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Mass of Ages The quarterly magazine of the Latin Mass Society

ISSUE 184 – Summer 2015

FREE – GOLDEN JUBILEE ISSUE

Girls just want to have... Mass in the Extraordinary Form? Women and the Old Rite

Plus: Interview with Bishop Mark O’Toole At Mass With: The Rt Hon Ann Widdecombe NEWS, FEATURES, COLUMNS AND COMPREHENSIVE TRADITIONAL MASS LISTINGS JOIN THE LMS NOW – APPLICATION FORM, BACK PAGE


CONTENTS

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

COMMENT 2. 3. 9. 15. 44. 45. 46. 47.

Intro Chairman’s Message At Mass with Ann Widdecombe Letters Family Notebook, Amanda Lewin The Adventures of the Lone Veiler Roman Report, Alberto Carosa Macklin Street, Stephen Moseling

EXTRAORDINARY WOMEN 4-7. 8. 10-11. 12.

Girls just want to have...Mass in the Extraordinary Form? LMS US-style by Lucia Lopez Jubilee 50 – The amazing Sue Coote and other memories Do we still believe in...the right to choose? Fr Bede Rowe

NEWS AND FEATURES 13. Parish Profile: Old Rite in the Ordinariate 14-15. Catholic Education by Corinna Bruce 16. In Illo Tempore and Liturgical Calendar 17. Crossword 19. St Wilfrid’s of York by Paul Waddington 20-21 Year Planner 22-23. Art & Devotion by Caroline Shaw 24-26. Bishop Mark O’Toole, interview

DIOCESAN REPORTS 27-36

MASS LISTINGS 37-43

The views expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the LMS or its members.

The Latin Mass Society 11-13 Macklin Street, London, WC2B 5NH Tel: 020-7404 7284

editor@lms.org.uk

Mass of Ages The quarterly magazine of the Latin Mass Society

ISSUE 184 – Summer 2015

FREE GOLDEN JUBILEE ISSUE

Girls just want to have... Mass in the Extraordinary Form? Women and the Old Rite

Interview: Bishop Mark O’Toole At Mass With: The Rt Hon Ann Widdecombe NEWS, FEATURES, COLUMNS AND COMPREHENSIVE TRADITIONA L MASS LISTINGS JOIN THE LMS NOW – APPLICATION FORM, BACK PAGE

Front cover picture: Lucia Lopez, vice president of the LMS (USA)/ Photo Ana Cristina Hernandez.

Mass of Ages No.184 Of your charity, we ask your understanding of the reality that, due to the considerable volume of e-mail received at Mass of Ages, it is regrettably not always possible to provide a reply. Views expressed by contributors are not necessarily those of the Latin Mass Society.

Cardinal Raymond Burke at Ramsgate/Photo Alan Frost.

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s ever, we have many excellent contributions to Mass of Ages. We are privileged to hear from the Rt Hon. Ann Widdecombe, who kindly agreed to attend Mass in the Extraordinary Form and tell us about it. She, typically, gives a robust reaction, so hold tight. We are also fortunate to have a fascinating interview with Bishop Mark O’Toole of Plymouth, the former rector of Allen Hall seminary, who tells us he is keen to learn to say the Old Rite Mass and make new provision in the south west.

But this edition focuses on taking a long look ‘under the mantilla’ – at women who attend the Traditional Mass. Some readers may wonder why we are devoting this issue to women. It is often noted that the Traditional Mass today attracts a lot of men. But the Old Rite is for all, and we ask some LMS women what they think. For decades, women were the backbone of the Society and through their devotion, prayers and actions, women have quietly kept the show on the road. From a 90+ year old original member to a 22-year old student, from young professionals to stay-at-home mothers, we hear from a host of women, all different but united by their love of the Traditional Mass. They demonstrate that, whether they wear a mantilla or not, there is a wide range of intelligent, articulate and friendly women attending the Old Rite and educating the next generation to do the same. They have strong views and are happy to debate attitudes to women in traditional circles, and even whether there is a hint of misogyny at large. They also explode a few of the more mischievous myths about women who attend the Traditional Mass. And they provide compelling insights into life for women who reject popular cultural values but we hear about the dangers of becoming a ‘sub-cultural’ stereotype. More than anything, though, we see that these LMS women are not yes-women but women who say yes to Catholic tradition. This is my fifth and final edition as editor of Mass of Ages. Many thanks, in particular, to all the contributors for their efforts, and to all readers for your patience. God bless.

THE LATIN MASS SOCIETY PATRONS: Sir Adrian Fitzgerald Bt, Lord (Brian) Gill, Dr James MacMillan CBE, Colin Mawby, Charles Moore COMMITTEE: Dr Joseph Shaw – Chairman; Paul Waddington – Treasurer; David Forster – Secretary; David Lloyd – Vice President; Paul Beardsmore – Vice President; James Bogle; Kevin Jones; Stefano Mazzeo; Roger Wemyss Brooks, Dylan Parry


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

CHAIRMAN’S MESSAGE

Winning the Argument Dr Joseph Shaw

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have spoken to a number of journalists over the last six months, and one of the things which has surprised many of them is, interestingly enough, that I am not particularly depressed. They had been in touch with a range of ‘conservative’ Catholic voices who were rather concerned about the Family Synod and other issues, and assumed that, since Pope Francis clearly doesn’t have the same zeal for the Church’s liturgical traditions as Pope Benedict XVI, I would be even more down in the dumps. While I do have concerns about the outcome of the Synod, which I am not going to address in this issue, as far as the Society’s specific area of interest is concerned, the promotion of the ancient liturgy, I am actually rather optimistic. Total victory - whatever form that might take - is not around the corner, but things continue to move in a positive direction for us. I have two reasons for taking this view. One is that, as a Society, we have not found our work especially impeded under Pope Francis. The spotlight of pontifical energy being directed elsewhere, means that liturgical matters are not being discussed with the same urgency as they were under Pope Benedict. While that debate was a good chance for us to set out our own point of view, it was never going to go on forever, and it isn’t necessary for our work on the ground: organising Masses and devotional events, training priests, servers, singers, and so on. My other reason is a longer-term observation. Co-ordinating the publication of the International Federation Una Voce’s series of ‘Position Papers’ on the 1962 Missal, it has come home to me the extent to which we are winning the argument at a very fundamental level. For example, 20 years ago even people sympathetic to the Traditional Mass often felt that they had to concede that the Novus Ordo Lectionary, with its much larger selection of Scriptural texts arranged over three years, was clearly superior to the traditional Lectionary. However, no one need feel defensive about the ancient Lectionary - upon which Pope Gregory the Great was preaching in 590 AD - in light of more recent scholarship and discussion. Even writers such as the Canadian Oratorian, Fr Jonathan Robinson, who does not identify himself with Extraordinary Form, concede that the new lectionary has serious drawbacks. Similarly, the old consensus that Mass was overwhelmingly celebrated ‘facing the people’ in ancient times, has collapsed under the scrutiny of a new generation of scholars, such as another Oratorian, Fr Michael Lang. The wisdom of reception of Holy Communion on the tongue, the Silent Canon and the use of Latin, is far more widely accepted by Catholics, who take an interest in these things, today than they were 20 years ago. Two decades ago it would have seemed fanciful that young women would ever again adopt head-coverings in Mass, but many have, and their testimonies about the value of the practice are all over the

internet. Thirty years ago, traditional walking pilgrimages seemed completely dead, and now they have sprung up all over the world in the context of the Extraordinary Form. These examples illustrate a trend in favour of the liturgical tradition, in favour of the work of the Society, which is both broad and deep. It is not going into reverse because of the pastoral priorities of the Franciscan Pontificate, because those priorities are not, in fact, opposed to this reassessment and re-appropriation of tradition. It is unstoppable, in fact, because it is connected with a fundamental fact of human life: the turnover of the generations. This leads to a reassessment of conventional thinking in all academic disciplines, especially after anything like a revolution of thought: official resistance to such revisionism simply makes it more exciting and dramatic which it does overwhelm its obstacles. Outside of the academic debate, it means that a time finally comes when young people can ask searching questions and get answers from those who don’t have a personal, emotional, stake in the status quo: from people who were not personally involved in creating that status quo. The process I have described is driven both by biological inevitability and simple human curiosity: people are always going to want to know about those things, the thuribles and books of chant and embroidered vestments, which have, metaphorically but also, often, quite literally, been locked away in a cupboard for a generation. We cannot hang onto an alleged golden age in the past, we cannot stop time and we cannot reverse it. We must move forward, not back. Yes, the 1970s are in the past: and they are going to stay there. Copies of the Second Edition of the collected Position Papers are available from Lulu.com and from the LMS Office: The FIUV Position Papers on the 1962 Missal.

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GIRLS JUST WANT TO HAVE… MASS IN THE EXTRAORDINARY FORM?

Extraordinary Women A Look Under the Mantilla

No stereotypes here: Annie O’Brien and Caroline Hill at a traditional evening/Photo by John Aron

Mary has been devoted to the Traditional Mass for getting on for 40 years, and she has brought up her own children to attend the Old Rite. 4

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Why would a woman in 2015 join the Latin Mass Society? Critics believe it promotes attitudes and values that are patriarchal, bordering on misogynist…right? Women, even little girls, have lately been expected to conform to a sub-cultural, veiled stereotype: more akin to the Arab world than Western Europe…aren’t they? You would have to be some sort of Stepford Wife to go along with it… wouldn’t you? Although the LMS has always included women and men, and it was led for many years by a woman (see page 10), a perception among some, critical of traditional circles, is that women and the Old Rite do not go together. To such critics the Old Rite has become a male-dominated preserve with women permitted only to sit meekly by, wearing a mantilla, looking after children. The reality is somewhat different. Many LMS women have contributed to this edition of Mass of Ages and not one is like a character from Bryan Forbes’s film. They are modern women, with their own views and they are not averse to saying what they think. But they also happen to be devoted to the Traditional Mass. Five mothers and three young single women, all within the LMS family, have contributed to this ‘e-conversation’ – where each talked and then had the opportunity to comment on others’ comments in an emailed conversation. They come from different backgrounds, have different homes lives and wear different clothes. They include students and professionals, mothers who home-educate and others who do not. And they demonstrate that the stereotypical ‘traddie’ woman, so beloved of critics, is a stereotype. Our eight consider the role of women and attitudes to women, in traditional circles, and they reflect on changes in the last five decades. These days, the traditional Catholic world can be so much more than simply attending Old Rite services. And we consider whether a ‘traddie sub-culture’, complete with its own dress code for women, has emerged – and, if so, whether this is an inevitable by-product of the rejection of contemporary values or something more. Our group is not entirely without concerns. It would be a strange group if they did not have any. After all, these are not yes-women. They are women who have said ‘yes’ to tradition. And they have chosen to be part of the LMS family. Only one of the group was initially dragged along to the Old Rite by her husband. The others found their own way to the Traditional Mass, or came through family. Their devotion is evident and intense.

Veronica is a young person is full of faith, a credit to her family. The student talks enthusiastically about exposition of the Blessed Sacrament and the Old Rite Mass.


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GIRLS JUST WANT TO HAVE… MASS IN THE EXTRAORDINARY FORM?

At the heart of the e-conversation, was a profound attachment to the Traditional Mass. According to Caroline, the precious and central factor for her, is the Mass, and the ‘contact with the Divine’ that is palpable at the Traditional Mass. ‘In the Old Rite one enters into beautiful long periods of silent prayer,’ she said. Anne-Marie, meanwhile, recalled with bemusement, strident active participants at her local church and the difference with an Old Rite Mass: ‘In the Extraordinary Form, everybody is there to worship, everybody is equal. Nobody is rushing around being an extraordinary minister…There’s none of that. Even welcomers [at the new Mass] can be terrifying.’ Since her reception into the Church four years ago, Corinna has thrown herself into the traditional community. She does a 100-mile round trip on a Sunday to attend an Old Rite Mass, she leads a young person’s group and has attended numerous pilgrimages. She maintained: ‘The Old Rite is amazing.’ For Mary, discovering the Old Rite, albeit at a very tender age, was ‘like a homecoming’. And she said, it is ‘wonderful’, now to be able to attend Mass in the Extraordinary Form in an ordinary parish church – something she remembers as being extraordinary in itself a few years ago. Meanwhile, Harriet, a single thirtysomething, disclosed she does not ‘feel spiritually fed’ unless she has been to an Old Rite Mass. And Kathryn is a stalwart of the Old Rite, but she was hardly typical material. A ‘biker girl’, she had been heavily involved in her local parish but changed when she met her husband and his family – all Traditional Mass goers.

and girls have worth, that saying the rosary has worth and all the other things that we do.’ There were some concerns. Harriet, who has attended Extraordinary Form services and events across the country, acknowledged that she is not a run-of-the-mill Traditional Mass-goer. And, she admitted, she has found herself to be an outsider among the tightly-knit Old Rite fraternity. Meanwhile, Corinna, admitted she has heard ‘bizarre assertions’ that have made her feel very uncomfortable: ‘On my last pilgrimage, this guy said that once a woman is given a role in the Church she just wants to take over and so she shouldn’t be allowed to do anything…Some people make out that all the problems in the Church are caused by women.’ But Jennifer added: ‘In England, I have always been treated with the greatest respect.’ Mantillas have long been a subject of debate, controversy even, in Catholic circles. Fifty years ago they were not habitually worn by women in England and Wales, let alone by young girls. Some women wore hats, because people did, some wore mantillas, others went bare-headed. Today, though, mantillas have become synonymous with traditional Catholic women – marking them out from most Mass-goers. Although our group talked of the importance of respect for the Blessed Sacrament, they considered the veiled question and the purpose of veiling. Is a mantilla is essential, they wondered, or even perhaps, at times, divisive. One of the eight admitted wearing a hat rather than a mantilla, especially when at an ordinary parish church, because she did not wish to make others feel uncomfortable – by appearing ‘holier than thou’ or seeming to say they were not as ‘religious’ as she. Anne-Marie, though, has no problem with wearing a mantilla – even if people assume her husband is an awful male chauvinist. She laughed at the very idea and said she actually finds it ‘empowering’. ‘I never considered a mantilla before I found the old Mass,’ she said. ‘Now I can’t not wear one. The Old Rite changes you.’ Kathryn simply added: ‘I heartily agree.’ Anne-Marie continued: ‘Veiling in the presence of Our Lord is a beautiful tradition, and spiritually very helpful and…in a world that objectifies women, it’s saying no to that objectification, and yes to God. So I would encourage anyone to try it.’ Meanwhile, Mary said: It’s very important to encourage respect for the Blessed Sacrament…But to make wearing

It is not a Medieval re-enactment society… it’s something life changing and profound.

Supporters of the Old Rite often point out the excellent news that the pews are full of men at Traditional Masses – a contrast to ordinary parish churches. There are, of course, no formal roles for women to play. But does this mean that women are not welcome or feel excluded? Jennifer said she likes the fact that there are a lot of men in Old Rite churches but, she pointed out: ‘There are a lot of women too.’ Caroline maintained: ‘Praying the Mass – it used to be called ‘assisting’ at Mass – is what I consider to be total involvement. ‘If a woman assists at Mass in this way, together with looking after her children…teaching them to pray and be focused on Our Lord, it is a huge involvement. I do not feel that it is necessary to be “involved” in a formal or organisational way.’ Veronica said lack of a ‘role’ does not put her off the Old Rite, but she said: ‘Maybe priests should say that women

Caroline found herself drawn to the Old Rite some years ago, along with her husband.

There is no nonsense about Anne-Marie. The mother and grandmother maintains that she feels far more connected to the Mass now, that she attends the Old Rite, than she did when she went to her local church. 5


GIRLS JUST WANT TO HAVE… MASS IN THE EXTRAORDINARY FORM?

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

a mantilla part of a religion is wrong. I used to have a lovely mantilla but I wore it because I thought it looked very becoming and romantic. You get mixed messages from people selling “chapel veils” on the one hand, saying we need to be modest and look like Our Lady, and the next minute explaining how to choose the style that will be most flattering!’’ She emphasised: ‘Everyone used to wear a hat or other head covering when they went out and men used to take off their hats as a mark of respect in church or in the presence of a superior. Keeping a hat on in church was a woman’s privilege. We cover our heads now as our way of showing respect to Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament, it is not a sign of our inferiority.’ Kathryn, asked: ‘Perhaps there should be more emphasis on explaining why women choose to wear a mantilla, rather than just telling people that they should be wearing them...’ There was recognition among the group that much has changed since the days when Sue Coote was LMS secretary. Today, some say, there is almost a dress code for women in traditional circles, with an emphasis on modesty and a particular dislike of trousers. There was general agreement that comments about women’s clothes were unhelpful and could even be a barrier to the Old Rite for some. According to Mary, some attitudes towards women have changed, as ideas, especially from America, have been imported into traditional circles. While it was more difficult to find an Old Rite Mass back in the 1970s, she said there were then no ‘issues’ about women’s clothing or appearance. She warned: ‘Some rather misogynistic views have crept into the traditional world – [for instance] saying that women should not wear trousers. There’s a particular type of man (usually young) who makes a big thing about this. And they can begin to make traditionalists appear like a “lunatic fringe”.’ Jennifer said with some incredulity: ‘Some people say it is a sin if you wear trousers.’ Anne Marie shrugs off unpleasantness as part of life; it happens everywhere. She remembered being snubbed at the sign of peace at her local church. ‘It’s hard, but you can’t let it get to you,’ she said, recognising difficulties faced by some. ‘The Old Rite is hugely rewarding, and well worth the effort of finding and sticking with. ’ And she continued: ‘You may come across some awkward people, but you get them everywhere. The Church is a hospital for sinners …’ ‘Yes,’ said Kathryn. ‘Focus on the worship being given to God, not the awkward so-and-so’s!’ But Kathryn described as ‘horrendous’ the idea of women being criticised for what they wear. ‘I choose to wear skirts and to cover my head at Mass, but I don’t really care if women wear trousers or don’t cover their heads. We can end up sounding judgmental. Modesty is a wider concept than that.’ She maintained: ‘You have to be welcoming, no matter how

Young, single and professional, Corinna says she is not a posh southerner. She was received into the Church just four years ago, but quickly found a love of the Traditional Mass. 6

someone is dressed. It’s easy for people to be put off by that kind of thing.’ Veronica recognised that other young Catholic women may be put off the Traditional Mass because: ‘The image of the traditional woman is of a dowdy person in horrible clothes wearing a massive head covering. ‘They think that you have to wear a sack or something.’ But this young woman summed up the thinking of many traditionally-minded women with a counter-cultural response to such thinking. She said she fears that her generation just ‘don’t know how to dress or know what it is to look nice’. Anne Marie spoke for everyone when she said: ‘I find it extremely frustrating when people, say, worry overly about a newcomer’s clothing, people are generally trying their best, and it’s great that they have come to see what the Old Rite is…I don’t honestly mind if people wear trousers…It is not a Medieval re-enactment society…it’s something life changing and profound.’ Our group debated whether discussions of clothing represent a more fundamental attitude about the place of women and present dangers for traditionalists? Kathryn, said: ‘People shouldn’t tell women off for wearing trousers, but at the same time I don’t think it can rightly be labelled as a misogynistic view. These people don’t hate

Jennifer (not her real name) is a 30+ year veteran of the Traditional Mass, first embracing it as a teenager and going on to become an established matriarch of an Old Rite clan.


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GIRLS JUST WANT TO HAVE… MASS IN THE EXTRAORDINARY FORM?

women: they are trying to oppose (albeit in a very unhelpful way) the feminist idea that men and women are the same, rather than equal but different and complementary…They think a woman wearing trousers is trying to look like a man. Of course, to most women, wearing trousers is just what modern women do – they are not trying to make any kind of statement. But I think these men react because they see it as a symbol of something the Church is opposed to.’ However, Corinna maintained: ‘I think it is an error to assume men and women really are that different except in a physical way. In terms of thinking, a lot of what is traditionally “male” and “female” behaviour is taught from birth….The issue I have is where in the traditionalist community you are judged as being a modernist (whatever that means) if you are a woman who wears trousers, perhaps the men feel that it is an affront to their own masculinity or something, I don’t know.’ Members of the group recognised and voiced concern over misconceptions held about traditionalists. But they also could see the dangers of turning inwards, away from the mainstream Church, or even being perceived as a ‘sub-culture’. Veronica said: ‘People [regular Catholics] think you’re a schismatic or don’t believe in the Pope [if you attend the Traditional Mass]. The Old Mass gets a bad press and people believe that those who go to the Old Rite are extreme, crazy people who are cut off from the real world.’ Jennifer agreed, she has met people who go to the new Mass who have all sorts of strange preconceptions about traditionalists. Sometimes, it is not a question of being exclusive but being excluded. Kathryn said she found friends among other similar mothers [who home-educate] – partly because she discovered that the ‘school’ mothers no longer seemed so friendly with her. ‘There is an image problem,’ she said. ‘Some people regard us as a bunch of weirdoes, who barely communicate with outsiders.’ But there was also a recognition that, perhaps as a consequence, a distinct ‘traddie’ community has developed in places – which can have unintended consequences. Jennifer feared she is regarded as a ‘liberal’ by others in traditional circles because she sends her children to school, rather than home-educating. Reflecting on attitudes to dress, Mary maintained: ‘There is a danger of looking like a cult...and of cutting off from the wider Church, becoming an inward looking group. That’s not what Catholics are supposed to be.’ And Harriet said she is concerned that some of the women she has spoken to may be put off the Old Rite: ‘If you’re not married and don’t have children, you can feel pushed out,’ she said. ‘It’s like a sub-culture.’ Kathryn was concerned but she pointed out: ‘Sub-culture’ has an unhealthy ring to it, like ghettoisation, but in a sense, as Catholics we are called to be ‘counter-cultural’ and to live

A young single professional woman, Harriet is a relatively recent convert but has found a spiritual home in the Old Rite.

a life which is often very much at odds with the prevailing secular culture. Maybe, the more Catholic a life you try to live, the more you can’t help looking like a sub-culture, and, maybe, this is what is happening in “traddie” circles? But, equally, Kathryn did not want to be seen as part of a closed, sub-cultural world and is horrified that any other mother would feel demeaned by the fact she has chosen to home educate. She wanted to make clear that she ‘is not saying that she is better than anyone else’ because of her choices or because she goes to the Old Rite. Caroline, meanwhile, maintained: ‘If a traddie is someone who goes to the Old Rite Mass, then I am happy to be called a traddie. If it is more of a cultural reference to the way you dress, how many children you have and whether you home educate them, then I do not fit neatly into that profile.’ Beyond practical and social matters, there was some academic consideration of the place of femininity in the Church and recent comments. Corinna voiced concern at attacks on the so-called feminisation of the wider Church. It may be presented as anti-trendy rhetoric, but what, she wondered, does it say about attitudes to women? ‘It is demonising women and what it is to be a woman,’ she maintained. Kathryn suggested: ‘When I hear people complaining about the feminisation of the Church, I understand it to mean the importing of a secular feminist agenda into the Church, and as a Catholic woman I do think this is a bad thing. That’s because I would class as “secular feminist” such things as the idea (already mentioned) that men and women are the same, rather than that they are equal but different…In this sense, I wouldn’t see the criticism as in any way demonising women. But it is very possible that we all understand different things by the broad term feminisation.’ Corinna continued: ‘I think a lot of people in the traddie scene do not really understand what feminism is about. It is about gaining equal rights for women…Women [in the past] didn’t have the choice about what to do in life, they weren’t allowed to train for most of the professions and were forced into being housewives (whether they wanted it or not). Feminism means that women have the genuine choice of a career or motherhood or both! This is true freedom.’ Behind all the debate, though, lay evident devotion to the Traditional Mass. Whether they are mothers, trying to bring their children up in line with Catholic values, or single women who have an attachment to the Old Rite, our eight reveal the diversity of women in traditional circles. And they confound the concept of the meek, downtrodden and unfriendly stereotype. Kathryn can have the last word. She pointed out that, at her local Traditional Mass there is ‘an eclectic bunch. If people can get past the image, they find we’re just ordinary people, trying to live the Church’s teaching’.

Oxford-educated Kathryn is a home-educating mother of eight. She is dedicated to the Old Rite, and passing on the faith to her family. And yet, look a little deeper and she is far from the stereotype. 7


THE LMS US-STYLE

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Old Rite in the New World Lucia Lopez, Vice President of Latin Mass Society (USA)

Six thousand miles away in California, another Latin Mass Society is thriving. Founded just three years ago by young people on a college campus, the LMS (US) is proving highly attractive to young people tired of contemporary culture and interested in Catholic tradition. Young women in particular are finding a voice and a welcome in the Society. Lucia Lopez, Vice President of Society Affairs, tells us why she has been drawn to the LMS. ‘I thirst.’ In the Latin Mass Society it is notable that women play a prominent role. They are interested in traditional Catholicism. They are interested in something that is counter-cultural. Why? The best way to answer these questions is by saying why I became interested in traditional Catholicism, and hope I am speaking accurately for the rest of my sisters in Christ. So, why traditional Catholicism? Because, ‘I thirst.’ Traditional Catholicism is a lifestyle, that, when it is seen and experienced, it resounds in the soul. God is calling us, from the wearing of the veil to modesty in dress. When the heart is disposed to the harmony of this lifestyle, by the grace of God, it becomes submissive in giving her fiat, and it rests in God. I believe this is happening. God is moving the hearts of women in the US to learn about traditional Catholicism, and to live it. They see the beauty in Our Lady’s submissive example and the desire to imitate her humility and love for God. We are living in a time of brokenness. We see this in families, in schools, mainstream music and entertainment. Granted, there have been bad times in ages past, however the family unit has not been under such attack as it has been in the last century. This is destructive to mankind and their souls. There are consequences to this attack. There is a sort of chaos in society because of the attack on something so beautiful – the family. Traditional Catholicism offers a refuge from this catastrophe, where our prayers and sufferings are taken to Calvary, united with Our Lady at the foot of the Cross and Our Lord on the Cross, and trusting in His resurrection. We say, ‘I thirst’ in union with Our Lord, and we are reminded that our hope is in Him. One of the most beautiful realities traditional Catholicism demonstrates so clearly is what a women’s role can be. In the last decades, women have been most convincingly encouraged to Many young women such as Lucia have been drawn to the Traditional Mass. Photo Ana Cristina Hernandez become powerful career-women. In traditional Catholicism, we see families together, and mostly large families. The mother in these families is usually a stay-at-home mother. They see joy in these families…They are drawn to this because it makes sense. Generally speaking, young girls want to be beautiful. When a lady (any age) wants to ‘look pretty’, she usually spends a little more time getting ready and adds some decorum to her look. There is a decorum and depth in traditional Catholicism that the soul thirsts for to adorn itself. Our souls know they are made for something greater, and many young girls, who are just regular people, have stumbled across the treasure of traditional Catholicism and have found an abundance of adornments that their souls are drawn to. They are being transformed and made new. From the wearing of the veil, and its significance, to learning about modesty in dress, and making that change for Our Majesties. Most importantly, to allow God to work in their souls through prayer, always trying to do God’s will and put Him first. A beautiful paradox at play here is that while we thirst for Jesus, He too thirsts for us. He is calling us and we are going to Him. Women in the Latin Mass Society play a prominent role in traditional Catholicism because of God’s great generosity- His grace working in us through our response in wearing the veil, our love and support of the Traditional Mass, and our support in modesty in dress. We need Him as we were made for Him, and He is beckoning us. Here we are, Lord! http://lmsociety.com

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ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

AT MASS WITH

I admire the dedication which will draw people many miles in inclement weather/Photo kind permission of Miss Widdecombe

At Mass with… The Rt Hon Ann Widdecombe DSG St Cyprian’s Chapel, Devon

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kindly soul advised me to sit next to the so-called radiator, but the temperature was as medieval as the priest’s headdress as I prepared for my first Mass under the Old Rite since I was 18. Then, I had been a pupil at Bath Convent, obliged to go to Mass before breakfast in a similarly cold chapel. Now, I was at St Cyprian’s chapel, part of Ugbrooke House on Dartmoor, where I live. Vatican II was in full flow when I left the convent, but its pronouncements had yet to be made. Mass was still in Latin, the nuns’ habits still reached the ground and the ecumenical movement was in its infancy. When I next came into contact with Catholicism, some years later, the Mass was in English, the nuns had hair (yes, I know they always did but you never saw it) and the priest no longer had his back to the people. The emphasis in comparing the old and the new is always on the Latin, but for me that is not the issue. I have a degree in Latin and by and large can read it without having to refer to the translation on the opposite page. And I always lament its loss when travelling. I have stood in many a foreign church, suddenly heard ‘Gloria in excelsis Deo’ and thought ‘Oh, that’s where we are!’ A universal language should be a basic provision of a universal church. No, for me the issue is exclusion. Under the Old Rite the priest has his back to the people, conducts a great deal of the consecration either sotto voce or silently and the rest of us just watch. At school, I was excluded anyway, being then an Anglican but still forced to attend a ceremony which meant nothing to me. Now in Ugbrooke, for the first time since becoming a Catholic 22 years ago, I also felt excluded and to such an extent that I was quite unable to take Communion, because I did not consider that I had any part in the preparation for it.

Readers may wonder if it was a high or low Mass. The very helpful explanation on the back of the Mass sheet informed us that in a low Mass there would be two lighted candles on the altar and in a high one there would be six. There were four, so I supposed we must be hovering between the two and hovering was what I felt I was doing throughout the service: observing not participating. Bluntly, I wonder that anyone managed to keep the Faith through all those years of this Rite. When Our Lord died, the veil of the Holy of Holies was rent in twain and there was nothing separating man from God. But for nearly 2,000 years God’s representative kept his back to his flock. The service was followed by a magnificent tea of scones and jam as, our collars turned up round our ears, we wrapped numb fingers round wonderfully hot teacups. I admitted how I had felt. ‘But,’ responded a lady who had come all the way from Sidmouth. ‘Don’t you find the priest facing the people a distraction?’ I said no and then further explained that I wanted anyone to be able to walk into a church and feel at once part of what was going on, not reduced to observer status. Surely that welcome is part of the Church’s essential mission to bring in others? Another lady then said that her son had been a non-believer for years but, having attended a Mass under the Old Rite, suddenly felt a connection. In essence, the Old Rite is for the meditators and the new one for the active participants. Both are valid and I admire the dedication which will draw people many miles in inclement weather. For me, however, the Mass I love is in Latin but with the priest facing the people and including them every step of the way. What a pity that such a combination is now so widely unavailable.

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GOLDEN GIRLS

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Housewife Superstar Sue Coote

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n this Jubilee year, it is right to remember a real-life housewife, superstar – not that one – but the Latin Mass Society’s own Sue Coote. As secretary, Sue, was for decades, a driving force behind the LMS - and the securing of the 1984 Indult, which allowed Mass in the Extraordinary Form to re-emerge from the shadows. In her ‘feminine’, non-confrontational way, Sue was popular with members, luminaries and bishops alike and she worked for the LMS until she was no longer able – and even beyond. At her Requiem in 2002, Fr Sean Finnegan said: ‘If there is any justice in history, when the true story of the Catholic Church in England and Wales during the second half of the 20th century is told…the name Sue Coote should appear there with honour….history will connect her forever with the Latin Mass Society and its work.’ Sue’s youngest son, long-standing LMS member Jonathan Coote, though very young at the time, recalls well his mother’s devotion to duty and the impact she had on the LMS scene. He accompanied her to events all over the country – and even abroad, when Sue went to conferences in Rome. But she was also instrumental in the day to day work of the Society. ‘The bulletin was produced in our dining room. It was printed at the local stationers and we stuffed the envelopes,’ said Jonathan, remembering working alongside his parents. In fact, his father, Bob, not even a Catholic, would also take Jonathan and Sue to events all over the country. ‘It took over our lives really,’ said Jonathan. She was already the Society’s diocesan rep for Arundel & Brighton, when she was elected to the committee in 1970. After serving as assistant secretary for two years, she became secretary on the retirement of Iris Roper. There had been a plot to change the direction of the Society to a more confrontational approach to the hierarchy and replace certain committee officers, including Iris, with the plotters’ own candidates, said Jonathan, but when his mother’s candidature was known, they knew they had no chance. ‘She was friendly and popular and had a great rapport with members,’ said Jonathan. ‘Those on the committee who had been plotting, were suitably put out.’ Sue, meanwhile, was ‘always suitably deferential’ in her meetings with bishops, but her humour and charm meant that she would quickly build a good relationship with them. In particular, she became friendly with the-then bishop of A&B, Michael Bowen – later Archbishop of Southwark. But it was always difficult to get to Old Rite Masses, recalled Jonathan. Some of the few Traditional Masses available would

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Sue in 1990 with the then Cardinal Ratzinger at a meeting in Rome / by kind permission of the Coote family

be funerals, if people had specified in their wills that they wanted the Old Rite. ‘We would usually be bringing the black vestments and the Requiem Mass missal and I would be serving,’ said Jonathan. ‘We went to a lot of funerals.’ Even before the 1971 Indult, Sue and some friends managed to secure a monthly Traditional Mass in the crypt of Westminster cathedral – at the time it was the only Old Rite Mass in London. It was a private, low Mass, said by Fr Ware. Although Sue was a cradle Catholic, her wider family did not necessarily share her passion for the Old Rite. ‘It was just a gut feeling she had,’ said Jonathan. ‘Born of a deep devotion to her faith. She didn’t think it was right that centuries of tradition should be thrown away.’ During her years at the helm of the LMS, Sue became friends with the great campaigners of the day. Jonathan remembered that every week, after Columbo on the television, the telephone would ring – it would be Michael Davies. They shared a love of the Old Rite and a fondness for the dishevelled detective. And Michael Davies declared, on her retirement in 1994, that if the Traditional Mass ‘returned to our altars then it would probably owe more to Sue than to anyone else in the United Kingdom’. Although she died before Summorum Pontificum, Sue did begin to see the fruits of her work, said Jonathan. And, after the 1984 Indult, the family would travel up from their home in Surrey to Mass at the Brompton Oratory and Spanish Place. ‘Everywhere she went, people from other countries would marvel at the fact that we had the Indult in 1971…maybe it was something in the British culture, because of the history of this country? We’d been through Henry VIII and all that, when people died for the Mass, so we weren’t going to give it up easily.’


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

GOLDEN GIRLS

Jubilee Memories: ‘Fifty Years Have Gone Very Quickly’ In conversation with Veronica Spender

At least they didn’t cut our heads off, not like last time,’ Mrs Veronica Spender laughed, with typical good humour. It would be impolite to say precisely how old Mrs Spender is but, as she recalled the early days of the LMS, it is clear that the grand old lady of the LMS is ever youthful. Joining the Society in 1965, the year it was formed, Mrs Spender declared that the 50 years ‘had gone very quickly’. Mrs Spender’s husband, Tony, a distinguished veteran of the Royal Navy and submarine commander in the last war, was one of the LMS’s founder members and treasurer in the early years. ‘We fought the good fight,’ she said with evident light-hearted amusement, as she reflected on the bleak early years. ‘Luckily,’ she said. ‘There’s far more going on now… and the magazine is absolutely wonderful.’ Mrs Spender said: ‘It was quite a small band to begin with.’ And she recalled how people would look after elderly priests, who would say the Traditional Mass privately for them during the difficult years.

‘Looking back, it was very desolate,’ said Mrs Spender. She and her husband were attached to the Old Rite partly because of the Navy, she recalled. They had travelled all over the world, attending Mass wherever Lieutenant-Commander Spender was stationed, but it was the same Mass wherever they went. The new Mass, however, seemed ‘almost a joke’. Happily, the war time generation was well used to deprivation: ‘The original lot worked hard…it was like an underground movement. One family had a chapel in their stables and people made a home for retired priests. ‘There was nobody to help, though, no advice anywhere,’ she said of the LMS’s early days. ‘People didn’t know what they were doing.’ Mrs Spender talked with delight of the Old Rite Mass she can now attend in her local area: ‘It’s improving slowly but it was such a sad thing to have happened.’ As she called in the dog, Mrs Spender emphasised that the article should ‘not be too serious’. ‘Be light-hearted,’ she said. ‘I just go to Mass. I don’t think too far into the future.’

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DO WE STILL BELIEVE IN...?

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Do we still believe in...

A Woman’s Right to Choose? Fr Bede Rowe

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ow interesting a title is, and how easy it is to modify words and phrases. Because it is most often used in a certain context, most people would automatically think that I am referring to a woman’s right to abort (kill) the life in her womb. I am not. Believe it or not, women are not to be defined simply as human beings with the legal right to end a life if they want to. No, the choice that I want to think about is whether or not a woman has the right to choose to stay at home as a mother, or indeed the right to go to work as a mother. This is an odd subject. You can usually tell if something is contentious by the language which is used about it. And here, let me assure you, is a minefield. What do you call a mother who does not go out to work? A stayat-home mum? This implies passivity, a lack of engagement with the world. A housewife? This has the woman’s life revolving around her husband and family – her only identity coming from others, either her husband or children. A homemaker? Beloved of the Americans, this implies that if a woman goes out to work, then she is not making a home – her home is somehow ‘less’. A domestic engineer? Too technical, too mechanical, too weird! This is not me being an unreconstructed male dinosaur, all of these definitions and critiques come from women’s own voices on websites which address this question, whether or not a woman should stay at home and look after the children, or whether she should go to work. None of this comes from me. It is often said that it used to be the case that when a woman became pregnant she would simply leave her job, and there would be no expectation at all that she would ever go back to work. Or if she did come back to work, it would be a number of years later. However, I suspect that this was actually only ever the case for the equivalent of the middle class. I know many women of my grandmother’s generation who simply had to work, or there would be no food on the table. And throughout history there have been a fair few women who have

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been left by their husbands, either wantonly or because of circumstances beyond their control. So the waters are a little muddier than some would have us think. And nowadays there is a financial argument for some men staying at home, or single mums having to manage family finances. There are as many individual cases as there are families. But what do we believe? Well, we believe that a family is a mother and a father, and that this is the place where children should be brought up. And we believe that if women wish to stay at home, then they should be allowed to do so with no persecution, either financially or psychologically. And if they wish to work, then the work and the working environment should bend to the good of the family. It is not simply a matter of ‘getting women (and specifically mothers) into the work force’ – which seems to be a fixation of our politicians – and the family, the children, can go hang. Our society should change. At the moment there is help towards childcare costs if you work, but not if you are at home. And the pension arrangements are similarly discriminatory. And if you do go back to work, then the hours and terms are not always helpful to spending time with the children. If our society values women, then we value them whether or not they work in the home or out of the home. And if we value children, then we facilitate the best environment possible for their nurture. ‘In this way, women who freely desire will be able to devote the totality of their time to the work of the household without being stigmatised by society or penalised financially, while those who wish also to engage in other work may be able to do so with an appropriate work-schedule, and not have to choose between relinquishing their family life or enduring continual stress, with negative consequences for one’s own equilibrium and the harmony of the family.’ CONGREGATION OF THE DOCTRINE OF THE FAITH, The Collaboration of Men and Women in the Church and in the World, §13, 2004.


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

T

here are three Forms of the Rite of the western Church: the Ordinary, the Extraordinary and the Ordinariate. The small parish of Mongeham and Sandwich, in coastal East Kent, comprises two churches, two congregations, one priest and it can boast the celebration of all three Forms. How did such a distant outpost of the Southwark archdiocese, closer to Calais than Clapham, come to be blessed with such a spiritual banquet? The answer lies with one man: Fr Christopher Lindlar. The parochial administrator of the parish, he was received into the Church, as a member of the Ordinariate, in Holy Week 2011 and now looks after both the local diocesan parish and the Ordinariate faithful. And, confirming the popular perception that converts often go seamlessly from Prayer Book to Old Rite, Fr Christopher has learnt to say the EF Mass. Inspired by requests from his diocesan flock, Fr Christopher learned to say the Traditional Mass last summer with LMS materials and a helpful DVD, and it was introduced on a trial basis in the Kent parish last Advent. ‘Over the preceding couple of years,’ said Fr Christopher, ‘numbers of people had persistently and consistently asked if provision could be made. It was not just a one-off remark from one or two people.’ The monthly Mass, held on a midweek evening with no publicity beyond his parish borders, has attracted 15-20 individuals, according to Fr Christopher, compared with six or eight for a usual weekday Mass. This represents more than 10 per cent of the local Mass-going population and, said Fr Christopher, justifies the trial period being extended ‘ad infinitum’. A cross-section of the parish has attended the Traditional Masses, not just older members of the community, who remember it from earlier days. And he has found willing and able altar servers, with long memories, who were ready to help and he is confident others will be willing to learn. Fr Christopher admitted he found little difficulty learning the Old Rite, since he was ‘old enough’ to have studied Latin as a schoolboy and since he had, as an Anglican, been familiar with the ceremonial of the English Missal (an early 20th century translation into Prayer Book language of the then-current Roman Missal). Indeed, Fr Christopher said, there is a ‘close affinity’ between the

PARISH PROFILE: MONGEHAM AND SANDWICH

Anything but Ordinary

‘EF or OU? – OU actually “bringing out of his treasure what is new and what is old”’

Ordinariate Use and the Extraordinary Form. For example, the Ordinariate Use (recently described in the Catholic Herald as ‘glorious and underrated’) includes the prayers at the foot of the altar, the traditional Offertory prayers of the priest, the traditional Embolism and the last Gospel, amongst other elements showing continuity in the shape of the liturgy. As a priest of the Ordinariate serving a diocesan parish as well as pastoring an Ordinariate Mission, Fr Christopher thinks that celebrating the Extraordinary Form helps to situate the Ordinariate and its Use in the life of the whole Church. Since the Church of England has consciously and definitively turned away from the rock from which it was hewn, he said, the Ordinariate and its Use offers a tangible link between preReformation England - represented as it were by the Extraordinary Form - and the present day in the Ordinary Form. He said that all three elements have a part to play in the new evangelisation of England, recalling our fellow countrymen and women to the Catholic Faith, which is their spiritual and cultural inheritance

and which once earned our land the title of Our Lady’s Dowry – a title that, pray God, will be earned again. Like many other priests who celebrate Mass in the Extraordinary Form, Fr Christopher said he ‘appreciates the structure’ of the Old Rite Mass. ‘Far from being rigorous or restricting, it allows one to concentrate… While some people may find it regimented or bothersome, my experience is that the structured nature of the EF leaves one free to pray the Mass in a particular way – which is not to say that the Mass cannot be similarly prayed in the Ordinary Form or indeed the Ordinariate Use.’ Before joining the Church, Fr Christopher had been in the Anglican ‘high church’ tradition. ‘I had been familiar with what was called in Anglo-Catholic circles the ‘Western Rite’,’ he said. For Fr Christopher, the Old Rite is therefore in some degree more familiar than the Ordinary Form, although saying Mass in another language ‘required practice’. As yet, Fr Christopher has not heard any adverse comment about the new Old Rite Masses he has introduced, although he thought it unlikely that a Sunday Mass could be introduced, simply on practical grounds. ‘I do not think anybody is grumbling,’ he said. ‘We are a parish rich in diversity, so I would like to think that the parish is open to all the treasures of the Catholic faith.’ Speaking as a member of the Ordinariate, Fr Christopher maintained. ‘Unity can be found in diversity… the Ordinariate is just another manifestation [of the Church], as is the Extraordinary Form.’ Following a joyful Missa Cantata in Easter Week, the series of ‘first Thursday evening’ low Masses will continue and be built on, as spiritual needs dictates. ‘It is both a joy and encouraging,’ he concluded. ‘That the parish has a rich enough life to have Mass celebrated in every Form available in the Latin Church.’ Keep an eye on the listings for details.

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CATHOLIC EDUCATION

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Religious Identity in Catholic Faith Schools A summary of Masters degree research by Corinna Bruce A brief history of Catholic education

So that the new state Catholic schools had a different purpose and aim to those that existed before the 1960s. New schools When Catholic schools were originally set up in England were state-funded and taught pupils about religions rather in the 1840s, they were operated and led by the Church, than encouraging them to practice a particular religion. which helped schools effectively to educate pupils in the Catholic faith. There was ‘a sense of shared purpose Under this new type of faith school, it seemed almost superfluous for a school to have among educators in effective identity, as it would schools which appeared to be The research clearly shows where anoCatholic longer be a school where a product of shared values’. was taught to the This enabled Catholic schools the failings of modern Catholic Catholicism pupils as ‘religious truth’ but to establish themselves as a instead taught as ‘one religion community with a distinct education have been. Children are among many’. Catholic identity. However, a century later, along not taught effectively about the Catholic education today with the changes in the Catholic Church in the 1960s and to the Within my research project faith and schools do not set good I wanted to see if this was the present day, the Catholic Church wanted to be more ‘acceptable’ case in Catholic schools today. in modern society. This would examples of how to live the Faith. T h e t w o s c h o o l s c h o s e n be a driving force in agreeing to deliberately contrasted a pre and Is it any wonder that so many government intervention in the post-1960s Catholic education. curriculum, alongside acceptance The state funded school is located of government funding (which children leave Catholic education in the Midlands (its name has had previously been rejected by been withheld for legal reasons) the Catholic Church). and it has been rated outstanding today without any faith? by Ofsted. It is perceived to offer The Education Reform Act of an excellent Catholic education, and conforms closely to 1988 introduced a National Curriculum for use in all schools, the government requirements of a faith school. The other and standardised what was taught in all state-funded school chosen was St Michael’s school, run by the SSPX schools. Policy making behind the 1988 Act did not in the south of England. It is an independent school and involve the Church and the ‘Catholic bishops…lamented is free to create a ‘Catholic’ school free from government their exclusion from the process of policy making and agenda and control as ‘the school is not bound by the National consultation’. It can be argued that this exclusion of the Curriculum, its guidelines are followed insofar as they are Catholic hierarchy from the decision-making process, helpful or practicable…All subjects are taught in harmony was perhaps a bid by government to stop Catholic with the Faith, for it impossible for faith and reason to be at schools from creating a strict Catholic identity in pupils. variance with each other’. (Interview with Fr Patrick Summers, The results of this can be seen in the so-called ‘Catholic’ education provided by state funded Catholic schools, which St Michael’s School) I witnessed first-hand in the course of my research. The whole of the school’s life and the identity of the pupils Fundamental change to Catholic education was accepted are formed to be ‘Catholic’, and all other aspects of education because of a mixture of the revolution in the Catholic Church, come secondary to this. This corresponds very closely to the and educational reforms pioneered by the government. concept of Catholic education espoused before the government intervention in the 1960s. On top of this, the Church was in ‘substantial financial problem’ because of the voluntary aided status. This led to a situation in which the education provided by state-funded Research findings Catholic schools was no longer purely Catholic, but instead After completing interviews and observations at the two was an education created to conform to a government agenda schools it was very obvious that both have very different to secure funding. approaches to Catholic education. The SSPX school has ‘The generally favourable attitude of Catholic leaders (perhaps unsurprisingly) deliberately stayed away from and thinkers to the general principles of comprehensive the government ideology of ‘education for all’. It has forgone education…of social justice, and of service to the whole funding to retain independence from the government’s community and to the poor’. (Judge, Faith-based Schools agenda for faith schools, which requires an undogmatic and the State, 2001:225) approach to education. The SSPX keeps to textbooks and

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ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

COMMENT

Dear Editor... We’re Women and We felt Welcome at the Old Rite From Jane Horton: I read Corrina Bruce’s letter [Mass of Ages 183] with interest. Having started attending Extraordinary Form Mass about a year and a half ago as a 50 year old woman with, in many respects, less traditional Catholic views, I have been surprised at the diversity and moderation of ‘Trads’. All those l have encountered attend EF Masses because they are looking for a more prayerful liturgy, not because they have extremist views. I would take issue too with Corrina’s assumption that it is unacceptable to have extremist views. It will be a sad day, when we police people’s thoughts and only allow expression of the party line... I would not give up EF Masses because some people hold different views. Extremists exist at both ends of the Church. A major strength of the EF Mass is that it is impervious to personalities and parish politics. Fr O’Donnell is absolutely right in his letter [Mass of Ages 183]. The Novus Ordo can be every bit as dignified, and prayerful as the Extraordinary Form. Both should, and can, be a prayer to God. It takes a good priest to manage this balance in the Ordinary Form, precisely because it is so open to domination by parish politics. The Church needs the new Mass, because it will always be more accessible to the majority of people. But we should not muzzle ‘Trads’ who, despite some

other resources from the 1950s, to maintain a sense of ‘Catholic purity’ in its teaching. The academic aspect of education very much came secondary to the faith, with the main task of the school to teach pupils to be Catholic. In contrast, the state Catholic school has followed government advice on religious education, and has created a school environment for the pupils where all religions are taught and kept on an equal footing with each other. Cohesion within society is created by people having an understanding of the faiths of others (the social cohesion agenda). This encourages Catholic schools to teach about other faiths in addition to Catholicism. (Note, the Catholic hierarchy encourages the practice of teaching about other faiths in Catholic schools). Although there was some teaching on specifically Catholic doctrines and dogmas, such as the seven sacraments and preparation for Confirmation, this was not such a priority as it was in the SSPX School. There was also no sense of Catholicism as absolute truth and this was not taught by any staff in the school. The consequence was a much weaker sense of Catholic identity, as pupils were taught a variety of religions, with Catholicism not being placed above but alongside them. Also, there was no mention of eternal salvation, and what a person must do to ‘get to heaven’. Such issues were not raised in any of the interviews or observations made in the state funded school.

unusual views, do at least stand for the reintroduction of reverence into our sacred liturgy.

From Clare Stevens: It is sad that Corinna Bruce feels so alienated from the Old Rite and that for, whatever reason, she felt unwelcome. My own experience was so different. I showed up, wearing jeans to an Old Rite Mass, partly out of curiosity and partly because it was at a convenient time. I walked in, a little apprehensive, but there didn’t appear to be any dress code and the congregation was small but apparently diverse. I did not feel out of place. An altar server welcomed me and made sure I had the right booklet. He asked if I’d take up the offertory collection, which I did. I felt immediately at home and part of proceedings. More, I felt a palpable peace and a link to the past which touched me at a profound level. I have since been to other regular Traditional Masses in and around Nottingham and always felt accepted. I feel strongly that the appeal of the Traditional Mass transcends culture, dress-code and politics. Many apologies to Corinna for mis-spelling her name in the last edition.

From the research, it appeared clear that St Michael’s school teaches children to be Catholics, whereas the state school teaches pupils about Catholicism. This is a very important distinction, and is, in my opinion, a summary of the differences between the schools. A Catholic identity which is an adherence to the beliefs and practices of Catholicism would (by definition) require a school to teach pupils to adhere to the teachings of the Catholic Church. The SSPX school was run by committed Catholics who imparted the Catholic faith to the pupils, whereas the other school taught about Catholicism, and used Catholicism as a backdrop to create a cohesive school community. It does not teach pupils to be Catholic as such. The research clearly shows where the failings of modern Catholic education have been. Children are not taught effectively about the faith and schools do not set good examples of how to live the Faith. Is it any wonder that so many children leave Catholic education today without any faith? On the other hand, the SSPX, who are not in full communion with the Church, offer an education that is more authentically ‘Catholic’ and imparts more effectively the faith to the children attending the school. So, if you have children, think very carefully where you send them to school. A ‘Catholic’ school may not in reality be very Catholic at all. *This article is a shortened version of the original thesis of 15000 words

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TIMES PAST AND LITURGICAL CALENDAR

In Illo Tempore

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ack copies of the Society’s magazines – from 30, 20 and 15 years ago – reveal the key role that women members have played in the LMS down the years. In May 1985, three of the ten candidates for committee membership were women, while the late LMS secretary Sue Coote’s influence as a driving force was clear. See page 10 for a tribute to Sue. A decade later, in May 1995, women were acting as sole reps for seven dioceses – some for two different areas. (And, incidentally, some current reps, including Jeremy Boot, were in evidence, indicating the long years of service by the LMS’s redoubtable members.) In the year 2000, meanwhile, there were eight different women solely representing dioceses from A&B to Birmingham, from Lancaster to Liverpool and Middlesbrough.

News Bulletin No.64 MAY 1985 Report on the General Assembly of FIUV by Mrs Sue Coote INDIA. No permissions. The All India Lay Congress is very concerned about the paganisation or Hinduisation of Mass. GERMANY. Requests under the Indult have been turned down although the most outrageous liturgies are tolerated. ITALY. The press was negative. 25 dioceses were approached. Five bishops refused and five agreed. The rest did not reply.

Newsletter 104 May 1995 The Universe became interested in the activities of the Latin Mass Society in the archdiocese [of Liverpool] and, in a survey of Catholic life in the area, gave details about the Tridentine Rite Masses which are celebrated here each week. The Catholic Pictorial (the diocesan paper) after reading this survey, decided it would like to do the same…The Catholic Times followed suit. By Miss Joan Diamond.

Newsletter No 124 MAY 2000 Mantilla – Sell Out or Sacramental by Rosemary Enright I suppose I was a modern young woman, influenced by the feminist writers, Simone de Beauvoir and Germaine Greer. With that background I readily equated the mantilla or headscarf worn in the church with the 1950s housewife’s frilly cocktail apron. Both were…badges of feminine submission to male authority…the mantilla or headscarf in church proved its wearer the victim of priestly misogyny based on St Paul’s ‘notorious’ strictures. But so what? The authority of neither living man nor the apostle is really at issue here. All that matters is the authority of God…

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ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

LITURGICAL CALENDAR MAY 2015

Sun 10 V SUNDAY after EASTER II Cl W Mon 11 SS PHILLIP § & JAMES § Aps II Cl R (Rogation Day) Tue 12 SS NEREUS, ACHILLEUS, DOMITILLA V & PANCRAS MM III Cl R (Rogation Day) Wed 13 VIGIL of the ASCENSION II Cl W (Rogation Day) Thu 14 ASCENSION of OUR LORD I Cl W Fri 15 S JOHN BAPTIST de la SALLE C III Cl W Sat 16 S UBALDUS B C III Cl W Sun 17 SUNDAY after the ASCENSION of OUR LORD II Cl W Mon 18 S VENANTIUS M III Cl R Tue 19 S PETER CELESTINE P C III Cl W Wed 20 S BERNARDINE of SIENA C III Cl W Thu 21 FERIA IV Cl W Fri 22 FERIA IV Cl W Sat 23 VIGIL of PENTECOST (Whitsun Eve) I Cl R Sun 24 WHIT SUNDAY (Pentecost) I Cl R Mon 25 WHIT MONDAY I Cl R Tue 26 WHIT TUESDAY I Cl R Wed 27 WHIT WEDNESDAY (Ember Day) I Cl R Thu 28 WHIT THURSDAY I Cl R Fri 29 WHIT FRIDAY (Ember Day) I Cl R Sat 30 WHIT SATURDAY (Ember Day) I Cl R Sun 31 FEAST of the MOST HOLY TRINITY I Cl W

JUNE 2015

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1 S ANGELA MERICI V III Cl W 2 FERIA IV Cl G 3 FERIA IV Cl G 4 CORPUS CHRISTI I Cl W 5 S BONIFACE B M III Cl R SH 6 S NORBERT B C III Cl W IH 7 II SUNDAY after PENTECOST II Cl G 8 FERIA IV Cl G 9 FERIA IV Cl G 10 S MARGARET Q W III Cl W 11 S BARNABAS § Ap III Cl R 12 MOST SACRED HEART of JESUS I Cl W 13 S ANTHONY of PADUA C D III Cl W 14 III SUNDAY after PENTECOST II Cl G 15 FERIA IV Cl G 16 FERIA IV Cl G 17 S GREGORY BARBARIGO B C III Cl W 18 S EPHREM the SYRIAN Deacon C D III Cl W 19 S JULIANA FALCONIERI V III Cl W 20 OUR LADY’S SATURDAY IV Cl W 21 IV SUNDAY after PENTECOST II Cl G 22 S PAULINUS B C III Cl W 23 VIGIL of the NATIVITY of S JOHN the BAPTIST § II Cl V 24 NATIVITY of S JOHN the BAPTIST § I Cl W 25 S WILLIAM Ab III Cl W 26 SS JOHN § & PAUL § MM III Cl R 27 OUR LADY’S SATURDAY IV Cl W 28 V SUNDAY after PENTECOST II Cl G 29 SS PETER § & PAUL § Aps I Cl R 30 COMMEMORATION of S PAUL § Ap III Cl R

JULY 2015

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1 MOST PRECIOUS BLOOD of OLJC I Cl R 2 VISITATION of the BVM II Cl W 3 S IRENAEUS B M III Cl R SH 4 OUR LADY’S SATURDAY IV Cl G 5 VI SUNDAY after PENTECOST II Cl G 6 FERIA IV Cl G 7 SS CYRIL & METHODIUS BB CC III Cl W 8 S ELIZABETH Q W III Cl W 9 FERIA IV Cl G 10 SEVEN HOLY BROTHERS MM & SS RUFINA & SECUNDA VV MM 11 OUR LADY’S SATURDAY IV Cl W 12 VII SUNDAY after PENTECOST II Cl G 13 FERIA IV Cl G 14 S BONAVENTURE B C D III Cl W 15 S HENRY Emperor C III Cl W 16 FERIA IV Cl G 17 FERIA IV Cl G 18 S CAMILLUS de LELLIS C III Cl W 19 VIII SUNDAY after PENTECOST II Cl G 20 S JEROME EMILIANI C III Cl W 21 S LAWRENCE of BRINDISI C D III Cl W 22 S MARY MAGDALEN Penitent III Cl W 23 S APOLLINARIS B M III Cl R 24 FERIA IV Cl G 25 S JAMES § Ap II Cl R 26 IX SUNDAY after PENTECOST II Cl G 27 FERIA IV Cl G 28 SS NAZARIUS & CELSUS MM & VICTOR I P M & INNOCENT I P C 29 S MARTHA V III Cl W 30 FERIA IV Cl G 31 S IGNATIUS C III Cl W

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OUR LADY’S SATURDAY IV Cl W X SUNDAY after PENTECOST II Cl G FERIA IV Cl G S DOMINIC C III Cl W DEDICATION of S MARY of the SNOWS III Cl W TRANSFIGURATION of OLJC II Cl W S CAJETAN C III Cl W SH S JOHN MARY VIANNEY C III Cl W


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

CROSSWORD

Mass of Ages Crossword (AF5) May 2015 Across 1 Decorated or carved screen at the back of an altar (7) 5 Architect who built 11 Shrine Church and ‘The Grange’ next door! (5) 8 ‘Ecce Homo’, ‘behold the …’ (3) 9 O  ld name for the Feast celebrated on 11 Nov., an association with the French city of Tours (9) 10 Colour of envy it is said (5) 11 Saint who landed near 1 Down sent by Pope Gregory the Great to convert England (9) 14 Gloria in excelsis Deo .. .. ….. pax hominibus [‘The Gloria’ in the Mass] (2,2,5) 18 See 16 Down 21 That which a person has for contributing or achieving (9) 22 Polite address to 8 (3) 23 A mediaeval pilgrim’s pouch or share certificate (5) 24 Christe …. …, Christ hear us (e.g. in Litany to Our Lady) (7)

[Alan Frost : Mar. 2015]

ANSWERS FOR LAST TIME: ACROSS: 1. Jericho 5. Waugh 8. Dog 9. Ritualism 10. Canes 11. Theorists 14. Easter Egg 18. Inigo 21. MacMillan 22. Ops 23. Slade 24. Nullify DOWN: 1. Judica Me 2. Regina 3. Christie 4. Octave 5. Wear 6. Unions 7. Hume 12. Regional 13. Stronsay 15. Sancta 16. Evelyn 17. Tivoli 19. Amos 20 Sine

Down 1 Town in Kent where Cardinal Burke celebrated Pontifical High Mass during his visit in March (8) 2 Dead look-alike in the campanile? (6) 3 Commanding note fifth in the diatonic scale? (8) 4 The ‘Second ……’ period of recovery of Catholicism in the 19th century. (6) 5 Peace in France (4) 6 Constellatory link to Roman twins in Acts 28:11 (6) 7 Nil …. bonum, (say) nothing but good (about the dead) (4) 12 Being in chains, as with St. Peter or slaves (8) 13 Latin phrase inserted in book indicating library it came from (2,6) 15 Hanc ….., spoken by the priest as bell rings approaching the Consecration (6) 16 & 18 Acr: Antiphon to Our Lady chanted from Holy Saturday to the Eve of Trinity Sunday (6,5) 17 Why it goes with faith (6) 19 Work in Latin (4) 20 To break stones for a purpose, especially flint (4)

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Entries for this time should be submitted by 30 May 2015 – a prize will be awarded to the winning entry. The winners last time were Dennis & Mollie Martin of Exeter, they win a copy of Tony Reynolds’ book St Nicholas Owen: Priest-Hole Maker.

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ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

ST WILFRID’S, YORK

Serving Future Generations of York Catholics By Paul Waddington

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mong the 47 churches of medieval York, one was dedicated to St Wilfrid. After the reformation, York’s churches were rationalised and several closed. St Wilfrid’s parish was merged with St Michael-le-Belfrey and the church itself was demolished in 1558. Catholics in post-reformation York would occasionally attend a clandestine Mass said by a visiting priest in a private house, such as St Margaret Clitherow’s in The Shambles. More frequently, they would have travelled to one of the larger houses outside York, where priests were concealed. Life gradually became easier for Catholics and the first record of a priest openly living in the city is in 1710. In 1742, the Vicar Apostolic, Edward Dicconson, established a mission in York with a priest living at Little Blake St. This was a very narrow street, also known as Lob Lane, following the alignment of the present Duncombe Place. In 1760, a chapel was opened on the south side of the street. It is likely that this was merely a room in the priest’s house, as Catholic churches remained illegal until the Second Catholic Relief Act of 1791. In 1802, a new, larger chapel was built on the opposite side of Little Blake St. With memories of the Gordon Riots lingering, the new chapel was hidden behind an existing house. This is the site of today’s St Wilfrid’s. Still described as the Little Blake St chapel, the new building was in the style of a nonconformist chapel, with galleries on three sides, and was said to accommodate a 700-strong congregation. It had no bell or steeple, as these were prohibited by the 1791 Act – which was repealed by the Catholic Emancipation Act of 1829. Development of the railways were having a major impact on York, which still had only one bridge across the Ouse. It was decided to build a second bridge across the river. The site of the new bridge was fixed at Lendal Ferry. The Dean of the Minster at the time, named Duncombe, argued for Little Blake St to be widened, because of concerns over the impact of traffic on the Minster. He got his way, and all the buildings on the south side, including the original mission at No 7, were demolished. A wide carriageway, named Duncombe Place, replaced narrow Little Blake Street, providing the opportunity for a prestigious church to be built on the site of the 1802 chapel, now within sight of the Minster’s West doors. A plan, to build a new church worthy of a great City, was revived, and taken up enthusiastically by many of the landed Catholic families of Yorkshire. Money was quickly accumulated, and George Goldie, whose family was prominent in the parish, was appointed architect. He had already built St Vincent’s church in Sheffield, which opened in 1856, and was busy with St Pancras’s in Ipswich, which opened in 1861. George Goldie was clearly intent on creating a new York landmark, for the church he designed dominates Duncombe Place. Although usually described as gothic revival, Goldie

St Wilfrid’s York/Photo by Joseph Shaw

devised a style of his own that incorporated some classical features, most notably Corinthian columns, which he used to decorate nearly every feature of the building. The church cost £10,000 and opened in 1864. It was dedicated to St Wilfrid, and succeeded St George’s as the pro-cathedral for the Diocese of Beverley, a status it maintained until the diocese was split into the Dioceses of Leeds and Middlesbrough in 1878. Its chief external feature, is a massive tower, so placed that, from some angles, it appears to be taller than the towers of York Minster, although in reality this is far from the case. The tower rises from a solid base to a height of 147 feet and is capped by a steeply pitched slate roof, a design that Goldie was to use in later churches. The louvres of the bell chamber, adorned as they are with Corinthian columns, were given particular prominence. Besides the tower, the other striking external feature is the west portal. The twin doors are beneath a tympanum made from an ensemble of four gothic arches, each supported by Corinthian columns, and the whole is surmounted by a gable-shaped hood. As a backdrop to the altar, Goldie placed five large paintings high up on the sanctuary wall, the central one being of the crucifixion. Beneath are the carved figures of the four evangelists, each sitting at a Corinthian column writing desk. Interspersed between these are the busts of several Old Testament characters. As if guarding the sanctuary, Goldie provided two much bigger statues: one of St Michael and opposite is St Joseph with the Child Jesus. Originally, there were two rows of richly carved choir stalls on each side of the sanctuary. Not surprisingly, Goldie designed the arcading of the nave around Corinthian columns. These seem unduly stout and give the church a heavy appearance. The windows of the north aisle all contain stained glass. The nave is lit by clear glass windows at clerestory level. Writing in the 1930s, Professor Niklaus Pevsner describes it as ‘all very massive and assertive’. More recently the Catholic architectural historian, Patrick Nutgens used the single word hideous for his description. At one time three priests were resident, but since the mid1980s the parish has been served by a single priest. Faced with insufficient clergy to staff the churches of the diocese, Bishop Drainey sought assistance from the Oxford Oratory, which was already considering the formation of a new Oratory. The size of the presbytery and the prominent position of the church attracted the priests of the Oxford Oratory to St Wilfrid’s Church, and they took charge of the parish in the autumn of 2013. Fr Richard Duffield was appointed parish priest, and he is assisted by Fr Nicholas Edmunds-Smith, whenever he can be spared from the Oxford Oratory.

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LMS YEAR PLANNER

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

LMS NOTABLE EVENTS Friday, 22 May - Tuesday 26 May Chartres Pilgrimage

Aylesford: Matthew Schellhorn conducts the choir – Joseph Shaw

Sunday 26 July to Sunday 2 August 2015 St Catherine’s Trust Summer School The St Catherine’s Trust Summer School is back this Summer, at the Franciscan Retreat Centre at Pantasaph CH8 8PE, in North Wales. There is no fixed fee but parents and guardians are invited to pay what they can afford. Alongside the Summer School, the LMS’s Latin Course for adults will take place. Accommodation at the retreat centre is limited,

Chartres: On the 70-mile walk – Joseph Shaw

Pilgrims will travel by Eurostar from London to join thousands more in Paris for the start of the 70 mile walk to Notre Dame Cathedral, Chartres. The theme of the pilgrimage is ‘Jesus Christ, Saviour of the World’ and pilgrims will meditate during the journey on the Incarnation, Redemption and Resurrection. The LMS has sponsored fifteen of the young people.

Sunday, 5 July Holywell Pilgrimage The annual LMS pilgrimage to Holywell will commence with celebration of High Mass at 2.30pm, followed by a Rosary procession to the well and veneration of the relic of St Winefride. The celebrant will be Fr Richard Bailey Cong. Orat., assisted by Fr Edmund Montgomery as Deacon.

Saturday, 11 July 2015 Annual General Meeting To be held in Westminster Cathedral Hall, Ambrosden Avenue, London SW1P 1QH at 11.00am. The guest speaker will be Prof. Roberto de Mattei, on ‘The importance of Tradition in our times’. The AGM will be followed by High Mass in the Cathedral at 2.00pm. The celebrant will be Bishop John Sherrington, titular Bishop of Hilta and Auxiliary Bishop of Westminster.

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Walsingham: A regular feature of the pilgrimage season – John Aron


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

LMS YEAR PLANNER

2015 ROLLING YEAR PLANNER

Holywell: Men, women and children on the annual LMS pilgrimage – Joseph Shaw

so Latin Course participants will stay at the Pilgrims’ Guest House in Holywell. Application forms for these events are available from the Trust’s website www.stcatherinestrust.org

Saturday, 14 November Annual Requiem Mass

Saturday, 1 August LMS Pilgrimage to Wrexham Cathedral The pilgrimage, in association with St Catherine’s Trust, will be begin with High Mass at 11am. Benediction and Veneration of the relic of St Richard Gwyn (Patron of the Society) will be at 2.00pm. The Mass will be a votive of St Richard Gwyn and the celebrant will be Fr Mark Kirby O.S.B. of Silverstream Priory, Co.Meath, Ireland.

Thursday 27 to Sunday 30 August Walking Pilgrimage to Walsingham The 6th annual walking pilgrimage for the conversion of England will take place during the August Bank Holiday weekend. Pilgrims will meet at Ely on the Thursday evening (27 August); Mass will take place early on Friday morning and the three-day walk of 55 miles will then commence. Sung or High Mass will be celebrated every day and Confessions will be available throughout the pilgrimage. Traditional devotions and hymns will be sung en route and spiritual talks from our pilgrimage chaplain. Full details are on our website.

Saturday, 3 October Aylesford Pilgrimage The annual LMS pilgrimage to the shrine of Our Lady at Aylesford, set in the beautiful Kent countryside. St Simon Stock, of the Order of Carmelites, received the Scapular from the hands of the Blessed Mother, at this location. The brown scapular of Mount Carmel has become one of the most common sacramentals in the Church, and is a great Marian devotion. Photos: Joseph Shaw

Cardinal Burke with Jamie Bogle – Joseph Shaw

High Mass of Requiem in Westminster Cathedral at 2.00pm, celebrated by His Eminence, Raymond Cardinal Burke. This is our annual Mass offered for the repose of the souls of all deceased members of the Latin Mass Society. Before Mass, a wreath is laid at the tomb of Cardinal Heenan, in grateful thanks for his role in helping to preserve the Traditional Mass in England and Wales.

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ART AND DEVOTION

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Holy Kinship Triptych of the Confraternity of St Anne in Leuven, 1509. Quinten Metsys 1465-1530 Caroline Shaw

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his calm group of men, women and children shows Our Lord as a baby boy surrounded by members of His maternal family. Our Lady is seated on the left in pale blue, while her mother, St Anne, is seated on the right, and they hold the Infant Jesus between them. Surrounding them are other members of the family – Jesus’ grandfather, cousins, uncles and aunts. This family group is one of a large number of paintings, sculptures and engravings illustrating The Holy Kinship – Jesus’ relatives on His mother’s side – which were produced in Germany and the Low Countries during the 15th and 16th centuries. The Holy Kinship offered an alternative lineage for Our Lord to that presented in the Gospels. According to Jacobus de Voraigne’s 14th century ‘Golden Legend’, St Anne was directly descended from King David, and thus Our Lord had a stronger link to the Old Testament patriarch through His maternal ancestry than He did through His earthly father, St Joseph. The ‘Golden Legend’ gives a full account of St Anne’s family. First she married Joachim, and gave birth to Mary, the mother of Our Lord. When Joachim died, Anne was said to have taken a second husband named Cleophas, and this produced another daughter, Mary Cleophas, who was given in marriage to Alphaeus. They had four sons: St James the Lesser, St Jude Thaddeus, Simon, and Joseph the Just, also called Barsabas. When Cleophas died, Anne took a third husband, Salomas. This marriage produced a third daughter, Mary Salomas, who married Zebedee. They had two sons: St James the Greater and St John the Evangelist. By this account, four of the Apostles were, therefore, first cousins of Jesus. In addition, St Anne’s sister, Hysmeria, was the mother of St Elizabeth, who gave birth to St John the Baptist. Our Lord’s maternal family tree was firmly established as fact at the time of this painting, and was taken up enthusiastically as proof that the ‘brothers’ of Jesus mentioned in the Gospels were actually His cousins; a belief that St Jerome had defended in the fourth century. In this image, we see St Joachim standing on the far left, together with St Joseph, Alphaeus and Zebedee. The men stand slightly apart from the women and children, and this was a standard part of the Holy Kinship iconography at the time. The men of Our Lord’s family were generally depicted as upright, devout yet somewhat self-contained, while the women took centre-stage. On the left of Our Lady is St Anne’s second daughter, Mary Cleophas, with her children James, Simon, Jude and little Joseph, who gazes at a book with an illustration of King David, emphasizing the family lineage. St Anne’s third daughter, Mary Salomas, is seated at her mother’s feet with her two sons, James and his brother John, who holds a book and carries an inkwell attached to his waist, hinting at his later role as the great Evangelist. The children are looking at books and interacting with their mothers in a very natural way. An emphasis on education at home, and in particular on teaching the children to read, was an important

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aspect of the iconography of the Holy Kinship. St Anne was very attractive to women of the time, because although she had conceived Mary without sin, she was a wife and a mother, and thus it was easy for most women to relate to her. Her exemplary life was held up as a model for all women, and she was often invoked as an aid to chastity and continence, for finding husbands, conceiving children and successful pregnancies, and for family life and widowhood. The members of the Confraternity of St Anne in Leuven, who commissioned this work in 1509, were among the thousands of men and women throughout Germany and the Low Countries who joined confraternities dedicated to the cult of St Anne in the 15th and 16th centuries. These confraternities were part of a general expansion of lay worship at the time: the recitation of the rosary and meditation on the Seven Sorrows of Mary were also gaining popularity. Membership of a confraternity devoted to St Anne involved an annual fee, and stipulated attendance at a confraternity church once a week to say one’s prayers in front of an image such as this one. Members were encouraged to commission a work of art depicting St Anne and her family, if they could afford it, or at least to contribute to the making of a work of art dedicated to her. This, naturally, tended to attract the more well-to-do, urban members of the population, although the advent of printing meant that all, but the very poorest, were able to afford inexpensive engravings of the Holy Kinship, which they could hang in their homes to aid their devotions. Hymns, litanies and offices were written in honour of St Anne, and small books containing prayers, details of St Anne’s life, examples of her intercessionary miracles, and accounts of her genealogy, were extremely popular. St Anne’s position as a ‘chosen vessel’ of God, at the heart of God’s plan for salvation, made her a powerful saint. The popularity of the Holy Kinship devotion also had a great deal to do with the fact that, in praying before an image such as this one, the faithful were addressing their prayers to no fewer than seven saints, plus Our Lady and, of course, Our Lord Himself. Interest in the Holy Kinship began to decline in the 16th century, mainly because of the increasing acceptance of the doctrine of the Immaculate Conception. St Paul’s advice that widows should not re-marry had always been something of a stumbling block, and it began to be considered incongruous that the woman who conceived Mary without sin should go on to marry twice more and produce more children in the normal way. By the end of the 16th century, devotion to the Holy Kinship had all but died out, and veneration of St Anne changed its emphasis. No longer depicted as the dignified matriarch at the centre of a large family, she was usually shown instead as a pious widow, together with Our Lady and the Infant Jesus, bowing her head and accepting a blessing from her divine grandson. In this new imagery, St Anne became a model for the worshipper, a receiver of grace, showing us how to pray and humbly invoke Our Lady and Our Lord for our salvation.


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

ART AND DEVOTION

© Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels – photo: J. Geleyns / Ro scan

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INTERVIEW WITH BISHOP MARK O’TOOLE

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

An Interview with Bishop Mark O’Toole

Western Rising for the Old Rite

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ishop Mark O’Toole is open minded. This may be a surprise to critics of the Church, who have very strange notions about Catholic bishops. But the 51-year old Londoner is not dogmatic – other than about dogma, of course. Even some inside the Church may be not expecting, though, that the new bishop of Plymouth would be so open to the Traditional Mass. But the former rector of Allen Hall, the seminary for the Westminster archdiocese, and a former private secretary to Cardinal Cormac, is not only ‘open’ to learning to celebrate Mass in the Extraordinary Form, he is actively working to ensure good provision of the Old Rite in his diocese. In an interview with Mass of Ages, Bishop Mark, who has been at Plymouth for just over a year, disclosed his plans to ‘normalise’ attendance at Old Rite Masses; create a new centre for Traditional liturgy in the east of his diocese; encourage traditional orders to take over a parish and provide pastoral support. And he praised the ‘fidelity’ of those who like to attend Mass in the Extraordinary Form. The bishop, whose family come from the Connemara Gaeltacht, further said that he can envisage that some seminarians may learn to celebrate in the Extraordinary Form, if that is what their bishops wish, and he argued that there is no danger from the plurality of Rites. With no prompting at all, Bishop Mark said: ‘It is very clear to me that there is a significant number of people who

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are attached to Mass in the traditional form. One of the things I have seen is quite a number of letters about this. I would like to establish a regularity of provision and systematised provision.’ Plymouth is a very large geographical diocese, encompassing as it does Cornwall, Devon and most of Dorset. But it does not have a Catholic community to match. According to Bishop Mark, between three and four per cent of the population admit to being Catholic. Parishes are far and wide and Plymouth has not been an Old Rite ‘hot spot’. The young (in episcopal terms) bishop is hoping all that will change. Bishop Mark, who is on the Bishops’ national committee for evangelisation, would like to see a significant increase in the Catholic population of Plymouth. ‘If we could get to 8-10 per cent in the Plymouth diocese who were practising, that would be wonderful. It would triple our numbers.’ But he also wants to see significant improvements in the provision of the Traditional Mass. ‘People are travelling vast distances [to attend Old Rite Mass in the Plymouth diocese]. I want to support that desire,’ he said. Bishop Mark revealed that, before Christmas, he ‘asked the priests who are saying these Masses to come together’. He said: ‘I have asked them to put together a list of what is available, so that we can advertise it…I’d like it to have


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015 a presence on the web – so that people can access it, so people can find out what is already being provided… make it more efficient in terms of meeting peoples’ pastoral needs.’ But the bishop’s ambitions do not stop there. ‘In terms of a more creative venture, I had a very good meeting with Fr Armand de Malleray [of the FSSP]. One of the things I was very interested to hear from him is that there are a significant number of seminarians, who are originally from England, studying in Nebraska. Some are quite well advanced. I was interested in whether they would be interested in manning a parish in the diocese. I would be open to that.’ One of Bishop Mark’s concerns is to establish proper provision, though, not just have another EF Mass celebrated. ‘It is not just about making provision for the celebration of Mass. There is also a question of how you pastorally accompany the people who come to it – the priestly support in terms of catechesis and support and advice.’ He added: ‘I don’t like the idea of someone just going round and saying Mass here, there and everywhere. It’s much better to have some consistent provision. Which provides people, not just with the celebration of the sacraments, but also with the pastoral side.’ His vision is to create a centre for traditional liturgy. There is currently provision at Lanherne, in the west of the diocese. That is already a hub for some. Bishop Mark said: ‘If we had something around Exeter, the east Devon part of the diocese, that would help.’ Would that mean, though, that Traditional Massgoers would continue to be ‘outsiders’ – rather than part of their local parish? ‘If there is regular provision, then that will become their parish,’ he said. ‘People travel anyway.’ And Bishop Mark said: ‘To have someone [a diocesan priest] say a Mass on a Sunday morning – would mean they would have to be taken out of parish work. I would be very open to what riches groups [such as the FSSP] would bring.’ Having said that, Bishop Mark does not rule out the idea of the Extraordinary Form becoming part of life in an ordinary parish. And he acknowledged that most who attend such Masses in the diocese are not members of the LMS. ‘…I’m open to the normalisation, certainly. I think there is some place for that. I think also we need to look… at the whole place of Latin and chant in the liturgy because I think there is a bridge there. When a lot of people talk about their love of the old Mass, it is often their love of the Gregorian chant and what goes with it. Those things should be introduced and a normal part of Catholic celebrations.’ The bishop is aware, however, that there can be problems between Old and New Rite congregations. He described tensions between groups of laity as ‘unfortunate’. But, he said, there are also difficulties for a priest trying to minister to both groups. However, Bishop Mark said: ‘It could be possible. It might come to that, I’m open to that suggestion.’

INTERVIEW WITH BISHOP MARK O’TOOLE

Not that like, like this: The very good-natured Bishop Mark in full flow /photos Fergus Atkinson

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INTERVIEW WITH BISHOP MARK O’TOOLE

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‘How can you say the people who celebrated it for 1,500 years [were wrong] – you can’t ban it or regard it as lesser. It is a matter of recognising that it has a legitimate place.’

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There was a clear sense of mission in the bishop, as well as a desire to embrace both adherents of the Old Rite and the Traditional Mass itself. ‘I am very aware that people feel slightly marginalised,’ he said. ‘That’s unfortunate because it’s very clear to me that they have a great love of the Church and the Church’s liturgy and great faithfulness. One of the things I have always been impressed by is when you reflect on the nature of Church…many of the saints’ experience was of the Tridentine Mass, this is what formed them. So the thing for me is one of integration, and normalisation.’ Bishop Mark said: ‘How can you say the people who celebrated it for 1,500 years [were wrong] – you can’t ban it or regard it as lesser. It is a matter of recognising that it has a legitimate place.’ And the bishop accepted that the Old Rite has appeal, especially among the young: ‘For some, this [the Old Rite] will be the thing that attracts them [to the Church]. This is just part of the Catholic richness. Why should we say that people can’t encounter Christ through this? They should have the opportunity.’ But he maintained the openness needs to go both ways: ‘As long as people recognise that it is a way of holiness, not the only way…you can’t be exclusive. That’s the attitude that people object to.’ Pope Benedict envisaged the two forms of the Rite informing each other. And he believes this is a two way street: ‘What can the LMS and the FSSP and the others learn? I suspect it’s, and I suspect they are trying to do this, is the sense of engagement with pastoral realities, the sense of imminence – the importance of people being accompanied in their faith...and Outreach to the world – The idea that we are fed and nourished and we gather together at the Mass and we need to bring that into the world.’ But the Bishop believes the existence of the two forms does not have to be a problem. He maintained: ‘The Catholic genius has always been to find the middle ground – both/and, not either/or. The Church recognises a diversity…the other wonderful insight that Pope Benedict brought is that they are two forms of the one Rite…You can be a Catholic and use a different language or a different form of the Mass and you are no less a Catholic...’ Pope Benedict’s wish for the two forms to be mutually enriching is a challenge, says Bishop Mark – to someone who grew up with the Ordinary Form. And it is a challenge the bishop, who is able to say Mass in Irish, is clearly keen personally to take up – by learning to celebrate the Traditional Latin Mass. ‘I’m open to it,’ he said. ‘It’s important. For me now the challenge is to learn the EF, give me a year or so – when I’ve got a bit more space in the diary. ‘…the key thing is attitude…the heart of the celebration is that you don’t get in the way. Christ is offering Himself… How do I not get in the way of that? The rubrics and so on really liberate…there is a truth in that. In that sense, even as a scriptural discipline, I can see there is an invitation there for me. It will help me enter more deeply, whenever I celebrate Mass...how can it not?’

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Traditional Priests’ Support Trust HMRC charitable status ref XR87762 'Sincere thanks to all those who have contributed to our website appeal for Fr G. It has raised £470 to date, mostly gift-aided. Please keep this priest in your prayers as his discernment continues.'

Since 2005 we have offered regular funding, in confidence, to individual priests resident in the UK, who are in need because they adhere to the traditional doctrine and liturgy of the Church and celebrate the Old Rite Mass exclusively. 13 Gladstone Road Headington Oxford OX3 8LL

www.traditional-priests.org.uk


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

REPS’ REPORTS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

DIOCESAN DIGEST

Mass of Ages quarterly round-up, Summer 2015

Cardinal Raymond Burke, Patron of the Order of Malta, celebrates Mass in March at the shrine church of St Augustine, Ramsgate/Photo courtesy St John the Evangelist and St Andrew, Deal, parish website

Arundel and Brighton Anne-Marie Mackie-Savage I am pleased to report that regular Masses are under way on the fourth Sunday of the month at the parish of Our Lady Immaculate and St Philip Neri, Uckfield. If you can travel, we now have Mass available each Sunday, bar the 5th, in the east and centre of the diocese at least. Anyone living west of Brighton, please contact me if you think you would be able to help establish a Mass in your area. Thanks to all the priests and servers and devotees of the Old Rite, who make these Masses happen. I would once again like to urge you chaps to consider serving. It is not something we ladies can volunteer for. It is not that hard to do. In the past young boys managed it! Knowledge of Latin is not a requirement. You only need to

know the bits you say and I am sure following along in a Missal has taught you most of it already. I know everyone is time-pressured, but we need more volunteers in parishes where the Mass is celebrated. At present, we have a hard core of servers who stand in for each other and travel to serve if they can. If we could have a few more volunteers, it would make a huge difference to morale, and it would mean I do not have to sound like a dud CD, stuck on repeat. Once again, my thanks to everyone who helps and supports the EF in our Diocese with their time and prayers. Tel: 01323 411 370 Email: amacsav@sky.com www.arundelbrightonlatinmasssociety.blogspot.com

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REPS’ REPORTS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

Birmingham & Black Country Louis Maciel The Birmingham Oratory held a very well attended High Mass on Ash Wednesday to mark the beginning of Lent, followed up by less well attended, but just as beautiful, High Masses for the Feasts of St Joseph and the Annunciation in March. The regular Sunday High Mass ensured there were also EF celebrations for Palm Sunday (at the slightly earlier time of 10am to accommodate a procession) and Easter Sunday. Our Lady of Perpetual Succour church celebrated a Low Mass on Easter Sunday, just as it did at Christmas and Easter last year, in addition to its usual Friday provision. There was

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015 even an extra Mass on Holy Monday to make up for the Mass lost due to Good Friday. I am pleased to report that the weekly Wednesday parish Low Masses at Halesowen continue, with the team of servers having grown from three to five. Monthly Masses continue on the 2nd Wednesday in Maryvale and last Friday at St Augustine’s in Solihull, thanks to the heroic efforts and serving skills of Kevin O’Connor, who, God willing, will be ordained to the permanent diaconate in June. Please keep him in your prayers. It was also pleasing to see how priests from the area are helping to maintain provision of the EF in North Staffordshire, while Fr Chavasse recovers from his illness, as reported by representative Alan Frost in the last quarter’s Mass of Ages. Tel: 07855 723445 E: louis.maciel@gmail.com W: http://birmingham-lms-rep.blogspot.co.uk/

N. Staffordshire Alan Frost

In the last Report, we were uncertain as to the situation beyond the short term with the loss of Sunday parish Masses at St Joseph’s Burslem. Masses had switched to the lovely and appropriate, if somewhat tucked away, church of Our Lady of the Assumption in the village of Swynnerton near Stone. However, the longer term picture is looking much rosier after parish priest Fr Paul Chavasse, Cong. Orat., had meetings with Archbishop Longley and Bishop McGough; the latter sending a blessing with his support. An interesting inclusion in a recent Mass was the brief ceremony of the admittance of one of the young altar boys into the Guild of St Stephen. A further uplifting sign was the fact that Masses were held in the Traditional Rite for both Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Fr Dykes and Fr Howell continue to celebrate the Old Rite in St Wulstan’s, Wolstanton and Oulton Abbey. Tel: 01270 768 144 Email: Alan.jfrost@btopenworld.com

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Fr Chavasse celebrating Mass at Our Lady of the Assumption, Swynnerton


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

REPS’ REPORTS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

Oxford area Joseph Shaw The new venue for the Extraordinary Form in Holy Trinity, Hethe is well established and the congregation is growing. Mass in the Old Rite takes place every Sunday at noon, and is sung on the second Sunday of each month and we’ve now had a High Mass as well. The parish priest, Fr Paul Lester, now says Low Mass on Saturdays at noon, and from Easter will be saying Low Mass on Fridays at 5pm. There will be a special celebration, with a polyphonic Mass, on 31 May for the patronal feast, Trinity Sunday. Please make an effort to come along to this very beautiful, historic church, which is north of Bicester. Many thanks are owed to Fr Lester for his initiative in starting these Masses. Also, of special note this quarter is the Oxford Oratory’s High Mass for the English Martyrs on 4 May. All the important Holy Days of the quarter are covered in the Oxford area, usually with Mass in more than one church. Please see the Mass listings for full details. Tel: 01993 812 874 Email: joseph.shaw@philosophy.ox.ac.uk www.oxfordlmsrep.blogspot.com

Worcester Margaret Parffrey A Traditional Mass started Holy Week at Spetchley, which concluded with an Easter Sunday Mass. Thanks and prayers to Fr Talbot and the Berkley family for use of their beautiful chapel. Also thanks to our faithful from Birmingham, who come to pray (and clean the church). Our Redditch Mass is celebrated by Fr Grynowski on the 1st Monday at 6pm. Our thanks to Melaine Bullivante for her support. Kidderminster continues under Fr Lamb on the 1st Sunday of the month and on Fridays at 7.30pm. There was also an Easter Sunday Mass at 3pm. Fr Draycott says Mass at Evesham every Tuesday at 7pm. Dates for the future include a Missa Cantata at Spetchley on 4 June.We pray for more priests to say Mass on Holy Days of Obligation and saints’ days. St Joseph pray for us.

Fr Paul Lester, Hethe/Photo Joseph Shaw

Please pray for the souls of all members who have died recently

Requiescant in Pace

Richard Arnold-Jones Dr Kevin Marshall Mark Roberts Every effort is made to ensure that this list is accurate and up-to-date. However, if you know of a recently deceased member whose name has not, so far, appeared on our prayer memorial, then please

Middlesbrough

contact the LMS, see page 2 for contact details.

Paul Waddington Provision of Extraordinary Form Mass in the Middlesbrough diocese will improve with the addition of a regular Low Mass in Hull at 6.30pm, on the first Wednesday of each month. This will start on Wednesday 6 May, and be at the Church of St Charles, with Fr Peter Mulholland as the usual celebrant. This arrangement has the support of Bishop Drainey, and is particularly welcome. It has been a long time since there have been regular Old Rite Masses in Hull, which is the largest centre of population in the diocese. The weekly midday Sunday Mass continues at St Wilfrid’s Church in York. Mgr Heslin tells me that the Sunday Mass at

Sacred Heart church in Redcar will be at 6pm in the summer months, but will revert to 11.30am in winter. Since there is no replacement for Mgr Heslin, if for any reason he is unable to offer Mass, it is advisable to telephone before travelling. We also have sung Vespers and Benediction every Sunday at 6pm at St Wilfrid’s in York, and the listings include extra Masses on major feast days. The pilgrimage in honour of St Margaret Clitherow and the martyrs of York will take place on Saturday 9 May, with Solemn Mass at 1.30pm followed by the usual procession visiting the shrine in The Shambles. This year, we will be joined by members of the Guild of Our Lady of Ransom. paul@gooleboathouse.co.uk 01757 638027

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REPS’ REPORTS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

REQUIEM FOR THE LAST PLANTAGENET KING: RICHARD III

Liverpool Jim Pennington Regular Sunday and Holyday Extraordinary Form Masses continue in three parishes as before. Two of these, in the northern part of the diocese, are not LMS-organised but are the initiative respectively of the Parish Priest of St Catherine Laboure, Farington, Fr Simon Henry, and the Institute of Christ the King, who provide the celebrant for the Masses at St Mary Magdalen, Penwortham. Fr Henry also offered a Solemn Requiem Mass at St Catherine’s on the occasion of the re-interment of the remains of King Richard III: there is a report of this Mass at Fr Henry’s blog offerimustibidomine. In addition, there are occasional EF Masses at other churches. Fr Sean Riley at Holy Cross in St Helens town offered a Missa Cantata on the Feast of the Epiphany, and again on the Feast of the Purification, with blessing of candles and procession. An Easter Sunday EF Mass is also in view. Our Palm Sunday Mass at St Anthony’s, Liverpool was a Missa Cantata offered by Fr Ian O’Shea, preceded by the blessing and procession of palms. Our thanks to Fr O’Shea for a very dignified and edifying celebration, which was a great joy to the large congregation. Fr Wood, formerly of Star of the Sea, Seaforth, continues to offer our Mass at St Anthony’s once a month, although he has been moved to a more distant parish. We should be most thankful to these busy diocesan priests for their continuing dedication to the Mass which we all love, sometimes in the face of less support than one would wish.

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Fr Simon Henry offers a Requiem Mass for Richard III at St Catherine Laboure church, Leyland., Lancs, LMS Liverpool rep, Jim Pennington can be seen serving ( right ) Photos/ Alan Frost


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

REPS’ REPORTS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

Lancaster Bob and Jane Latin We now have two very active centres in the diocese. The Traditional Mass is offered every Sunday evening at Our Lady & St Joseph, Carlisle, with a Missa Cantata at least once a month, and this has included Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Mass was also offered there for the Feasts of St Joseph and the Annunciation. Additionally, there was a High Mass for Our Lady of Lourdes at the church of Our Lady & St Wilfrid in Warwick Bridge. For the first time in many years, the Sacred Triduum was offered in the Extraordinary Form at St Walburge’s in Preston and there was Mass for Candlemas and a Lenten Retreat Day on ‘The Four Last Things’. We were very sad to hear the news of the death of Mrs Angela Hornyold-Strickland, who had given us such wonderful hospitality at Sizergh Castle for a number of years. The family is keen to continue having an EF Mass there and we are trying to match available priests and dates. Please check the website for details.

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING The AGM will take place in Westminster Cathedral Hall Ambrosden Avenue London SW1P 1QH

SATURDAY 11 JULY 2015 11.00am – doors open 10.30am The guest speaker will be Prof. Roberto de Mattei, on ‘The importance of Tradition in our times’ A buffet lunch, for all paid-up LMS members,will be provided directly after the AGM. There will be a charge of £5 per person to help defray costs. Please book in advance by calling the office 020 7404 7284 or email info@lms.org.uk.

HIGH MASS Celebrated by Bishop John Sherrington 2.00pm in Westminster Cathedral

Candlemas at St Walburge’s

There will be Mass on Ascension Thursday at St Walburge’s, and at Our Lady & St Joseph, Carlisle, both at 7.00 pm. There will also be Mass for Corpus Christi at Our Lady & St Joseph at 7.00 pm and this will be followed by all-night Eucharistic Adoration in reparation for offences against the Blessed Sacrament. For early birds, there will be Mass at 7.30 am at Our Lady & St Joseph for the Feast of SS Peter & Paul. Masses at St Peter’s Cathedral continue once a month, but there will not be a Mass in August. Please see the Mass Listings for all the details. Tel: 01524 412 987 Email: lancasterlms@gmail.com www.latinmasslancaster.blogspot.com

Nottingham Jeremy Boot We still have no Bishop one year on and no indication of how much longer we are likely to wait. This makes a long term strategy difficult. Masses continue with increased attendance as we come out of winter. It is still intended to centralise Masses at one venue, when possible. Our Masses meanwhile are: The Good Shepherd (Sat before 2nd Sunday, 4.45pm); Our Lady and St Patrick’s, The Meadows, Nottingham (3rd Sun, 2pm) and the Cathedral 3rd Wed 6.15pm in the Blessed Sacrament chapel. Our thanks to celebrants, servers, organist as usual, with a particular request for more servers please! Tel: 0115 913 1592

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REPS’ REPORTS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

MARCO’S PRIZE MUSIC

The £500 first prize in the inaugural Schellhorn music composition competition went to Marco Galvani, pictured here (right) with competition sponsor and LMS member, Matthew Schellhorn. As part of the prize, Marco’s piece, Ecce Quam Bonum, a setting of Psalm 133, was given its world premiere during the Easter vigil at St Mary Moorfield’s church, in the City of London. Marco, 20, from Prenton on the Wirral, is a secondyear music student at The Queen’s College, Oxford.

Nottingham South

Northampton (Beds. and Bucks)

Paul Beardsmore

Eric Friar

Masses at Holy Cross Priory continue as usual, and we remain most grateful to the Prior and SubPrior for offering these Masses for us – particularly given the increased pressure on their time recently, arising from the activities in Leicester surrounding the reburial of Richard III. In addition to the usual schedule, a sung Mass was offered at Holy Cross on the feast of St Joseph. Meanwhile, at St Peter’s, Leicester, Fr Cahill offered Mass for us on the feasts of the Purification and the Annunciation. Both Masses were sung. Weekly Masses continue at Oakham, where Fr Dye also celebrated a sung Requiem Mass at the end of January for the repose of the soul of Mackenzie Urquhart.

Weekly Sunday Mass (8am), and Masses on Holy Days of Obligation continue at Our Lady of Perpetual Succour under the care of the Priestly Fraternity of St Peter. At Sacred Heart, Flitwick, Fr Horgan and Fr Byrne have continued to celebrate weekly Sunday Mass (5pm) and a monthly last Thursday Mass (7.30pm), during Canon Dennis McSweeney’s absence. The monthly 3rd Friday Mass at St Francis of Assisi, Shefford (7.30pm) continues, thanks to the enthusiasm of Canon Bennie Noonan and the commitment of Fr Gerard Byrne. But, there has been some bad news. Canon Dennis has not recovered as expected. So it is likely that Flitwick 5pm Mass will cease after 31 May, because Fr Horgan will no longer be available to celebrate it. God willing, Canon Dennis will be well enough to celebrate Mass on Holy Days. Progress has also been slower than ideal with the introduction of Latin chant and vernacular hymns at Chesham Bois. Ivan Grimer has developed a beautiful book of hymns, which we hope to go forward with, as soon as we are certain that there will not be any copyright issues. Again, many thanks to Paul Rowntree, Eric Caudle, and the Di Falco and Grimer families for all their support in serving and singing at our Masses.

Nottingham North (Northamptonshire) In addition to the weekly Saturday Masses, Fr Byrne offered low Mass on Easter Day.

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ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

REPS’ REPORTS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

Menevia Tom and Elaine Sharpling Sunday Masses continue as usual with an extra Mass being offered by Fr Jason Jones on Ash Wednesday. This was very much appreciated and it was very encouraging to see some members of the parish taking the opportunity to attend. As we write, we are looking forward to a Missa Cantata for both Palm Sunday and Easter Sunday. Again we are indebted to Fr Jones for the opportunities given to the Newcastle Emlyn Schola. The number of servers was doubled when Seamus made a brief return to Wales from his university. However, lack of servers remains a concern and we continue to pray for another to share the load with Corey. Looking further ahead, we have plans for the Ascension, a May Procession and Corpus Christi. Email: tom.sharpling@btinternet.com

Fr Jason Jones and server at Palm Sunday Mass

Cardiff Andrew Butcher Masses in Hereford, Much Birch, Ledbury, Abergavenny and Cardiff are continuing as scheduled. Thank you to the handful of priests who keep them going. Please do your best to support these Masses by attending them. Without your support, they will not continue. Our priests celebrate these Masses in addition to their many other Masses and parish responsibilities. On Saturday 7 February, Fr Gareth Jones celebrated a Missa Cantata in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite in the pre-Reformation church of St Teilo, which is located in St Fagan’s museum Cardiff. The Mass was well attended, with more than 60 people in the congregation. Fr William St Teilo’s pre-Reformation church Isaac, the parish priest of St Teilo’s, Whitchurch sat in choir, along with Robert James, a seminarian for the Archdiocese of Cardiff. The Mass was a votive Mass for the Feast of St Teilo, which is normally celebrated on 9 February. Beautiful polyphony by Palestrina was used for the ordinary of the Mass. Missa Cantata in Cardiff – Sunday 26 July 2015. Pilgrimage, including a sung Mass and procession and recitation of the Holy Rosary to the place of martyrdom of St John Lloyd and St Phillip Evans followed by Benediction. Venue and time to be confirmed. Please visit the website for more details or contact the representative. Please continue to keep Dom Antony Tumelty OSB in your prayers at this time. All important updates can be found on our website.In Domino. T: 07905 609770 E: andrew.butcher@lmscardiff.org.uk Fr Gareth Jones and servers, including LMS Cardiff rep, W: www.lmscardiff.org.uk Andrew Butcher, third from right

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REPS’ REPORTS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Portsmouth

Reading

Peter Cullinane

Adrian Dulston

Numbers at both Portsmouth and Winchester remain at about three dozen, occasionally augmented at Portsmouth by Malayalam groups. An important development in St John’s Cathedral has been the increase in the pool of altar servers. For many months a father and teenage son team has been our mainstay and the father has recently instructed a Polish gentlemen, now working in this country, enabling him to build upon his skills as an altar server in the parish of his youth. In addition, thanks to the same instructor, we are delighted that an 11 year-old has shown himself to be a most competent server, even serving on Christmas Day. Well done Harry! With our thanks of course to Fr McNerney for his weekly celebration of Holy Mass.

Busy time. I attended the Holy Saturday Tenebrae Service at St William of York, concluding the three day Divine Office. The FSSP proving once again that stability and regular timing attracts a steady crowd. They travelled from afar to share in the joy of Holy Thursday, the drama of Good Friday and, on Saturday evening, the welcoming candle light which begins Easter. It does seem that the island of St William of York remains the sole witness or the rest of Reading. The good news is the youthfulness of the congregation. Surely this will bear fruit for the next generation? Please continue to visit the FSSP Facebook page which has taken over from the website: https://www.facebook.com/fssp. england...and as Fr de Malleray reminded us in the Maundy Thursday sermon, ‘pray for your priests. http://lmsreading.wordpress.com Email: Adrian.dulston@btinternet.com

Isle of Wight (Portsmouth Diocese) Peter Clark The two weekday Traditional Masses (Tuesday and Thursday) continue at St Mary’s, Ryde. Both are now at noon. There is also a Sunday Old Rite Mass at 5pm on the first Sunday of the month and at 7.45am on the third Sunday. A first Friday Traditional Mass is now at 10am at St Michael’s church, Bembridge. We were pleased once again to have Old Rite Masses on the Feasts of Candlemas, Ash Wednesday and St Joseph’s Day. It was good to have the annual 40 Hours Exposition of the Blessed Sacrament again at St Mary’s, Ryde over the Passion Sunday weekend. In addition to the various devotions that took place, there were two Extraordinary Form Masses during the 40 Hours. In his sermon Fr Glaysher reminded the people of the Real Presence of Our Lord in the Holy Eucharist: ‘We must

Plymouth Francis Osborn Mass in the Extraordinary Form took place at Our Lady’s Church Marnhull on 11 December. We also witnessed an Old Rite Baptism, by Fr Martin Budge, for Konrad De Slizewicz at Marnhull on 31 January. His parents, Constantine and Phoebe of Yunnan, China, returned to the UK for his birth, and were living in Marnhull. The De Slizewicz family are traditional Catholics living in Toulon and Lille. It was altogether a delightful occasion for all who attended.The next Mass in the Extraordinary Form

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remember that Christ was born Incarnate of the Virgin Mary, and when we receive Him in Holy Communion, we receive His Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity. The crucified Christ is the same Christ that is present in all the tabernacles of the world; the same Christ that we will receive (in unbloodied form) at this Mass. ‘We are fortunate to have these 40 Hours in which to come along and worship and adore Our Lord and Saviour. There is no greater gift that we will receive in life than, God Himself. The most beautiful and wonderful thing on this earth is the presence of Our Blessed Lord, truly present in the Blessed Sacrament, a gift to us and an aid to our salvation.’ An increasing number of LMS members are visiting the Island for a day visit. Why not combine a day visit on a Tuesday or Thursday and include an EF Mass at noon with a guided tour of our beautiful Victorian church in Ryde. Tel: Peter Clarke 01983 566740

will occur at Our Lady’s Church, Marnhull on 16 April. Our plans to develop the Dorset Gregorian Choir are moving ahead positively.

At the Baptism of Konrad De Slizewicz


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

REPS’ REPORTS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

Wrexham Kevin Jones All Masses took place during the last quarter with one slight change to the March Mass at Llay; this was switched to the first Sunday from the second. This was to allow as many of the faithful as possible the opportunity to attend the Low Mass celebrated by His Eminence Raymond Leo Cardinal Burke at the nearby Shrine of Ss Peter & Paul and Philomena which fell on the second Sunday. A diocesan LMS digest was sent out to Wrexham members during the second week of Lent. This confirmed two key dates. Firstly, the Holywell Pilgrimage is on Sunday 5 July at 2.30pm. This usually well-attended annual LMS event will be a High Mass, Rosary Procession and veneration of the relic of St Winefride. The celebrant is Fr Richard Bailey, Cong. Orat. (Manchester Oratory) assisted by Fr Edmund Montgomery (Shrewsbury) as deacon and Fr Simon Henry (Liverpool) as sub deacon. Meanwhile, it is some time since the last pilgrimage to Wrexham Cathedral, the Church of Our Lady of Sorrows, (St. Mary’s). The LMS and St Catherine’s Trust will return on Saturday 1 August with High Mass at 11am followed by Benediction and Veneration of the relic of St Richard Gwyn (a patron of the Society) at 2pm. There is an opportunity to refresh between Mass and Benediction. We are grateful to Cathedral Dean, Fr Simon Treloar. The Mass will be a votive of St Richard Gwyn and the celebrant will be Dom Mark Daniel Kirby O.S.B., Prior of Silverstream, Co. Westmeath, Ireland. Assisting sacred ministers are to be confirmed.

Hexham & Newcastle Andrew and Jayne Armstrong and Philip Dillon Since our last report in January, we have continued with our efforts to take the Traditional Mass to new places within the diocese. Philip Dillon has approached Durham cathedral as a possible venue for an annual High Mass as well as The Youth Ministry Trust and Ushaw College. Unfortunately, we have yet to receive a positive response, however it is still early days. In addition to our weekly Sunday Mass, the Gateshead Juventutem chapter, with the support of Fr Brown, has established monthly Traditional Benediction. This takes place on the third Sunday of every month. A second Juventutem chapter has been founded in the diocese, based in Durham. It has already hosted several events since its formation and we wish them every luck in their efforts. We are delighted to report that this month saw a visitation from Bishop Cunningham to the parish. The Missa Cantata was celebrated by Fr Brown, with music provided by the Westland Singers from Sunderland with their directors Paul and Theresa Dewhurst. The congregation was made up of more than 80 faithful, with the serving team provided by the local Juventutem chapter. We would like to express our thanks

Fr Francis Doyle celebrates Mass on the First Sunday of Passiontide at Holywell.

Finally, there will be daily Mass in the Extraordinary Form for the duration of the St Catherine’s Trust Summer School at Pantasaph for the week commencing Sunday 26 July, please refer to the Mass listings. Web: http://lmswrexham.weebly.com Twitter twitter.com/LMSWrexham Email: lms.wrexham@outlook.com.

to Bishop Cunningham for his support, kind words and his excellent sermon regarding the importance of the Sacrament of Reconciliation. http://lmshn.blogspot.co.uk Email: Andrew_armst@hotmail.com

Bishop Cunningham at Newcastle

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REPS’ REPORTS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Lincolnshire

Clifton

Mike Carroll

Ken and Carol Reis

Lincolnshire continues to have one Sunday Old Rite Mass at St Mary, Brigg with Benediction at 4.15pm, and Low Mass at 5pm. There is a natural lull in proceedings this quarter. The following two Masses will take place in the second half of the year, and preparations are in place for the next Traditional Mass at Holy Rood, Market Rasen, which is likely to be on the Feast Day of St Thomas More and St John Fisher on 9 July. Please keep an eye on the Lincolnshire website for details. The next obvious step is to work towards a Missa Cantata, which is already being discussed. We certainly have some excellent, and renowned, singers who are keen to proceed along this line. http://lmslincolnshire.blogspot.com http://lincolnshiremartyrs.blogspot.co.uk/

On Saturday, 15 November at St James’s Church, Spanish Place, London at 11:30 am the Sacrament of Confirmation in the Traditional Rite was conferred and Pontifical Benediction was given by Rt Rev John Arnold, the then Auxiliary Bishop of Westminster. Among those being confirmed was Lottie HarveyCraig, from the parish of Woodchester in Clifton. Lottie has attended the Traditional Mass at Dursley on a regular basis for a number of years and has benefited greatly from the spiritual guidance given by Fr Alex Redman. After the service, there was a get together in the church hall for the candidates and their families and friends with lunch provided. Amongst Lottie’s family and friends was Carrie Stribbling, who at the tender young age of 100 had travelled with her son, Mike, to see Lottie confirmed. Carrie who was a 100 on 19 October is Woodchester born and bred but moved to Nympsfield upon marriage. Fr Redman celebrated a sung Mass on the Feast of the Purification of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Candlemas) at Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception Catholic Church in Devizes on Monday, 2 Feb. The Mass was very well attended, there were more than 40 in the church. The Rupert Bevan singers provided the music, which was wonderfully spiritually uplifting. In his homily, Fr Redman spoke about how the Purification of Mary was not because she was considered to be unclean after giving birth, but quite the opposite, as giving birth to new life involves the divinity of God. The purification was to mark the change from the divine back to a more earthly nature, rather like when the chalice is purified after Communion. After the Mass, refreshments were provided in the narthex, which gave an opportunity for people to get together, many having come from the outer reaches of the Clifton diocese. Tel: 07896 879 116 Email: felisbenglaensis@gmail.com www.lmsclifton.blogspot.com

Westminster Roger Wemyss Brooks The great feasts of Christmas and Epiphany were suitably celebrated in the Old Rite, a particular high spot being the High Mass of New Year’s Day at Spanish Place. This year it was beautifully offered by newly-ordained Norbertine, Fr Stephen Morrison. He delivered an inspiring sermon and gave priestly first blessings to a great crowd of the faithful. In early February, a sung Requiem was offered for the victims of the Air Asia disaster, which had claimed the lives of two relatives of a Society member. Ash Wednesday and early Lent devotions seem to have been especially well-attended. There are many reasons in today’s troubled world urging us to increased prayer and penance. This season saw the departure of Mike Lord from Macklin Street as General Manager who will be much missed. His place is ably taken by Stephen Moseling who deserves a warm welcome and many prayers. Tel: 0207 224 5323

Fr Z (Fr John Zuhlsdorf) celebrates Mass in Maiden Lane on a recent visit to London/Photo Joseph Shaw

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Lottie and Carrie – together in tradition


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

MASS LISTINGS

The Latin Mass Society

Mass Listings

Supplement to Mass of Ages 184 Summer 2015 While the Latin Mass Society makes every effort to ensure that these listings are accurate, we cannot guarantee that they are free of errors or omissions and acknowledge that some Masses can be cancelled at very short notice.

WESTMINSTER Westminster Cathedral, Victoria Street, VICTORIA, London SW1P 1QW

2nd Saturdays (Lady Chapel)

4.30pm

Low Mass

The Oratory, Brompton Road, LONDON SW7 2RP

Sundays 9.00am Mon to Sat (St Joseph’s Altar) 8.00am Saturdays 12.15pm (usually in St Wilfrid’s Chapel)[1]

Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass

St James’s, Spanish Place, LONDON W1U 3QY Corpus Christi, Maiden Lane, COVENT GARDEN, London WC2E 7NA

Sundays Holy Days of Obligation

9.30am 11.00am

Low Mass Low Mass

Mondays 2nd Fridays

6.30pm 6.30pm

Sung Mass Low Mass

St Etheldreda, Ely Place, LONDON EC1N 6RY

1st Fridays

6.00pm

Low Mass

St John the Baptist, 3 King Edward’s Road, HACKNEY, London E9 7SF

1st Fridays Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Fri 12 Jun (Sacred Heart)

6.00pm 6.00pm 6.00pm 6.00pm

Low Low Low Low

St Mary Moorfields, Eldon Street, LONDON EC2M 7LS

Fridays Last Fridays

7.45am 7.30pm

Low Mass High Mass

Holy Trinity and St Augustine, London Road, BALDOCK, Herts SG7 6LQ

1st Sundays

3.00pm

Low Mass

St Edmund of Canterbury & English Martyrs, Farm Lane, Old Hall Green, Nr WARE, Hertfordshire SG11 1DT

3rd Sundays[2]

3.00pm

Low Mass

Our Lady of Lourdes & St Michael, Osborn Rd, UXBRIDGE UB8 1UE

1st Fridays

7.00pm

Sung Mass

St Bartholomew’s, 47 Vesta Avenue, ST ALBANS AL1 2PE

Sundays

5.00pm

Low Mass

Our Lady of Willesden, Acton Lane, WILLESDEN, London NW10 9AX

Sundays

5.30pm

Low Mass

Immaculate Conception and St Joseph, 23 St John’s Street, HERTFORD SG14 1RX

Sat Sat Sat Sat

11.00am 11.00am 11.00am 11.00am

Low Low Low Low

16 11 19 31

May Jul Sep Oct

St Bonaventure, 81 Parkway, WELWYN GARDEN CITY AL8 6JF Wed 13 May (Vigil of Ascension) 7.00pm [1] Phone 020 7808 0900 to check before travelling. [2] TBA please check with Rep - 07810 778160 or 07920 122014.

Mass Mass Mass Mass

Mass Mass Mass Mass

Sung Mass

ARUNDEL AND BRIGHTON St Pancras, Ireland’s Lane, LEWES, Sussex BN7 1QX

1st Sundays Saturdays Thu 14 May (Ascension) Sun 24 May (Pentecost) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter &Paul) Sat 15 Aug (Assumption)

12.30pm 10.00am 7.00pm 12.30pm 7.00pm 7.00pm 10.00am

Low Low Low Low Low Low Low

Mass Mass Mass Mass Mass Mass Mass

St Mary Magdalene, Upper North Street, BRIGHTON BN1 3FH

Sundays Fridays Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Fri 12 Jun (Sacred Heart) Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter &Paul)

6.30pm 7.00pm 7.30pm 7.30pm 7.00pm 7.30pm

Low Mass Low Mass High Mass Sung Mass Low Mass High Mass

St Mary, Surrenden Road, BRIGHTON BN1 6PA

Thursdays

7.00pm

Low Mass

St Thomas More, Sutton Road, SEAFORD Sussex BN25 1SS

3rd Sundays

3.00pm

Low/Sung

Our Lady of Consolation, Park Lane, WEST GRINSTEAD RH13 8LT

2nd Sundays Sun 10 May Sun 8 Nov Sun 13 Dec

3.00pm 3.00pm 3.00pm 3.00pm

Low Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass

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MASS LISTINGS

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Sacred Heart, Essendene Road, CATERHAM, Surrey CR3 5PB

Wednesdays

10.00am

Low Mass

Our Lady Immaculate and St Philip Neri, UCKFIELD TN22 5DJ

4th Sundays

3.00pm

Low Mass

The Oratory, Hagley Road, BIRMINGHAM B16 8UE

Sundays Fridays Saturdays Weekday Feast Day / Holy Days of Obligation (check newsletter)

10.30am 6.00pm 9.30am 6.00pm or 7.00pm

High Mass Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass High Mass

St Augustine’s Catholic Church, Herbert Road, SOLIHULL B91 3QE

Last Friday

6.30pm

Low Mass

Maryvale Institute Chapel, Old Oscott Hill, BIRMINGHAM B44 9AG

2nd Wednesdays

7.00pm

Low Mass

Our Lady & St Kenelm Cobham Road, HALESOWEN B63 3JZ

Wednesdays[1]

12.00pm

Low Mass

Our Lady of Perpetual Succour, Cannock Road, WOLVERHAMPTON WV10 8PG

Fridays

6.30pm

Low Mass

The Oratory, Woodstock Road, OXFORD OX2 6HA

Sundays Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi)

8.00am 6.00pm 6.00pm

Low Mass High Mass High Mass

SS Gregory & Augustine, 322 Woodstock Road, OXFORD OX2 7NS

3rd Sundays Wednesdays Fridays 1st Thursdays Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Fri 12 Jun (Sacred Heart) Mon 29 Jun (SS Paul and Peter)

12.00pm 6.00pm 6.00pm 12.00pm 6.00pm 6.00pm 6.00pm 6.00pm

Sung Mass Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass

St Birinus, DORCHESTER-ON-THAMES, Oxfordshire OX10 7JR

Wednesdays Saturdays Mon 6 Apr (Easter Monday) Thu 14 May (Ascension) Sun 31 May (Trinity Sunday)

8.00am 9.30am 10.00am 7.30pm 12.00pm

Low Mass Low Mass High Mass High Mass High Mass

Holy Trinity, Hardwick Road, HETHE, nr Bicester, Oxfordshire OX27 8AW Sundays Saturdays Fridays Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Fri 12 Jun (Sacred Heart) Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter & Paul)

12.00pm 12.00pm 5.00pm 6.30pm 6.30pm 6.30pm

Low/Sung Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass

St Wulstan, Wolstanton, NEWCASTLE-UNDER-LYME, Staffordshire ST5 0EF

1st Fridays Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter & Paul)

7.00pm 7.00pm

Low Mass Low Mass

Our Lady of Mount Carmel, REDDITCH B98 8LT

Mondays Mon 13 Apr

6.30pm 6.00pm

Low Mass Low Mass

St Mary & Egwin, High Street, EVESHAM, Worcestershire WR11 4EJ

Tuesdays

7.00pm

Low Mass

St Ambrose, Birmingham Road, KIDDERMINSTER DY10 2BY

1st Sundays Fridays

3.00pm 7.30pm

Low/Sung Low Mass

St John Baptist, Spetchley Park, WORCESTER WR5 1RS

Sundays[2] Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi)

10.45am 10.45am

Low Mass Low Mass

Our Lady of the Assumption, 8 Weaver’s Walk, Swynnerton, nr STONE, ST15 0QZ

Sundays Saturdays (fortnightly)[3]

6.00pm 10.00am

Sung Mass Low Mass

BIRMINGHAM

Oulton Abbey, Kibblestone Road, Oulton, Nr STONE ST15 8UP 3rd Sundays[4] 3.00pm Sung/Low [1] Phone 0121 6021972 before travelling. [2] No Mass on Sunday 3 May. [3] Phone Local Rep on 01270 768144 to confirm dates. [4] Monthly Masses - check for future dates on http://north-staffs-lms.blogspot.co.uk or call Local LMS Representative, Alan Frost, on 01270 768144. Subject to cancellation, so check blog above before travelling.

BRENTWOOD Our Lady of Lourdes & St Joseph, Leigh Rd, LEIGH-ON-SEA, SS9 1LN

1st Sundays

4.00pm

Sung Mass

St Philips Priory, 178 New London Road, CHELMSFORD CM2 0AR

2nd & 4th Sundays

10.30am

Low Mass

Our Lady Immaculate, New London Road, CHELMSFORD CM2 0AR

1st Fridays Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter & Paul)

7.30pm 7.30pm 7.30pm 7.30pm

Low Low Low Low

Church of the Assumption, 98 Manford Way, HAINAULT IG7 4DF

Most Mondays[1]

6.30pm

Low Mass

St Mary Immaculate and the Holy Archangels, KELVEDON CO5 9AH

1st Saturdays

12.15pm

Low Mass

St Margaret’s Convent Chapel, Bethell Avenue, CANNING TOWN, London E16 4JU

Sundays

6.00pm

[1] Please telephone 020 8500 3953 to confirm before travelling or email nda.hainault@btinternet.com

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Mass Mass Mass Mass


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

MASS LISTINGS

CARDIFF Poor Clare Convent, Much Birch, HEREFORD HR2 8PS

Sundays

6.30pm

Low Mass

Most Holy Trinity, New Street, Ledbury, HEREFORD HR8 2EE 2nd

Sundays

5.00pm

Low Mass

St Francis Xavier, Broad Street, HEREFORD HR4 9AP

Last Sundays Fridays

12.15pm 6.30pm

Low/Sung Low Mass

Our Lady & St Michael, Pen-y-Pound, ABERGAVENNY NP7 5UD

Fridays

7.00pm

Low Mass

University Chaplaincy, 62 Park Place, CARDIFF CF10 3AS

1st Thursdays[1] 3rd Thursdays[1]

7.00pm 7.00pm

Low Mass Low Mass

[1] Until further notice please visit the website www.lmscardiff.org.uk for more information and full listings. For the Herefordshire area contact Marion Luscombe (01432 760896) or Shaun Bennett (07917 577127).

CLIFTON Holy Cross Church, Dean Lane, Bedminster, BRISTOL BS3 1DB

Sundays 1st Wednesdays

12.30pm 6.30pm

Low Mass Low Mass

St Dominic’s, Jubilee Road, DURSLEY, Gloucestershire GL11 4ES

Sundays[1] Mondays & Tuesdays Wed - Sat (inclusive) Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Fri 12 Jun (Sacred Heart ) Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter &Paul) Wed 1 Jul (Precious Blood) Thu 2 Jul (Visitation) Thu 6 Aug (Transfiguration)

5.30pm 9.00am 8.00am 8.00am 8.00am 8.00am 9.00am 8.00am 8.00am 8.00am

Low Low Low Low Low Low Low Low Low Low

St George’s, Boreham Road, WARMINSTER, Wiltshire BA12 9JP

One Saturday per month[2]

9.30am

Low Mass

SS Joseph & Teresa, 16 Chamberlain Street, WELLS, Somerset BA5 2PF

Tuesdays [3] Fridays

6.00pm 6.00pm

Low Mass Low Mass

Our Lady & St Kenelm, STOW-ON-THE-WOLD, Gloucestershire GL54 1DR

Saturdays[4]

10.00am

Low Mass

Our Lady Help of Christians, Station Road, BOURTON-ON-THE-WATER, Gloucestershire, GL54 2ER

Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi)

10.00am

Low Mass

Prinknash Abbey, CRANHAM, Gloucestershire GL4 8EX

1st Sundays Saturdays[5] Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter & Paul)

3.00pm 11.00am 8.15am 8.15am 8.15am

Low Low Low Low Low

Our Lady of Lourdes, 28 Baytree Road, WESTON-SUPER-MARE BS22 8HQ

4th and 5th Sundays 1st Thursdays Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi)

11.30am 9.30am 7.30pm

Low Mass Low Mass High Mass

St Benedict’s, Stratton-on-the-Fosse, RADSTOCK, Bath BA3 4RH

1st Sundays

11.15am

Low Mass

Our Lady of Glastonbury, Magdalene Street, GLASTONBURY BA6 9EJ

3rd Sundays

12.30pm

Low Mass

Downside Abbey, Stratton-on-the-Fosse, RADSTOCK, Bath, BA3 4RH

Sat 30 May (Whit Sunday)

11.00am

High Mass

St Gregory’s, 10 Saint James’ Square, CHELTENHAM GL50 3PR

1st Wednesdays

7.00pm

Low Mass

The Holy Ghost, 73 Higher Kingston, YEOVIL, Somerset BA21 4AR

Fridays Thu 14 May (Ascension) Wed 1 Jul (Precious Blood)

6.00pm 6.00pm 7.00pm

Low Mass Low Mass High Mass

All Saints, WARDOUR CASTLE, Salisbury, Wiltshire SP3 6RR

Quarterly 3rd Saturdays[6]

11.00am

Low Mass

Holy Redeemer, Fotherby Crescent, SALISBURY, Wiltshire SP1 3EG

Quarterly 3rd Saturdays[7]

11.30am

Low Mass

Mass Mass Mass Mass Mass Mass Mass Mass Mass Mass

Mass Mass Mass Mass Mass

[1] No Mass on Sunday 24 May (Pentecost). Missa Cantata first Sunday of each month. [2] Please check with Parish Office on 01985 212329. [3] Phone 01749 673183 to confirm before travelling. [4] Phone 01451 830431 to confirm before travelling. [5] Phone Fr Damian on 07742 659106 to confirm before travelling. [6] These Masses will continue quarterly (May, August, November) until further notice. Please call 01373 301691 before travelling. [7] Quarterly (June, September, December). Please call 01373 301691 before travelling.

EAST ANGLIA Cathedral of St John the Baptist, Unthank Rd, NORWICH NR2 2PA

First Fridays

6.00pm

Low Mass

Blackfriars, Buckingham Road, CAMBRIDGE CB3 0DD

Sundays 1st Fridays

9.15am 6.00pm

Low Mass Low Mass

University Chaplaincy, Fisher House, Guildhall Street, CAMBRIDGE CB2 3NH

Sundays (during term time)

8.30am

Low Mass

St Peter & All Souls, Park Road, PETERBOROUGH PE1 2RS

1st Fridays

7.00pm

Low Mass

39


MASS LISTINGS

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

St Mary Magdalene, 468 Norwich Rd, IPSWICH IP1 6JS

Wednesdays

12.00pm

Low Mass

St Pancras, Orwell Place, IPSWICH, Suffolk IP4 1BD

2nd Sundays 2nd Thursdays

5.30pm 10.30am

Low Mass Low Mass

St Joseph’s, 58 Cromer Road, SHERRINGHAM NR26 8RT

Last Sundays

6.00pm

Low Mass

St Teresa’s Church, Prince of Wales Road, SHEFFIELD S2 1EY

1st Sundays[1] Fri 12 Jun (Sacred Heart)

12.15pm 7.30pm

Low/Sung Low/Sung

Padley Chapel, GRINDLEFORD, Hope Valley S32 2JA

Sun 17 May (LMS Pilgrimage)

1.00pm

Sung Mass

HALLAM

[1] Please phone 0114 2332801 for more information or visit our Facebook page (Hallam lms) for updated events.

HEXHAM AND NEWCASTLE St Joseph’s, High West Street, GATESHEAD NE8 1LX

Sundays[1] Saturdays

12.00pm 11.00am

Low/Sung Low Mass

St Mary’s, Barrasford, Swinburne, HEXHAM NE48 4DQ

Sundays

12.00pm

Low Mass

St Mary’s Church, Birch Road, BARNARD CASTLE, Co. Durham DL12 8NR

Sundays[2] Tuesdays[2] Holy Days of Obligation[2]

9.00am 7.30pm 7.30pm

Low Mass Low/Sung Low Mass

Sacred Heart & English Martyrs, THORNLEY, Co. Durham DH6 3HA

Sundays

9.30am

Low Mass

St Patrick, Smith Street, Ryhope, SUNDERLAND SR2 0RG 3rd

Wednesdays

7.30pm

Sung Mass

SS Joseph, Patrick & Cuthbert, Church Street, COXHOE, Co Durham DH6 4DA

Thursdays 1

2.00pm

Low Mass

St Augustine’s, 30 Coniscliffe Road, DARLINGTON DL3 7RG

2nd Wednesdays

7.15pm

Low Mass

[1] Sung Mass on 1st & 3rd Sundays. [2] Owing to the ill health of the priest, please confirm with Rep before travelling (0191 264 5771).

LANCASTER St Peter’s Cathedral, Balmoral Road, LANCASTER LA1 3BT

Sunday 17 May Sunday 28 June Sunday 12 July

3.00pm 3.00pm 3.00pm

Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass

Our Lady & St Joseph, Warwick Square, CARLISLE CA1 1LB

Sundays Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 June (Corpus Christi) Mon 29 June (SS Peter & Paul)

6.00pm 7.00pm 7.00pm 7.30am

Sung/Low Sung/Low Sung Mass Low Mass

Our Lady & St Wilfrid, WARWICK BRIDGE, near Carlisle CA4 8RL

TBA[1]

TBA

TBA

Sizergh Castle Chapel, Sizergh, Nr KENDAL, LA8 8DZ

TBA[2]

TBA

TBA

St Walburge’s Church, Weston Street, PRESTON PR2 2QE

Sundays Mon-Fri[3] Saturdays Thu 14th May (Ascension)

10.30am 12.00pm 10.30am 7.00pm

Sung Mass Low Mass Low Mass Sung Mass

[1] Occasional Masses may be arranged for Warwick Bridge. For information on Masses, please contact Canon Watson or Fr Millar on 01228 521509 or visit latinmasslancaster.blogspot.com .[2] Please check latinmasslancaster.blogspot.com details. [3] Except First Fridays when the Mass will be at 7.00 pm. See www.stwalburge.org for details of all services.

LEEDS Leeds University RC Chaplaincy, 5–7 St Mark’s Avenue, LEEDS LS2 9BN

5th Saturdays

4.00pm

Low Mass

Immaculate Heart of Mary, Harrogate Road, LEEDS LS17 6LE

1st Fridays

7.30pm

Low Mass

St Mary’s, Gibbet Street, HALIFAX, Yorkshire HX1 5DH

Saturdays

6.00pm

Low Mass

St Joseph’s, Pontefract Road, CASTLEFORD, Yorkshire WF10 4JB

Sundays

3.00pm

Low Mass

The Sacred Heart, Broughton Hall, SKIPTON, Yorkshire BD23 3AE

Sundays[1] Monday-Saturday inclusive[1]

11.00am 9.30am

Sung Mass Low Mass

St Peter’s, Leeds Road, Laisterdyke, BRADFORD, Yorkshire BD3 8EL

2nd Sundays

3.00pm

Sung Mass

Holy Spirit, Bath Road, HECKMONDWIKE, Yorkshire WF16 9EA

1st & 3rd Sundays

4.00pm

Low Mass

St Ignatius, Storrs Hill Road, OSSETT WF5 0DQ

Last Mondays

7.30pm

Low Mass

3.00pm 12.00pm 12.00pm 12.00pm

Low Low Low Low

[1] Anybody wishing to attend these Masses is advised to ring 01756 793794 or visit www.lmsleeds.blogspot.com.

LIVERPOOL St Anthony’s, Scotland Road, LIVERPOOL L5 5BD

40

Sundays[1] Holy Days of Obligation Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi)

Mass Mass Mass Mass


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

MASS LISTINGS

Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter & Paul)

12.00pm

Low Mass

St Joseph, Bolton Road, ANDERTON PR6 9NA

Saturdays[2]

9.10am

Low Mass

Holy Spirit, 66/68 Poulsom Drive, BOOTLE L30 2NR

Tuesdays[3]

7.00pm

Low Mass

St Mary Magdalene, Leyland Road, PENWORTHAM PR1 9NE

Sundays[4]

8.30am

Low Mass

St Catherine Labouré, Stanifield Lane, Farington, LEYLAND, PR25 4QG

Sundays[5] Tuesdays Saturdays Holydays of Obligation[5] Thu 23 Apr (St George) Mon 4 May (English Martyrs) Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Fri 12 Jun (Sacred Heart) Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter & Paul)

11.30am 12.00pm 12.00pm 7.00pm 7.00pm 7.00pm 7.00pm 7.00pm 7.00pm 7.00pm

Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass

[1] For all Masses, please phone 0151 426 0361 before travelling. [2] Please phone Fr. Ian O’Shea 01257 480237 before travelling. [3] Please [1] For all Masses, please phone 0151 426 0361 before travelling. [2] Please phone Fr. Ian O’Shea 01257 480237 before travelling. [3] Please check with Fr John Harris 0151 928 0040 before travelling. [4] Please phone Jim Aherne 01772 378488 before travelling. [5] Additional Masses may be posted on Fr Henry’s blog (offerimustibidomine.blogspot.com). Please phone Fr Henry 01772 421174 before travelling.

MENEVIA St Joseph’s Cathedral, Greenhill, SWANSEA SA1 2BX 4th

Sundays

12.00pm

Low Mass

Sacred Heart, School Road, Morriston, SWANSEA, SA6 6HZ

Saturday before 1st Sundays[1] 3rd & 5th Sundays[1] Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi)

5.00pm 3.00pm 7.00pm 7.00pm

Low Mass Sung Mass Low Mass Sung Mass

[1] Please check with Local Rep, as there may be cancellations – 01239 710411 or 07810 778160.

MIDDLESBROUGH St Wilfrid’s, Duncombe Place, YORK YO1 7EF

Sundays Sat 9 May (LMS Pilgrimage) Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter & Paul)

12.00pm 1.30pm 6.00pm 6.00pm 6.00pm

Sung Mass High Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass Sung Mass

Sacred Heart Church, Lobster Road, REDCAR TS10 1SH

Sundays[1]

6.00pm

Low Mass

St Brendan, Beanfield Avenue, CORBY NN18 0AZ

Saturdays

9.30am

Low Mass

Sacred Heart, Pope Close, FLITWICK, Bedfordshire MK45 1JP

Sundays

5.00pm

Low Mass

Our Lady of Perpetual Succour, Amersham Road, CHESHAM BOIS HP6 5PE

Sundays[1]

8.00am

Low Mass

St Francis of Assisi, 25 High Street, SHEFFORD, Bedfordshire SG17 5DD

3rd Fridays

7.30pm

Low Mass

St Barnabas Cathedral, Derby Road, NOTTINGHAM NG1 5AE 3rd

Wednesdays[1]

6.15pm

Low Mass

The Good Shepherd, 3 Thackeray’s Lane, Woodthorpe, NOTTINGHAM NG5 4HT

Saturday before 2nd Sundays (anticipated Mass of Sunday)

4.45pm

Low Mass

Our Lady and St Patrick, Launder St, Meadows, NOTTINGHAM NG2 1JQ

3rd Sundays

2.00pm

Low Mass

Holy Cross Priory, 45 Wellington Street, LEICESTER LE1 6HW

Sundays Mon - Sat inclusive

12.30pm 8.00am

Low Mass Low Mass

St Peter’s Church, Hinckley Road, LEICESTER LE3 0TA

1st Fridays Saturdays

6.00pm 11.00am

Low Mass Low Mass

St Joseph, Station Road, OAKHAM, Rutland LE15 6QU

Fridays[2]

7.00pm

Low Mass

St Mary’s, 12 Barnard Avenue, BRIGG DN20 8AS

Sundays[3]

5.00pm

Low Mass

Holy Rood, King Street, MARKET RASEN, Lincolnshire LN8 3BB

TBA[4]

TBA

Low/Sung

[1] Please check before travelling (01642 484 047).

NORTHAMPTON

[1] Sung Mass on 1st Sundays.

NOTTINGHAM

[1] Cathedral Mass is followed by a social for young Catholic adults (18-35), organised by Juventutem Nottingham. For more details call 07791 041442. [2] Check newsletter at www.stjosephs-oakham.org. [3] Check newsletter at St. Mary’s Brigg, or ring 01652 652221. [4] Please contact the LMS Rep - Mike Carroll for more details on 07883 564408.

PLYMOUTH Church of Christ the King, Armada Way, PLYMOUTH PL1 2EN

1st Sundays

3.00pm

Sung Mass

41


MASS LISTINGS

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Blessed Sacrament Church, Fore Street, Heavitree, EXETER EX1 2QJ

3rd Sundays

3.00pm

Sung Mass

Exeter University Catholic Chaplaincy, Boniface House, Glenthorne Road, EXETER EX4 4QU

Fridays

7.30pm

Low Mass

St Cyprian’s Chapel, Ugbrooke House, nr CHUDLEIGH, Devon TQ13 0AD

4th Sundays

3.00pm

Sung Mass

Lanherne Convent, St Mawgan, Nr NEWQUAY, Cornwall TR8 4ER

Sundays & Holydays of Obligation 10.00am Mondays to Saturdays inclusive 7.30am

Sung Mass Sung Mass

St John’s Catholic Cathedral, Edinburgh Road, PORTSMOUTH PO1 3HG

Sundays

8.00am

Low Mass

St William of York, Upper Redlands Road, READING RG1 5JT

Sundays Mondays Tuesdays to Thursdays[1] Fridays Saturdays Holy Days of Obligation[1]

11.00am 12.00pm 7.00am 7.30pm 8.00am 7.30pm

Sung Mass Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass Sung/Low

Our Lady Immaculate, Westbourne, BOURNEMOUTH BH4 9AE

3rd Sundays

6.00pm

Low Mass

St Peter, Jewry Street, WINCHESTER, Hampshire SO23 8RY

2nd Sundays[2] Sun 3 May

12.15pm 12.15pm

Low/Sung Low/Sung

St Mary’s, High Street, RYDE, Isle of Wight PO33 2RG

1st Sundays 3rd Sundays Tuesdays Thursdays

5.00pm 7.45am 12.00pm 12.30pm

Low/Sung Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass

St Michael’s Church, Walls Road, BEMBRIDGE, Isle of Wight PO35 5RA

1st Fridays

10.00am

Low Mass

St Mary’s, Old Mill Lane, MARNHULL, Dorset DT10 1JX Buckfast Abbey (St Michael’s Chapel), BUCKFASTLEIGH TQ11 0EE

PORTSMOUTH

St Joseph’s Church, St Michael’s Road, BASINGSTOKE, RG22 6TY

[1] Please check before travelling - 0118 966 5284 or visit www.fssp.co.uk/england for details. [2] No Mass on the 2nd Sunday in May. No Mass in July.

SALFORD Oratory Church of St. Chad, Cheetham Hill Road, MANCHESTER M8 8GG Sundays

4.45pm

Low Mass

English Martyrs, Alexandra Road South, Whalley Range, MANCHESTER M16 8QT

Saturdays Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter & Paul)

10.00am 7.00pm 7.00pm 7.00pm

Low Low Low Low

St Osmund’s, Long Lane, Breightmet, BOLTON BL2 6EB

1st Thursdays[1] Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter & Paul)

7.30pm 7.30pm 7.30pm

Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass

St Marie’s, Manchester Road, BURY BL9 0DR

Fridays

7.30pm

Low Mass

St Winefride’s, Crowmere Road, Monkmoor, SHREWSBURY SY2 5RA

Sundays

12.15pm

Low Mass

St Vincent de Paul’s, 2 Bentinck Road, ALTRINCHAM WA14 2BP

2nd Sundays

Mass Mass Mass Mass

[1] No Mass in July.

SHREWSBURY 3.00pm

Low Mass

SS Peter & Paul and Philomena, Atherton Street, NEW BRIGHTON, Sundays[1] Wallasey CH45 9LT Mondays-Thursdays[2] Fridays[2] Saturdays and Bank Holidays[2] Holy Days of Obligation[3]

8.30am 10.30am 9.00am 7.00pm 10.00am 7.00pm

Low Mass Sung Mass Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass Sung/Low

St Thomas Becket, Nantwich Road, TARPORLEY CW6 9UN

12.30pm

Low Mass

3rd Sundays

[1] Preceded by Confession and Rosary. Sunday Vespers & Benediction at 5.00pm. [2] Confessions are heard and the Rosary is recited half an hour before Mass. In the evening Vespers is said at 5.30pm followed by Adoration. [3] In accordance with the Calendar of the 1962 Missal.

SOUTHWARK (NORTH) St Bede’s, 58 Thornton Road, CLAPHAM PARK, London SW12 0LF

Sundays Mondays – Fridays (inclusive) Thursdays Saturdays

10.45am 7.00am 12.30pm 9.00am

Sung Mass Low Mass Low Mass Low Mass

St Mary Magdalen (East Hill), 96 North Side, WANDSWORTH COMMON, London SW18 2QU

Sundays

11.00am

Low/Sung

St Mary, 28 Crown Lane, CHISLEHURST, Kent BR7 5PL

1st & 3rd Sundays Fridays

11.00am 7.30pm

Sung Mass Low Mass

42


ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

MASS LISTINGS

SOUTHWARK (KENT) St Augustine’s Church, St Augustine’s Road, RAMSGATE, Kent CT11 9PA Sundays Fridays[1]

12.00pm 9.30am

Sung Mass Low Mass

St Ethelbert, 72 Hereson Road, RAMSGATE, Kent CT11 7DS

Wednesdays[2]

9.30am

Low Mass

St Austin & St Gregory, 38 Charlotte Place, MARGATE, Kent CT9 1LP

Sundays Mondays

11.30pm 6.30pm

Sung/High Low Mass

St Thomas of Canterbury, Station Road, HEADCORN, Kent 4th

Sundays Most Fridays Thu 14 May (Ascension) Thu 4 Jun (Corpus Christi) Mon 29 Jun (SS Peter & Paul)

12.00pm 9.30am 12.00pm 12.00pm 12.00pm

Low Low Low Low Low

St Augustine’s, Crescent Road, TUNBRIDGE WELLS, Kent TN1 2LY

First Wednesdays[3]

7.30pm

Low Mass

Mass Mass Mass Mass Mass

St Francis, Week Street, MAIDSTONE, Kent ME14 1RL

1st Sundays

12.30pm

Low Mass

St Simon Stock, Brookfield Road, ASHFORD SOUTH, Kent TN23 4EU

2nd & 5th Sundays

12.15pm

Low Mass

St Andrew, Ashford Road, TENTERDEN, Kent TN30 6LL

3rd Sundays

12.30pm

Low Mass

[1] Then Exposition, Confession & Benediction at 10.00am. [2] Preceded at 8.30am by Exposition & Benediction. [3] Check on 01892 522525.

WREXHAM Cathedral Of Our Lady Of Sorrows, Regent Street, WREXHAM LL11 1RB

Sat 1 Aug (LMS Pilgrimage)

11.00am

High Mass

St Francis of Assisi, Llay Chain, Llay, nr. WREXHAM LL12 0NT

2nd Sundays[1]

12.30pm

Low Mass

Our Lady of the Rosary, Jubilee Road, BUCKLEY CH7 2AF

1st Saturdays

12.30pm

Low/Sung[2]

St Winefride’s Catholic Church, Well Street, HOLYWELL CH8 7PL

4th Sundays[3] Sun 5 July (LMS Pilgrimage)

11.30am 2.30pm

Low/Sung[2] High Mass

St David’s, Franciscan Friary, Monastery Road, PANTASAPH, CH8 8PE

Sunday 26 Jul Monday 27– Friday 31 Jul Sunday 2 Aug

5.40pm[4] Sung Mass 11.30pm[4] High Mass 11.00am[4] Sung Mass

[1] Not in August. [2] Dependent on availability of cantor. [3] Not in July. [4] Times to be confirmed. Please refer to www.lmswrexham.weebly.com/mass-times.html.

"God Will Not Leave Us Orphans" At a time of widespread apostasy, God is raising up shepherds to lead the faithful remnant. The following is from an interview with Bishop Athanasius Schneider concerning the recent scandalous synod: " Even though it has not achieved the required two third of the votes, there remains nevertheless the worrying and astonishing fact that the absolute majority of the present bishops voted in favour of Holy Communion for the ‘divorced and remarried’, a sad reflection on the spiritual quality of the Catholic episcopacy in our days." [emphasis ours] We are possibly in a worse tragedy now than the Arian crisis, when, according to some historians, in some areas only about 3% of the bishops remained faithful. Blessed John Henry Newman wrote of that period that it was the laity who saved the Church. Are the laity ready to step up to the plate again? If you are tired of complaining, tired of feeling useless, if you are ready to take the gloves off and demand your Church back, start reading the Flock. The Flock is published quarterly by Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice and is FREE - we rely on the generosity of our readers for survival. To enrol ring Graham Moorhouse on 0132-240-9231 or email him at PEEP@cathud.com, or complete and post the slip below to Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice, 118 Shepherds Lane, DARTFORD, DA1 2NN:

Please send me the FLOCK Title: Mr, Mrs, Mr & Mrs, Miss, Dr, Rev, Other: * Full Name: Address: Tel:

Email:

Postcode:

43


FAMILY NOTEBOOK

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Living the Faith Amanda Lewin

The author and Kathryn Hennessey at the Oxford Pro-Life Witness

S

hall I press send or not? I argued with myself last October. My fingers were about to commit me to yet more pro-Life work which would mean greater sacrifice for my dear husband and children. Being a Catholic mother who home educates and is actively immersed in a pro-Life apostolate (the Oxford Pro Life Witness) does demand sacrifice. Striving to be a good mother and instilling the beautiful Catholic faith in one’s children, is the greatest privilege of all. Their innocent souls are in our hands from the moment they are conceived and we have the honour to teach and nurture them to know, love and serve God in this world and be happy with Him forever in the next...This is the second catechism question all young children will learn and it is our duty to God to fulfil. Alongside raising children, who are the crown of every Catholic marriage, and must always be our priority no matter what other work we may do, for me there is also my pro-Life apostolate which lives within me and has showered our home with many graces and blessings over the years. The question I was debating with myself, was whether I should organise another pro-Life witness on a Thursday morning outside the new BPAS centre in Oxford. There I was, quarrelling with myself about whether I should take this on, in addition to my duties as a wife and mother and home educating five children. (My eldest son has been let loose in Campos, Brazil). I never seem to have the answer, or know whether there is a right answer, but needless to say every Thursday is now dedicated to the babies. Each week, I leave home at 11am to return after 2pm. Our tiny group, (which consists usually of the Conventual Friars,

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myself and two more mature ladies, and occasionally my eldest teenagers) stand and silently pray at the gates of hell, whilst I try and converse with the people entering or leaving, and hand out gentle pro-Life leaflets. It is something so strong within me, it is hard to resist. The lesson, I believe, it teaches my children is that they see the passion and fervour for the babies and their mothers first hand, even if they only understand it in their innocence. As my four year old daughter, Grace, says: ‘Mammy works for the babies.’ And this is what all my six children (when they were little) have been told. They see I am willing to give up half their Thursday with them for the love of life. Even though I miss them, and they miss me (I hope!). I berate myself that perhaps this should be left until they are older, I also feel they will grow up living their faith in all ways; being and seeing pro-Life work and hopefully, carrying it on. After all, our children are those babies’ futures. One day they may grow up and even save a life – how magnificent. My six children are now 18 down to just four and I have seen with my own eyes the way my active involvement within the pro-Life movement has affected them. They have grown up knowing the reverence for life in seeing their own siblings and friends be born and loved deeply. They have seen the hours spent on a witness or a march, which is putting the innocent unborn before them. It teaches a selflessness which, in a selfish world, is paramount to becoming a compassionate being. I have seen it affect my older daughter, and my older sons, profoundly, but not necessarily in the same ways it affected me. Marie has had the gift of faith since she was nearly three and growing up within a traditional Catholic home, she can see extremely clearly that the Church’s teachings on the sanctity of human life are both right and true. I see this in the way she lives her life and, if this is the legacy we will leave our children, then I thank God for it. So, yes, I pressed ‘send’ that day and trusted God would do the rest. Amanda Lewin is a home schooling mother and has run the Oxford Pro Life Witness for eight years. They meet on the last Saturday of every month (25 April, 30 May, 27 June) at the entrance of the John Radcliffe Hospital, from 3pm-4pm and every Thursday at 11am-1pm opposite the BPAS Centre, (27-29 Rectory Road). Amanda blogs at http://catholichomeeducationuk.blogspot. co.uk/ And at http://lovingmantillas.blogspot.co.uk/


ADVENTURES OF THE LONE VEILER

Three very-human persons taking a break from infesting the planet/photo Sarah Whitebloom

Confusion The Lone Veiler

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eading the news recently I found articles about PETA, one of the more radical animal rights groups, and the Greens, which got me thinking about our relationship as Catholics to the planet. I try to avoid most of the arguments for and against global warming; it seems to be mainly political posturing. Call me cynical, but when ‘big money’ is behind any kind of research, you have to question what big money’s motivation is. Not that I doubt the planet warms up and cools down. We have abundant evidence that it has and does and presumably will do again – from ice cores, pollen profiles, sediment cores. I also do not doubt that there is an anthropogenic factor from industry, nor that the sun has quite a lot to do with our planet’s long term temperature fluctuations. What bothers me are the vested interests, which have more to do with shareholders and profit, and fads and fashions, than necessarily the long term survival of the planet. I was going to say survival of the human race, but there is often a disturbing anti-human bias when it comes to saving the planet. I say antihuman because reproductive freedom is generally not part of any political or

ecological mantra. The overpopulation argument is tired and flawed, and ‘solutions’ by way of contraception and sterilization are invariably aimed at the poor, who are not, in the main, huge consumers of the planet’s resources. In an effort to minimise mankind’s unwanted impact on our beautiful blue and green sphere, humans are often portrayed as parasitical, infesting a world which would be far better off without them – especially if they are poor, economically unproductive, too fertile or dependent through ill health, disability, or age. So much for humans. The interesting case of Sandra the orang-utan underlines the rather complicated relationship secularists have with other species and indeed the planet. Sandra was declared to be a ‘non-human person’ in December 2014. The Green Party hold similar views, going further in fact, calling for an extension to article five of the UN Declaration on Human Rights, the article banning ‘inhuman’ treatment, to all sentient life forms, so the same prison sentences for the murder and kidnap of humans would apply to crimes involving elephants, monkeys and whales. The case fought by the Association

of Officials and Lawyers for Animal Rights (AFADA) in Argentina, who argued Sandra the ape had ‘sufficient cognitive functions’ not to be ‘treated as an object’, would therefore become the norm. Sandra is not a thing, more a person, and she should be moved to a sanctuary rather than confined in a zoo. Whether or not Sandra’s status as ‘non-human person’ is upheld at appeal, it says a lot about us as humans that we can look at other species and recognise their dignity and worth, and yet happily denigrate our own species. Natural, it seems, is okay for nature, but intervention is in vogue for mankind. Three-parent embryos are merely the latest insult as our dignity and worth is eroded by a secular society which sees us merely as commodities and economic units. As Catholics, we believe we exercise stewardship over God’s wonderful creation. That means using prudence in all our actions, constantly remembering and thanking Him for the great gifts He has bestowed on us. Being Catholic is fundamentally to be ‘green’ in a real sense of the word, valuing all human beings and respecting the world which we are given to live in. We are not called to abuse the gifts he has given us, but to use all things properly. So forgive me if I appear annoyed by much of the rhetoric surrounding animal rights, global warming, and planet saving. I cannot see how wearing leather shoes and eating a bacon sandwich occasionally is worse for the planet than munching processed micro protein while wearing synthetic shoes produced by a petrochemical company. We are part of the planet, and have a unique place on it, which is where activists such as PETA and I must diverge. People are not a parasitical infestation. We belong here. ‘Animals, like plants and inanimate beings, are by nature destined for the common good of past, present, and future humanity. Use of the mineral, vegetable, and animal resources of the universe cannot be divorced from respect for moral imperatives. Man’s dominion over inanimate and other living beings granted by the Creator is not absolute; it is limited by concern for the quality of life of his neighbour, including generations to come; it requires a religious respect for the integrity of creation.’ The Catechism of the Catholic Church. N2415

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ROMAN REPORT

ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

Is the Pope drawing inspiration also from the traditional liturgy and its calendar Alberto Carosa

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he first Mass predominantly in Italian was celebrated 50 years ago on the first Sunday of Lent, 7 March 1965, by Blessed Paul VI in the Chiesa di Ognissanti (Church of All Saints) in Rome, Radio Vatican reported in March. And Pope Francis celebrated Mass precisely there and on the same date to commemorate the anniversary. In his homily, the Holy Father recalled the Gospel account of the cleansing of the temple, with Jesus’ famous remark: ‘Do not make My Father’s house a marketplace.’ This expression did not solely refer to those doing business in the temple, the Pope noted, but it intended to reprimand a certain type of religiosity. Jesus’ gesture is one of ‘cleansing, of purification’, since God is not pleased with material offerings based on personal interests. Rather, the Pope went on, Jesus is calling us to ‘authentic worship, to the correspondence between liturgy and life – a call that is true for every age, and also for us today’. Recalling the Second Vatican Council’s constitution on the Liturgy, Sacrosanctum Concilium, Pope Francis was quoted as saying that ‘the Church is calling us to have and to promote an authentic liturgical life, so that there may be harmony between what the liturgy celebrates, and what we live in our daily existence’. The liturgy, he continued, ‘is the privileged place to hear the voice of the Lord, who guides us on the path of righteousness and Christian perfection’. All the more so during Lent, when the liturgy, he continued, invites us especially to a journey of conversion and penance. It is not known if Pope Francis also had in mind the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, but who can dispute the fact that the Traditional Mass is an ideal tool to fulfill the exhortations called for by him? And who can question the fact that this Rite is best suited to promote liturgical reverence? And the long silences of this liturgy could not offer a better setting ‘to hear the voice of the Lord’. Even as recently as 9 March, the new Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, Cardinal Robert Sarah, made it very clear in his book God or Nothing that ‘the Second Vatican Council never asked for the rejection of the past and the abandonment of the Mass of Saint Pius V, that formed so many saints...But it is necessary at the same time to promote the liturgical reform willed by the Council itself’. In his book, he often mentions the ‘liturgical war’ that

has divided Catholic for many decades, calling for a mostneeded reconciliation. This was, in his opinion, also the aim of Summorum Pontificum. “Benedict XVI spent considerable energy and hope in this undertaking”, he was quoted as saying. “Alas, he did not succeed completely, because ones and others have ‘clutched’ to their rite by excluding themselves mutually’. Moreover, he goes on, the Eucharist is not a ‘meal among mates’, it is a sacred mystery. If we celebrate it with beauty and fervor, we will reach a reconciliation, this is clear. In a subsequent article in L’Osservatore Romano, he further elaborated on the issue. The sacred liturgy is a treasure that is not ours, but something ‘received through pure grace’, he pointed out, and a humble attitude in the presence of this treasure leads priest and people alike to fulfill liturgical norms. Meanwhile, ‘what happened after [the Second Vatican] Council was the reform was hijacked by the so-called ‘Spirit’ of the Council, which was not related directly at all to the actual texts of the Council Fathers’, Cardinal Burke was quoted as saying. ‘And now we’re returning to those texts, which promote reform in continuity with the tradition.’ Speaking of the efforts of Blessed Pope Paul VI, Pope Saint John Paul II, and of Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI to foster the work of authentic liturgical reform, an effort that continues in the pontificate of Pope Francis, he pointed out that this reform ‘is brought about not through rupture with the past, not through revolution, but through continuity with the past, through respect for the sublime beauty of the Sacred Liturgy celebrated uninterruptedly along the Christian centuries.’ Interestingly, another significant event ‘as a sign of Catholic unity with and under Peter’ is the fourth annual international Summorum Pontificum pilgrimage to Rome, October 22-25, 2015, the third edition being amply reported on in the previous edition of Mass of Ages. Since its inception, the conclusion of these pilgrimages was always made to coincide with the solemnity of the Feast of Christ the King, October’s last Sunday in the liturgical calendar of the Extraordinary Rite. Perhaps it is not a coincidence then that Pope Francis announced that the extraordinary Jubilee Year of Mercy would begin on the Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception, 8 December, and end on the Solemnity of Christ the King on 20 November 2016, the last Sunday of the liturgical year according to the Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite.

It is not known if Pope Francis also had in mind the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, but who can dispute the fact that the Traditional Mass is an ideal tool to fulfill the exhortations called for by him?

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ISSUE 184 - SUMMER 2015

MACKLIN STREET

A Golden Opportunity Stephen Moseling, LMS General Manager Watch this space. Since joining the staff of the LMS, I have been reflecting quite a lot on the fact that we are commemorating our 50th anniversary year. A Golden Jubilee, by definition, is reason for great celebration. Without the dedication, commitment and sheer hard work of all those who have contributed to the work of the LMS throughout those 50 years, we would not be here today, let alone have been able to achieve a fraction of what has been done during those five decades. Therefore, I do think it behoves each and Traditional Mass at Westminster cathedral at last year’s AGM / photo Joseph Shaw every member of the Society to give thanks to them, and to God, for all that we have been, y the time you read this, it will be four months since I are and can be in the future. took over from Mike Lord; as the saying goes – how time I would like to think that each member of the Society will flies when you’re having fun. This being my first Macklin Street column, I must thank Mike for making the handover make a special effort during this our Jubilee year to do a little from one General Manager to the next so easy. Although, at bit extra (be it practical, spiritual or financial) to contribute one stage - as dozens of computer files were sent flying through towards our work. This could be by attending an extra Mass the ether from one side of the office to the other – I did wonder or inviting a friend to attend Mass, and thereby introduce them what I had let myself in for. Likewise, I would like to express to the glory of the Traditional Mass. It could be by joining in my thanks to George and Gareth in the office who have both one of the annual events we organise on your behalf, saying been a great support. additional prayers to support our work, or by becoming I am also very grateful for the many messages of welcome, good an Anniversary Supporter. Details of all these things appear wishes and assurance of prayers I have received from members elsewhere within the pages of Mass of Ages and can also be of the Society. I am equally conscious that there is much I have found on our website. For anyone reading this magazine who is to learn about the day-to-day activities of the LMS, and people I not a member of the LMS, why not join? There is a membership have yet to meet – especially many of the local representatives, form on the back cover. who so generously give of their time to maintain and further Members are reminded that the Annual General Meeting will our work. take place in Westminster Cathedral Hall on Saturday 11 July, Before coming to the LMS, I spent 15 years working for the followed by High Mass in the cathedral. Again, details of this can Society of St Paul, a religious congregation of Catholic priests be found in this magazine and on our website. Two members and brothers whose work is to promote the Gospel using the of the Committee are eligible for re-election this year. If anyone various means of social communication. As Operations Director else would like to stand as a candidate, you must have been a at St Paul’s, I was responsible for building to five their chain of paid-up member of the LMS for at least two years. You will also bookshops around the country. And I was instrumental in making need to have your nomination signed by another paid-up member. available to a wider audience many of the books and some of the Nomination forms are available from me and, in accordance literature available on the Traditional Mass. On the subject of with the constitution of the Society, must be returned to me communication, one of the projects we are currently working on by Sunday, 24 May 2015. in Macklin Street is the redesigning and re-launch of our website. Together, let us make our Jubilee year a year to remember.

B

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Mass of Ages Issue 184 Summer 2015  

Mass of Ages – The Quarterly Magazine of the Latin Mass Society. Issue 184, Summer 2015

Mass of Ages Issue 184 Summer 2015  

Mass of Ages – The Quarterly Magazine of the Latin Mass Society. Issue 184, Summer 2015