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ISS International Space Station

Canadarm2 and Dexterous Manipulator 11 March 2008 robotic system and associated equipment on the International Space Station. It plays a key role in station assembly and maintenance: moving equipment and supplies around the station, supporting astronauts working in space, and servicing instruments and other payloads attached to the space station. Astronauts receive specialized training to enable them to perform these functions with the various systems.

Tranquility 8 February 2010 The third and last of the station's US nodes, Tranquility contains an advanced life support system to recycle waste water for crew use and generate oxygen for the crew to breathe. The node also provides four berthing locations for more attached pressurised modules or crew transportation vehicles, in addition to the permanent berthing location for the station's Cupola.

Unity 4 December 1998 to the Russian section (via PMA-1), and providing berthing locations for the Z1 truss, Quest airlock, Destiny laboratory, Tranquility node and the PMM Leonardo.

Destiny 7 February 2001 The primary research facility for US payloads aboard the ISS, Destiny is intended for general experiments. The module houses 24 International Standard Payload Racks, some of which are used for environmental systems and crew daily living equipment. Destiny also serves as the mounting point for most of the station's Integrated Truss Structure.

Quest 12 July 2001 The primary airlock for the ISS, Quest hosts spacewalks with both US EMU and Russian Orlan spacesuits. Quest consists of two segments: the equipment lock, that stores spacesuits and equipment, and the crew lock, from which astronauts can exit into space.

Harmony 23 October 2007 The second of the station's node modules, Harmony is the utility hub of the ISS. The module contains four racks that provide electrical power, bus electronic data, and acts as a central connecting point for several other components via its six Common Berthing Mechanisms (CBMs). The European Columbus and Japanese Kibō laboratories are permanently berthed to the module, and American Space Shuttle Orbiters dock with the ISS via PMA-2, attached to Harmony's forward port. In addition, the module serves as a berthing port for the Italian

Kibō Experiment Logistics Module 11 March 2008 Part of the Kibō Japanese Experiment Module laboratory, the ELM provides storage and transportation facilities to the laboratory with a pressurised section to serve internal payloads.

Kibō Pressurised Module 31 May 2008 Part of the Kibō Japanese Experiment Module laboratory, the PM is the core module of Kibō to which the ELM and Exposed Facility are berthed. The laboratory is the largest single ISS module and contains a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks. The module is used to carry out research in space medicine, biology, Earth observations, materials production, biotechnology, and communications research. The PM also serves as the mounting location for an external platform, the Exposed Facility (EF), that allows payloads to be directly exposed to the harsh space environment. The EF is serviced by the module's own robotic arm, the JEM–RMS, which is mounted on the PM. Permanent presence of the crew of 3

Long-duration 6-member crew onboard

Columbia accident grounds the Shuttle of the ISS crew to 2

astronauts going up

logistic delivery cargo supply Rafaello module logistic delivery Soyuz replacement module delivery new crew members

1998

1999 2000

2001

autics and Space Administration

Q) NASA headquarters, in Washington, D.C. JSC) Johnson Space Center in Houston. (KSC) Kennedy Space Center, in Cape Canaveral. enter (MSFC) in Huntsville Alabama. nters (TSC:). ace Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama.

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

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2010

2011

astronauts coming back

Roscosmos, the Russian Federal Space Agency

European Space Agency (ESA)

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

Canadian Space Agency (CSA)

Moscow Mission Control Center (TsUP). Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) at Zvezdny Gorodok (Star City). Baikonur Cosmodrome The Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. Columbus Control Center (COL-CC). The COl-CC, at the Aerospace Center

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) In addition to the JAXA

Mobile Servicing System (MSS ) Operations Complex (MOC), located in Saint Hubert, Quebec. Payload Telescience Operations Centre (PTOC) in Saint Huber.

Automated Transfer Vehicle Control Center (ATV-CC) in Toulouse, France. European Astronaut Center (EAC) in Cologne, Germany. Guiana Space Center (GSC) in French Guiana.

arch Center (GRC) in Cleveland. ace Center in Houston.

2009

Tskuba Space Center (TKSU) located in Tsukuba Science City. Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) located in the south of Kagoshima Prefecture, along the southeast coast of Tanegashima.


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Module Length: 51 meters Truss Length: 109 meters Solar Array Length: 73 meters Mass: 370,290 kilograms Habitable Volume: 360 cubic meters Pressurized Volume: 837 cubic meters Power Generation: 8 solar arrays = 84 kilowatts Lines of Computer Code: approximately 2.3 million

Poisk 10 November 2009 One of the Russian ISS components, Poisk is used for docking of Soyuz and Progress ships, as an airlock for spacewalks and as an interface

Zvezda 12 July 2000 The station's service module, which provides the main living quarters for resident crews, environmental systems and attitude & orbit control. The module also provides docking locations for Soyuz spacecraft, Progress spacecraft and the Automated Transfer Vehicle, and its addition rendered

Nauka May 2012 The MLM will be Russia's primary research module as part of the ISS and will be used for general microgravity experiments, docking, and cargo logistics. The module provides a crew work and rest area, and will be equipped with a backup attitude control system that can be used to control the station's attitude. Based on the current assembly schedule, the arrival of Nauka will complete construction of the Russian Orbital Segment and it will be the last major component added to the station.

Zarya 20 November 1998 power, storage, propulsion, and guidance during initial assembly. The module now serves as a storage compartment, both inside the pressurised section and in the externally mounted fuel tanks.

Rassvet 14 May 2010 Rassvet is being used for docking and cargo storage aboard the station.

Cupola 8 February 2010 The Cupola is an observatory module that provides ISS crew members with a direct view of robotic operations and docked spacecraft, as well as an observation point for watching the Earth. The module comes equipped with robotic workstations for operating the SSRMS and shutters to protect its windows from damage caused by micrometeorites. It features a 80-centimetre round window, the largest window on the station.

Leonardo 24 February 2011 The Leonardo PMM will house spare parts and supplies, allowing longer times between resupply missions and freeing space in other modules, particularly Columbus. The PMM was created by converting the Italian Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module into a module that could be permanently attached to the station. The arrival of the PMM module marked the completion of the US Orbital Segment.

Columbus 7 February 2008 The primary research facility for European payloads aboard the ISS,

provide power and data to external experiments such as the European Technology Exposure Facility (EuTEF), Solar Monitoring Observatory, Materials International Space Station Experiment, and Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. A number of expansions are planned for the module to study quantum physics and cosmology.

Permanent presence of the crew of 3

Columbia accident grounds the Shuttle of the ISS crew to 2

1998

1999 2000

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA Headquarters (HQ) NASA headquarters, in Washington, D.C. Johnson Space Center (JSC) Johnson Space Center in Houston. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Kennedy Space Center, in Cape Canaveral. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville Alabama. Telescience Support Centers (TSC:). Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland. Johnson Space Center in Houston.

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2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Roscosmos, the Russian Federal Space Agency Moscow Mission Control Center (TsUP). Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center (GCTC) at Zvezdny Gorodok (Star City). Baikonur Cosmodrome The Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

2006


title

ISS International Space Station

Canadarm2 and Dexterous Manipulator 11 March 2008 robotic system and associated equipment on the International Space Station. It plays a key role in station assembly and maintenance: moving equipment and supplies around the station, supporting astronauts working in space, and servicing instruments and other payloads attached to the space station. Astronauts receive specialized training to enable them to perform these functions with the various systems.

Tranquility 8 February 2010 The third and last of the station's US nodes, Tranquility contains an advanced life support system to recycle waste water for crew use and generate oxygen for the crew to breathe. The node also provides four berthing locations for more attached pressurised modules or crew transportation vehicles, in addition to the permanent berthing location for the station's Cupola.

Unity 4 December 1998 to the Russian section (via PMA-1), and providing berthing locations for the Z1 truss, Quest airlock, Destiny laboratory, Tranquility node and the PMM Leonardo.

Destiny 7 February 2001 The primary research facility for US payloads aboard the ISS, Destiny is intended for general experiments. The module houses 24 International Standard Payload Racks, some of which are used for environmental systems and crew daily living equipment. Destiny also serves as the mounting point for most of the station's Integrated Truss Structure.

Quest 12 July 2001 The primary airlock for the ISS, Quest hosts spacewalks with both US EMU and Russian Orlan spacesuits. Quest consists of two segments: the equipment lock, that stores spacesuits and equipment, and the crew lock, from which astronauts can exit into space.

Harmony 23 October 2007 The second of the station's node modules, Harmony is the utility hub of the ISS. The module contains four racks that provide electrical power, bus electronic data, and acts as a central connecting point for several other components via its six Common Berthing Mechanisms (CBMs). The European Columbus and Japanese Kibō laboratories are permanently berthed to the module, and American Space Shuttle Orbiters dock with the ISS via PMA-2, attached to Harmony's forward port. In addition, the module serves as a berthing port for the Italian

Kibō Experiment Logistics Module 11 March 2008 Part of the Kibō Japanese Experiment Module laboratory, the ELM provides storage and transportation facilities to the laboratory with a pressurised section to serve internal payloads.

Kibō Pressurised Module 31 May 2008 Part of the Kibō Japanese Experiment Module laboratory, the PM is the core module of Kibō to which the ELM and Exposed Facility are berthed. The laboratory is the largest single ISS module and contains a total of 23 racks, including 10 experiment racks. The module is used to carry out research in space medicine, biology, Earth observations, materials production, biotechnology, and communications research. The PM also serves as the mounting location for an external platform, the Exposed Facility (EF), that allows payloads to be directly exposed to the harsh space environment. The EF is serviced by the module's own robotic arm, the JEM–RMS, which is mounted on the PM. Long-duration 6-member crew onboard astronauts going up

logistic delivery cargo supply Rafaello module logistic delivery Soyuz replacement module delivery new crew members

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

astronauts coming back

European Space Agency (ESA)

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

Canadian Space Agency (CSA)

European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, the Netherlands. Columbus Control Center (COL-CC). The COl-CC, at the Aerospace Center

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) In addition to the JAXA

Mobile Servicing System (MSS ) Operations Complex (MOC), located in Saint Hubert, Quebec. Payload Telescience Operations Centre (PTOC) in Saint Huber.

Automated Transfer Vehicle Control Center (ATV-CC) in Toulouse, France. European Astronaut Center (EAC) in Cologne, Germany. Guiana Space Center (GSC) in French Guiana.

Tskuba Space Center (TKSU) located in Tsukuba Science City. Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) located in the south of Kagoshima Prefecture, along the southeast coast of Tanegashima.

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Magdalena Polrolniczak  
Magdalena Polrolniczak  
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