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INSIDE THIS ISSUE LEADING WITH SOLE THE EVERYDAY ASSESSMENT CHALLENGE MACUHO HELPS PITTSBURG DRESS FOR SUCCESS

Delaware • District of Columbia • Maryland • New jersey • Pennsylvania • West Virginia

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M A C mUagaz H inOe

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Mid-Atlantic Association of College & University Housing Officers


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Update From the President

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EVENTS Philly Exchange 2013

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ACUHO-I Annual Conference and Exposition Review

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ARTICLE The 2013 Lisa A. Pierce Volenteer Incentive Program (VIP)

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Spring Academic Excellence Awards and Recipients

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Recognition and Motivation

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The Real Res Life Motivator: RELI

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Best Blue Jay RA Award

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“Because I Said I Would”

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Housing and Residents Lives

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FEATURES Leading With Sole

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The Everyday Assessment Challenge

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Photo Gallery for Upcoming MACUHO Annual Conference

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MACUHO Helps Pittsburg Dress for Success

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THIS ISSUE’S CONTRIBUTORS Joe Russo

Rhett Burden

Joshua R. Belice

Joe Courtade

Natalie Liston

Debbie Scheibler

Jovin M. Fernandez

Ashley Nickelson

Kim Pontano

The Diversity Committee

Maggie Flynn Kurtis Watkins

EDITORS Christina Moran Philadelphia University

DESIGNER Ashley Murray Temple University


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September 2013

AN UPDATE

FROM THE PRESIDENT

We are stepping out of our

comfort zone. We’re trying some

new things. We’re pushing

boundaries.”

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E

arlier this summer, I visited Pittsburg, PA, the home to our 2013 Annual Conference. My visit was not MACUHO or Drexel-related. Instead, I was passing through on a trip to Cedar Point. (if you didn’t know this already, I’m an Amusement Park junkie). I decided to spend a night in Pittsburg and explore. My only other time in this wonderful city was several months ago for a MACUHO Executive Board Meeting. My friends and I rented bicycles and spent the afternoon riding and enjoying the beautiful weather. When they call this the City of Bridges, they mean it. As I rode along and passed our Host hotel, I couldn’t help but think of how proud I am of the work being done by Brooke, Chris, and the entire Host Commit-

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tee. At that time, we had several months to go before the Conference were very much ahead of schedule with regard to details, programming, and creative ideas. For the 2013 Conference – our 41st Annual – we are stepping out of our comfort zone. We’re trying some new things. We’re pushing boundaries. We’re asking how you like the new approach to ensure the 2014 Conference is a success as well. Historically, this issue of the MACUHO Magazine is dedicated to the upcoming Fall Conference. Over the years, the issue was less of an “Announcement” – since details are blasted out moments after the decision is made – but more of a “Reminder.” The issue you’re reading is intended to do just that. Please be reminded of several important items about the upcoming fall season

and our Annual Conference. Further, please be reminded that the MACUHO Annual Conference is a fantastic opportunity for you to connect with old friends. Or, for our friends new to the field, the annual gathering serves as an opportunity to form new connections. Together, we will learn, grown, and enjoy each other’s company. While you’re in Pittsburg, I invite you to explore the wonderful city. We’ve built some time for you to do just that and hope you’ll take the opportunity. If you are unable to join, you know that you’ll find us on the Back Channel.

“Together, we will learn, grown, and enjoy each other’s company.”


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EVENTS

PHILLY EXCHANGE 2013 -Kim Pontano (Holy Family University)

This year, Philly Exchange 2013 was hosted by Holy Family University in Northeast Philadelphia. Our small campus was happy to welcome colleagues from over 20 area schools to participate in the 3rd annual event! Hosting was a campus-wide effort for us that involved staff from many different areas of campus who all worked together to make this conference a success. We were honored to have in attendance past-presidents, board members, seasoned professionals, new professionals, mid-level professionals, and graduate students who are just starting out. We went with a theme designed to show how much we value the knowledge that we share with one another at this conference: Exchange. Expand. Explore. Many of us share similar gripes and concerns, but it is very helpful to learn from one another and to hear suggestions on how to make things better. The day began with

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check-in and breakfast, which was Holy Family University’s first large event with our new dining services company Parkhurst. Many seemed to enjoy both the breakfast and the lunch, which had “the best chicken salad ever,” according to one participant! We had a number of sessions and presenters from many different schools which made the planning committee very happy! We are hoping to increase the number of schools that boast presenters next year and to get more people involved with MACUHO in Valley Forge (2014!). In total, the day offered three program sessions, with five different choices at each session. This allowed for participants to choose the best sessions for them based on where they are in their careers and what specific duties their jobs entail. During the social time, Holy Family Resident Advisors also offered tours for any visitors who were interested in seeing the newest hall, Ste-

venson Lane Residence (built in 2009) and our first-year St. Joseph’s Hall (a former convent). Sessions varied, but covered topics including diversity, sexual assault, health and wellness, RHA, emergency response, coping skills, supervision, and many more! We were honored to welcome our keynote speaker Courtney Stone O’Connell from Rutgers University- New Brunswick, who presented on how to be innovative in higher education. She presented three main concepts that she felt were imperative for innovation and success in Student Affairs. After her keynote, she went on to present during our first programming session to continue educating professionals about how to be innovative with training and development. After all sessions were over, we met together for our closing. As usual, many schools were able to provide items so we could celebrate our day with a fun raffle at the end. Personally,


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this is one of my favorite parts of the conferences for MACUHO events! Even though I didn’t win anything, many prizes were given out and the joy of seeing how excited people got when they won was enough for me. I had a great time working with SEPA Regional Coordinators Sarah Piff fromVillanova University and Laura Egan from St. Joseph’s University and the rest of the planning committee. Thank you all for your hard work and dedication these last few months. I hope that this article gets everyone excited about Philly Exchange 2014. Speaking from experience, hosting an event is a great challenge with even greater rewards! Are you up to the challenge?! See you all at MACUHO events in Fall 2013!

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EVENTS

ACUHO-I ANNUAL CONFERENCE AND EXPOSITION REVIEW By: President Joe Russo The ACUHO-I Annual Conference and Exposition (ACE) was held in Minneapolis this past summer with over 100 MACUHO members in attendance. I had the pleasure of representing our Association, along with several past-presidents, MACUHO Award winners, and Executive Board members.

At ACE, ACUHO-I announced changes to the annual awards which its affiliated organizations, such as MACUHO, distribute to their membership. MACUHO will implement these changes over the next twelve months.

Starting this year, My Favorite Student, an ACUHO-I Corporate Partner, will sponsor the majority of the awards. Additional corporate sponsors may join this sponsorship going forward as well. For MACUHO, our Ann Webster New Professional Award will remain attached to the namesake. The same holds true for the David G. Butler Distinguished Service Award, and the James Hurd Outstanding Service Award.

A new component of the awards will be introduced: The recipient will have a new call to action. For example, the Executive Board will ask award winners to discuss their nomination and award either through a program, magazine article, or other creative medium.

Some awards allow the recipient to attend the ACUHO-I Annual Conference and Exposition through a financial reimbursement. This will remain and the Executive Board will work closely with each award winner to ensure they are represented at ACE and introduced during regional gatherings and events.

ACUHO-I and MACUHO share similar goals and missions. Our involvement in ACE and ACUHO-I events strengthens our individual members, home campuses, and the MACUHO Association.

Please take a moment and nominate a colleague for a MACUHO Award at www.macuho.org and to read more about the ACUHO-I Annual Conference and Exposition at www.acuho-i.org.

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VIP PROGRAM

The 2013 Lisa A. Pierce

Volunteer Incentive Program (VIP) By: Recruitment and Retention Co-Chairs Joshua R. Belice, UMBC and Natalie Liston, Shippensburg In 2001, Lisa A. Pierce of NJIT founded a program called Volunteer Incentive Program (VIP) in the MACUHO region as a method of recruitment for undergraduate students to the Annual Conference. Although a tragic accident would end Lisa’s life, her passion and dedication to her students would live on. Today, the Pierce Volunteer Incentive Program (VIP) for students, now in its ninth year, focuses on bringing undergraduate students interested in Student Affairs to the annual MACUHO conference for an opportunity to learn more about the field of Student Affairs, to begin networking, and to find mentors. In exchange for volunteering and attending a special series of sessions at the conference, VIP participants will have conference registration and hotel accommodations waived. Each year, the MACUHO Host Committee, Recruitment & Retention Committee, and Executive Board request that the membership encourage their best undergraduate students apply to for the chance to be one of the 10-12 10 |

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undergraduate students selected for this valuable experience. Last year, over 80 students applied to be a VIP. This year we are hoping for even more because we know this program impacts our undergraduates. Recruitment and Retention Interim Co-Chair Natalie Liston of Shippensburg University knows first-hand. “I knew I wanted to do student affairs as a career, there was no question about that,” Liston says, “However, MACUHO, through the VIP program, has given me a place to call home and a safe space to grow in a field I am very passionate about. I am so excited to be able to continue my work with the VIP program and give back to a program that has given me so much.” Students interested in pursuing a career in Student Affairs should apply using the application found on VIPS Program section of the Annual Conference’s page and be aware of the following criteria: •Criterion 1: Content The application clearly exhibits effort, time, thoughtful-

ness, and thoroughness. •Criterion 2: Experience The application exemplifies a well-rounded, diverse, and meaningful experience as an undergraduate student. •Criterion 3: Relevancy The application exemplifies continuance in the field, recognition for profession and personal growth, a student within their last two years of their baccalaureate degree. •Criterion 4: Energy The application conveys the students interest, passion, and energy for the housing and residence life field or student affairs. •Criterion 5: Intent The application demonstrates reasons beyond resume building as to why the applicant would like to be involved in the VIP program. •Criterion 6: Mission The application makes effort to integrate and utilize MACUHO’s mission statement.


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Additionally, applicants should be aware of the following timeline, subject to change without notice:

MACU H O MAGA ZI N E

senior years who are attending the program for the first time.

Interested in being a mentor? Please make sure to mark this on your registration to •September 30: VIPS apthe annual conference. A VIP plication closed mentor means so much to our •October 1: October 15: undergraduate VIP members Application Review that we are asking for certain •October 16: Contact apexpectations so that our underplicants with acceptance graduates are getting as much or non-acceptance as possible out of their experi•October 21: Gain confirmaence. Being a VIP mentor is a tion from participants; reach great experience. You get the out to alternates if needed chance to connect with the future of our field, to guide unPlease note that participants dergraduate students through will be responsible for making graduate school interviews their own transportation arrangements. VIP applicants are and processes, and to form a selected based upon the quality connection with an individual that will last a lifetime. Below and completion of the online you will find expectations of application available on the our VIP mentors. We hope MACUHO website. Preference will also be given to undergrad- you can join us in intimately introducing the future of our uate students in their junior or

field to our great region! A VIP Mentor is a MACUHO member, graduate student or higher, who has attend at least one annual conference. Mentor must be willing to donate time during the annual conference to mentor an undergraduate student aspiring to break into the field of student affairs. Additionally, a mentor must be willing to provide feedback for the VIP’s professional profile, share contact information, and be contacted after the Annual Conference concludes. In continuing with the spirit of Lisa’s work, thank you for your support of the Pierce VIP, and we look forward to seeing you in Pittsburgh!

“MACUHO, through the VIP program, has given me a place to call home and a to grow in a field I am very passionate about.”

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The REC Committee Is Proud To Announce Its Semi-Annual

Spring Academic Excellence Awards Recipients To be a recipient of this award, students achieved a GPA of 3.7 or higher

Alderson Broaddus University

Matthew Wood, Aubrey Greathouse, Steven Fuir

Alvernia University

Alexander Roche, Casey Green, Victoria Oliver, Alisha Dockery, MarleeMcNerney, Kelli Fitzgerald, Jennifer Petrilla

Caldwell College

Megan Collins, Kathleen Flynn, Sarah Schiffelbein, Sarthak Giri, Romas Tamrakar, Dayana Zeballos Van Dang

Chestnut Hill College

Helen Squitieri, Liz Herrera, Christina Baker, Allison Eberly

College of Saint Elizabeth

Allison Cardelli, Sarah Briant, Cierra Walker

DeSales University

Lauren Cartlidge, Danny Drain, Ericka Esposito, Matthew Meyers

Drew University

Karina Russ, Jaime Ballesteros

Elizabethtown College

Jaina Defenderfer, Caitlyn Whirt, Alyssa Vasaturo, John Holbert, Marissa Aulenbach

Fairleigh Dickinson University-College at Florham Elona Bilovol, Chris Trautman, Kaitlyn Pickerelli

Frostburg State University

Samantha Barger, Katie Dignan, Jacob McDonald, Howard Fookman, DAniel Weir, Nicole Welsch, Jordan Jones, Jessica Moser, Kevin Kidwell, Thomas James, Ronald Troutman, Lekia Clark, Dana Staats, Alexandra Jones, Hudgins Danielle, Jake Blakely

Harrisburg Univesity of Science & Technology Nicole Borrell

Holy Family University Matthew Higgins

Keystone College

Catherine Scheuch, Jerica Rode, Jonathan Mayes, Megan Fry

Lock Haven University

Daniel Ford, Scott McKenrick, Phillip Griffith, Nathan Hartlieb, Kyle Smail, Loren Appolonia, Jennifer Frantz

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Marshall University

Ryan Kerns, Jessie Swiger, Danielle Ocheltree, Lance West, Caralyne Saunders, Libby Danishanko, Dustin Bell, Ali Dotson, Kayla Fizer, Kyle Wilson, Chase Canterberry, Glen Godby, Erin Hensley, Levi Kerby, Marla Nowlin, Ethan Curry, Jonathan Doak, Allison Richards

Montclair State University

Susan Abowizzedine, Danielle Breckenridge, Yvelande Cajuste, Ian Callahan, Kevin Carlin, Nicole Galipo, Serena Gattuso, Kathryn Goldner, Rebecca Haupt, Amber Kusching, Luis Lopez Gomez, Melissa Miceli, Alexandra Ortea, Melanie O’Shea, Ebony Potts, Jamie Sommer, Danielle Vaccaro, Anna Voyce, Stephanie Ridge, Amanda Santos, Nicholas Vessichelli, Monique Woods, Catherine Baxter, Brenda Eke, Nicole Hernandez, Nakia Swinton, Davika Patel, Nilay Patel, Talia Philippsborn, Leonard Auguste, Rachel Druker, Andrew Fludd, Jason Zablow, Melissa Chayt, James Ellis, Jennifer Okorie, Sahara Perkins, Ashley Pryce, Latifah Salahuddin, Denise Schwabe, Catherine Toufiles, Christopher Koscica, Malcolm McMichael, James Myricks, Anastasia Brown, Felix Dailey Sterling, Iris Frankel, Randi Freedman, John Teixeira, Ja-Tonja Bailey, Denise Bambinelli, Scott Wilson, Theresa Bright, Kimberly Cullen, Aliaskar Hasani, Bhavin Patel, Dan Talasnik, Kathleen Gaffney, Derek Darby, Joanne Powser, Adam Starr, Rachel Turner, Adewonu-Ola Ogunfowora, Zahava Picado, Casey Quinn, Karla Sanchez, Amanda Ewing, Mollie Rosenkrantz, Margaret Rose Barschow, Tiffani Rottner, Katherine Hardy-Diaz, Peter Surace, Gentrix Shanga

Morgan State University

Shakiel Brennan, Charlese Johnson, Yomi Busari, Jamillah Hadid, Marvin Thomas, Kevon Brown, Aima Imoukhu, Abena Adusei, Yehnara Ettinoffe, Justin Johnson, Sherean Jones, Esosa Aimufua, Samyia Jackson, Brittney Carter

Mount St. Mary’s University

Olivia Curcillo, James Gibilisco, Nicole Jones, Zachary Lesieur, Opeoluwa Aniyikaiye, Rebekah Hayes, Afton Eichelman, Alexandria Honsberger, Benjamin McNamee, Jennifer McSparron, Beatriz Tenorio

Muhlenberg College

Olivia Scotti, Colleen Touhey, Kathryn Harple, Margaret Johnston, Kelsey Metz, Tyler Bauer, John Krutsick

Penn State University Ryan Golas


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Spring Academic Excellence Awards Recipients Ramapo College of New Jersey

Steven Shaw, Thomas Colella, Brian Petty, Asal Salah,

Bria

Beaufort, Anthony Majer, Alyssa Nathanson, Brooke Jamison, Erin Mulligan, Colin English, Hannah Kucks

Rider University

Kathryn Guiry, Kristin Hill

Rutgers University - Camden Campus Daniel Ricketti, Ravi Trivedi

Salisbury University

Brooke Temple, David Eberius, Olivia Bankard, Jordan Vasquez, Josh Mathis

Seton Hall University

Melissa Desoto, Stephen Gadomski, Victoria McAllister, Jessica Wiler, Melissa Hannen, Kelly Crowley, Arianna Moliere, Sean Greene, Safia Abulaila, Melissa Teresco, Michael Kelly, Shannon Lavis, Samantha Grimaldi, William Thomsen, Peter Portanova, Jayde Hooven

Towson University

Sam Boone, Luke Penne, Ryan Muffi, David Raymond, Reema Riaz, Michael Spisak II, Rebecca Nappi, Lauren Zizwarek, Kayla Donnelly, Bryan Goodyear, Vanessa Gonlin, Adriana Featherstone, Katie Thompson, James Warner, Michael Thompkins, Meredith Walter

University of Delaware

Matthew Heinrich, Brenna Puza, Sara Sovoia, Radhika Kasabwala, Luke Magera, Vasili Pantazis, Becky Wos, Steven Paul, Michelle Castroagudin, Min Yang, Joanna Paglino, Robert Pinto, Michael McAree, Daniel Munt

Dylan Kahler, Austin Bragg, Nora Tang, Jordan Barnada, Mark Rucci, Allie Hussar, Giancarlo Martinez, Rachael Cooper, Alex Buckingham, Dylan Shea, Madison Helmick, Brandon Deo, Nichole Schneider, Ashley Zawistowski, Sam Le Faive, Kelsey Mellow, Robert Willoughby, Alexander Waad, Isaiah Thompson, Ariana Woodson, Kelsey Mensch, Megan Clark, Melany Justice, Enoch Cheung, Jessica Oestreicher, Alexander Wright, Ian Guthoff, Kathryn Patchan, Anne Pugliese, Cassie Whitebread, Mike Meck, Rebecca Frost, Lillian Greener, Jennifer Williams, Megan Dawson-Elli, Tim Melville, Sean Krazit, Matthew Conrad, Shadoe Lange, Alyssa Norfleet, Shubhro Bose, Alex Schilder, Nicholas King, Amanda Mouser, Steven Bankert, Elizabeth Keating, Nicholas Pitts, Hannah Winand, Amanda Abrom

Susquehanna University

University of Maryland Eastern Shore

Helen Garcia, Chelsea Luzuriaga, Ivonne Martinez, Matthew Ullrich, Fred DeRitis, Anthony Delaney, Kailan Butler, Kevin Gilligan, Carl Johnston, Samantha Hill, Veronica Grupico

St. Mary’s College of Maryland

Jessie Nolasco-Sandino, Matthew Tettelbach, Amy Maenner, Claire Tiffany, John Henry Hain, Caitlin Nickens, Natalie Ulrick, Raymond (RJ) Zukowski

Stevens Institute of Technology

Sarah-Jane Abate, Zachary Horning, Paige Cook, Haley Cheetham, Kayla Kluse, Kristin Drabik, Stephanie Heinz, Ben Bosnic, Nadine Hoffman, Alyssa Williams, Jakub Husek, Briley Acker, Ryan Woodward, Salvatore D’Angelo, Rebecca Neubauer, Marni Horton, Brooke Renna, Katie Battle

Temple University

Alicia Patrick, Timothy Valstein, Daniel Butsko, Matt Miller, Chelsea Redmond, Julia Wade, Rebeka Murray, Madeleine DiLeonardo, Sneha Patel, Alex Cruz, Camile Smith, Jalen Blot, Lindsay Whipple, Portia Lewis, Robert Wilder, Nadia Ouazzi, Juliet Klinman, Madeline Luebbert, Ryan Sample, Vincent Leone, Susan Whitworth, Julian Fowler, Jill Matz, Amriptal Rathore, Zachary Hausemen

The College of New Jersey

Emad Zanati, Dylan McClung, Brendan Owens, Julia Nelson, Jennifer Toth, Colleen Stalter, Jessica Scardino, Kimberly Barrett, Gary I Stenftennagel,

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The University of Scranton

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Thomas Assante, Jerry Paul, Dike Tochukwu, Okeyere Acheampong Nana, Etey-Bennissan Dede Ida

University of the Sciences

Van Au, Linnae Homza, John Rademacher, Daniel Boulos, Brent Valosin, Laura DeLoretta, Stephanie Czastkiewcz

Ursinus College

Colleen Walsh, Kevin Cox, Caitlin Lindley

Wilson College

Nicole Melanson, Ayorkor Dua, Ashlee Yealy

York College of Pennsylvania

Conor Murphy, Shelby Lund, Heather Dachiu, Alyssa Molino, Colin Porter, Meredith Hunt, Megan Nyce, Danielle Patton, Cory Weiss *Names written in red have achieved a 4.0 GPA

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Designed By York College’s Alyssa Molino


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ARTICLE

RECOGNITION AND

M O T I VAT I O N NJ Core 2013 ended over a month ago, but there was one moment there that stayed on my mind. My greatest memory took place at a session I attended entitled “Assembling your Supervision Toolbox.” This was an excellent presentation facilitated by Jeff Miele and Tony Conard of Monmouth University. The session was very informative. It showcased a variety of supervisory, advisory, and managing tools for student affairs professionals. Personality types (including the know-it-all RA) were all covered and effectively discussed with managing preferences. The presentation and discussion created an atmosphere of excitement and rigorous discourse amongst all that were in attendance. I enjoyed the conversations thoroughly, and I listened with enthusiasm until one brave guest shared her personal story. She shared her experience with an RA that had been very rude and challenging to her. In one instance, the staff member flat out told her no concerning something she asked him to do. Her question to the room was how to deal with a staff member that won’t listen, and does not do what they are told to do. 14 |

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Kurtis Watkins Assistant Director Stevens Institute of Technology

I listened as the packed classroom of guests showered their thoughts ways to address the situation. Comments ranged from having a one-on-one with the staff member, putting the person on probation, having an intervention, and even speaking to her supervisor on how to address this situation. All of the answers that were given were well thought out and in line with the right course of action; however, one significant piece was left out – the young lady who was telling the story. There was a subtle tone to her message, and I could tell that this staff member really did upset and disappoint her. As an assistant director, being someone who supervises hall directors /Area Coordinators, I saw the story through a different lens. I saw that young lady as one of my own staff members—a staff member who had been challenged and caught off-guard by her RA’s response and actions. I saw someone who was very much affected by the “no” she received from her staff member. I saw someone who may have had an expectation that all staff members should follow the same way. By now it was towards the end of the session (in fact we had

already run over the time limit), but I felt compelled to share my take on her issue. I first shared how proud I was of the young lady to share her story and how excited I was that she brought it to the forefront. I shared that my excitement for her was because of her tailored experience. That staff member unknowingly gave her a unique gift for her own professional development. In that conflict, she received the real experience of what it means to be let down by staff member, to have expectations shattered, and to have a professional conflict knock on your front door. We all have to experience this, and it is in these moments where we really test who we are as supervisors, role models, and educators. I share with my staff all the time that the strength of your professional development is not in the absence of conflicts, but in the way you are able to manage them successfully. This was really a professional development opportunity for her that was disguised as a conflict. I took it as a privilege and shared that by experiencing this challenging RA, she discovered more about herself and how she manages conflict. Her concerns


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and her questions really revealed more about herself, than the student that gave her the “no.” I told her that this was a great opportunity for her, and that she should take a moment to view the professional development aspects of the situation. As student affairs professionals, we won’t always receive what we like, and we won’t always receive staff members that follow our leads. But it is these moments that show us who we really are. It is these moments that show the leaders that are within us. What happens when someone tells you “no?” What happens when you do have missed expectations, missed job responsibilities, disagreements, disappointments, constructive criticism, and misinterpretations from a staff member? How do you as a supervisor rise to the occasion? What skill sets do you call on when you’re back is against the wall? What language do you use? What is your body language; what is your approach? Do you give up; do you fight back; do you fight dirty? Are you condescending to your staff? Does your attitude towards your staff change? Can you still extract leadership from yourself even after you have been affected?

As an assistant director, these are the real attributes and skills that I look for, cherish, and champion within my own staff. To all of my hall directors and area coordinators out there, here is my spin on this issue’s theme of recognition and motivation. While you consider ways to recognize and motivate your student staff, can you recognize the challenges and opportunities for growth within your own supervision? Can you be challenged as a professional – seriously challenged – and still provide something from within that ignites motivation? To the young lady who shared her story, again I applaud you, and I admire your opportunity within that situation. Yours is the opportunity to experience fully what it means to have opposition within a staff, internalize it, and rise above it. Yours is the opportunity to speak from experience and truly know it what it means to have a conflict with a staff member. And yours is the motivation for us all to consider not just the good parts of our profession but also the areas that challenge, push, and stretch us to our future potential as senior student affairs professionals and beyond.

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NEW PROFESSIONAL CASE STUDY COMPETITION Are you attending your and want to

first MACUHO conference? Have you been before

spice up your experience?

If you are a

new professional (0-3 years experience) join the Personal and Professional Development Committee in the new

professional case study competition.

for the annual conference

When you register

check the box that indicates you are interested in the case

study competition. Contestants compete

in pairs, choose a partner or we will place you

together with one. The pair has about 24

hours

to put together a

response to the prompt and will then present it to a panel of esteemed judges. The winners will receive conference! Look for the

registration for next year’s annual

case study sign-up when you register for the

annual conference in Pittsburgh!

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PPD Committee


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The REAL Res Life motivator: RELI! By: Jovin M. Fernandez

“Don’t miss out on this

wonderful opportunity to receive the highest degree of motivation in the field!”

The REAL Res Life motivator: RELI! This summer I had the privilege of participating in the 2013 Regional Entry Level Institute. Words cannot even begin to express how amazing this opportunity was. The Regional Entry Level Institute (RELI) enables young professionals to gain an in-depth, holistic approach of the field, which sometimes can take people years to understand. This program enables participants to fill in those missing pieces that a master’s program or entrylevel position does not always expose you to. The program focused on eight competencies which included: accountability, campus politics, crisis management, operations, managing multiple priorities, problem-solving skills, planning and assessment, and supervision. These competencies were thoroughly explained and presented by seasoned professionals who currently work in the field. These professionals were specially selected to serve as faculty members and mentors for the program. This year’s RELI faculty members were Joanne Goldwater, Jon Conlogue, Roger Becks, Darese Doskal-Scaffido, Olan Garrett, Joshua Hettrick, Delmy Lendof, Laura Randolph, Usama Shaikh, and Mike Taberski. These faculty members went above and beyond to ensure that all participants received a clear

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understanding of the material being presented. Each faculty member was unique and had a different area of expertise to share with everyone. Not only were participants educated on the eight competencies, but there was also a panel discussion which allowed participants to openly ask questions and receive honest feedback. This was extremely helpful because it gave us an opportunity to seek information that is not easily accessible or sometimes difficult to discuss with supervisors. In addition to the informative sessions and panel, we also had an opportunity to work one-on-one with a mentor throughout the program. The faculty did a wonderful job serving as mentors, providing guidance and creating a positive learning environment. Being a part of the RELI program helps participants bring new ideas, perspectives and professional development opportunities to their institutions. Although RELI itself was short, the memories, mentorships and relationships built will last long. Don’t miss out on this wonderful opportunity to receive the highest degree of motivation in the field! I encourage all those seeking to gain more knowledge, experience and additional mentorship in the field to apply for the 2014 RELI program!

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SATURDAY NOVEMBER 23, 2013

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DON’T FORGET ABOUT THE 2013 Annual Conference and Exposition in PITTSBUR GH, PENNSYLVANIA November 6th-8th, 2013

LaRoche College and West Virginia University would like to invite you to MACUHO's 2013 Annual Conference and Exposition that will focus on creating "Strong Bonds to Build Better Bridges."

Registration is still open at http://www.macuho.org/group/conference2013 The 2013 Annual Conference is proud to present Dr. Robin DiAngelo as our Keynote Speaker.

The 2013 Annual Conference is Proud to present Dr. Robin DiAngelo as our keynote speaker.

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BEST BLUE JAY RA AWARD: RECOGNIZING RAs WHO GO ABOVE AND BEYOND By: Maggie Flynn, Area Coordinator, Elizabethtown College Last year I noticed that some of my staff members were really going above and beyond, while others were simply doing the bare minimum. I started thinking about how I could

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recognize those top-notch RAs while trying to

tickets, gift cards from local places, and items from

motivate those that were barely making it.

the school bookstore. I also had an abundance of

My solution was “The Best Blue Jay RA Award,”

school credit that I could use at the college market;

named after our mascot, the Blue Jay.

this was where I ended up getting most of my

The concept was simple. Each month, RAs

prizes. I told winners they could either have a box of

were encouraged to nominate other RAs who

something from the market, or lunch with me—my

went above and beyond by sending me an

treat. Most of them wanted choice number one.

email stating who they would like to nominate

As for staff morale, the RAs in both of my build-

and why. RAs nominated each other for all

ings seemed to step up their game. RAs previ-

kinds of things—switching duty nights, helping

ously doing the bare minimum were starting to

with programs, searching for possible bed-bug

ask other RAs how they could help while RAs

fecal matter, responding to an incident, etc.

already going above and beyond enjoyed being

I wrote the nominations on pieces of paper and

recognized for their extra effort. Furthermore,

kept them in a jar. At the last staff meeting of each

peer nominations allowed me to recognize RAs

month, I read off the nominations from my jar,

whose work I may not have noticed since I cannot

folded them up, threw them back in the jar, shook

see everything that goes on in my two buildings.

it up, and picked a winner. The more nominations a

One staff even won “RA staff of the year,” an award

person had the better his/her chances of winning.

given by our Office of Residence Life to an RA

The suspense was priceless. My RAs loved

staff that works well together and collaborates to

hearing the nominations, and all joined in on the

create a welcoming environment for residents.

drumroll as a name was drawn at the end.

This year, I have implemented the Best

The prizes varied. My budget was low, which

Blue Jay RA Award again and have already

forced me to get pretty creative. I made some

gotten an abundance of nominations. I am

calls around town and was able to get free movie

hoping for another successful year.

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FALL IS SU E

ARTICLE

“BECAUSE I SAID I WOULD”

Now that the dust has settled, the tide has subsidized, and the storm has quitted, it is the obligation of all professional staffers to lift up, motivate and recognize the sweat equity that our student staffers put in during check-in, new student orientation and duty nights. At the end of check-in week, I always meet with my staff and tell them that though housing can be a thankless job, it is truly a pleasure to work with such a fantastic group of student leaders. I give them a business card that says: “Don’t worry when you are not recognized, but strive to be worthy of recognition.” - Abraham Lincoln

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By: Rhett Burden


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With that quote being our premise for the

BEST, simply, “BECAUSE WE SAID WE WOULD!”

academic school year, each member of my team

We each wrote our promise on the cards I provided

has taken a professional oath called “Because I

and I purchased shirts for my staff because I

Said I Would.” I learned about this concept from

believe that this will be a dynamic semester.

a fantastic young man named Alex Sheen. I found out about Alex from watching televi-

As most state institutions know, the dark-

sion one day and he shared his personal story

cloud always looming over the heads of uni-

of heartache and success. He shared that it was

versity officials is the fear of budget cuts and

his life mission, to fulfill promises to make life

a lack of professional development funds to

a little better for someone who needs help.

support the dynamic efforts of staffers.

In comparison to his personal oath, we as res-lifers

Though the recognition I give to my staff may

make a vow to provide excellent customer service,

be more profound than tangible, it truly does

foster relationships and provide communities that

make a difference when they know that as their

are safe and conducive to living and learning.

supervisor, I appreciate the work they do and

“Because I Said I Would” is a promise that we

take an interest in the professional success.

each made stating our professional goals for

I would encourage all pro-staffers to take the time

our “residents, each other and community.

to not only provide incentives through gifts but also

We don’t do our very best day-in and day-out

to touch the hearts and minds of our students.

because of the title, money, responsibility, re-

This year, we are Team Because I Said I Would.

sources, perks or benefits, we do OUR VERY

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WI NTER IS SU E

ARTICLE

HOUSING AND RESIDENTS’ LIVES By: Joe Courtade Assistant Area Coordinator Stevens Institute of Technology Hoboken, New Jersey

In the field of Housing and Residence Life, many of us began our careers as Resident Assistants. We came into the job with ambitions of creating a strong community and contributing to a positive experience for our residents. For many, the passion we had for the RA position led us in the direction of a professional career in higher education, and as a result many of us have worked so long in the field that we forget what it was like to be on the other side— to be a student, one of the many residents that we work so hard to cater to. Once you become an RA, you’re no longer a normal student. Your college experience changes as an inevitable result of combining your job with your personal life. In Residence Life you never really leave work; your residence hall is your workplace; your bedroom is your office, and you never really fully get away.

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Almost two years ago, I escaped the RA life. I was given the opportunity to study abroad for a semester, working as an RA in the fall then flying off to New Zealand in the winter. I lived in university-leased apartments, for the first time in a long time being on the other side of the floor meeting as—finally—a “normal person”. Think of a life without meetings, without (required) events, without any commitments each night other than a handful of homework assignments for your classes. This is the life of a normal college student. I was a resident. I went to floor meetings, had a RA, and attended events that I had no part in planning. I definitely made my RA a little nervous when he realized one of his residents had more RA experience than he did, but I did nothing to challenge his leadership.


FALL IS SU E

MACU H O MAGA ZI N E

Instead, I watched. I saw the way he interacted with the other residents on my floor, and thought about my own leadership style as I analyzed his behavior. I will say nothing negative about his approach as I did enjoy him as a RA, but it was definitely a policy-enforcement strategy with an intentional distance between the RA and the residents. As Residence Life professionals, we forget what it’s like to be on the other side of Housing—the resident side. We get annoyed when they break policies, feel frustrated when we repeatedly need to clarify deadlines, and often times make the mistake of calling them “kids.” In positions of authority, we feel professionally and mentally “older” than our students, despite (for the many young professionals in our field) often times being the same age or just a few years older. Whether you are a 22 year-old fresh out of undergrad, or a seasoned ResLife professional of 50+ years of

age, our 18-21 year-old students (no matter how they act) are not children or “kids.” To call them as such is demeaning, and it is so easy to address them as they TRULY are—students, residents, and young adults. Part of our job is to help them become more responsible adults, and if we want them to act like adults, we need to treat them as adults. Also, good luck getting a positive response from any headstrong young adult that you try to assert authority over by calling him or her a kid. Anyone that has ever been a teenager can tell you that that’s the last way you’ll gain their respect or cooperation.

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FALL IS SU E

FEATURE

LEADING

Assistant Director of Housing and Residential Life Rutgers University - Camden

WITH SOLE - Debbie Scheibler

It ’s the most wonderful time of the year: Staf f Training Season! At Rutgers- Camden we wanted to think beyond the standard, tired themes frequently used for training and of fer a fresh, totally new spin to what it means to be an R A or CA . We kicked of f our almost two-week training with the theme of service and how important it was to serve, support and inspire others around us (we are located in Camden, NJ, so if you know anything about this city you know it is a city in great need). We also discussed how one can be a leader while also 28 |

M AC U H O

humbling themselves and serving others. It helped to put a fresh perspective on the R A role and helped my student staf f and professional staf f to look at our job of working with students through a dif ferent, more “customer-centered” lens. The big idea that so many people in higher education tend for forget is that we work for our students (and not the other way around). Using the theme of service as our platform really helped to shape that mantra for our team. In addition to just using the idea of service, my staf f

spent an of f-site weekend at the Center for Environmental Transformation (CFET) in the Waterfront South neighborhood of Camden, NJ. At CFET our team helped to plant trees, clean gardens and parks, and get a local school ready for the impending start of the school year. We also had the opportunity to meet and play with folks who live in the neighborhood. In their retreat center, the CFET staf f also facilitated event sessions focused on service and being environmentally sound in our daily practices. They also led


FALL IS SU E

discussions focused around the ideas of obsolescence and consumerism. It was absolutely something new to focus on during a standard R A Training week, but the staf f bonding, service to our host city, and discussion of a larger-scale epidemic was amazing and really brought our team together. It also got the staf f thinking about issues that should be of importance to their residents as well as themselves. As part of our training, we also tried to bring it back to center and continue to ask ourselves how we served each other that day. We watched the TOMS YouTube video “For Tomorrow” and discussed how starting positive change starts with an idea that people can rally around. We also used the YouTube video to introduce our team to

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M AC U H O

the meaning and message behind TOMS (other than being a social fashion trend) at which point we handed out a pair of the collegiate red and black TOMS as well as Blake Mycoskie’s book “Start Something that Matters” to every staf f member. They were thrilled (some were even crying). Many of my R As are members of Greek letter organizations, student government, civic engagement clubs, and other organizations that are looking for ways to gave back not just to Camden but also to the region and beyond. Seeing how Blake founded TOMS and changed the lives of the children in the YouTube video was incredibly inspiring to them. Everyone on campus keeps saying “hey, great shoes,” or “The R As all get shoes? ”

and even just, “ Wow! I love TOMS.” Now, our team follows up on the compliments and comments by stopping and educating their fellow students and staf f members as to the reason behind the TOMS shoes for our of fice. As a staf f, we all wore our TOMS for our various new student move-ins and plan to continue the trend of service and engaging in things that matter as we move through the academic year! Also, if you are interested in chatting more about how service can inspire great leaders on your campus? Leading with Sole: Service as a Foundation for R A /CA Staf f Training (Incorporating the TOMS Philosophy) will be a Poster Presentation at the MACUHO 2013 Annual Conference in Pittsburg, PA .


WI NTER ISESU E FALL IS SU

FEATURE

THE EVERYDAY ASSESSMENT As a new professional in Residence Life, I engage in conversation with student staff and residential students every day. These conversations both inspire and motivate me to more effectively understand the student voice. Each conversation provides me with an opportunity to assess the student experience. As we enter a new academic year, assessing the student experience not only becomes a passion of mine, but also a priority. It is essential for student affairs professionals to hear the student voice, because this voice will impact decision-making and strategic planning at the university level. I value the process, the validity, and the procedures we utilize to assess the residential student population. Engaging in formal assessment by conducting surveys or facilitating focus groups provides staff members with a baseline understanding of the student experience. The quantitative data we collect, analyze, and report offers us numbers and statistics. Numbers and statistics are tangible evidence that can be used to make improvements and enact change. The qualitative information we acquire offers us a glimpse into the

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M AC U H O

overall student experience. Formal qualitative data typically highlights the “best” and the “worst” of a student experience. However, the “everyday” student experience lies deep within the unique stories, narratives, and anecdotes that we discover through our daily conversations with students. Both formal and informal assessment strategies help student affairs professionals learn about the student experience, engage with data, question the status quo, and recommend proposals to enact change. The process of utilizing assessment results to inform our practice is more commonly referred to in the assessment world as “closing the loop.” Closing the loop may seem like a daunting task. However, when both formal and informal assessment strategies are utilized effectively and in collaboration with each other, the outcome yields more powerful and more accurate recommendations. Everyday Assessment Challenge The Everyday Assessment Challenge provides student affairs professionals with a framework to engage in conversations with students from an assessment lens. Here are four strategies for you to embrace this challenge and learn

more about the student voice on your campus this academic year: ONE. Identify trends and patterns in existing assessment data. Take a look at current and past assessment data in your department or unit. What are some highlights from this data? Challenge yourself to have a critical eye when analyzing this data. Although you may certainly have great highlights to showcase from your department, what are some areas for improvement? What more do you want to learn? What do the recurring responses indicate about your department? What can you learn about the outlier responses? By reflecting on these questions when analyzing your data, you can create a list of highlights, areas of concern, and unanswered questions. TWO. Ask questions. Although student affairs professionals have a wide range of interaction with students, every professional typically has the opportunity to work within the campus environment. By asking questions to the students you supervise or to


MACU H O MAGA ZI N E

FALL IS SU E

CHALLENGE the students who walk into your office to schedule an appointment, you have the opportunity to learn from them. Students enjoy answering questions about their experience because this provides them with the opportunity to take ownership of their experience. THREE. Brainstorm in large groups with diverse perspectives. After you have gained more knowledge about the student perspective, you can organize this feedback and begin to brainstorm with colleagues. The brainstorming process provides an opportunity to gain a vast array of perspectives. Collaborate with colleagues across your division, and be open to the possibility of change. Students share their experiences with you, and we want students to know that we care about their opinions, ideas, and concerns. The more time we take to assess the student experience, the more motivated our students become to share their ideas. FOUR. Ask more questions and establish buy-in. Bring your ideas and perspec-

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M AC U H O

Ashley Nickelsen

tives back to the student population. Provide opportunities for students to offer alternative suggestions, but use this time to educate students on the rationale for your idea. Inform students of how this idea was created. The “Everyday Assessment Challenge” enables student affairs professionals to take the student voice into account during every step of the process. Students will begin to learn that their voice matters and this not only provides them with ownership of their experience, but it also establishes a culture of true assessment within your institution. By providing students with the context for a change that is student-driven, you have just created an environment for more student buy-in. The Everyday Assessment Challenge is a state of mind. Advisor meetings with student organizations on campus or conversations with work-study students at your main Student Center can be viewed as opportunities to learn more about the student experience. Closing the loop with your assessment data does not happen overnight. Practical strategies to establish purposeful initiatives require practice, time, and the

dedication to maintain an assessment mindset. As a result, your outcome will be more meaningful and effective amongst your student population. Take advantage of these moments and take on your own version of the Everyday Assessment Challenge.

“It is essential for student affairs professionals to hear the student voice, because this voice will impact decision-making and strategic planning at the university level.”


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WI NTER ISESU E FALL IS SU

FEATURE

MACUHO HELPS PITTSBURGH

DRESS FOR SUCCESS

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For MACUHO’s service learning project

be greeted by one of their representatives to

during the annual conference, the Diver-

talk more about their organization and be in-

sity Committee is graciously working with

structed on how they can help. Volunteers will

Dress for Success of Pittsburgh, an inter-

be back around noon so that no one misses

national, not-for-profit organization.

the Welcome/Keynote Speech later that day.

The mission of Dress for Success is to promote

In addition, a small informal discussion to process

the economic independence of disadvantaged

your experience with Dress for Success will be

women by providing professional attire, a

held later that day, location TBA (please review

network of support and the career develop-

the conference schedule). Those who volunteer

ment tools to help women thrive in work and

should commit to be part of this discussion.

in life. Since 1997, Dress for Success has served

If you are interested in this worthwhile op-

more than 700,000 women around the world

portunity, please send your name, institu-

by providing donated interview suits and attire

tion, and contact information to Anthony

for the workplace, employment retention

Florendo, Diversity Co-Chair: antad97@an-

programs, and a network to support all clients

dromeda.rutgers.edu. Spaces are limited!

who may face obstacles during their journey.

For those who want to get involved but cannot

Part of their success is attributed to their many

make it that day, Dress for Success Pitts-

volunteers who help with the evaluation, or-

burgh accepts suits and other professional

ganization, and distribution of the clothing

clothing to help each woman look her best

and accessories donated by the community.

and feel confident for an interview or her new

This year, MACUHO will be sending a small

job. They gladly accept donations of new and

delegation to help Dress for Success in their

gently worn women’s interview and work ap-

efforts. This event will be held on Wednes-

propriate clothing, shoes, purses, and acces-

day, November 6th at 9:00a.m. Volunteers will

sories. Items that are damaged or are more

meet at the front lobby of DoubleTree Hotel

than 10 years old cannot be accepted. We are

at 8:20a.m. for transportation to Dress for

in need of clothing of all kinds – from suits to

Success’ base of operations. Volunteers will

scrubs to hospitality and safety uniforms.


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MACU H O MAGA ZI N E

THE DIVERSITY COMMITTEE

Cosmetics and beauty items • Samples or full sizes of shampoo, conditioner • Unused cosmetics – foundation, eye shadow, etc. especially for African-American women • Tampons, razors, deodorant, soap, various toiletries • Perfume (can be used) Clothing Donations All sizes are accepted but the greatest need is for: • Sizes 0, 2, 14 and women’s plus sizes • Maternity wear • Black casual work pants • Black, navy and brown tone suits and coordinated separates • New undergarments and panty hose are always needed Accessories and Other Items • Closed toe shoes in black, navy or brown tones (3 inch heel or less) • Non-skid, black or white shoes and steel toed boots • Pantyhose, knee highs and undergarments (new) • Business appropriate purses or briefcases • Jewelry: earrings (no larger than a quarter), necklaces, working watches • Scarves in good condition All donations are tax deductible. Please contact Anthony Florendo during the conference (preferably during Committee Expo) with your donated items. For more information about Dress for Success: http://www.dressforsuccess.org/affiliate.aspx?sisid=107&pageid=1

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MACUHO Magazine Fall 2013 Final