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SPECIAL REPORT: ADVANCES IN NAVAL ARCHITECTURE AND MARINE ENGINEERING

The Future Trends in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering By Don McBarnet, Staff Writer

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EERING INTO the future as a generalist journalist writing about a specialist area can create hostages to fortune. The future is not always a trend forward from the past. Disruptive technologies can and do do what they are described as doing and disrupt hitherto familiar patterns. To look at what may be over the horizon in the naval field, Rear Admiral Matthew Klunder, United States Navy Chief of Naval Research, is a sound source of ideas. In his testimony to the House Armed Services committee 2013 Budget request he offered an informed appraisal of what the United States Navy had in planning. Klunder describes Innovative Naval Prototypes (INP) as discontinuous, disruptive, radical departures from established requirements and operational concepts.16 He describes Persistent Littoral Undersea Surveillance (PLUS) INP (to develop an autonomous over-the-horizon Anti-Submarine Warfare system) and Sea Base Enablers INP (to evaluate Transformation Craft concepts) completed last year and elements of both transitioning to the Fleet/Force.17

The Free Electron Laser Klunder notes the Free Electron Laser (FEL) INP is hoped to develop the critical technologies needed for a Megawatt class laser system. The FEL is designed to be tunable to atmosphere penetrating wavelengths for use in maritime environments. Focusing on the critical components will allow the US Navy to assess the potential of fielding a Megawatt class laser on a surface ship, which will permit additional shipboard sensors and defense that includes tracking, discrimination, countermeasures, and scalable direct fire at the speed of light. Because of its potential to reach Megawatt power levels, the FEL is designed to defend against current and future surface and air threats, anti-ship cruise missiles, small boat swarms, and other asymmetric threats.

The Integrated Topside INP The Integrated Topside INP may enable the US Navy to dominate the electromagnetic spectrum through development of multisimultaneous function wide-band apertures and Radio Frequency (RF) equipment for all ship classes. And, of course, there are naval unmanned autonomous systems, like the Large Displacement Unmanned Undersea Vehicle (LDUUV) INP. This is a potentially reliable, long endurance UUV capable of extended operation in cluttered littoral environments. The program will develop the needed energy, autonomy and core UUV systems to operate in a complex ocean environment near harbours, shore, and high surface traffic locations.

DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) Innovative Projects with Transformative Potential Continuing in the search for autonomous systems that deliver beyond the capability of manned systems, DARPA is working on the Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) Continuous Trail Unmanned Vessel (ACTUV). This is being developed as an unmanned vessel optimized to robustly track quiet diesel electric submarines. DARPA says the program is structured around three primary goals, to explore the performance potential of a surface platform conceived from concept to field demonstration under the premise that a human is never intended to step aboard at any point in its operating cycle. As a result, a new design paradigm emerges with reduced constraints on conventional naval architecture elements such as layout, accessibility, crew support systems, reserve buoyancy and dynamic stability. The objective is to generate a vessel design that exceeds state-of-the art platform performance to provide complete propulsive overmatch against diesel electric submarines at a fraction of their size and cost. Advanced unmanned WWW.DEFENCEINDUSTRYREPORTS.COM | 13

Special Report – Advances in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Qinetiq  

Defence Industry – Special Report on Advances in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

Special Report – Advances in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Qinetiq  

Defence Industry – Special Report on Advances in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering