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SPECIAL REPORT: ADVANCES IN NAVAL ARCHITECTURE AND MARINE ENGINEERING

The Navy is currently studying potentially significant design changes, such as increasing the commonality of systems between the two ship

PHYSICAL MODEL TESTING AT QINETIQ’S OCEAN BASIN FACILITY

variants and changing ship capabilities

stemming from concurrent design, production, and testing activities. The Navy has taken steps to resolve problems with the lead ships, and the shipyards are beginning to realize benefits from facility improvements and experience. However, testing remains to be completed and the Navy is currently studying potentially significant design changes, such as increasing the commonality of systems between the two ship variants and changing ship capabilities. Changes at this point can compromise the positive impacts of shipyard learning, increase costs, and prolong schedules. The mission module program also has concurrency issues, and testing to date has shown considerable limitations in capabilities. The Navy is pursuing an incremental approach to fielding mission packages, but it has yet to finalize the requirements for each increment and does not plan to achieve the minimum performance requirements for the mine countermeasures and surface warfare packages until the final

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increments are fielded in 2017 and 2019, respectively.10 What a tale of unending woe for the naval architects!

Multi Criteria DecisionMaking Based on Too Many Uncertainties Unfortunately, this is not a new situation and the process of clarifying the decision-making process involved in the final product is encapsulated adroitly by Hootman at MIT. Today’s ship is composed of many systems: propulsion, electrical, weapons, mechanical, and environmental to name a few. Many of these systems are complicated in their own right, but their interactions can be even more so. Further, due to these interactions, it is entirely possible that the integration of optimized subsystems into a ship design will not create an optimized ship system. Therefore, it is clear that a ship design is a multi-criteria decision problem by its very nature, composed of multiple, competing objectives.11

Special Report – Advances in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Qinetiq  

Defence Industry – Special Report on Advances in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering

Special Report – Advances in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering Qinetiq  

Defence Industry – Special Report on Advances in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering