces with customers, facilita ng informa on and preparing them for their mee ng with the op cian. The ELEC OM touchscreen table which displays the store’s frame catalogue, provides addi onal informa on and helps streamline wai ng mes. Next, a Fi ng Box virtual fi ng room helps customers select in-store from an extended product catalogue. Digital measuring and 3D simula ons offered by all lens manufacturers guarantees a high level of accuracy and reliability.

Crea vity trend Crea ve diversity was at the heart of the exhibi on, with an op cal frames and sunglasses offering of over 1,200 brands,

illustra ng the sector’s vitality. Also unveiled, a selec on of the finest brands via two Pop-Up Stores — The Collec onist and The Selec onist, a selec on bolstered by the trends brought together in the digital magazine Trends by Silmo (available on the exhibi on’s website), focused around five themes: Ultra Colours, No Gender, Cosme c Touches, Gold Thread and Men in Stylish Fashion. The 2016 Silmo d’Or awards dedicated to eyewear demonstrated the extent to which style combined with technical exper se highlights brand crea vity. Frame Technological Innova on category: 77H by Exalto (Oxibis Group), featured a hinge comprising a ceramic compound, an ultra-func onal, flexible hinge. Jury’s Award: Mask E3 by Kuboraum, a frame featuring drilled unworked lenses into which acetate is inserted, to produce eye-catching glasses with porcelain nose-pads and adjustable sleeves.

Support for scien sts and future professionals Taking place under the Mondial de L’Op que umbrella, Silmo Academy certainly asserted its value, a rac ng a total of 425 par cipants over the three days of discussions. A endees enjoyed the presenta ons by guest speakers including Professor Yves Pouliquen who is a member of the Académie Française, ophthalmologist Professor Chris an Corbé and neurologist Dr Olivier Mar naud. With contribu ons from more than twenty specialists and renowned authori es, they explored the challenges inherent in sight and reading. By encouraging research into visual health, Silmo is also suppor ng future genera ons of op cians through its organisa on, for the second me, of an inter-school contest. In a fun and fes ve ambience, 280 students and eight high schools went head to head in the Silmo TV studio to win a trip to the Op Trade Fair in Munich in January.

Save the date for 2017! On October 6-9, 2017, the next edition of Silmo will celebrate its 50th anniversary, where the focus will be on renewal, by enhancing its allure to host the sector’s finest trends and innovations, along with its best brands and companies.

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8.8 billion opcs spend in turnover in Italy, France, Spain and Germany

O

ne of the world’s largest market research institutions GfK (Gesellschaft für Konsumforschung) has announced the latest sales figures for four European optics markets: Italy, France, Spain and Germany. Total turnover for these markets stands at €8.8 billion for the first half of 2016, registering a sales value growth of 2.8 per cent compared to the previous year. GfK’s Optics Panel tracks sales data for sunglasses, frames, spectacle lenses, contact lenses and care products for contact lenses. The overall positive performance of the European market is the result of mixed trends registered in each country: ranging from +4.7 per cent in Germany to the quite flat performance of Spain (+0.9 per cent). France (+2.2 per cent) and Italy (+2.4 per cent) came in-between, with a performance in line with the European average. German market growth has been generated by the spectacle lenses and spectacle frames categories, which account for 87.6 per cent of the entire market, off-setting sunglasses, which delivered a particularly negative trend. The negative performance of sunglasses (-7.5 per cent) is the main reason behind the overall flat performance of the Spanish market, which was nonetheless quite positive in categories such as spectacle lenses (+3.8 per cent) and contact lenses and care products (+2.8 per cent). France is the most negative market for contact lenses and care products (down 2.8 per cent), but the three per cent increase in spectacle lenses – a category that represents 60.9 per cent of the total optics market in France – resulted in an overall positive trend for the entire local market. And finally, Italy is the only country that showed positive growth in each single segment of the market, as well as being the country showing the highest growth for spectacle frames (up 5.4 per cent).

Category overview The spectacle lenses and spectacle frames categories, which represent 79.8 per cent of the overall optics market, have positively contributed to the performance of opticians in Europe - with sales value growths of 3.9 per cent and 3.6 per cent respectively for the first half of 2016. Sales of contact lenses and care products (representing 9.7 per cent of the total optics sales value) were almost flat (-0.2 per cent). The sunglasses market is now back to an overall negative trend (down 1.8 per cent) after a year of growth. In both spectacle lenses and frames, the premium segment (prod-

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ucts costing over 200 Euros) performed the best during the first part of 2016. Spectacle lenses registered 9.6 per cent growth and represents 17 per cent of this market, while, for spectacle frames, the premium segment grew 3.7 per cent, accounting for 8.8 per cent of the sales. For spectacle lenses, this positive performance is thanks to a double-digit growth of progressive lenses (12 per cent). Looking at the trends around new designs within frames, GfK’s figures show that the premium segment’s growth is driven by lighter materials and thinner shapes, with plastic/metal remaining the preferred combination (40 per cent). For sunglasses, the premium segment (where women’s models represent 60 per cent of sales) is, by contrast, quite flat (-1 per cent). Monthly expenditure for contact lenses costing over 22 Euros has risen due to the continuous growth of daily and daily silicone hydrogel lenses. At the same time, weekly and monthly replacement lenses have shown growth more in the area of ‘bargain’ or low cost lenses.

French optics market Marion Starkman, GfK’s optics market expert for France, added, ‘Looking at the French market in particular, the eyewear business market has moved from a negative performance in value in the first half of 2015 (-0.6 per cent versus same period in 2014) to overall growth of 1.6 per cent in the first half of this year. This is a promising trend, given the inclement weather conditions that prevailed at the beginning of the sunglasses season this year.’ Overall eyewear activity in France amounts to 1.1 billion Euros for the year to date, with more than 1,300 brands competing locally. Starkman continued, ‘We are seeing a very dynamic life cycle here, with more than 100 new branded players launched in France over the past 2 years. The competition is fiercer than ever between brands, and even more if we take into account retailers’ own private labels’. GfK has divided the eyewear category into 10 different segments, in order to underline the key growth contributors. At the end of June 2016, ‘Pure Optical Brands’ remains the biggest segment, growing by three per cent in volume compared to the same period last year. ‘Luxury & Couture Brands’ is the second biggest segment in both volume and value, and is back into positive trends after having been dismissed by consumers in 2015. Lastly, ‘Optical Designers Brands’ continues to show very dynamic trends, as it is the fastest growing segment for the year to date.


Vocational lenses Tony Jarratt, Technical Editor

ver the last few decades our lives have changed quite dramatically – particularly when it comes to using computers, tablets, smart phones and similar devices. These changes bring with them greater demands on visual performance. What have been considered ‘standard’ lenses used by most wearers – distance and reading lenses, bifocals, trifocals and progressives – do not always meet the requirements for good strain free vision when used for the modern devices. To overcome these shortcomings, many manufacturers now offer what can be loosely termed as ‘vocational lenses’. During early to middle age, the eye can exert accommodation to achieve focus at near to intermediate distances. Therefore, the emmetropic patient will not

the second for near / intermediate. However, this solution does introduce its own problems. The use of two pairs is fine if the user only needs to change from one to the other occasionally, for instance, someone working outdoors who only needs to view something at a close distance every now and then (e.g., a gardener). The office worker, however, would find this solution impossible; changing from one pair to the other would have to occur every few moments. Early on, and to overcome this problem of frequent changes, the first bifocal lenses were introduced, followed by trifocal and, eventually, progressive addition lenses. Each has its advantages and disadvantages, which are summarised in Table 1.

Table 1: Advantages and disadvantages of different lenses

require any correction and the myope will only require help for distance, using distance single vision lenses. Moderate to high hyperopes may well require lenses for distance, but will normally be able to use the same single vision lenses for near work, using their accommodation. As age increases, the available accommodation is gradually lost and a correction for near work and sometimes intermediate will be required (the near addition). This requirement can often be met by the use of two pairs of spectacles – one for distance use and

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There are, of course, other advantages and disadvantages according to the use to which the lenses are to be put, but those shown in the table are the most frequently encountered. Current usage A survey published by the Optician a few years ago (February 29, 2008) showed the then current United Kingdom market as being split: Single vision, 71.8 per cent, progressive, 17.6 per cent, and bifocal, 10.6 per


Vocaonal lenses cent. This split is only for the UK market and it is not possible to obtain similar figures for worldwide usage, but it must indicate the approximate usage in the ‘average’ country. From this, it can be seen that progressives had taken the major share (approximately 62 per cent) of the market for lenses used to correct presbyopia and this is true today. However, they do not necessarily offer the best solution for all tasks. Their main disadvantage is the narrowness of the intermediate corridor and near zone. This is where a bifocal scores; it can offer a much wider field of view, particularly for close work. The narrow field of view in the intermediate area of PALs means that they can be difficult to use by, for example, artists, particularly those painting landscapes where a large, wide field of view is required at the intermediate distance of the canvas. Here, a lens with a small distance portion and large near portion is indicated (usually an upcurve design). Modern lifestyles haven’t helped either. Many of us spend large amounts of time in front of the computer and are required to view a screen at about arm’s length and the keyboard at a closer distance. Normal progressives aren’t completely successful. The focusing distances are difficult to reconcile; the near zone probably provides the correct focus for the keyboard, but an intermediate distance is required for the screen, and ‘normal’ everyday progressives don’t provide this. Another problem arises for the motor mechanic who is required to work underneath a car whilst lying prone. He (or she) will need to look ‘above’ the normal line of vision to see work on the chassis and a progressive with its near portion at the bottom of the lens doesn’t work correctly for this task. Although progressives are eminently suitable for the clear majority of everyday activities, they do not,as has been shown, provide the ultimate answer to every visual task. Often these more specific tasks can be better served using a bifocal or trifocal. Because of these limitations, the manufacturers of progressives have gradually developed some special designs, intended for specific uses – such as computer / VDU use and the office environment. They have also introduced a variation, the ‘degressive’. Here the major portion of the lens is the near zone and the lens power is calculated so as to ‘reduce’ towards the distance zone, rather than the other way around. This allows the designer more latitude when considering the lens form. Lenses suitable for close and or intermediate use

are available in several forms, although today many are now difficult to source due to limited demand. Bifocals and trifocals Bifocals have been with us for well over two hundred years. It is generally accepted that they were first described by Benjamin Franklin in 1784. They can be sub-divided, by their general construction, into four main types: 1. Split or two-piece – two pieces of lens material (usually the same) held edge to edge in a frame (Franklin-split); 2. Cement – two pieces of material (usually the same) – one cemented onto the other; 3. Fused – two different types of glass, one fused to the other; 4. Solid or one piece – ground / cast or moulded from one single piece of glass or resin. Of these designs the fused (glass) and solid (resin and glass) are in general production, but Franklin split and cemented versions can be obtained from some suppliers to special order. The Franklin-split This ‘lens’ is produced by edging two lenses for the right eye and two lenses for the left, so that they all fit the frame. Each lens is then cut in half (or as required) and flat edged along one side, so that when re-inserted into the frame they form one ‘lens’. Normally, the upper lens will be for distance and the lower for near or intermediate, but any combination is possible. The great advantage of this design is the complete flexibility. Centres can be placed almost anywhere and different prismatic powers can be supplied in the two areas – even different cylinder powers and/or axes are possible in the rare occasions that these are required. The main disadvantage is the very visible dividing line. Cemented As its name implies, one section of the lens (the segment) is cemented to a main carrier lens. The advantage is flexibility in the use of centration and prism power, but this type of bifocal suffers from the (normally) visible segment edge. It is only available in glass. Fused A segment of higher index glass is heat fused into a depression in a main carrier lens (normally spectacle crown n=1,525). This has the advantage that several segment sizes and shapes can be supplied to a large range of powers. It can only be supplied with the carrier lens in 1.5 and 1.6 indices, as the segment must have a higher index to supply the addition power.

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Vocaonal lenses However, this can suffer from chromatic aberration in higher power additions and is only available in glass. Solid Made from one piece of material – either glass or resin = very few glass solids are produced now as the cost of production is relatively high and the use of resin materials has increased. Trifocal designs have had a much shorter life and have never become universally popular. A trifocal lens was the subject of a patent in America in 1911 (A. J. Boness) – but the main advantage of the trifocal – the third focusing distance – has been superseded by the continuously variable addition of the progressive design. Both bifocals and trifocals are available in a range of segment shapes and sizes, each type suitable for a range of tasks and users. The range available can be classed by segment shape:Bifocals Round shaped – normally available in the range 22mm to 45mm D Shape (flat top) – normally listed from 25mm to 40mm C Shape (curved top) – in a similar range E-line (executive) – straight segment similar in appearance to the Franklin-split Trifocals Similar shaped segments to those available in the bifocal range, but in a far more limited range. One disadvantage of a multifocal lens is the fact that it is not possible to have a true optical centre in the segment. The main carrier lens (normally the distance portion) will have its optical centre placed at or near the geometrical centre (often this is decentred nasally by a set amount to increase the available decentration), so that when wearers look through the centre of the lens they will normally be looking through or near the optical centre. However, when they view through the segment there will be a prismatic effect due to the distance the eye has traversed from the OC of the distance carrier. Even if they are looking through the centre of the segment (which is unlikely) there will be residual prismatic effect. This problem is normally of no consequence when the Rx of the two eyes is reasonably equal (as happens in most cases), as the prismatic effect will be the same (or nearly so) in both eyes. If the problem is too great to overcome (in cases of anisometropia), it

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may be necessary to use a Franklin-split or cemented lens to correct the imbalance. Another of the main problems with bifocals and trifocals is prism jump. As the user’s line of gaze traverses the lens when moving from the distance portion into the reading area, it experiences a sudden change in induced prism. At the distance optical centre there is no prism, but as the line of vision moves away from this point the lens will exert an increasing prismatic effect due to the power of the lens. For a wearer with similar Rx in both lenses, the prism will be balanced between the two eyes and will not be noticeable. However, as the line of gaze reaches the segment dividing line, the effect will be altered instantly by the added effect of the addition power. As the add is always a plus power and the optical centre of the segment will be at a finite distance below the segment top, the new added effect will be base down prism. The effect of this extra prism will be to cause the apparent position of the object under view to move or jump. The amount of jump will depend on the addition power and the size of the segment – as these increase the amount of induced prism will also increase. The problem can be reduced by keeping the segment size as small as possible (taking into account, of course, the requirements of the patient regarding segment size) and a few designs do not exhibit the effect. E-line bifocals are normally produced with the distance and reading ‘centres’ on or very near the dividing line. It is also possible to produce some flat top and curved top segment with the optical centre of the segment placed at or very near the top of the segment, thus reducing or even eliminating the effect. This is not normally possible for round segment bifocals, except in the case of a prism segment bifocal, where the prism with the segment area can be controlled. It is also possible, with limitations, to produce a jumpfree lens in cemented form, although this is dependent on the Rx and addition power. Many manufacturers now offer one or more lenses within their range, designed for ‘vocational use’ – these are normally varieties of progressive or degressive. The availability of these lenses is made possible by the use of up-to-date digital free-form lens processing. The distance / intermediate and near areas of the lens can be designed with a specific type of use in mind. They are particularly aimed at office and indoor use, where a full range of distance vision is not so important. Here the intermediate and near ranges are given priority.


Vocaonal lenses However, this can suffer from chromatic aberration in higher power additions and is only available in glass. Solid Made from one piece of material – either glass or resin = very few glass solids are produced now as the cost of production is relatively high and the use of resin materials has increased. Trifocal designs have had a much shorter life and have never become universally popular. A trifocal lens was the subject of a patent in America in 1911 (A. J. Boness) – but the main advantage of the trifocal – the third focusing distance – has been superseded by the continuously variable addition of the progressive design. Both bifocals and trifocals are available in a range of segment shapes and sizes, each type suitable for a range of tasks and users. The range available can be classed by segment shape:Bifocals Round shaped – normally available in the range 22mm to 45mm D Shape (flat top) – normally listed from 25mm to 40mm C Shape (curved top) – in a similar range E-line (executive) – straight segment similar in appearance to the Franklin-split Trifocals Similar shaped segments to those available in the bifocal range, but in a far more limited range. One disadvantage of a multifocal lens is the fact that it is not possible to have a true optical centre in the segment. The main carrier lens (normally the distance portion) will have its optical centre placed at or near the geometrical centre (often this is decentred nasally by a set amount to increase the available decentration), so that when wearers look through the centre of the lens they will normally be looking through or near the optical centre. However, when they view through the segment there will be a prismatic effect due to the distance the eye has traversed from the OC of the distance carrier. Even if they are looking through the centre of the segment (which is unlikely) there will be residual prismatic effect. This problem is normally of no consequence when the Rx of the two eyes is reasonably equal (as happens in most cases), as the prismatic effect will be the same (or nearly so) in both eyes. If the problem is too great to overcome (in cases of anisometropia), it may be necessary to use a Franklin-split or cemented

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lens to correct the imbalance. Another of the main problems with bifocals and trifocals is prism jump. As the user’s line of gaze traverses the lens when moving from the distance portion into the reading area, it experiences a sudden change in induced prism. At the distance optical centre there is no prism, but as the line of vision moves away from this point the lens will exert an increasing prismatic effect due to the power of the lens. For a wearer with similar Rx in both lenses, the prism will be balanced between the two eyes and will not be noticeable. However, as the line of gaze reaches the segment dividing line, the effect will be altered instantly by the added effect of the addition power. As the add is always a plus power and the optical centre of the segment will be at a finite distance below the segment top, the new added effect will be base down prism. The effect of this extra prism will be to cause the apparent position of the object under view to move or jump. The amount of jump will depend on the addition power and the size of the segment – as these increase the amount of induced prism will also increase. The problem can be reduced by keeping the segment size as small as possible (taking into account, of course, the requirements of the patient regarding segment size) and a few designs do not exhibit the effect. E-line bifocals are normally produced with the distance and reading ‘centres’ on or very near the dividing line. It is also possible to produce some flat top and curved top segment with the optical centre of the segment placed at or very near the top of the segment, thus reducing or even eliminating the effect. This is not normally possible for round segment bifocals, except in the case of a prism segment bifocal, where the prism with the segment area can be controlled. It is also possible, with limitations, to produce a jump-free lens in cemented form, although this is dependent on the Rx and addition power. Many manufacturers now offer one or more lenses within their range, designed for ‘vocational use’ – these are normally varieties of progressive or degressive. The availability of these lenses is made possible by the use of up-to-date digital free-form lens processing. The distance / intermediate and near areas of the lens can be deigned with a specific type of use in mind. They are particularly aimed at office and indoor use, where a full range of distance vision is not so important. Here the intermediate and near ranges are given priority.


Vocaonal lenses SUPPLIERS The following suppliers have kindly provided information on the lenses they list within this category. Essilor

Norville

www.essilor.co.uk Essilor’s Varilux Digi me are a new genera on of occupaonal lenses for pa ents with a near vision correc on, who use digital devices daily or have any other near or intermediate vision ac vi es, to help relax their eyes and posture in front of screens. These lenses are designed specifically with the pa ent in mind. Essilor’s research and development has used findings from numerous studies on posture, viewing distances, eye declina on and more to develop the lenses. The Varilux Digi me range is available in three versions: Varilux Digi me Near, which offers up to +0.50D in the ultra near vision zone, to relax the eyes of presbyopes, who regularly use smartphones, tablets and other near vision items, from digital stress; Varilux Digi me Mid, which offers up to +0.25D in the ultra near vision zone, to relax the eyes of presbyopes, who regularly use computers and other intermediate vision items, from digital stress; Varilux Digi me Room, offering up to +0.125D in the ultra near vision zone, to relax the eyes of presbyopes, who regularly use large screens and other extended vision items, from digital stress. Varilux Digi me lenses are recommended for presbyopic pa ents using digital devices either at work and/or at home and pa ents whose hobbies / lifestyle involve significant intermediate and near vision tasks.

www.norville.co.uk Norville list many of the occupa onal lenses produced by other manufacturers such as Seiko, Sola, Essilor and Hoya. They also show several designs sold under their own name, including both degressives (enhanced near vision) and occupa onal progressives. The various designs are numerous and include the Pilotour RD 40, a lower area progressive with upper ‘upcurve’ segment and the same design but with the areas reversed, i.e., upper progressive and lower down curve segment. Also listed is an ‘e-line’ version of the lens with either upper or lower straight line segment. Rounding off these lenses is the Auto-Pilotour up and down progressive. For those requiring greater assistance with reading, Norville list a number of ‘enhanced readers’ – single vision lenses with added power in the lower area. These are available in a number of materials. In the same area, the company list a number of degressives with enhanced near areas. In the more ‘conven onal range’, Norville have several trifocals with two segments – up and down ‘d-curve’ flat top and a double up and down curve (40mm segments) called the Pilot.

Hoya www.hoyalens.co.uk Hoya list three specific designs of voca onal lenses. These are the Hoyalux ID Workstyle V+, Tact Trueform and the AddPower Trueform. The Workstyke V+ is an exclusive indoor solu on that is tailored to individual working condi ons. Available in three designs – Space, Screen and Close – it offers op mal depth and width percep on at both near and intermediate. Each of the designs is op mised for a different working distance, depending on the pa ent’s requirements. Individual wearing parameters can be taken into account to ensure op mal vision based on the wearing posi on of the frame. Tact is a progressive lens designed for occupa onal use. Available as Tact 200 and Tact 400, it is ideal for presbyopes who wish to combine a wide and comfortable view of their immediate surroundings with a real depth of vision without extra head movements. The third lens, the Tact Tueform , features an intermediate area twice as wide as conven onal progressives, making it ideal for a relaxed variable depth of vision. Specific requirements such as VDU users, surgeons, den sts, musicians, and any hobby requiring good intermediate vision would find the design beneficial.

Rodenstock www.rodenstock.co.uk Rodenstock offer several voca onal lenses, based on the paents’ requirements and prescrip on. Impression Ergo FS 2 and Impression Ergo 2 are unique individual near comfort lenses with patented Eye Lens Technology and freely configurable posi oning of viewing zones for all distances. Mul gressiv Ergo 2 is a custom-made and individually opmised near comfort lens with patented Eye Lens Technology for excellent visual comfort in three versions: Book, PC and Room. Progressiv Ergo 2 is a branded near comfort lens in the three variants - Book, PC and Room – and manufactured using the latest free-form technology. The three design types – Book, PC and Room – offer the characteris cs as set out overleaf in Table 2.

Seiko www.seikoeyewear.com Seiko list two dis nct varie es of voca onal lenses – the Computer Xtra and Indoor. Computer Xtra is a new design of degressive lens, and is suitable for all spectacle wearers requiring consistent performance throughout the en re near and intermediate ranges. Adop ng the same Inner Surface technology that is synonymous with all Seiko mul focal lenses, the lens also offers excep onally wide fields of view, providing natural, comfortable vision for all task-related, occupa onal and lifestyle needs. W

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Vocaonal lenses Table 2

The company’s Indoor lenses have much wider intermediate and reading areas than general use lenses and therefore op mise performance at distances of 30cm to 4m. The distance zone is wide enough for indoor purposes so Indoor is the ideal solu on for people who spend most of their me in the workplace or at home. The fi ng cross is 40 per cent of the way down the intermediate progression, thus the lenses should be fi ed so that the fi ng cross is on the main viewing line. When looking straight ahead the wearer focuses at about 4m. The lens is therefore perfect for business mee ngs, watching television and similar situa ons. The user has a choice of either 23mm or 20mm corridor lengths, making it suitable for frame depths of 27mm or more. This lens benefits from being an ‘internal’ design manufactured using freeform technology. As the ac ve surface is near to the eye the wearer has up to 35 per cent wider field of view than would be experienced with a tradi onal front surface design. The lenses should be ordered in the same way as other Seiko progressive lenses, with the fi ng cross at pupil centre when the frame is in the ‘as-worn’ posi on.

Shamir www.shamirlens.com Shamir list four voca onal designs in their extensive lens range. For those focused on immediate surroundings - when focusing on a computer and its near surroundings is a top priority – the Shamir Computer, an advanced free-form lens, provides a wide field of near viewing with clear vision up to 1.5m (5 .) – a far greater depth of field than that offered by conven onal reading lenses. Offering sharp focus for ‘dynamic’ workers, Workspace is offered as the best solu on when priority focus is both middistance and near viewing. Offering a greater depth of field, up to 3 m (10 .), this advanced and highly sophis cated freeform lens design, allows movement within the workspace and sharp vision whether the required focus is on the desk or across the room. Office (SF) is designed for all addi ons including high adds. It has the same prescrip on and fi ng demands as a progressive lens and is available in four dynamic powers (degressions), -0.75, -1.25, -1.75 & -2.25. Minimum fi ng height ls 16mm. This lens is intended for people who want a be er solu on than they get from their reading glasses and who need to focus on near and mid-distance work. Shamir Smart Office – a member of the Shamir Smart lens 20

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family – is the bright answer for crystal clear vision in today’s workplace. A personal occupa onal lens for fashionable frames, Smart Office answers the needs of a wide range of professionals requiring concentrated vision for up to 4 meters (13 feet) and a smooth transi on from mid to near distance vision. Based on Shamir’s Direct Lens Technology, Smart Office is the result of a cu ng-edge design and free-form manufacturing technology that is the most advanced surfacing system for customised back surface op cs. The personalised, back surface occupa onal lens is designed for all addi ons, including high adds.

Tokai www.tokai.be The Tokai range includes the Lu na Relaxus, a brand new personalised single vision lens designed to help prevent eyestrain and available in the new lens material Lu na. It cuts UV up to 420nm. Also offered is the Contrast Leisure lens, designed for specific sports, as well as Readers & Largo, for professions or hobbies. Largo is available with or without Back Surface (BS ) technology. BS Largo is also available is the new Lu na lens material. Indoor is available with or without Back Surface (BS ) technology. BS Indoor is also available is the new Lu na lens material. Supply is for computer users, a personalised single-vision lens that will support the eyes during long visual efforts with a reading assistance of +0.75D. Also offered, Resonas Fit is for computer users, with the emphasis on intermediate vision field. This lens, too, is available in new Lu na lens material.

Carl Zeiss http://www.zeiss.co.uk/vision Zeiss list the Office and Computer lens designs, both produced for indoor and office use. The Office lens gives wearers crisp, clear vision of the three working area distances, according to the individual wearer needs: 1. reading, 2. workplace and 3. room distance. Benefits include clear visual acuity for near to intermediate distance vision with wide vision zones and relaxed and natural vision in the office and for any ac vi es at near and mid-range. Zeiss digital lenses offer op mised lens design to support close-up vision for digital devices, as well as stress and strainfree viewing throughout the en re day and easy adapta on for unaccustomed eyes.


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layers of premium acetate, polished to perfec on.

voted the best lens surfacing solu on by

Timeless tortoiseshell tem-

EyeVote 2015 and eye care professionals.

ples, fastened to the

BlueShield’s performance is unmatched

frame by robust triple-bar-

in its category, blocking over 95 per cent

rel hinges, team up with

of the blue light specifically associated with

silver dual-pin detailing to register a certain vintage-

age related macular degenera on and eye

inspired quality. Designed in a so rectangular shape, the 7161 is available in a range of

strain, plus an average of over 85 per cent

neutral colour op ons.

of the generally harmful blue light range. For further details visit:

For further details visit:

www.ogieyewear.com

www.superoptical.com

Driving lenses Many spectacle wearers feel insecure and stressed when driving

Due to bad wearther or low-light, wearers’ visibility can be re-

in bad weather or at night, as glare from street lights and traffic

duced, causing many people to feel uncomfortable and stressed

is uncomfortable and along with poor light condi ons, can

when driving in such condi ons. A er intensive research and

reduce visibility. Last year, Zeiss launched DriveSafe lenses,

wearer trials, Zeiss has developed the new Luminance Design

specifically designed for spectacle wearers who want to feel

Technology (LDT) to give spectacle wearers improved vision in

safer and more relaxed when driving

low-light condi ons.

in their everyday lenses.

In addi on, when driving, there is

Zeiss DriveSafe lenses combat the

a necessity to con nually switch

three most common visual challenges

focus between the road, dashboard

experienced when driving: glare, vis-

and mirrors, and for progressive lens

ibility in low-light and for progressive

wearers this can be a real challenge.

lens wearers, ability to see clearly

The new Zeiss DriveSafe lens design

when switching focus between the

makes it easier for progressive lens

road, dashboard and mirrors.

wearers to quickly refocus, as it also

Glare is a challenge for drivers, as

features op mised distance and in-

it can reduce the visibility of objects and sensi vity of the eye to

termediate viewing zones, reducing the need for horizontal head

contrast. The DuraVision DriveSafe coa ng applied on Zeiss Dri-

movement.

veSafe lenses reduces perceived glare by par ally reflec ng the wavelengths of light responsible for causing glare.

For further details visit: www.zeiss.co.uk/better-vision

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AtoZ of OPTICAL websites All the companies listed in our A to Z guide are featured on our own Website along with a Hyperlink. Log onto www.optical-world.co.uk and select the company you are looking for, then simply click on their URL which is highlighted and you’ll be automatically re-directed. Remember to bookmark the Optical World Website so you can easily locate it for future use. If your company’s Website is not shown below, contact us immediately, via our email address info@optical-world.co.uk – The annual cost of an entry in this guide is £90 (£180 with logo)

Acreas www.acreascoatings.com

. www.europtica.co.uk

www.agp-abrasifs.com

OptoTech www.optotech.de

Fair & Cheer Inc www.fnc.com.tw

www.optrafair.co.uk

w.

AIM Specialty Materials www.aimspecialty.com

Fil-Tech Inc www.filtech.com

Arch Crown www.archcrown.com

Automation & Robotics www.ar.be

Bühler Alzenau GmbH Business Area Leybold Optics www.buhlergroup.com

www.pads4labs.com

PBG Piezoelettrica Business General Srl www.pbg.it

Federation of Manufacturing Opticians www.fmo.co.uk

Groupe Couget Optical www.groupecouget.com

Hong Kong Optical Fair www.hkopticalfair.com

Phantom Research Labs Inc www.phantomresearch.com

POMDI-Herramientas De Diamante S.A. www.pomdi.com

ww

www.isucl.co.kr

www.satisloh.com

Cerium Optical Products www.ceriumoptical.com

Schneider GmbH & Co. KG www.schneider-om.com

www.kepets.com

Coburn Technologies www.CoburnTechnologies.com

Comes Fratelli Colombo S.r.l. www.comes.it

www.laser2000ophthalmic.com

www.scl-intl.com

SEIKO Optical UK www.seiko-optical.co.uk

www.laserop.com

Comexpo – Silmo www.silmoparis.com

Stratox Ltd www.stratox.com

Contact Lens Manufacturers Association www.clma.net

www.ml-oc.com

www.tecofrance.com

www.contamac.com

www.mido.it – www.mido.com

COTEC Gmbh www.cotec-gmbh.com

Reed Exhibition Companies www.reedexpo.com

Norville Autoflow www.norville.co.uk

OLA (Optical Laboratories Association) www.ola-labs.org

22

www.optical-world.co.uk

Wenzhou Int’l Optics Fair, China www.donnor.com


IS YOUR COMPANY FEATURED HERE Telephone: (44) 1702 345443 Email: info@optical-world.co.uk

The International Suppliers Guide Circulates to over 11,500 readers in more than 100 countires www.optical-world.co.uk W

December 2016

23


IS YOUR COMPANY FEATURED HERE Telephone: (44) 1702 345443 Email: info@optical-world.co.uk The International Suppliers Guide Circulates to over 11,500 readers in more than 100 countires www.optical-world.co.uk

24

www.optical-world.co.uk


The International Suppliers Guide Circulates to over 11,500 readers in more than 100 countires www.optical-world.co.uk

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December 2016

25


IS YOUR COMPANY FEATURED HERE Telephone: (44) 1702 345443 Email: info@optical-world.co.uk

The International Suppliers Guide Circulates to over 11,500 readers in more than 100 countires www.optical-world.co.uk

26

www.optical-world.co.uk


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December 2016

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2017 EXHIBITION DIARY 28-30 January

OPTI 2017 Munich, Germany

4-6 February

100% Optical ExCel, London, UK

15-17 February

17th China (Shanghai) International Optics Fair Shanghai World Expo Exhibition & Convention Centre, P.R. China

25-27 February

MIDO Fiera Milano – Rho, Milan, Italy

9-11 March

10-12 March

1-3 April

SILMO Sydney International Convention Centre Australia Opta 23rd International Fair for Eye Optics Optometry and Ophthalmology Brno, Czech Republic OPTRAFAIR Birmingham NEC, UK

20-22 April

DIOPS – 16th Daegu International Optical Show Daegu Exhibition & Convention Centre, Korea

24-27 May

Expo Abióptica 2017, São Paulo, Brazil

25-27 May

Thailand Optical Expo – THOPIX 2017 BITEC, Bangkok, Thailand

6-8 September

30th China International Optics Fair China International Exhibition Centre Beijing, PR China

14-16 September

6-9 October

International Vision Expo West Sands Expo Centre, Las Vegas, USA SILMO 2017 Parc des Expositions, Villepinte, Paris, France

FORTHCOMING FEATURES FEBRUARY 2017 ISSUE Special MIDO Edition OPTICAL WORLD will once again be publishing a major preview of the show. Exhibitors are invited to send details of the products they will have on display to: Email: info@optical-world.co.uk

MARCH 2017 ISSUE Survey: Lens Tinting If you wish your company to be included in the above survey please send relevant information to our technical consultant Peter Wilkinson Email: peterwlk@btinternet.com 28

www.optical-world.co.uk


Optical World December 2016