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Vacuums


Hoover 517

Materials: Aluminum Body with wood handle Our thoughts: This is the second model from the Hoover company. We found this vacuum is pretty good but not the most state of the art. Eureka Model 2X Materials: Aluminum body with plastic handle Our thoughts: We would recommend this model over the Hoover 517 just because it is much more state of the art with a more powerful fan. We found that this model will help you clean your house a lot faster.


Hoover Model 700 We have found this model to be the cream of the crop. With its full aluminum body it is an ease to push around the house, unlike the clunky previous model, the Hoover 517. Everyone in the office has taken their turn pushing this beauty around. If you are looking to buy your wife a new vacuum you cannot go wrong with the Hoover Model 700. The only down fall is it is so good you will never be able to go back to another vacuum again.


The Sacco and Vanzetti Trial By Michael Easterlin This decade there as a large trial that showed the unfairness of the court system. The trail was called the Sacco- Vanzetti Trial. We found the trial to be very unfair because these people that were accused were falsely accused just because the magazines and groups they were involved with. In the trial two Italian anarchists were tried for bombing Wall Street. The judge found them guilty just because of the groups they were involved with and that they were anarchists. We found this to be unfair because through the trial there was no real evidence that they did it just evidence that they were a part of the groups. The two men also were originally arrested just because they roughly fit the description, but not really. Another thing that made them arrest them was both men were carrying guns, this wasn’t fair because it is the second amendment is the right to bear arms. We also found the trial to be unfair because the judge seemed to deem them guilty before any defense was made.


Tune in to hear Babe Ruth hit another homer. The radio brings the nation together, so tune in to the baseball game. The game will be the talk of your town, so you’ll be left out of many conversations if you don’t listen up. With the radio, the country is united together with one common experience. Also, it can be very entertaining and exciting, So tune in, and enjoy!

Tune In!


Section A — General News THE MOVEMENT FOR WOMEN CHANGES THE FUTURE FOREVER!!!! Finally, after about one hundred years of waiting, the women on August 26th finally got their wish, they finally have the right to vote which changed not just the year of 1920, but for the future. The women fought so hard that on that day the 19th amendment finally came it clearly stated: “The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” And also, “Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.” This was all thanks to the women who started this ever since the beginning of July 13th, 1848 like Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage and Lucy Stone started in a conversation over a cup of tea. Talking about how Democracy has changed where women has been doing equal risks just like the men has. Determined to do something about it, Stanton agreed with her friends two days after their tea together that they would form an announcement on Seneca County Courier. They said it was "A convention to discuss the social, civil, and religious condition and


rights of woman," having the convention on July 19-20 at Wesleyan Chapel. For the preparation of the convention, Stanton came up with “Declaration of Sentiments” not only just showed proof of the turning point of society, but also saying "We hold these truths to be selfevident; that all men and women are created equal; that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness." Stating how women have been treated unequally. She pointed out eighteen ways of this stating how: Married women were legally dead in the eyes of the law, Women were not allowed to vote; Women had to submit to laws when they had no voice in their formation; Married women had no property rights; Husbands had legal power over and responsibility for their wives to the extent that they could imprison or beat them with impunity; Divorce and child custody laws favored men, giving no rights to women; Women had to pay property taxes although they had no representation in the levying of these taxes; Most occupations were closed to women and when women did work they were paid only a fraction of what men earned; Women were not allowed to enter professions such as medicine or law; Women had no means to gain an education since no college or university would accept women students; With only a few exceptions, women were not allowed to participate in the affairs of the church; Women were robbed of their self-confidence and self-respect, and were made totally dependent on men. For the day of the convention, Stanton was ready with 12 resolutions to the amendments and the Declaration of Sentiments, but even with good ideas, she wasn’t successful with having everyone agree that women should have the right to vote.


Not only did the majority of the people disagree with the idea of women’s right to vote, but editors started to criticize and laugh at the idea of it becoming true. They tried every tactic to bring down the women. Luckily, most of the women were firm in their belief and raised awareness across the neighboring towns. Having more people join the women. With everyone agreeing, there were constant conventions that started from 1850 to the beginning of the Civil War, where drastic measures were turned in Seneca Falls for them to change the generation of the future. Where women finally got what they wanted... the right to vote.


WHO WILL WIN…RELIGION OR SCIENCE? The arrest of John Thomas Scopes in 1925 led “The Scopes Monkey Trial” on July 11th that would forever change so many viewpoints in society. Bryan was asked by the World Christian Fundamental Association to represent teacher John Scopes from the religious point of view. It was where William Jennings Bryan and Clarence Darrow fought against each other to represent religion and evolution. To be more specific, it was a debate of whether or not religion should be able to be taught from public schools…where religion would explain all of the reasons of why earth was created, who created it, how it was created, all of the questions that one could ask them self. For all of those questions would be answered. So many people were blinded due to F.L. Allen who’s from “Only Yesterday” who was basically saying that Darrow humiliated Bryan so bad during the trial, when in fact, that wasn’t the whole entire case of the trial. Even though there was an interesting question of "What is the meaning of this harangue?" questioned Scopes, while Darrow cried out in frustration "To show up fundamentalism." Having, Mr. Bryan shouts out “To protect the word of God from the greatest atheist and agnostic in the United States."


From there on in the trial, tables turned after so many good arguments, both sides finally came to an ending where religion won the case! Bringing a huge accomplishment for everyone to understand why Religion won. Thankfully religion won because even now, society has been brought up to where they just rely on scientific facts, when it has been proven that not all things can be logically and scientifically proven with facts. For example, evolution can’t answer on how it all began, of where all creatures came from. They can start talking about how they think everything began from the generation of the apes, which has given people the theory that we people are from monkeys. Saying how animals would be related to each other, etc. How there’s a whole chain of relationships between each and every animal.


June 21, 1926

Oil reserves were discovered in Teapot Dome, Wyoming, at the beginning of this century. In 1912, President William Taft decided that Teapot Dome and other government owned land and there oil reserves should be set aside for the United States Navy’s use. On the 4th of June, 1920, Congress passed a bill stating that the Secretary of the Navy would have the power “to conserve, develop, use and operate the same in his discretion, directly or by contract, lease, or otherwise, and to use, store, exchange, or sell the oil and gas products thereof, and those from all royalty oil from lands in the naval reserves , for the benefit of the United States” This means that the oil reserves were in the hand of the secretary of the navy. Yet just a year later, Secretary of the Interior, Albert Fall, convinced Edwin Denby, the Secretary of the Navy, that he should take over the responsibilities of the Naval Reserves at the Teapot Dome and other government reserves. So Albert Fall, the Secretary of the Interior, was now in charge of the oil reserves. Later on, Fall decided that his two friends, Harry Sinclair and Edward Doheny, should be allowed to lease part of the oil reserves. Many rumors and witness have said that Albert Fall was spending large sums of money. On the 14th of April of 1922, it was

released that Fall leased the Teapot Dome to Harry Sinclair. When reporters asked President Warren Harding, he defended Fall saying “the policy which has been adopted by the Secretary of the Navy and the Secretary of the Interior in dealing with these matters was submitted to me prior to the adoption thereof, and the policy decided upon and the subsequent acts have at all times had my entire approval.” By saying this, President Harding conformed that he was fully aware of what was going on. When President Harding passed away on August 2nd of 1923, Robert La Follette and John Kendrick called for a senate investigation into Albert Fall and the oil reserves. Over the next few months there were many

different hearings, and many witnesses testified before the committee. On January 24, 1924, Edward Doheny, his friend, admitted that he lent Fall one hundred thousand dollars. Seven days after that the Senate stated that the leases to the Teapot oil reserve “were executed under circumstances indicating fraud and corruption.” After that, Edwin Denby and Albert Fall were forced to resign from office. Harry Sinclair appeared on trial and was charged with conspiracy to defraud the United States. The trial ended two weeks later, because evidence showed that Sinclair had hired and detective agency to shadow the jury. He was charged for criminal contempt of court and was found guilty, and sentenced to six months in prison. Albert Fall was charged with accepting money from Doheny. Though M. T. Everhart’s testimony showed that Fall had lied to the senate committee when he said he had accepted any money from Sinclair. He was found guilty, fined $100,000, and sentenced to one year in prison. The thing is though, President Harding admitted to backing Fall up in the whole deal, so the question is up to you. Was the President behind the whole plan of corruption against the United States? Or had Albert Fall and his friends fool everyone, including the president?


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ful newsletter is making it useful to your readers.

variety of topics but try to keep your articles short.

One benefit of using your newsletter as a promotional tool is that you can reuse content from other marketing materials, such as press releases, market studies, and reports.

A great way to add useful content to your newsletter is to develop and write your own articles, or include a calendar of upcoming events or a special offer that promotes a new product.

While your main goal of distributing a newsletter might be to sell your product or service, the key to a success-

You can also research articles or find “filler” articles by accessing the World Wide Web. You can write about a

Much of the content you put in your newsletter can also be used for your Web site. Microsoft Publisher offers a simple way to convert your newsletter to a Web publication. So, when you’re finished writing your newsletter, convert it to a Web site and post it.

I n s i d e This story can fit 100-150 words.

Caption describing picture or graphic.

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H e a d l i n e

customers or clients.

The subject matter that appears in newsletters is virtually endless. You can include stories that focus on current technologies or innovations in your field.

If the newsletter is distributed internally, you might comment upon new procedures or improvements to the business. Sales figures or earnings will show how your business is growing.

You may also want to note business or economic trends, or make predictions for your

Some newsletters include a column that is updated every issue, for instance, an advice

I n s i d e This story can fit 75-125 words. Selecting pictures or graphics is an important part of adding content to your newsletter. Think about your article and ask yourself if the picture supports or enhances the

S c a n d a l

H e a d l i n e

This story can fit 150-200 words.

“To catch the reader's attention, place an interesting sentence or quote from the story here.”

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message you’re trying to convey. Avoid selecting images that appear to be out of context. Microsoft Publisher includes thousands of clip art images from which you can choose and import into your newsletter. There are also several

column, a book review, a letter from the president, or an editorial. You can also profile new employees or top customers or vendors.

H e a d l i n e tools you can use to draw shapes and symbols. Once you have chosen an image, place it close to the article. Be sure to place the caption of the image near the image. Caption describing picture or graphic.


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S t o r y

H e a d l i n e

One benefit of using your newsletter as a promotional tool is that you can reuse content from other marketing materials, such as press releases, market studies, and reports.

Caption describing picture or graphic.

This story can fit 150-200 words.

I n s i d e This story can fit 100-150 words.

While your main goal of distributing a newsletter might be to sell your product or service, the key to a successful newsletter is making it useful to your readers. A great way to add useful content to your newsletter is to develop and write your own articles, or include a calen-

S t o r y

The subject matter that appears in newsletters is virtually endless. You can include stories that focus on current technologies or innovations in your field.

If the newsletter is distributed internally, you might comment upon new procedures or improvements to the business. Sales figures or earnings will show how your business is growing.

You may also want to note business or economic trends, or make predictions for your

Some newsletters include a column that is updated every issue, for instance, an advice

I n s i d e

S t o r y

This story can fit 75-125 words. Selecting pictures or graphics is an important part of adding content to your newsletter. Think about your article and ask yourself if the picture supports or enhances the message you’re trying to convey. Avoid selecting images that appear to be out of context.

dar of upcoming events or a special offer that promotes a new product. You can also research articles or find “filler” articles by accessing the World Wide Web. You can write about a variety of topics but try to keep your articles short. Much of the content you put in your newsletter can also be used for your Web site. Microsoft Publisher offers a simple way to convert your newsletter to a Web publication. So, when you’re finished writing your newsletter, con-

H e a d l i n e

customers or clients.

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column, a book review, a letter from the president, or an editorial. You can also profile new employees or top customers or vendors.

“To catch the reader's attention, place an interesting sentence or quote from the story here.���

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Microsoft Publisher includes thousands of clip art images from which you can choose and import into your newsletter. There are also several tools you can use to draw shapes and symbols. Once you have chosen an image, place it close to the article. Be sure to place the caption of the image near the im-

age.

Caption describing picture or graphic.


WE’RE ON THE WEB! EXAMPLE.COM

Organization This would be a good place to insert a short paragraph about your organization. It might include the purpose of the organization, its M I C R O S O F T

mission, founding date, and a brief history. You could also include a brief list of the types

Primary Business Address Your Address Line 2 Your Address Line 3 Your Address Line 4

of products, services, or programs your organization offers, the geographic area covered (for example, western U.S. or European

Phone: 555-555-5555 Fax: 555-555-5555 E-mail: someone@example.com

markets), and a profile of the types of customers or members served. It would also be useful to include a contact name for readers who want more information about the organization.

Your business tag line here.

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This story can fit 175-225 words.

ployees.

If your newsletter is folded and mailed, this story will appear on the back. So, it’s a good idea to make it easy to read at a glance.

If you have any prices of standard products or services, you can include a listing of those here. You may want to refer your readers to any other forms of communication that you’ve created for your organization.

A question and answer session is a good way to quickly capture the attention of readers. You can either compile questions that you’ve received since the last edition or you can summarize some generic questions that are frequently asked about your organization. A listing of names and titles of managers in your organization is a good way to give your newsletter a personal touch. If your organization is small, you may want to list the names of all em-

You can also use this space to remind readers to mark their calendars for a regular event, such as a breakfast meeting for vendors every third Tuesday of the month, or a biannual charity auction. If space is available, this is a good place to insert a clip art image or some other graphic.

Caption describing picture or graphic.


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