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Inspirations for The KnollTextilesÂŽ Glass Collection

Made in Chicago / Š 2013 Skyline Design

skydesign.com / 888-278-4660 / sales@skydesign.com


Explore these four studies in inspiration for our KnollTextiles Glass Collection that demonstrate the creative process of translating textile into glass. A blend of the innovation from two companies, Knoll and Skyline, the collection’s patterns play with scale and layering on one or both sides of glass. The organic, linear, and structural designs offer privacy options for a variety of markets— from healthcare to corporate. Designer: Dorothy Cosonas, Creative Director, KnollTextiles Dorothy Cosonas is highly influenced by her passion for fine art, international fashion, travel, and nature. For example, she has been known to draw inspiration from the finest detail in a dress sleeve to create upholstery patterns on a larger scale. Dorothy lives in New York City, with its inspirations for color, pattern, and art. The three strips of images in this study re-create Dorothy’s own inspiration wall of color, nature, and art. Organic elements from nature, as well as ribbons demonstrate her study of pattern. Colors exemplify how you can bring color into this collection.


Textile: Divine™ Inspired by the sanctuary of industrial designer Russell Wright, Divine was designed by Dorothy Cosonas. Wright’s home near a quarry in the Hudson River Valley blended art and nature, house and landscape, inspiring this pattern, which adapts beautifully to glass. Divine references nature in an abstract way. Adding color and tonality help emphasize its simplicity and organic elements. Like the bundled twigs and pins in this study, objects help connect the design to nature. Wright was a passionate advocate of ‘good design for the masses’ and was interested in ecology and nature. He was also influenced by Japanese art, architecture, and landscape; see the inspiration photo that Dorothy took of the white panel with reeds which was in Wright’s home. Divine also exemplifies the environmental values of the two companies behind the collection.


Textile: Fibra™ Fibra textile designer and textile division head, Esther Haraszty, worked under Marianne Strengell, the head of the textile department at Cranbrook Academy of Art from 1953. A highly textural fabric, Fibra was as timeless then as it is now. The pattern was applied to linen, sheer cotton, and fiberglass. In 1953, the textile division head relied on the same design and architectural networks for commissioning textiles that they used to recruit furniture designers. Fibra was inspired by photomurals of antique looms that Herbert Matter created for the 575 Madison Avenue showroom. Haraszty asked the photographer Erich Hartmann to take a series of photographs, shown in this study, of the wire heddles of a loom (also shown). Fibra won a First Award for Printed Fabrics from the American Institute of Decorators (AID 1953), selected for a Good Design exhibition (1953) and was widely published. Haraszty also adapted the pattern for the collection of clothes she designed for the sportswear manufacturer B.H. Wragge. Fibra is about the weaving – the construction of a textile that translates well to glass. It adapts to color, scale shift, and layering to offer privacy options. An organic pattern, Fibra works well in healthcare as well as corporate environments.


Textile: Cyclone™ and Enchantment™ These two textiles were originally created as casement cloth for window treatments. Their patterns easily lend themselves to building interiors and architecture. Designed in 1972 as a series of innovation textiles for a student exhibit, Cyclone is an archival pattern. The designer is unknown. Originally called Transparent, it’s the result of an opportunity Knoll offered to young designers to experiment with a casement fabric. Cyclone’s timeless design demonstrates innovation from the early 1970s and innovation today: translating textile into glass. Just as casement fabrics altered the transmission of light, the open, translucent qualities of Cyclone also transform a space by altering light. Cyclone is an open single sided pattern but it can be used with Vitracolor® to create an opaque wall cladding. Enchantment was designed by Dorothy Cosonas. Its clover-like forms are an abstraction of nature. The coral and leaf shapes in this study add the influence of natural elements. As a reversible fabric, it is a nice example of how Dorothy’s two-sided textile design translates onto one side of glass. By playing with scale and adding color, Enchantment makes a great option for healthcare environments.


Inspirations for The KnollTextilesÂŽ Glass Collection

Made in Chicago / Š 2013 Skyline Design

skydesign.com / 888-278-4660 / sales@skydesign.com


Inspirations for The KnollTextiles Glass Collection