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NO. 18 PS MAGA ZINE SEP TEMBER/OCTOBER 2016

SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016 ISSUE 18

Route 66: The Great American Roadtrip Yoga for Lower Back Pain HEIDI WAGNER’S PASSIONS PROJECT

LIVING PASSIONATELY


New problems with communication is 1 of the 10 warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Recognizing the symptoms is the first step toward doing something about it. For more information, and to learn what you can do now, go to alz.org/10signs or call 800.272.3900.

Copyright © 2016. Alzheimer’s Association®. All rights reserved.


SKINCARE

Creating True Beauty Through Healthy Skin


PHOTO: HOWARD BERMAN/GETTY IMAGES

FEATURES 35

Discovering Your Passion by MELISSA MAYNTZ

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LIVING PASSIONATELY

Route 66 and the Great American Road Trip

September/October 2016 Issue 18

Text by TOBI ADAMS Photographs by JULIEN MCROBERTS

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DEPARTMENTS

IN EVERY ISSUE

6 Remember When

4 Letter from the Publisher

10 Did You Know?

48 Books: In Such Good Company by Carol Burnett

12 Health & Wellness: Yoga for Lower Back Pain 18 Life with The Eden Alternative: Revisiting Heidi Wagner’s Passions Project 24 Dr. Lori: Keep Your Aging Brain Strong 28 Facing Alzheimer’s: Living Passionately with Alzheimer’s Disease

49 Fun & Games

52 for (Grand) Children 56 Horoscopes 60 Puzzle Solutions 64 The Last Laugh

32 The Place They Call Home: The Seniors Action Network

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PS Lifestyle CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

John Polatz CO-FOUNDER

Scott Fisher

MAGA ZINE PUBLISHER AND CEO

John Polatz

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Christina Burns ART DIRECTOR

Elle Chyun

EDITORS AT LARGE

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

Shelley Kondas

VICE PRESIDENT — ADMINISTRATION & LICENSING

Susan Polatz

VICE PRESIDENT — FINANCE & ACCOUNTING

Ranae Lewis

VICE PRESIDENT — TECHNOLOGY

Brandon Crafts

VICE PRESIDENT — BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

Brian Goetz

Laura Beck, The Eden Alternative Bruce Rosenthal, Leading Age

VICE PRESIDENT — BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

CONTRIBUTORS

Kenish Patel

Katherine Adams Tobi Adams Melissa Mayntz

PS Magazine is published by PS Lifestyle LLC 55 Public Square Suite 1180 Cleveland, OH 44113 Phone: (440) 600-1595 Fax: (440) 848-8560 © 2016 PS Lifestyle LLC. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is prohibited. To order a subscription or to distribute PS Magazine at your business, contact info@pslifestyle.com Cover: © Heidi Wagner

Kristin Hinkson

DIRECTOR — PROCUREMENT & LOGISTICS DIRECTOR — HUMAN RESOURCES

Debra Moore

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POP CULTURE, NEWS, AND EVENTS FROM PAST DECADES

Remember When... 1936

While seated at a piano, singer and actor Fred Astaire first performed “The Way You Look Tonight” for Ginger Rogers’ character in the film Swing Time, which won the Academy Award for Best Original Song.

1946

Playwright Eugene O’Neill’s drama The Iceman Cometh opened on Broadway at the Martin Beck Theater in New York City. PHOTO: AP PHOTO/ED FORD

PHOTO: MOVIEPIX/GETTY

The first radio quiz show “Professor Quiz,” starring Professor Quiz, his wife Betty and his son Professor Quiz Jr. with Robert Trout as the announcer, made its premiere on CBS. PHOTO: CBS VIA GETTY IMAGES

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The film biopic The Jolson Story, starring Larry Parks as Al Jolson with Al Jolson providing almost all the vocals, was released and became a box office smash. PHOTO: AP PHOTO


1956

1966 The first regular episode of the sciencefiction television show Star Trek: The Original Series aired on NBC.

PHOTO: REX FEATURES VIA AP IMAGES

Inventors Nicholas and Helen McKay patented the Lint Pic-Up, the world’s first adhesive tape lint roller.

1976

Jim Henson’s primetime television series The Muppet Show was broadcast for the first time in England before being shown in the US. PHOTO: AP PHOTO/ALAN GRETH

PHOTO: PHANUWAT NANDEE/123RF

The first completely enclosed, climatecontrolled shopping mall, Southdale Shopping Center (also known as simply Southdale), opened in Edina, Minnesota. PHOTO: AP PHOTO/LARRY SALZMAN

Folk music duo Simon and Garfunkel released their third studio album, Parsley, Sage, Rosemary and Thyme, named after a line in one of their songs. PHOTO: AP PHOTO

While appearing on Jerry Lewis’ 10th Annual Muscular Dystrophy telethon, performer Frank Sinatra surprised the host by bringing on his former partner Dean Martin, reuniting the comedy team after 20 years. PHOTO: AP PHOTO

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1986

Fox Broadcasting Network (known as Fox) was launched as a competitor to the Big Three television networks—ABC, CBS, and NBC.

1996

2006

Author Frank McCourt’s Pulitzer Prize-winning memoir Angela’s Ashes, which detailed his tragic childhood in Brooklyn and Limerick, Ireland, was published. Television personality and wildlife daredevil Steve Irwin (who was known as The Crocodile Hunter) was killed by a stingray during filming. PHOTO: AP PHOTO/WONG MAYE-E

Television talk show host Oprah Winfrey changed her popular morning talk show AM Chicago to The Oprah Winfrey Show and debuted nationally with the first episode, “How to Marry the Man/Woman of Your Choice”.

PHOTO: AP PHOTO/CHARLIE KNOBLOCK

8

The New York Yankees won their first World Series championship in 18 years after defeating the Atlanta Braves. PHOTO: AP PHOTO/SUSAN WALSH

Tennis champion Andre Agassi retired from the sport following his defeat at the US Open. PHOTO: AP PHOTO/ELISE AMENDOLA


Remember When... The First Self-Improvement Book Became a Phenomenon

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ale Carnegie was already influencing people as a popular public speaker when he published his book on developing social and communication skills, How To Win Friends and Influence People. In 1936, Leon Shimkin, the publisher of Simon & Schuster, took his 14-week course and persuaded Mr. Carnegie to publish his lectures in a book. At first, Mr. Carnegie didn’t believe that he should give away his teachings in a $2 book when he was successfully selling his $75 lecture courses around the country. But Mr. Shimkin persisted, bringing in a stenographer to transcribe the lectures, which Mr. Carnegie then edited for publication. Mr. Carnegie described his book as an “action-book,” but it was classified as a “self-help” book, and the first of its kind. The book promises to improve people skills and, in turn, increase popularity and bring success. By following Mr. Carnegie’s many principles, readers learn the six ways to make people like them (“Talk in terms of the other person’s interests”), twelve ways to win people to their way of thinking (“Let the other person feel that the idea is his or hers”), and nine ways to change people without arousing resentment (“Talk about your own mistakes before criticizing the other person”). The first printing was only 3,000 copies but it became an immediate success, attracting men and women alike. Shortly after publication, it even garnered a ten-page article in Reader’s Digest. The book continues to be influential today with over 30 million copies sold worldwide, and it has been translated into dozens of languages. 9


?

DID YOU KNOW

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PHOTOS: STEVE DEBENPORT/ISTOCK, US NAVY

Pioneering the Huddle It was a Deaf team who first used the football huddle. Located in Washington, DC, Gallaudet University was the first in the country to focus on the Deaf and hard of hearing, and they have a competitive football team. In the early 1890s, the quarterback player for the Gallaudet Bisons, Paul Hubbard, realized that his sign language could be read by opposing players so he pulled his teammates into a tight circle so that his hand signals could not be seen by anyone on the sidelines or on the opposing team. Other teams soon followed suit, discussing strategy through sign language inside the huddle.

The Legacy of Big Mo On V-J Day on September 2, 1945, the battleship USS Missouri was chosen as the location for Japan’s formal surrender to the Allies. The battleship, also known as Mighty Mo or Big Mo, was named after President Harry Truman’s home state. After serving in three wars—World War II, the Korean War, and the Gulf War—Missouri was retired in 1992 and turned into a museum at Pearl Harbor in Honolulu, placed well back from and facing the USS Arizona Memorial. The placement of the two battleships was intended to convey that Missouri watches over the remains of Arizona so that those interred within her hull may rest in peace.


Fascinating Facts to Know and Tell

PHOTO: AP PHOTO/PAUL SAKUMA

Once an Enthusiast, Always an Enthusiast Even as a 13-year-old boy, Steve Jobs loved how electronics worked. When he didn’t have the parts he needed to build a frequency counter, he looked in the local phone book and found the listing for the CEO of Hewlett-Packard, Bill Hewlett. The emboldened 8th grader called the number and had a lengthy conversation with Mr. Hewlett. Not only was he able to acquire the parts he needed, he was offered a summer job: assembling frequency counters. “I remember my first day, expressing my complete enthusiasm and bliss at being at HewlettPackard for the summer to my supervisor, a guy named Chris, telling him my favorite thing in the whole world was electronics,” recalled Mr. Jobs in a 1985 interview. The Eighth Continent The first private company has received approval from the US government to travel beyond Earth’s orbit and land on the Moon as early as next year. Up until now, all commercial companies have been limited to operations in Earth’s orbit, and only governments have sent missions beyond. Moon Express is set to land their robotic spacecraft on the Moon and then hover across the lunar surface, taking pictures and perhaps even bagging moon dust samples to be returned to Earth. 11


ILLUSTRATION: JC ROSEMANN/ISTOCK

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Three Essential Yoga Stretches for Lower Back Pain by KATHERINE ADAMS

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  lmost everyone has suffered   from lower back pain at some   point in life. Since relieving it with medication is often ineffective and not always an option for many of us, a huge—and profitable—industry has been devoted to selling us things like special pillows and massage devices that could possibly help (or not). Unfortunately, even when these are effective, they often do not work to get rid of our pain entirely. 12


Yoga has long been touted as a way to strengthen and tone the body. But as it has become more popular in the US, we have been increasingly inundated with imagery of sweating fitness buffs doing strenuous and seemingly impossible yoga poses while in a group setting at gyms and studios. That type of yoga isn’t for everyone, and it goes against what yoga was originally: a quiet and gradual softening of the body designed to clear a path for meditation. Without straining or hurting the body, the yoga practitioner moves into specific poses in order to circulate the blood and energy, free the body of its aches, and open the mind and heart. Sure, intense practices and gravity-defying poses can come about after years of training. But those things are for the experienced yogis. For the rest, yoga can offer a gentle solution for inflexible and painful muscles, easy enough to do at home and at any time of the day. A few, light movements can really help with lower back pain and get the energy focused into this area of the body, where so many of us suffer from aches and stiffness.

There are three movements that can help alleviate lower back pain that only take about 5 to 10 minutes to complete, but could potentially make a huge difference in the way your back feels. As always, you should check with your medical professional before engaging in any kind of new exercise. If you are not sure exactly how to move your body into the poses without straining, a yoga teacher, preferably one who has special experience with gentle yoga, can help. The poses suggested here can be modified and include instructions for people sitting in a chair. Never attempt a pose that feels uncomfortable. Every pose should follow a path of relaxation. If the muscle is tight at first, breathe deeply as you mentally focus on the muscle; fill your lungs with air, then exhale, telling your body to relax. Never go so far into a pose that you cannot get back out of it the same way you moved into it. If you feel your body falling, or moving out of alignment, lessen the stretch—you have not relaxed into the pose, you have only compensated in another direction and this could cause strain or injury. 13


SEATED HALF TWIST

SEATED HALF TWIST One of the best poses for lower back pain is the sitting half twist. Almost anyone can do it and all it requires is gently twisting the body to one side and then the other. To start: Either on a chair or on the floor, sit with a neutral spine. Your back should not slouch or arch; lift up from your rib cage and relax your shoulders. The crown of your head should feel like it is being gently pulled up by a string, leaving your chin only slightly tucked. The movement: If you are seated on the floor, your legs may be crossed or straight. If they are crossed, it is possible to follow the above steps. For a slightly more intense stretch, 14

you may bend one leg and move your foot to the outside of your opposite leg, placing it on the floor next to your thigh. This can be done with either crossed or straight legs. If this is too intense, it is also possible to bend one leg without crossing it over the other. Gently twist on the same side as the leg that is flat, following the above sequence. You may place your hand of the same side on the floor behind you for support, as long as your shoulders do not rise and back does not slouch. You may rest the opposite hand in your lap or gently move your arm over the bent leg to press it along outer thigh of the bent leg, using your pressing arm to deepen the twist. Chair modification: While seated


in a chair, take a deep breath and exhale as you gently twist from your waist to one side, placing your opposite hand on either your leg or the chair seat. Continue the movement from the waist through your shoulders and finally gently turn your neck to your comfort level, looking back over your shoulder if possible. Slowly deepen the pose through a series of breaths, closing your eyes, inhaling and exhaling as you actively twist. Once you are at your level of intensity, take a few deep, slow breaths. Coming out of the pose: When you are ready, come out of the pose in the same sequence: head, neck, chest, and finally ribs and waist. Take a moment to feel your body before

repeating this on the other side. CAT/COW This is another very basic movement that increases the flexibility of the entire length of the spine. Without a chair modification, it requires getting down on your hands and knees, so make sure you are not suffering from knee problems and that you have a soft rug or mat beneath you. The movement: Once on your hands and knees, make sure your hands are directly under your shoulders and your knees directly below your hips. Achieve a neutral spine, not sagging or arching. Do not slouch into your shoulders; your shoulders should be strong and your

ILLUSTRATIONS: Š JASON LEE

CAT/COW

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neck long. Slowly bow your back, lifting the tailbone and head up. Passing back through a neutral spine, slowly move in the opposite direction, arching your back by tucking your head and tailbone. Repeat this movement as many times as you wish, slowly, and using inhalations and exhalations to guide you. Chair modification: Sitting upright with a neutral spine, place both feet firmly on the floor, rest your hands on the tops of your thighs, and gently bow your back. Be careful not to tense your neck and shoulders. If comfortable, let your head slowly fall back. Breathing deeply, move through neutral position to arch your back, letting your head fall to your chest, pulling in your stomach, and slightly tucking your tailbone. Repeat as desired. SEATED FORWARD BEND This pose is a bit more intense in that it also engages the gluteal muscles (i.e. glutes) and hamstrings, large muscle groups that can get very tense. It can be done seated on the floor on in a chair. The movement: While sitting on the floor, extend your legs straight out in front of you, but make sure you can 16

support the correct spinal posture in this position. As you go through the first inhalation described above, make sure your spine remains straight and arms overhead as you fold forward. When you have reached your limit, take another deep breath and exhale while you let your arms rest where they are comfortable, and then allow the shoulders and neck to relax. Take a few more breaths in the pose. If you find your muscles loosening, without sitting all the way up, use the inhale to lift your arms over your head again, lift the neck and shoulders from their deep stretch, and then exhale, reaching longer and deepening into the forward fold. Repeat the steps to relax. Chair modification: While seated in a chair, plant you feet firmly on the floor and make sure your spine is engaged and supported by your abdominals, yet neutral. Take a deep breath. Lifting the rib cage and filling the chest, raise your arms over your head, stretching up, and slowly exhale while folding forward from your waist. Do not bend so far as to throw yourself off balance and tumble off the chair; rather, round your back and, if able, place your


SEATED FORWARD BEND

hands on the floor to either side of your feet. Blocks or pillows placed there can help if you have trouble with this part. Coming out of the pose: If you are seated in a chair, you can slowly roll up to sitting. If you are on the floor with straight legs, when you are ready to come out, inhale lifting your arms, neck, and shoulders, then carefully and with a straight back, use the inhale to pull your body back up to sitting. If this is too difficult, you can slowly roll up. Additional modifications and cautions: For the floor-level seated forward bend, it is sometimes easier—for those with flexible hips— to have one leg bent with the sole of the foot touching the inside of the opposite thigh. Make sure to switch

legs to stretch both sides. It is also possible to use a chair in front of you (your legs going though the chair legs) to place your hands on so you don’t extend too far but still are able to get a deep stretch. Keeping the extended legs straight, the knee pointing up (not falling to the inside or flopping out) is important; but do not hyperextend. Go only as far into the pose as you are able while keeping your legs straight. This is an active pose, so it may require using your muscles to make sure your leg stays extended forward from the hip without bending. It may mean that you do not bend as far over the leg, which is okay. With practice, the legs will become stronger and the muscles more supple, naturally deepening the bend. ■ 17


LIFE WITH THE EDEN ALTERNATIVE

Checking Back with Heidi Wagner’s

Passions Project

ALL PHOTOGRAPHS: © HEIDI WAGNER

by LAURA BECK

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This article was originally published in the May/June 2015 issue of PS Magazine and is being reprinting with updated photography by Heidi Wagner.

M

y neighbor Sara once told me, “If there’s anything you feel passionately about doing, do it now.” Her words gave me pause. Was I living my passion, I wondered? Was I being true to myself? In her 70’s, Sara had a love for travel and would journey each winter to some place new, the more remote and challenging the destination, the better. For me, the significance of Sara’s story was less about her advancing years and her exotic adventures, and more about her bold commitment to herself. Her choices continue to remind me that, no matter what our age is, the current moment is what counts. Sara’s story and others inspired a presentation I was doing about living with passion and purpose at any age. As I left the stage, questioning whether what I shared had really touched anyone, a woman approached me with damp eyes and introduced herself. She

got it, I thought. What a relief. What I learned though, as our conversation unfolded, was that she didn’t just get what I was talking about, she was living it. In 2011, Heidi Wagner had an idea. Having worked in long-term care at Frasier Meadows in Boulder, Colorado since 2002, she began to see glimpses of how to bring her work with Elders together using her renewed passion for photography. Not entirely clear where this calling would lead her, she decided she wanted to do a portrait series of Frasier Meadows residents doing what they love. “I would say to the residents, ‘I want to know what your passions are.’ ‘Passion’ is kind of an intimate word, so it was a little awkward at first. But the more we talked about it, the clearer it became… the name ‘Passions Project’ was the right title for this work,” says Heidi. It wasn’t long before a particular hallway at Frasier Meadows was graced with 41 portraits of residents living their passion. A great source of pride for the community, the project was clearly a game-changer. Relationships began to unfold around newfound, mutual interests, 19


and the conversation about aging took on a different shade. “As I’m connecting with people about their passions, there is something that comes through when people are genuinely interested in showing you who they are,” says Heidi. “I’m not asking them what their age is, because honestly, I don’t care. That’s not what this project is about.” Heidi’s words affirm that when we have the opportunity to know someone well, ageism is a moot 20

point. Where individuality is supported and celebrated, stigma and preconceived notions have no place. This sense of identity is also richly entwined with those things we hold dear, that enliven us and enrich our relationships. “Meaningless activity corrodes the human spirit,” states Principle Six of the Eden Alternative philosophy, “the opportunity to do things that we find meaningful is essential to human health.” Through meaningful engagement, too, we continue to


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grow and deepen our capacity for joy, both of which are key to our overall well-being. “These portraits reflect the spirit of a community,” Heidi shares, “they say ‘this is who we are, these are the things we love.’ Living with passion and purpose is about being alive. When we see someone living their passion, we see someone we can be inspired by, someone we might wish to know better.” Heidi’s desire to chronicle others had clearly shed light on her own 22

passion. Inspired by the subjects of her photos to live life to the fullest, she left Frasier Meadows in 2013 to pursue a full-time career in photography and her commitment to growing the Passions Project nationwide. Since then, Heidi has completed other Passions Projects in Northern Colorado and Iowa, and interest is brewing in other states. Once during a recent visit back to Frasier Meadows, a group of residents asked Heidi if she would ever return to work there. “I told


them that doing so would mean I wasn’t living my passion as a photographer,” says Heidi. Having been touched, themselves, by the Passions Project, they unanimously agreed that she shouldn’t return. “Looking back, this all began with me searching for my own voice,” says Heidi, “And in turn, the project ended up giving a voice to a population of people I so deeply appreciate and enjoy. I’m always so energized when I work with someone on their portrait.

Living with passion and purpose… it’s really about being alive.” ■

Laura Beck is the Learning and Development Guide for The Eden Alternative, an international, nonprofit organization focused on creating quality of life for Elders and their care partners. For more information about The Eden Alternative, go to www.edenalt.org. 23


Doctor Lori Stevic-Rust

Keep Your Aging Brain Strong

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agging skin, wrinkles, diminished eyesight, and so much more are the beautiful and visible reminders of aging. But it isn’t just the outside that ages—our brains age, too. With the passing years, our brains shrinks in size, changing the speed and ability for processing complex information. For example, we may find ourselves entering a room and forgetting what we were looking for or finding that somebody’s name or a word takes much longer to recall. A delay in recall or becoming more vulnerable to inattention due to distractions can be a normal part of an aging brain. However, what is not a normal part of aging is short-term memory loss, including forgetting

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information in 30 second to two-minute intervals of time, significant changes in use of language, getting lost in familiar settings, or impairments in judgment and reasoning skills. These can all be signs of vascular or frontal lobe impairments, or diseases such as Alzheimer’s, and should be evaluated by a professional. To keep our brains healthy well into our later years, we need to focus on preventative wellness. Many of the same things we need to do to keep our hearts healthy also keep our brains healthy—maintaining a healthy diet, regularly exercising, and remaining socially active. However, there are some additional factors to consider


when focusing on the health of our brains. The human brain is powered with 100 billion nerve cells, or neurons, that communicate with each other through electrical and chemical processes. Each neuron can create or form thousands of links resulting in a staggering 100 trillion synapses or connections. We used to believe that the brain was hard-wired and after a certain developmental stage, no changes were possible. Now, with the development of better neuroimaging technology like functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we can visually see how the brain can reorganize itself. The ability of the brain to reorganize itself both functionally and structurally simply by changing our thoughts, emotions, behavior, and environment is called neuroplasticity. This is what allows the brain to recover after strokes or injuries as the brain can create new neuronal connection to compensate around the damaged connections. For example, the more we practice a task or repeat a thought, the more intense neuronal connections are made. When we

engage in routine and overlearned behaviors, the brain becomes lazy and disinterested in making new connections. So creating new connections is important to overall brain health. Many of us take pride in our ability to multi-task and actually may criticize those who are only able to do one thing at time. Recent research has demonstrated that when we think we are multi-tasking or engaging in several tasks simultaneously, our brain is actually switching back and forth between tasks and ultimately wasting brainpower. It turns out that our poor brains are using tremendous energy moving back and forth between the multiple tasks that we are trying to simultaneously engage in, and in the process losing valuable resources. We all have our peak times of the day—those times when we feel most rested, clear in our thinking, and focused. For morning people, their peak time may be in the early hours while for others, it may be late in the evening. During these peaks hours is when we are most able 25


Human brain, front view PHOTO: SCIENCE & SOCIETY PICTURE LIBRARY/SSPL/GETTY IMAGES

to solve analytic problems that require deep concentration and a systematic approach, like solving a math problem. However, it is also important to exercise the creative part of our brain. Researchers suggest that insight oriented problems or creation of concepts requires some distractions. That’s right, periods of distractions and fatigue may 26

also be good for our brains. Here is how it works: When we are at our peak times, we are laser-focused and able to filter out most distractions. This allows us to remain attentive and solve complex analytic problems. But during our off-peak times when we are fatigued, our mind may move from distraction to distraction, leaving us less focused on one thing. It is during these times that the brain is free to make new connections between seemingly unrelated topics. This is where creativity, innovation, and insight can develop. The creation of new connections in the brain is at the core of “out of the box” problem-solving and insight orientated solutions. Further, the establishment of new neuronal connections keeps the brain strong. Protect your brain by eating healthy proteins, leafy green vegetables, dark chocolate, and Omega-3 rich foods like salmon and lentils. Stay hydrated. Laugh often. Exercise regularly. Create new ideas, friendships, and experiences. Your brain will thank you. ■


A few simple techniques for increasing neuroplasticity:

TOM CHENEY, THE NEW YORKER COLLECTION/THE CARTOON BANK

• Learn a new skill, preferably one that engages both hemispheres of the brain like learning to play a musical instrument, juggling, or practicing ambidextrous activities like brushing your teeth with your non-dominant hand. • Take a new route to work to force the brain out of over-learned routines and patterns. • Practice focused attention by listening more closely to conversations and taking in details. Similarly, take in moments or experiences with all of your senses—this activates new neuronal pathways. • Physically exercise several times a week for 20 to 30 minutes to improve blood flow to the brain, which facilitates the process of neuroplasticity. • Create new experiences—make new friends, laugh, and rely on humor.

“I can’t complain—at least he has a hobby that pays for itself.” 27


PHOTO: COURTESY OF ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION

FACING ALZHEIMER’S

Living Passionately with Alzheimer’s Disease

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ou don’t look like you have Alzheimer’s,” is a phrase Eric Thompson has gotten used to hearing over the past three years. Intelligent, funny, and physically fit, Eric’s energy and attitude make him seem much younger than 57. Three years ago, Eric was diagnosed with younger-onset Alzheimer’s, a term that describes the disease when it develops in people under age 65.

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Prior to his diagnosis, Eric enjoyed a long and successful data management career, which included writing manuals and training other professionals in his field. “I’m a documentation nut,” he jokes. He started to struggle to learn new information and tasks for his job as an information technology professional at a military base near his home in Ohio. Initially, Eric managed his memory loss by creating detailed instructions to complete his work and by putting in more hours. He used the map application on his smartphone while driving to the office and relied on meticulous notes to navigate his building. However, one day, Eric drove to work without his phone; after an hour of searching for his office, he decided to go home and call his doctor—but couldn’t remember how to get there. Eric’s wife, Laurel, had to meet him at a gas station and lead him back to their house. A few months later, after a battery of tests, Eric received his Alzheimer’s diagnosis. He remembers thinking, “What am I going to do now? I’m never going to work again.” The loss of his professional identity was devastating. “I had to decide how to live,” he explains. “I thought about what I could still do, and decided to take over all the household chores, except for laundry. I don’t like doing laundry at all,” he laughs. Eric’s smartphone continues to help with reminders for meals and medications. But devices can’t do everything, and Laurel is regularly at Eric’s side to gently assist when he becomes confused. Eric appreciates the manner in which Laurel supports him, without judgment or anger. Laurel cut back on her responsibilities and hours as a bank manager so she could be more available to her husband. “I want Eric to enjoy his retirement years,” she says. Neither of them thought he would retire so early, but they are determined to live as well as possible for as long as possible. Taking walks together is one way they celebrate the present. The couple loves to travel and recently took a trip to the Bahamas. They also dote on their cat, Barney, named after Barney Fife from “The Andy Griffith Show,” one of Eric’s favorite TV programs. Eric plays guitar and basketball to keep his mind and body active, and he’s very involved with the Alzheimer’s Association. 29


“I’m so thankful that I contacted them,” Eric says. “The staff at the Miami Valley Chapter has given me back part of my old life through meetings, events and speaking engagements.” Eric is a compelling speaker; after he appeared on local television, some of his former co-workers were so moved they reached out to ask how they could volunteer for the Association. Chapter staff grew to admire and appreciate Eric’s speaking skills and enthusiasm so much that they nominated him for the Association’s National Early-Stage Advisory Group, which he joined in July 2016. “I want to give back to an organization that gave more purpose to my life,” Eric says. Early-Stage Advisors are individuals living in the early stage of Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias and include some individuals with younger-onset. The early stage of the disease can last for years, a time during which individuals may still function independently, volunteer and remain engaged in social activities. Advisors share their experiences to raise awareness about Alzheimer’s and its impact on individuals, families and communities. Feedback from the group helps the Association to develop appropriate care and support services, as well as to extend outreach to those living with the disease. By sharing their stories, advisors raise public awareness and concern and help “put a face” to Alzheimer’s disease. They also play an essential role in advocacy efforts to advance Alzheimer’s-related legislation, something Eric and Laurel did this year at the Alzheimer’s Association Advocacy Forum, the nation’s premier Alzheimer’s advocacy event, in Washington, D.C. A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s is devastating, but people like Eric and Laurel are powerful role models for how to live with the disease and not give up. As Laurel says, “There’s hope out there. There’s a lot of help out there, too. Stay positive.” ■

For more information, please visit alz.org or call 800.272.3900.

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The Alzheimer’s Association helps people living with the disease and their caregivers by providing information and support. Some of the Association’s tips for those in the early stage include: Focus on what you can do. Set realistic expectations for yourself. Reduce stress by asking family or friends for help. Give yourself enough time to complete a task. Take breaks when needed. Control what you can. Develop a daily routine. A schedule lets you know what needs to be done and when, and helps you accomplish goals.

PHOTO: SOLSTOCK/ISTOCK

Recognize triggers that cause you stress. Knowing what causes you stress allows you to make better plans. Ask for others’ understanding and assistance. Use your sources of strength. Family, friends, prayer, pets—all of these supports can help get you through difficult times. 31


THE PLACE THEY CALL HOME

The Seniors Action Network Giving Seniors a Voice to Make Change

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eet Mr. Jones*, a 75-year-old resident who had the opportunity to move into an affordable senior housing community two years ago. As a senior in the low-income bracket who had struggled to pay market-rate rent, this community was a blessing because it provided Mr. Jones the ability to live a bit more comfortably and securely on a fixed monthly income. Additionally, it meant enjoying the benefits of being a part of a community where the other residents became like family and looked after each other. The affordable apartment also became a vital platform for the delivery of healthcare services. The community had a partnership with a health care

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PHOTO: ST. JOSEPH’S SENIOR APARTMENTS IN OAKLAND, CA, PHOTO BY CLARK MISHLER. COURTESY OF BRIDGE HOUSING

provider that brought a physician, nurse navigator, and social worker on site each week. With Mr. Jones’ chronic health issues, this combination of housing plus services became an essential way to maintain his independence. This story, an increasingly common one, demonstrates how critical it is for America’s seniors to have affordable, quality homes where they can age safely. Unfortunately, America’s seniors in the low-income brackets are finding it increasingly difficult to rent or buy affordable housing due to a shortage of inventory across the nation. The National Alliance to End Homelessness predicts that homelessness among the elderly population will increase by 33% by 2020 and more than double by 2050. There are still ten seniors on the waiting list for every affordable housing unit that becomes available, according to AARP. We are not only unprepared to meet our current needs but also those of the near future, as each coming decade brings millions of new seniors with decreased financial resources to housing markets.

These statistics demonstrate that we must increase the supply of affordable senior housing, as well as invest in the preservation and maintenance of existing ones. It is time for Congress to increase funding for the expansion of federal senior housing programs and provide the tools and resources needed to preserve existing affordable senior housing. LeadingAge and Volunteers of America, two organizations working on senior issues, are committed to advocating for older Americans’ priorities and have joined to form the Seniors Action Network (SAN)— a movement created to amplify the voices of seniors through direct outreach to policy makers. The network is comprised of seniors, their families, caregivers, and others who care about seniors’ issues. When we organize and advocate with one voice, we can be successful in bringing awareness to these and other issues that are impacting the daily lives of seniors. By signing up to be a SAN advocate for yourself or a lovedone, you will be adding your critical voice to ours. Collectively we can help shape public policies that 33


ensure America’s seniors get the support they need and deserve. Participating in SAN is easy and doesn’t take much time. We will ask you from time to time to take action by emailing, calling, or writing your representatives in Congress to support or oppose relevant legislation. Your outreach will let lawmakers know that their senior constituents’ needs should be a priority. Our aging population is our greatest national treasure. So take a few minutes right now and visit 34

www.seniorsactionnetwork.org or text “seniors” to 52886 to join SAN. ■ *Note: Name has been changed to protect his privacy. LeadingAge is an association of nonprofit organizations representing the entire field of aging services with a vision of an America freed from ageism. Volunteers of America is a national nonprofit organization providing more than 400 human service programs throughout the US.


Discovering Your Passion

PHOTO: TOM WANG/123RF

by MELISSA MAYNTZ

35


T

here’s no trick to being passionate about something, and it’s never too late to learn something new. The biggest obstacle to overcome is to discover what truly excites you and how you can learn more about it. It is easier than you think to discover new things and get involved with new passions. First, you need to brainstorm your interests. It may be a passing fancy, a long-forgotten spark of interest, or a newfound intrigue— there is a passion out there for you to enjoy. Write a list of things you like to do and would enjoy doing more of, including any hobby, cause, or topic that catches your eye. Then, do a bit of preliminary research to learn more and what might suit you best. For example, if you’ve always been interested in gardening, pick up a gardening magazine and browse articles to learn about specific aspects of gardening and what may appeal to you most —container gardening, backyard garden ponds, growing herbs indoors, building raised garden beds, joining a community garden, etc.

“The biggest obstacle to overcome is to discover what truly excites you and how you can learn more about it.” Magazines aren’t the only way to find and research a new passion, if you are willing to really explore your options. Consider attending a local festival to learn about new topics such as art, history, culture, food, and more. Introductory lessons at local studios can expose you to new ideas, or you may want to visit museums, fun attractions, special events, or other local hotspots to discover new ideas to explore. Once you find a topic you want to pursue, there are many different ways to learn more about your beginning passion. Visiting a local library will yield a wealth of specific books and publications so you can learn the basics and get started right away. Many libraries also host different group meetings of hobbyists—you just might find a like-minded group that shares your passion. Lecture series, book


PHOTO: 123RF

groups, and other meetings are also common at libraries and community centers and can help you discover more to be passionate about. If your passion requires more intensive learning, such as learning the basics of digital photography, studying a new language, or learning how to paint or sculpt, there may be classes you can try. Many community colleges, universities, and community centers offer shortterm classes on popular topics. These classes generally last a few weeks, meeting 1-2 times each

week, and can help you really get involved in your new passion with experienced, professional guidance. If there are no ongoing classes in your area, check local businesses for one-day class options, such as a flower arranging class from a local florist, a scrapbooking tutorial at a craft store, or a cooking demonstration at a local restaurant. You may learn better in a oneon-one setting rather than an organized class, and in that case individual lessons may be the more enjoyable way to get involved in


PHOTO: JOZEF POLC/123RF

your passion. Local experts can be found in nearly any hobby or interest, from playing the organ to hang gliding, pet grooming, and even something as exotic as bonsai or orchid cultivation. You may be able to arrange ongoing individual lessons or just connect with an expert for occasional consultations as you explore your newfound passion. If you can’t find an expert to connect with, consider running 38

a simple advertisement in a local paper seeking help. The responses you get can connect you to many different experts, and you may even discover completely new ways to approach the topic you are experimenting with. Part of the fun of a new passion is sharing it with others, and hobby groups are a great way to not only learn more but to explore it with others of all abilities and


PHOTO: IAN ALLENDEN/123RF

experience levels. From bird watching to woodworking, there are groups for all types of passions, and these groups often welcome both new, interested guests and new members with equal enthusiasm. If you’re just getting started, joining a group can be a way for you to learn more in a short period of time, or if you’ve been enjoying your passion for a while, you can pass your experience, tips ,and love on to others in the group and help them develop even more passion. Look for group meetings at churches, libraries, schools, community centers, parks, and other public places, and don’t be worried about trying different groups until you find the one you are most comfortable joining. If your best group doesn’t exist, you may even consider starting your own hobby group to bring together other people who share your passion. With so much to try and so many things to be interested in, it can be overwhelming to think of finding and exploring a new passion. Like any new trick, you might have some beginner’s luck but you could also have trouble

practicing to get the skills just right, and there may even be a skill or two you don’t enjoy. Don’t give up on your passion, however, and in time you will be delighted with the new tricks you have learned and how much they can enrich your life. ■

Melissa Mayntz is a Florida-based freelance writer whose passions include birding, cruise travel, roller coasters, reading, and cross-stitch. Learn more at MelissaMayntz.com. 39


by TOBI ADAMS Photographs by JULIEN MCROBERTS

B

ack in 1946, Bobby Troup told us to “get our kicks on Route 66” and we did. Packing up the family and going somewhere new became a national pastime, and there was nothing quite like the adventure of the journey and the people you would meet along the way. The Mother Road, Route 66, hadn’t always been a road for vacationers and fun-seekers, though. Stitched together from a patchwork of rural farm and ranch roads in 1926, Route 66 was also the Migrant Road. Many families traveled Route 66 to escape the Dust Bowl in the 1930s and to seek a better life in the Golden State. Like the Joads in John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath, many families who migrated along the road had struggles and hardship before they reached California. Beginning in downtown Chicago, Route 66 meanders through seven US states—Illinois, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona—before finally crossing into the eighth, California, and ending at the Pacific Ocean in Santa Monica. Much of it was a 2-lane road surrounded by family-owned businesses. You could spend the night in an auto court and the owner would check you in, pump your gas, and cook you a burger. There were no franchised drive-thrus, just lots of mom-andpop businesses vying for your attention. Neon signs proclaimed, “Eat Here,” “Refrigerated Air,” and “See Live Rattlesnakes!” You could sleep in a motel room shaped like a teepee and buy rocks that (supposedly) came from the Moon. If that didn’t interest you, there were the giant things: a giant tire-man advertising a restaurant in Illinois, a giant blue whale in

40


Oklahoma, and countless other roadside attractions designed to get travelers to stop their cars and part with their money. Can you still get your kicks on Route 66? Absolutely! While the interstate highways are now the primary roads used for travel, those with a sense of adventure (and a Route 66 guidebook) can exit the interstates and visit most of the towns bypassed by them. Some places are in ruins and some are struggling to survive. Many towns, though, have been thriving since a Route 66 revival began in the 1990s. Business owners in towns like Tucumcari, New Mexico and Williams, Arizona has been restoring the old motels and turning on the neon once again. â– 41


Lou Mitchell’s Restaurant Chicago, Illinois

Donut Drive-in St. Louis, Missouri 42


Allen’s Conoco Fillin’ Station Commerce, Oklahoma

The Blue Whale Roadside Attraction Catoosa, Oklahoma 43


The Original Big Texan Steak Ranch Amarillo, Texas

44


Motel Safari Tucumcari, New Mexico

Continental Divide, New Mexico

45


Twisters Soda Fountain Williams, Arizona

Elmer’s Bottle Tree Ranch Oro Grande, California

46


Roy’s Motel and Café Amboy, California

47


BOOKS IN SUCH GOOD COMPANY: ELEVEN YEARS OF LAUGHTER, MAYHEM, AND FUN IN THE SANDBOX CAROL BURNETT

C

omedy legend Carol Burnett has penned a memoir about her years developing and making The Carol Burnett Show, and, boy, is she ever funny. In Such Good Company delves into the outrageous tales of the guests, sketches, and antics that made the show legendary. Ms. Burnett shares the behind-the-scenes stories of the show’s original conception including how the show nearly didn’t air. In a competitive period when TV

48

variety shows ruled, she dissects its success including the talented cast and rich array of guest stars, all of whom were vital to the fabric of the show. She shares anecdotes of her famous friends who took part including Lucille Ball, Roddy McDowell, Jim Nabors, Bernadette Peters, Betty Grable, Steve Lawrence, Eydie Gormé, Gloria Swanson, Rita Hayworth, and Betty White. And then there are the individuals behind the cameras who gained fame, including costume designer Bob Mackie and the cameraman who appeared in her opening Q&A. Through Ms. Burnett’s witty reminiscences, we discover an appreciation for the amount of talent and creativity that went into every episode. This memoir is a love letter to a golden era in television history through the lens of a brilliant show and the voice of a true comedienne. You’ll want to watch re-runs of The Carol Burnett Show immediately. ■


FUN & GAMES

Solutions on page 60

CROSSWORD PUZZLE 1

2

3

4

5

6 7 8 9 11

12

10 13

14

15 16

18

17

19 20

© ANY PUZZLE MEDIA LTD

21

ACROSS 3. Writing (5) 6. Meat-and-vegetable pasty type (7) 7. Copious (5) 8. Take by force (5) 9. The human foot (3) 11. Opts (5) 13. Guide (5) 15. Opposite of north (abbr) (3) 18. Put a ship out of use (3,2) 19. Rub vigorously (5) 20. Without being able to see (7) 21. Tasting of sodium chloride (5)

DOWN 1. Dwarf tree (6) 2. Hooded jackets (7) 3. Stages (6) 4. “Sorry!” (4) 5. Always (4) 10. Stretches with great effort (7) 12. Short (6) 14. Is the same as (6) 16. Queries (4) 17. Verbal (4)

49


FUN & GAMES

Solutions on page 60

WORLD FOOD World Food

R I D B I R Y A N I I A G O A

O O E S E I L T E L A K S A L

N A O N E R H L O U O A L P S

U D R C R R E Z S R D O D A S

P A E H L A P D N D T N T S K

BIRYANI CHILI CON CARNE BIRYANI CHORIZO CHILI CON CARNE COUSCOUS CHORIZO DOLMA COUSCOUS ENCHILADA FEIJOADA DOLMA FONDUE ENCHILADA FEIJOADA FONDUE 50

N L T A L E C A R L U I O I S

O I T G C A F N K I S O L F M

Z H I G O I O E O O U U S L E

I C R I U C D R I C R I S D A

R N F S S O J O Y J I A S H C

O E N A C R O C L O O L N D I

FRITTER HAGGIS FRITTER LAKSA HAGGIS MOUSSAKA LAKSA PAKORA MOUSSAKA SAUERKRAUT SUSHI PAKORA TORTILLA SAUERKRAUT SUSHI TORTILLA

H L I E O N R G D M H A I R R

C C A I U A O I E M A K D H A

A K A S S U O M E T R S A A C

© ANY PUZZLE MEDIA LTD

U Z S R R S A U E R K R A U T


SUDOKU Sudoku—also known as Number Place—is a logicbased, combinatorial numberplacement puzzle. The aim of Sudoku is to enter a number from 1 through 9 in each cell of a grid. Each row, column, and region must contain only one instance of each number.

LETTER SOUP Can you rearrange the floating letters below to spell out different fast food items? Each letter should be used exactly once in the resulting set.

1. 2. © ANY PUZZLE MEDIA LTD

3. 4.

2 9 6 4 7 5 4 1 9 5 3 1 4 8 3 4 1 9 6 2 7 8 5 4 6 3 8 3

I U AA

O BC D A A N WG I HP A Z T ZS R E DR L C

S

5. 51


Illustrated by BB Sams

52

Š 2016 Highlights for Children, Inc. All rights reserved.


Going Batty

Lead Dr. Livingstone through this labyrinth of winged things back to the cave entrance.

finish

Illustrated by R. Michael Palan

Answer on page 61

start Š 2016 Highlights for Children, Inc. All rights reserved.

53


Top Spot Wow, this puzzle has us coming and going. We’ve hidden 23 palindromes—words that are spelled the same forward and backwards—in this grid. Search for them up, down, across, and diagonally. Eye them all, and you can say, “Now I won!” Answer on page 61

Word List BIB CIVIC DAD DEED DEWED KAYAK LEVEL MADAM MOM NOON PEEP

POP RACECAR RADAR REDDER REFER REPAPER ROTATOR SAGAS SEES SOLOS TENET TOOT

54

Illustrated by Tim Davis

A S M R A C E C A R S N O O N C I V I C T O M R F J S K A Y A K L T A E M A S T X T L O B O K P G R E F E R S I R O T A T O R P E M B J D T S P L E G D A T E N E T D E W E D D R A D A R P V R A E A E E A U S E E S I R M B X D E E D L D P O P

© 2016 Highlights for Children, Inc. All rights reserved.


Bagpipe Tune Find these objects hidden in the big picture. Answers on page 61

cake

teacup

mitten

purse Illustrated by Susan T. Hall

needle Š 2016 Highlights for Children, Inc. All rights reserved.

ruler

star

feather 55


SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2016 HOROSCOPES by Chris Flisher ARIES (March 21–April 19) A veil of responsibility and confusion may surround you during this period. This is nothing to be dramatic about, simply aware, especially as it pertains to travel, education, and moving forward. Transition can be a marvelously invigorating experience since we never know what to expect. As you move through these months, turn your focus towards doing the right thing and opting for the more challenging task rather than the easy way out. You may find that diving into the details proves to be the most fruitful way forward even if that requires more on your part. TAURUS (April 20–May 20) Much of your efforts during this time may be directed towards financial institutions. Insurance claims, inheritances, long-term investments, and the like are all subject to your increased scrutiny. You may be a part of a financial investment club or gathering of friends who share their experiences for the greater knowledge of the group. While information may 56

flow quite freely, you may be wise to pause and react slowly and with an eye towards responsibility and the future. Seek outside professional advice before following the herd in this case. The consensus of friends may not be proof enough. GEMINI (May 21–June 21) Your significant partner or close friends may be a bit more demanding than usual over these few months. The effort you extend may, in fact, appear one-sided to some extent. You may be consumed with details and requests that end up taking up more time than you might care to offer. Like any relationship, though, there is often an ebb and flow that may tip on you more than usual during this time span. While you may be willing to step in and help, you are also realistic in how much of your time this situation can occupy. The pendulum swings both ways in the end. CANCER (June 22–July 22) Your body might be asking for attention over this period as you


address your limitations by actively pursuing a new exercise routine. While exercise can never be a bad thing, you may come to terms with this idea in a new manner. Perhaps you spend more of your days focused on moving or maybe you are examining your patterns a little more closely. With that in mind, you may be up for pursuing a healthy vacation or getaway to spur on your renewed interest in maximizing your health potential. Spas and spiritual retreats are in order. LEO (July 23–Aug. 22) A spark of creativity may encourage you to pursue new skills or hobbies. While this pursuit may be exciting and refreshing, you may also find that what once looked easy now requires a little more effort than had you originally thought. This creative theme also applies to children, so if they are a part of your world lately you may be surprised at the effort they take on your part. Yes, children are a marvelous boost in our lives but the responsibility that comes with them can be overwhelming

sometimes. Your lineage may be an important part of this process and telling your stories of your journey may be a wonderful method for coping while extending your own role. VIRGO (Aug. 23–Sept. 22) You may be quite interested and occupied by the comfort of your home and friends during this period as you turn your focus towards enhancing that experience in some manner. You could be renovating or redecorating to accommodate the needs of those with whom you share your domestic life. This same theme also applies to shifting your primary residence to something more manageable and appealing. Be careful not to be sold a short bill of goods, though, and if something appears too good to be true, it is, generally speaking. A word of caution though since your partner might see things much differently and may require some diplomacy and negotiation. LIBRA (Sept. 23–Oct. 22) For approximately the next 57


year, you alone will be the beneficiary of Jupiter in Libra. Jupiter’s slow 12-year transit around the zodiac allows it to imbue each sign with good fortune and an amplification of all that is you. If you choose to direct this energy in a fruitful and positive manner, you can achieve great things and turn new corners. By the same token, Jupiter tends to expand so that can also have the opposite effect. With that in mind, why not step into the light and lean towards something fruitful and optimistic and see where you are a year from now. SCORPIO (Oct. 23–Nov. 21) The coming months should find you at a point of transition. Closing old doors and opening new ones is the general theme, so in that capacity you have a choice as to which way to turn. Whichever direction you may choose, you may be motivated to record your progress in some form of report. Documenting what you have accomplished allows you to reflect on where you have been so that you can better determine where you want to go. With both of your ruling 58

planets, Mars and Pluto together, you may be determined to see this through with as much impact as possible. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22–Dec. 21) Expect to be involved with groups during the coming season. Your role in those groups may be highlighted by an affinity to manage budgets and resource allocations. This particular area relates to friends as well as business or club associations in what many consider to be an excellent method for using your existing or former skills and turning them into something useful going forward. The noticeable difference comes from the type of organization where you can exert your influence most effectively. Where you might have engaged in a business sector when you were younger, you may now be called to use that same expertise in a charitable or altruistic manner. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22–Jan. 19) You may be feeling restless and a bit out of sorts with a lot of free time on your hands. While idle


hands may be the devil’s playground, you may be singularly motivated to re-direct that energy into something more meaningful and personally satisfying. You may be looking for a bridge that successfully appeals to your sense of purpose while using your time to adopt a different form of occupation. This may be a shift in focus that allows you to continue being a contributing member of your community, while fulfilling a long-time dream. If you can pivot towards this occupational arrangement you may feel incredibly satisfied. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20–Feb. 18) While you may not be able to explain it, you may have a burning desire that urges you towards higher learning, travel, and a broadening of your personal knowledge base. Any outlet that enables you to deepen your experience may be of great value and motivation for you. New vistas, new courses of study, and new philosophic outlooks are all prime areas that may capture your attention. At the core of this is an innate curiosity to discover and

learn more. This deepening of experience and wisdom may be the most compelling aspect of your daily life to the point where you appear to have an unquenchable thirst for something new. PISCES (Feb. 19–March 20) The next few months provide you with an excellent opportunity to capitalize on your investment portfolios. You could be quite happy with the results, especially if you base your decisions off the recommendations or inclinations of friends and former business associates. With that in mind, you might decide to join or start an investment group to mull over future holdings with others and see how things work out. You might enjoy the camaraderie and the shared experience of investing with others. Who knows? You might even be able to form a collaborative venture where you pool your funds and share risk and the rewards collectively. ■

© 2015 Chris Flisher 59


FUN & GAMES SOLUTIONS WORDSEARCH SOLUTION

CROSSWORD PUZZLE SOLUTION B C

O

A R

N U

S

N

I

U

R

S K S

S

T

R L

T

S

O M S

S

T

P

L

E

E

I

Y

R

Q

A

Y

U

I L

E R

R L

E V

S

E

B B

O

H

H

U U

R

S P

S

A A

P

K

O C

S

A

A C

A

I

O

A P

P

P

A

N

D

L

S

Y

S

SUDOKU SOLUTION

7 9 2 6 5 3 4 1 8 60

1 6 8 7 9 4 2 5 3

5 4 3 2 8 1 6 7 9

8 7 4 5 1 9 3 2 6

6 3 1 8 4 2 7 9 5

9 2 5 3 7 6 8 4 1

4 8 7 1 3 5 9 6 2

2 5 9 4 6 8 1 3 7

U Z S R R S A U E R K R A U T

R I D B I R Y A N I I A G O A

O O E S E I L T E L A K S A L

N A O N E R H L O U O A L P S

U D R C R R E Z S R D O D A S

P A E H L A P D N D T N T S K

N L T A L E C A R L U I O I S

O I T G C A F N K I S O L F M

Z H I G O I O E O O U U S L E

I C R I U C D R I C R I S D A

R N F S S O J O Y J I A S H C

O E N A C R O C L O O L N D I

H L I E O N R G D M H A I R R

C C A I U A O I E M A K D H A

LETTER SOUP SOLUTION

3 1 6 9 2 7 5 8 4

1. PIZZA 2. BURGER 3. TACO 4. SANDWICH 5. SALAD

A K A S S U O M E T R S A A C


FUN & GAMES SOLUTIONS GOING BATTY (Page 53)

Magazines for every age!

finish Ages

0-2 Ages

2-6

NEW!

In Spanish and English

Ages

Ages

2-6

6-12

start Highlights.com/Friends

1-800-627-1976

15 AD-HXM0315.indd 1

TOP SPOT (Page 54)

1/16/15 2:09 P

BAGPIPE TUNES

(Page 55)

A S M R A C E C A R S N O O N C I V I C T O M R F J S K A Y A K L T A E M A S T X T L O B O K P G R E F E R S I R O T A T O R P E M B J D T S P L E G D A T E N E T D E W E D D R A D A R P V R A E A E E A U S E E S I R M B X D E E D L D P O P

61


Complete your collection of PS MAGAZINE PS Magazine is the only pro-aging print magazine that is designed for and about older Americans.

MAGA ZINE

You can now order past issues of the print magazine for $5 per issue simply by contacting 440-600-0028. ISSUE 1 The Happiness Issue ISSUE 2 Take Control of Your Health ISSUE 3 Our American Values ISSUE 4 Brain Power ISSUE 5 The Era of New Technology ISSUE 6 The Creative Arts 62

ISSUE 7 Family & Staying Connected ISSUE 8 Turning Ageism Into Sage-ism ISSUE 9 The Companionship Issue ISSUE 10 The Bonus Years ISSUE 11 Super Humans

ISSUE 12 The Style Issue ISSUE 13 What’s Your Heritage? ISSUE 14 The Wonders of Nature ISSUE 15 Home and Belonging ISSUE 16 Reminiscences ISSUE 17 Celebrating You


MOVIE SCREENING

ADVANCED STYLE PS Enrichment, a division of PS Lifestyle, offers your senior living community the special opportunity to host a movie screening of the documentary film, ADVANCED STYLE (run time: 72 minutes).

© ARI SETH COHEN

Sign up to have PS Enrichment provide your community with a DVD of ADVANCED STYLE, the public performance rights to show the film to a non-paying audience on organization grounds, and a digital flier to print out to promote your screening. Respond by email to info@pslifestyle.com with the header “Movie Screening”.

Sponsored by ENRICHMENT

63


“I’m looking for an outside interest I can do from my couch.”

Gone Fishing A retired man had just one hobby—he loved to go fishing. One day, he was sitting in his boat when he heard a voice say, “Pick me up.” He looked around but didn’t see anyone. Just when he thought he must have imagined it, he heard the voice again say, “Pick me up.” This time he noticed a frog floating on a lily pad. The man asked it, “Are you talking to me?” The frog responded, “Yes, I’m talking to you. Pick me up and kiss me and then I’ll turn into the most beautiful woman you have ever seen and I will become your bride.” The man looked thoughtfully at the frog for a moment, then picked it up carefully and began to open up his shirt pocket. The frog asked, “What are you doing? I said, ‘Kiss me, and I will be your beautiful bride!’” Before placing the frog inside his pocket, the man said, “Nah, I’d rather have a talking frog.” 64

BARBARA SMALLER/THE NEW YORKER COLLECTION/THE CARTOON BANK

THE L AST L AUGH


Caring for someone with Alzheimer’s isn’t easy. Reaching us is.

If you care for someone with Alzheimer’s disease, memory loss or dementia, you are not alone. We’re here day or night — whenever you need us — offering reliable information and support. Free 24/7 Helpline: 800.272.3900 Alzheimer’s and Dementia Caregiver Center: alz.org/care

Issue 18: Living Passionately  

Discovering Your Passion; Route 66 and the Great American Roadtrip; Heidi Wagner's Passions Project

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