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MACUHO

WINTER 2017

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE EDITION

Inside this Issue TEMPORARILY DISABLED

SPEAK YOUR TRUTH

A DAY MY MUSLIM PRIVILEGE

Living Life at Waist Level

Conversations through Storytelling

Bent...But Did Not Break

PAGE 12

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WINTER 2017

Table of Contents 4 Letters from the Presidents 8 Committee Updates

Managing Editor DON BRENNAN, Alvernia University

Director of Business Operations & Communication

CONAL CARR, Penn State University-University Park

Associate Editor TORY ELISCA, Rutgers University-Newark Associate Editor

NICOLE CLEMSON, Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA)

12 Temporarily Disabled

Copy Editors TIMOTHY FERRET, Messiah College

14 Pop Into Community Building

KEVIN BATTERSBY, Alvernia University

15 Five Minutes Longer

Columns Editor

18 F.O.R.M. 20 Speak Your Truth

for Students (V.I.P.S.)

22 Volunteer Incentive Program 24 A Day My Muslim Privilege Bent…But Did Not Break 26 A to Z: Accommodating Tomorrow’s Students 29 Humans of MACUHO 30 10 Topics on Diversity 34 Moving Mountains, One Student at a Time

39 Academic Excellence Awards Fall 2016

2

MACUHO Magazine Staff

ARLEYNA LOSS, Penn State University-University Park Committee Liaison CATHERINE BAXTER, Rowan University

Social Media Editor JACQUI ROGERS, Wesley College

Design & Visual Editor HEIDI MULLER, West Virginia University

Feature Editors

EMILY NANNA, Georgetown University BRIAN ROOT, University of Pittsburgh-Greensburg

Columnists

JENNA KONYAK, Seton Hill University SINCLAIR CEASAR, Loyola University Maryland ARLEYNA LOSS, Penn State University-University Park For more information about getting involved with the MACUHO Magazine, please email magazine@macuho.org.


Executive Board

MACUHO

President OLAN GARRETT, Penn State University Vice-President / President Elect DEBBIE SCHEIBLER, Rutgers University - Camden Past President BRIAN MEDINA, Frostburg State University Secretary SUSANNE FERRIN, University of the Sciences Treasurer DEREK SMITH, Delaware Valley University Sage GRACE REYNOLDS, Lafayette College

Director, Membership Development CRYSTAL LOPEZ, Caldwell University Director, Business Operations and Communication CONAL CARR, Penn State University Director, Strategic Initiatives NATALIE LISTON, Bucknell University Director, Training and Development VACANT Director, Annual Programs JESS LANCIANO, Shepherd University Director, Information Technology JIM CLAGG, Marshall University

Diversity Committee CURTIS CHAN, Rutgers University - New Brunswick KURTIS WATKINS, Stevens Institute of Technology Host 2017 Committee JACKYLN GENTILE, University of Maryland - College Park LAURA TAN, University of Maryland Housing & Facilities Operations Committee JAN MASON, Penn State University JENNA KONYAK, Seton Hill University Personal and Professional Development Committee GINA KIEFER, Alvernia University ELIZABETH ALI, St. Joseph’s University Program Committee JORDAN TOY, Ursinus College GENICKA VOLTAIRE, Montclair State University Recognition, Education, and Connections Committee JOHNNY KOCHER, West Virginia University NICOLE CLEMSON, Maryland Institute College of Art Recruitment and Retention Committee TORY ELISCA, Rutgers University - Newark MAX SHIREY, Kutztown University Regional Coordinators LAUREN WAY, The George Washington University (DC Metro) KATIE BUEHNER, Frostburg State University (Delaware/Maryland) MISTY DENHAM-BARRETT, Rutgers University - New Brunswick (New Jersey) NICHOLAS LOWRY, DeSales University (PA-Northeast) CORY AMENTA, University of the Arts (PA-Southeast) AMANDA GEORGE, Dickinson College (PA-Central) RHONNA BOLLIG, Gannon University (PA- West) TONY SAMPSON, Marshall University (West Virginia)

Archives Coordinator LAURA TAN, University of Maryland Magazine Editor DON BRENNAN, Alvernia University Strategic Planning Coordinator CAROLYN PITCAIRN, Fairmount State University Exhibits & Displays Coordinator CHRIS WILLIS, LaRoche College Sponsorship Coordinator TRACEY EGGLESTON, Marshall University Mid-Atlantic Placement Conference VACANT Webmaster TIFFANY HUGHES, West Virginia University Systems Analyst NICK GRAMICCIONI, William Paterson University Social Media Coordinator STEVEN COURAS, Stevens Institute of Technology Financial Advisory Board Chair BRANDON CHANDLER , Rutgers University - Camden Senior Level Housing Officer Task Force Chair  STEWART ROBINETTE, The George Washington University Mid-Level Housing Officer Task Force Chair  VACANT Committee Structure Review Task Force Co-Chair  DEBBIE SCHEIBLER, Rutgers University - Camden VACANT ACUHO-I Regional Affiliation Director  JOANNE GOLDWATER, St. Mary’s College of Maryland ACUHO-I Foundation Rep for MACUHO DANA SEVERANCE, Frostburg State University  

Leadership Council

3


WINTER 2017

Letters from the Presidents

PAST

partnerships with CAACURH

goes largely unnoticed. We are at

Conference, I ended my heartfelt

and ACUHO-I toward a common

the end of a long political season,

introduction as MACUHO President

purpose. Task Forces have conducted

with many unknowns in the years

with the notion that it is a privilege

assessment to hear many voices

ahead, regardless of your party

to serve. I reiterate that philosophy

to better engage our membership

affiliation. Some predict further

still today, now as the immediate Past

and to enhance the conferences

economic challenges in the wake of

President of MACUHO.

and professional development

bank scandals and a growing divide

opportunities we can offer in the year

between rich and poor. While the

conjures the duty of a soldier,

ahead. Committees have hosted

advances in technology have certainly

committing themselves to the

Fireside Chats with anyone interested

made communication quicker,

principles and values of a country they

to talk openly about topics affecting

we continue to see the abuses of

must defend at all costs. For others,

your daily work. We have connected

technology as ways to marginalize

service is a religious tribute, bred of

over dinners and meetings to envision

others or hack private information.

a faith that a God or gods deserve as

a better future for our profession.

much human reverence as one could

you still give me hope for a better

honor.

done together, can we ever say

future. No, it will not be easy, and

that it is enough? Could that one

it may require personal sacrifice or

go well beyond the boundaries

email have been crafted to better

collective reconciliation. Many of you

of a country or a religion and can

portray the compassionate support

have demonstrated to me that despite

encompass the whole world with all

for a mourning friend? If I had just

real struggle in your lives, there can

of its inhabitants. This may be a lofty

called that colleague more readily,

indeed be optimism. We may regress

proposal, but should we not strive

would they have felt comforted and

in some ways, but that means we

to serve others despite their creed,

supported through a tough work

have to be ever vigilant to observe

origin, or intersecting identities?

environment? Maybe I was so focused

and acknowledge our errors to thus

Should we not endeavor to better

on my MAPC interview schedule

improve for the future.

ourselves, yet humbled in the reality

that I neglected to spend some time

that we cannot do this alone? Can

with new professionals to better

merely be contained in platitudes

we not reach out to one another to

understand their hopes and fears

or a fancy slogan. Service is a daily

embrace our differences, rather than

when entering our field.

effort despite the odds and a counter

feel secure with our commonalities,

to all of the critics. Service embodies

segregating us from one another

the past year with gratitude and

hope while also enduring the pain of

rather than unifying the whole?

a newfound appreciation for the

progress. Service reflects seriously the

complexity of the issues we all may

challenges of others while taking the

worked with many of you on a

face. We have seen great turmoil

time to smile and to appreciate how

wide variety of initiatives, some

as a nation and as a world; violence

much more we can all do together.

well beyond MACUHO and its own

and bigotry constantly making

borders. MACUHO has strengthened

headlines when positive reconciliation

opportunity to serve.

4

During the 2015 Annual

Brian Medina

For some, the word service

My hope is that service can

In the last year, I have

Despite all of what we have

Through it all, I reflect upon

Despite all of these concerns,

Humble service cannot

Thank you for giving me the


MACUHO

PRESENT

I hope this update finds you

Olan Garrett

work of the association. While we ran

thanks to him for stepping up in this

well and anticipating (or having) a

out of time at the business meeting

important role.

great start to your 2017. It was just

and did not vote on the resolution, it

two short months ago that we were

was clear that there were still some

met at Bucknell University on

all together at Hershey Lodge for the

significant issues to be addressed

December 9 for a one-day retreat and

2016 MACUHO Annual Conference,

regarding how the position was

I have to say that we had some very

co-hosted by Lehigh University and

structured, and so, with the consent

productive and fruitful conversations

Lafayette College. I am grateful to

of the board, the decision was made

about where we’re headed as an

host chairs Chris Ottey and Sarah

to appoint a Sage as a one-year

association. I am proud and honored

Yencha, the host committee, and

ad-hoc appointment to pilot the

to be able to work with some amazing

all those who were involved in the

position and refine the positional

individuals. One of the items that

planning of what was a memorable

responsibilities. I am pleased to

we finalized were the charges for

and outstanding conference. For

announce that I have appointed

the four task forces for this year: the

those that were able to attend, I

Grace Reynolds to this ad-hoc

Financial Advisory Board Task Force,

hope that the conference provided

appointment, and I thank Grace for

Mid-Level Professional, Senior-Level

valuable opportunities to connect or

her support and commitment.

Professional, and Committee and

re-connect with old and new friends,

Leadership Council review. Watch

get re-energized, and learn some

our efforts at the annual conference

your e-mail for a call for involvement

new ideas or good information that

to support the ACUHO-I Foundation,

for these groups, which should be

you were able to take back to your

both through providing donations

imminent. I hope you will consider

home institutions. As I mentioned

to support ACUHO-I initiatives, as

serving the association on one of

in my remarks during the banquet,

well as the basket raffle that we do

these task forces, as the work each

MACUHO is a strong family of caring

to support our Lisa A. Pierce V.I.P.S.

will do is vital for the future of the

and committed people, and I hope

Endowment. Our successful support

association.

that if you were in attendance,

for the past two years has been due

you were able to build bonds and

to the excellent work of our outgoing

of you at MAPC in mid-February,

strengthen connections to our bigger

ACUHO-I Foundation Representative,

and I am excited to serve you as

regional family. During the annual

Shana Alston. By the time this issue is

President. As I said in my conference

conference business meeting, there

published, Shana will have completed

remarks, you, our membership,

was significant discussion regarding

her commitment to the representative

are the lifeblood and heartbeat of

the addition of a Sage position to

role. MACUHO owes Shana a debt

our association. Your association

the Executive Board. The position

of gratitude for all her hard work,

needs you, MACUHO is committed

was proposed in order to ensure

and I am grateful to Shana for her

to serving you and meeting your

continuity in our history and to have

service. Dana Severance of Frostburg

needs so that you can do what you

a person to be able to provide

State University will become our new

do best—serve our students! In the

guidance, support, and advice to

ACUHO-I Foundation Rep effective

meantime, please enjoy this edition

the Executive Board and Leadership

in January 2017. Congratulations to

of the MACUHO Magazine and the

Council as it completes the important

Dana on his appointment, and a big

great content that is included in it!

Many of you will remember

Finally, the Executive Board

I look forward to seeing some

5


WINTER 2017

FUTURE

launched by President Olan Garrett,

of all women and their allys in our

writing this from the position of

I plan to take a look at how we

region and will serve as a method of

Vice President/President-Elect, and

are utilizing our resources to best

illuminating trends/research for or by

I again express my gratitude to the

meet the changing professional

women in our field.

membership for putting your trust

development needs and restraints

in me to continue the work of our

of our membership. If changes need

Vice President/President-Elect of

Association after the presidency of

to be discussed or set in motion

MACUHO, I was the Director of

Olan Garrett.

in order to serve our membership

Annual Programs. In this role I gained

more directly or in a different format

valuable insight into every aspect of

personally know that I dream big, loud

than we have historically done so

how our annual conference comes

and in glittering colors. What I mean is

(for example increasing our regular

to be each year. I plan to take that

that I tend to utilize an optimistic lens

webinar presence via existing

experience, coupled with annual

for everything I do, incorporate a high

technology we already have), then I

survey data results to examine how

energy approach to tasks, and lead

plan to create opportunities to do so.

our annual programs such as Philly

with a can-do attitude when working

Exchange, SSLI, NJCORE, etc. are

with teams. I also wager that I am

likely heard this said before, but the

being planned, executed and utilized.

anticipating more than will fit into a

work MACUHO has been a part of

As previously mentioned, professional

one-year term, and so fear not, there

with the Regional Affiliations Task

development is a changing landscape

is a healthy dose of reality mixed in

Force is fabulous and as a region

in our profession right now, and I

with those rainbows and unicorns. I

MAUCHO was well-represented

want to ensure that our resources and

hope you’ll support me as we embark

within this group. I plan to continue

efforts are serving our membership in

on that journey together.

fostering strong relationship between

the most efficient and beneficial way.

our counterparts in other regions and

(and retention and graduation)

representing the strong work that

any of us have will get off the ground,

demographics. The rise in for-profit

we are doing here in MACUHO. If

however, without you. All of you…

institutions. These are just a few

you have not yet had an opportunity

and I need to hear you voices! We are

of factors that have been and still

to review this work, I’d strongly

truly only as strong as our weakest

are currently impacting our home

encourage each of you to do so, as

link. We need folks who are willing

institutions. FLSA is probably the

I anticipate the impact to be a long-

to commit themselves to making the

most directly impactful of them

lasting and beneficial one.

difference in our region. I am looking

all right now. We know that it has

for individuals with wisdom within the

dramatically changed the game for

will be launching this year under

profession, region and Association to

all of us in regards to our work days,

Olan’s presidency is the Women of

step forward (in some cases to step

our responsibilities, our professional

MACUHO initiative. Modeled after the

forward again) and help lead up. I am

development and perhaps even our

Women of WACUHO and ACUHO-

looking for graduate students, entry

job searching plans or expectations.

I’s Women in Housing Network, it

levels, mid-levels, SHOs and anyone

Utilizing data from the tasks forces

is my goal that our own version of

who has yet to play a leadership role

compiled by Past President Brian

Women of MACUHO will be a venue

in our association, to present at

Medina and the work to come this

to create networks, and mentorship/

year from 4 task forces set to be

sponsorship, will recognize the work

6

I feel very privileged to be

Debbie Scheibler

Those of you who know me

FLSA. Changing enrollment

At this point you have very

A special project that I

Prior to being elected

None of the great ideas that

...continued on page 17


MACUHO

7


WINTER 2017

COMMITTEE UPDATES Housing and Facilities Operations (HFO) Committee Jan Mason, Penn State University Jenna Konyak, Seton Hill University

The HFO Committee was excited to see everyone this past month at the Annual MACUHO Conference! We were thrilled to award Brandon Chandler of Rutgers – Camden the 2016 MACUHO Excellence in Operations Award. Brandon not only does an outstanding job managing facilities at RutgersCamden, he is an active and very much appreciated member of the HFO Committee. Congratulations Brandon! Additionally, we were proud to present the Halls to Walls event(s) at the conference. Thank you to Milton Hershey School and Lebanon Valley College for opening your doors and allowing our wonderful MACUHO members to explore your campuses. We recently added a new Co-Chair, Jenna Konyak, Assistant Director of Residence Life at Seton Hill University, to the team. Together, Jan and Jenna hope to lead the HFO Committee in the development of some awesome projects in the new year. The HFO Committee recently had a conference call and many new and returning voices were on the line. We are continuing our Open Forum during each call, where committee members can discuss any topics, issues, or best practices with the group. We are also looking forward to developing this Spring’s Halls to Walls event in the Washington DC region. New this year, we are looking into ways to connect with Senior Housing Officers and engage them in not only the HFO Committee, but in MACUHO as a whole. Interested in joining the HFO Committee or looking for any information? Please email one of the cochairs: Jan Mason at ejm140@psu.edu, or Jenna Konyak at jkonyak@setonhill.edu. We are looking forward to working with you in the new year. 8

Johnny Kocher, West Virginia University Nicole Clemson, Maryland Institute College of Art First off, Nicole and I want to thank everyone that participated in the REC Committee events throughout the Annual Conference at Hershey and those that contributed to the Get Connected! Photo Challenge. We enjoyed hosting the events and loved the creativity and energy we saw in the photos! With the annual conference concluded for the year, REC has started a short reset period in which we have consolidated our awesome new committee members that signed up at the Annual Conference Committee Expo and held our first committee conference call in December in which we debriefed on all of our Annual Conference initiatives and discussed the sustains and improves for the upcoming year. Finally, we have started our fall 2016 Academic Excellence Awards submissions and are excited to receive submissions from all of your academically excelling student staff! This year 4.0 students will receive an awesome printed certificate in the mail from the REC Chairs signed by the MACUHO President and the 3.7-3.9 students will receive a digital certificate with the same design and signatures. REC is excited to be entering the New Year with a great group with great ideas and motivation and would like to invite anyone interested in assisting us with Recognition, Education, and Connection across the MACUHO region to contact us at macuhorec@gmail. com. To join our mailing list, and jump on one of our open conference calls. Talk to you soon!


MACUHO

Max Shirey, Kutztown University

Tory Elisca, Rutgers University - Newark

The 2016 Annual Conference is behind us and we welcomed 16 undergraduate students to the MACUHO

family through the Volunteer Incentive Program for Students (VIPS).For those new to MACUHO, every year, the Recruitment & Retention Committee invites undergraduate students interested in pursuing a career in Student Affairs to be a part of the Lisa A. Pierce Volunteer Incentive Program for Students. The program provides an opportunity for undergraduate student staff members to learn more about the field of Student Affairs by attending the annual MACUHO conference. Our committee reviewed over 50 applications and narrowed down the group to the 16 students who participated in this year’s class. The undergraduate students had the opportunity to volunteer at the conference, network with graduate students and professional staff, meet distinguished guests including Mr. Tom Pierce, father of Lisa A. Pierce; Expert in Residence, Dr. Ann Marie Klotz; and MACUHO Past President, Brooke Clayton.

Aside from the 2016 V.I.P.S., we are always looking for new members for the R&R Committee and individuals

that have an interest in engaging more of our membership in MACUHO. We encourage you to join our team and continue the great work the committee has started. Below is a list of the current initiatives that the R&R Committee is working on: - Creating more opportunities for graduate student engagement; - Enhancing the mentoring experience of our VIPS; - Building our relationship with the Central Atlantic Affiliate of College and University Residence Halls (CAACURH); - Developing a professional development curriculum for MACUHO membership; and - Recruiting and engaging new professionals to join and be involved with MACUHO.

We welcome your thoughts and new ideas as well! Please sign up for the committee through the MACUHO

website and consider reaching out personally to either of the co-chairs to get more involved!

The diversity committee would like to highlight our achievements at the Annual Conference: -Collaboration of Common Ground Room with PPD and REC committee -Presented Commitment to Social Justice Award to 1 professional and 1 student -Offered a diversity read for the basket raffle -Presented at the Diversity Round Table -Held Committee Expo and Committee Meetings, attracting over 25 attendees -Promoted an all-gender restroom -Responded to immediate need to process after election with an impromptu conference session

Kurtis Watkins

Diversity Committee is also working on the 2nd Annual Inclusion Summit and creating Diversity Resource Guide for Members. 9


WINTER 2017

Personal and Professional Development Committee

Gina Kiefer

The Personal and Professional Development

Elizabeth Ali

Committee held its annual case study competition at the annual conference in Hershey, PA. Thank you to everyone who participated and helped facilitate the case

study competition. Participants worked in small groups

January to talk about initiatives and activities that we

to present a solution to the case study issued during

would like to accomplish. Please consider joining us

the first day of the annual conference. This year’s case

and sharing any ideas you may have to help us engage

study was developed with submissions by both Nicole

MACUHO members this year! Contact PPD Co-Chairs

Clemson, Maryland Institute College of Art and Anthony

Gina Kiefer, gina.kiefer@alvernia.edu and Elizabeth Ali,

Florendo, University of the Sciences. Special thanks to

elizabeth.ali@sju.edu. Happy New Year!

PPD kicked off 2017 with a conference call in

PPD member, Emily Nanna, who edited the case studies to our final version! Â We had five teams of two participate in the case study competition. Congratulations to the winners Kelly Brower and Matthew Ullrich.

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MACUHO

11


WINTER 2017

Temporarily Living Life at Disabled: Waist Level By: Chris Bryant, Temple University

a timely manner. There was sometimes a lot of distance

to travel in a short amount of time. I had already begun

Last fall, on September 15th, I had an experience

that forever changed my life. I was traveling to a local

to learn that you have to preplan EVERYTHING. I was

store to purchase supplies for an RA Program when I

fortunate enough to have great assistance from my

drove through a green light at an intersection and was

colleagues and others at the conference. For the most

t-boned by a car. Having never been in any kind of serious

part, there was hardly ever a time where I was stuck and

accidents, I wasn’t entirely aware of what was happening.

had no resources.

I remember a lot of noise, smoke, air bags, and a ton of

adrenaline—I was bound and determined to get out of

it would be like to live this way on a permanent basis.

my car because I thought it was on fire. If you have never

We take for granted that we don’t spend our lives at waist level, and that the world is designed for the able-bodied.

been in an accident nor experienced air-bag deployment, there is a ton of dust and powder involved that resembles smoke. I noticed that when I got out of the car, I was unable to apply any kind of weight to my right leg. I was transported to the hospital via ambulance, and later found out I had suffered a tibial plateau fracture. Where your knee connects to your tibia---mine was fractured.

After waiting a week for surgery and then being

told I couldn’t walk without crutches or would have to use a wheelchair for the next 8 weeks, I was pretty bummed out. I wasn’t doing a lot other than sleeping, sitting, and working from home since the accident. I was working at Marshall University at the time (Go Herd!) and had some colleagues who were involved in MACUHO that encouraged me to attend the Annual Conference. Having been an active participant in previous annual conferences, I desired to connect with other professionals in the field and to attend sessions that would help my own professional development. I decided to go to the conference with the support of my colleagues.

I found the conference to be somewhat difficult

to get around at. I think the overarching issue was that everything was so spread out. Without the use of a power chair—I was rolling myself around by using my hands or having others push me—it was hard to get anywhere in 12

My temporary disability made me think about what

Being in a wheelchair is not easy, not only due to the physical limitations, but also the social stigma attached to being in a chair. I can’t tell you how many stares or questions I got. The questions were, I believe, mostly out of concerns for my well-being, but the stares were oftentimes people taking in the fact that I had a chair. I will share with you that I am the kind of person who prefers to stay in the background—I don’t need to receive accolades or be front and center in any situation, but when in the wheelchair, I didn’t have that option. Everyone who knew me was concerned and had questions, and strangers would just stare. As physically exhausting as being in that chair was, it was also mentally exhausting explaining to everyone what had happened. I became tired of telling the same story over and over again—it almost felt like I had to justify my reason for being in my chair.

What I came away with from my overall experience

was 3 things we need to consider if we are ready for students with physical disabilities:


MACUHO

#1 Are the sidewalks safe?

I had to constantly worry

about tipping over because there were multiple cracks in the sidewalks and uneven pavement. A couple times I almost fell out of my chair, due to the nature of the uneven sidewalks. I think it is important to get a good feel of your college campus and seriously consider if the sidewalks are wheelchair accessible.

#2 Are the facilities accessible?

#3 Are the restrooms wheelchair accessible?

issues to deal with on our college

from your health services office, going

I can tell you from my

campuses but I think we can do a better job of assisting our students with disabilities. I would challenge all of you to try taking a wheelchair

experience, many places I went

around campus, and seeing how you

had a large stall for wheelchairs but

fare in your travels. I would guess that

lacked the ability to actually get in the

a majority of you would find many of

bathroom. Often the door was too

the same issues I faced and maybe

heavy for me to open alone, the door

even more. We need to continue

opened the wrong way, or my chair

to do better and think about all of

wouldn’t fit through the door frame to

our students when we design new

get in.

buildings, create new pathways, and

I know that we have many

work to improve our campuses. ◆

Ideally, anyone

in a wheelchair should be able to successfully enter the dining space— the ramp shouldn’t be too steep that someone would need help getting in and out. There needs to be adequate space to maneuver around and the floors should be consistent in level and texture to make getting around easy. Also, it would be great if the workers at a dining counter, the library, or at any other office could actually see you and not just from the neck up.

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WINTER 2017

Pop Into Community Building The Realities of Virtual Reality Programming By: Don Brennan, Alvernia University

The Christmas season, a time where the economy flourishes while it seems like everyone else is in a mad dash to

find “the gift of the year,” has passed yet again. What was the Christmas gift above all else this season? For our students, it isn’t as easy as Doc McStuffins, Power Rangers, Cabbage Patch Kids, or a Disney Princess Castle. What did our students want? In my Christmas experience this winter, I kept seeing and hearing people wanting virtual reality (VR) cell phone glasses. I had seen the commercials for the Samsung Galaxy VR glasses and wondered what the VR experience would be like and how it worked. My wonder officially came to an end on Christmas day when my younger cousin, Colin (13 years old), arrived to my parents’ house with his VR glasses.

What was the experience like? At first, I

was stunned when he loaded his iPhone 6 into the glasses; I was under the impression that these VR glasses were exclusive to the Samsung galaxy. I quickly took time to reflect on how this former tech-savvy 30-year-old would be mocked by his 25-yearold self for making such an assumption. The first VR glasses tip I can give you: “VR glasses can be compatible with several smartphones through the use of YouTube and the Google Cardboard feature.” As a Disney fanatic, I immediately decided to ride Soarin’ Around the World, an updated Disney World attraction I hadn’t ridden yet. I was able to fly above the Great Wall of China, Eiffel Tower, and an African Safari.

My initial thoughts on the experience was: “I am going to be sick!” The second VR glasses tip I can

give you: “If you are prone to motion sickness, you may get nauseous.” In addition, I found the quality of the video to be pretty low. I quickly realized that in order to have a more realistic experience, you need to find a good, high quality video on YouTube. The quality of the video can greatly impact the experience that you will have. My final thoughts on the experience as a “ResLifer for Life” was a question: “How can I use this in my residential education and programming?” I began to do some brainstorming which also gave me a reason to surf YouTube. I came up with a few scenarios or ways that this VR technology could be helpful with Residential Education.

Distracted or Impaired Driving Programming. As I began my search, I immediately thought of

getting the virtual experience of being in a car accident and the lesson that could help teach our students about 14


MACUHO distracted and impaired driving beyond the novelty of “drunk goggles”. I came across a video called Decisions which focuses on several different groups of people who are distracted or impaired in different ways while driving and ends with the groups encountering each other in a

Five Minutes Longer By: Arleyna Loss My journey into higher education began only a short few years ago. As any new professional in higher

fatal car crash. I found the simulation and experience to be

education, the list of lessons to learn is certainly a mile

pretty chilling and unnerving.

along. I find that in life, I am learning new lessons every

day, and sometimes, I even have to re-learn the old

Cultural Diversity & Immersion Experience. How many of us have had to tell our

lessons I forgot. Some of those lessons are easy, and some

student staffs that a cultural dinner where they serve tacos

certainly shake the foundation. There are hard days, easy

is not really meeting a cultural diversity programming?

days, and emotional days. My goal is to seek to inspire,

Imagine being able to virtually immerse your residents

and sometimes even re-inspire, because sometimes we

in another culture. They can experience the daily life,

forget. This is for the days there doesn’t seem to be

landmarks, and culture of others without leaving the

enough time, the days where you simply want to quit, the

residence halls. There are so many different cities and

days where you wonder if what you’re doing even matters,

tourist attractions I have found that have VR 360 tours,

and the days you get so caught up in the little things that

taking the cultural immersion program to the next level.

you are momentarily blind to the big picture.

Study Skills. For a visual learner, VR technology

I always give my RAs one piece of advice. In the

might be the new frontier for studying and learning. For

midst of their occasional fears about becoming “real

example, I have found a number of videos on experiences

adults” or the excitement of something new, I tell them all

inside the human body or organs. For a health related

the same thing: You can change the world. It truly seems

major, getting to virtually enter the human body might

such a crazy concept that you, as a single human being,

be the best way to learn the material for their anatomy &

can change the world. People will often tell you that you

physiology class.

can’t, but those people are wrong. If that were the case,

names like Ghandi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Maya Angelou,

In conclusion, VR technology could be a useful

tool in your residential education arsenal. However, these

and countless others who have changed humanity would

glasses can be pricy depending on the quality that you are

never grace our lips. This alone

purchasing. I purchased a pair I am happy with for around

is sheer evidence that one

$50 to use with my iPhone 5. With YouTube and the VR

person can change the world.

glasses, the programming possibilities are plentiful for

student staff members. You can type in almost anything

these individuals, really? The

into YouTube with the phrase “360 VR” and might strike

older that I get, the more I realize that what we admire

gold for your program. If you are willing to try something

most about these individuals is that they were strong

a little different, there is virtually no limit to what virtual

enough. Life is a constant uphill battle. The wave of

reality experiences you can add to your residential

criticism and nay-sayers is like an angry, storm-induced

programming.

tidal wave with a soul-crushing weight, made simply out of

humanity’s own ruined and lost hopes and dreams. How

For advice on purchasing VR glasses, visit here:

But why do we admire

You can change the world.

http://www.theverge.com/a/best-vr-headset-oculus-rift-

easy it has become to yield to such criticism and negativity.

samsung-gear-htc-vive-virtual-reality

These individuals (dare I say heroes?) survived that

constant barrage and changed the world regardless. What

For more information about using the google

cardboard feature on YouTube, visit here: support.google.

I truly think we admire about these people is that they are

com/youtube/answer/6239930?hl=en. For the Decisions

the strength we want to have to overcome our critics, and

video: youtube.com/watch?v=jIuwTvtDdVg ◆

even ourselves. These heroes represent the belief we all want to have in the good of humanity, and that we can somehow contribute to it. 15


WINTER 2017

I suppose this begs the question: What is a hero?

saddened to see me move on, and even now I keep in

How can I become one? Well, Ralph Waldo Emerson,

touch with most of them. This relationship and these

someone I frequently turn to for inspiration, once said, “A

moments are what got me through the hatred I felt from

hero is no braver than an ordinary man, but he is brave five

my supervisor. This alone let me hold on five minutes

What is a hero?

minutes longer.” What an extraordinary

longer.

thought that five minutes longer of

sustained bravery could change the

with a separate personal crisis. In April of 2016, I had

world. I would argue that he’s right.

revealed to friends through written word that I had been

When I started my role at Penn State, I was dealing

I would also argue that I am blessed to know a field full

sexually abused as a child. I had, since college, wanted to

of heroes. I have known enough colleagues in Students

use this experience to make a difference in students’ lives.

Affairs to know that on countless occasions we have all

This was my first real brave conquest to talk openly about

held on for five minutes longer.

this part of my life in an attempt to spread awareness and

knowledge about survivors.

Through the endless parental phone calls, the

student deaths, the political battles, the quests for funding

and grants, the attempts to understand the needs of our

also greeted with information from my cousin that she had

students, the blunders, and of course, the FLSA fiascos,

also been abused by the same man. This launched a trying

we have all kept going. We keep going for the moments

and painful months-long legal process because I was asked

that make a difference. We live for those moments

to step forward with my cousin, and I could not let her do

where a colleague becomes a friend, a student becomes

it alone. Some days I simply was not okay, especially the

interested in Student Affairs, a student in crisis makes it to

day I was subpoenaed as a witness.

graduation, a compromise is found, and most importantly,

the moments of sincere, sometimes tear-filled, gratitude.

I shared this part of my life were consistently supportive.

This support alone made me comfortable enough to

My own life has been filled with its own tests.

While a lot of what I received was support, I was

Co-workers and supervisors around me with whom

When I landed my very first full-time job in Student Affairs

make a presentation for our department about abuse

as a Residence Life Coordinator, everything seemed to be

our students bring with them to campus. There is one

coming together. I had completed great internships and

woman in particular who was my pillar of support and

worked so hard to make myself a desirable candidate.

encouragement as I asked her to continue to press me

Little did I know, that job would be the worst year of my

through the anxiety so that I could make a difference. The

life. I was nothing like what my supervisor wanted, and

idea was terrifying, but because I held on just five minutes

what he did want, I could not tell you. I won’t go into fine

longer, I was able to make and give a presentation that

details, but I can tell you that job destroyed my confidence

was so well received. I am positive that this has laid the

and self-esteem within what I do. I thought that I might

foundation for the work I will continue to do for survivors

never find another job, and I wondered if I would have to

for the rest of my career. That is how five minutes longer

leave Student Affairs altogether.

led to me truly believing I can make a difference.

My Community Assistants (CAs, though most of

Does this make me

...because I held on just five minutes longer,...

you refer to them as RAs), kept me going. I had moments

a hero? I’m not sure. What I

with them. I helped them survive their crises, I walked their

do know is that you, whoever

triumphs and losses with them; we shared so many, many

you are, have gone through

laughs, and also many tears. I had such a relationship with

your own trials. You have felt

them that when my father became diagnosed with cancer

the awful sting of defeat, and

for the second time, I told them at a staff meeting that I

the beautiful flutter of victory.

would be taking time off to go to doctor’s appointments

Through the defeats in Student Affairs, you have kept

with him, and I was met with loving texts while I was

going. No matter what you go through, never give up.

gone saying I was missed, and greeted with a thoughtful,

Never let the critics win. Because you, the hero, can stay

love-filled card upon my return. So many of them were

strong for five minutes longer. Just five more minutes. ◆

16


MACUHO

SEPA Update

Hello SEPA! I hope you all had a relaxing break. My

name is Cory Amenta and I am the Regional Coordinator for the SEPA region. A little background about myself, I completed my undergraduate degree at West Chester University in Communication Studies. I recently graduated from Temple University with a master’s degree in Educational Leadership/Higher Education Administration. Currently, I am the Conduct Coordinator at the University of the Arts.

As the Regional Coordinator, I would love to hear

about any ideas you have for our region or any ideas about

FUTURE PRESIDENT...continued from page 6

conferences and events, to write for the MACUHO Magazine and/or to host webinars to seize the moment and raise your hand. I need current leadership members to remain committed and invigorated in the roles you have, as we will need your experiences to guide us. If you want to be an active and dedicated part of MACUHO then I am looking for you.

The future is exciting, but we need to be prepared to

step up, serve, and be nimble in doing so. I look forward to creating memories and magic with each of you. Happy New Year, MACUHO, and get excited about the future!

coordinating an event. I am currently brainstorming a few events for the spring semester such as happy hours, lunches, coffee breaks and more. If you have any ideas, I would love to hear them! Please feel free to email me (camenta@uarts. edu) with any ideas/suggestions. I hope you all have a great semester and I hope to see you soon.

17


WINTER 2017

F.O.R.M.

As a supervisor of para-professional staff, I have

By Timothy Ferret, Messiah College

year on topics such as microaggressions and sexuality.

often encountered difficulty in casting the vision for my

For my staff in particular, it looks like reminders of how

resident assistants at the beginning of the year; It is not for

they each felt when they were outside, or on the margins.

lack of motivating, inspiring jargon to choose from. By my

Nancy Schloessberg’s (1989) theory of mattering and

count, I could choose from any of the following with which

marginality reminds us that we have all experienced feeling

to inspire my RAs: the mission and vision of the institution,

marginalized. To aid in individuals moving to a place of

the student affairs mission and learning outcomes, the

mattering, they often need an invitation into a ritual or

departmental mission, the first year experience residence

rite. If we meet our residents where they are at, it can go a

life learning outcomes, and then finally my own council.

long way toward sensing their own mattering, and intrinsic

value.

It is pretty overwhelming, and it can’t all be done

effectively in a manner that is ultimately reassuring my RAs that they know who they work for and why they are in their

Opportunities for autonomy

positions. The great thing about working with a residence

Residents will be respected as adults and will learn more

life team is that with high turnover from year to year, we

about themselves. Working with first year residents, there

can try different things as professional staff. I like to think

is a temptation for my resident assistants to reference their

of residence life as work which can be done in a variety

residents as “kids”. The irony is that some of my RAs are

of “right” ways. Some years I have focused more on the

sophomores, yet somehow come to use this demeaning

institution, the department, and always my own supervisory

term. We could credit this language to the seriousness that

vision for my own staff. The following is a set of ideals

our RAs take in their role, but regardless of their intentions

that I use with my residence life para-professionals, asking

it is a mindset I actively try to adjust as I work with them.

them to foster a particular sort of environment. With these

Enough of our first year residents display attention-seeking

core values for our staff, the hope is that we are creating

behaviors; they don’t need RAs projecting adolescent

an environment conducive to transformation. What I

identities upon them as well. If our RAs can instead

appreciate about transformation is that it is comprised of

encourage their developing sense of autonomy, this will

three important elements to student life: growth, learning,

allow residents to discover more of their character and

and change. It is a more holistic, encompassing term than

calling. I reference this as “who our residents are, and

many realize when thinking of work with students. Most

where they are going.”

definitions use adjectives such as “radical” or “dramatic” for what is occurring when they are really trying to describe transformation. So my catchphrase with my RAs is, “In

Regulated safety Residents should experience healthy living circumstances,

order to transform, we must F.O.R.M.”.

and we will be aware of the conditions of their rooms and

Face value

providing a residence life program, safe and healthy living

shared spaces. While the latter is a practical aspect of

Each resident will be accepted as they are, and met

circumstances requires intentionality as well as presence. We

where they are at. At our institution, inclusivity has been

should not expect our residents to thrive or come to a better

a newer term that we have sought to integrate into our

place of self-awareness if they don’t feel safe. “Holistic” is a

campus culture. For our resident assistants, this looks

term used in many of our campus and departmental mission

like experiencing inclusivity training with our intercultural

statements. For my staff, holistic means having an awareness

office, and professional developments into the school

to the personhood of their residents. Similar to reporting a

18


MACUHO faulty drinking fountain or clogged toilet, I want my staff to be sensitive for irregularities among their residents. If they notice odd trends or adjustments in behaviors, I want them to develop an internal warning system that causes them to take note and be proactive in providing care to residents.

Memorable community Residents will have the opportunity to become a well-adjusted group member and learn the social skills necessary for living in a community; they will be encouraged to grow in their knowledge and understanding of the diverse people present on their floor. Former United States Commissioner of Education, Ernest L. Boyer, has six principles for an integrative community of learning; one is being a caring community. Boyer (1990) states that students “must understand what it means to share and understand the benefits of giving. Community must be built. Thus, a caring community not only enables students to gain knowledge, but helps them channel that knowledge to human ends” (p. 54). We utilize September as “story month”. Building off the chosen memoir for the incoming class’ common reading, my RAs create a floor event founded upon the concept that everyone’s story is important and valuable. This hopefully creates a foundation for the floor community and allows for a comfortable atmosphere where the uniqueness of each person is upheld.

F.O.R.M. isn’t groundbreaking or altogether unique. It is simple, concise, and core to what I desire my RAs to be about as they interact with residents on their floor. When I describe the RA role to potential applicants, or those outside of higher education, I refer to it as a “both...and…”. It is both a professional job as well as a lifestyle. Professionally they receive training and have expectations for how they maintain a sense of safety for their floor and building. It is also a lifestyle, in that there is so much of their work that will never be quantified. We don’t measure the impact of every little conversation that happens as our RAs stop by doors, or talk to a resident on the sidewalk. We don’t gather every note they jot down to themselves to follow up with a student who seemed lonely, agitated, or off. F.O.R.M. gets at the “both…and…” of residence life. Boyer, E.L. (1990). Campus Life: In Search of Community. The Carnegie Foundation for Advancement of Teaching. Schlossberg, N.K. (1989). Marginality and Mattering: Key Issues in Building Community. New Directions for Student Services, No. 48.

19


Speak Your Truth:

WINTER 2017

Encouraging Social Justice Conversations through Storytelling at

The George Washington University By: Cierra Kaler-Jones, Assistant Program Coordinator at The George Washington University

or other activity geared around the

activity that delves into potentially

else’s story, you can’t help but feel for

month’s theme. Monthly themes

controversial or difficult topics without

them regardless of their background

include: Who Am I? Reconstructing

creating community may have an

or of how different they may seem on

Identity, My Voice/My Vote, Mental

adverse effect on students that could

the surface level. In today’s society,

Health Matters, Food Insecurity, Faith/

destroy their desire to connect. The

we are faced with a multitude of social

Belief/Spirituality, Colorism, and more.

community must establish ground

issues that affect our students directly.

rules together. Although the facilitator

Whether we read stories on a news

may have a few rules in mind to

University, we are seeing a diverse

outlet site, whether we listen to a TED

start, students should not be given

student body with varied backgrounds

talk to find the motivation for our day,

rules to abide by, it must be a social

arriving on our campus each year.

plan out future goals, read a novel,

contract amongst the group. The rules

While working directly with students

or talk about an article we read for

usually include statements similar

in a residential position, we began

class or professional development,

to: using “I” statements about how

to see that although social justice

stories are all around us. In our daily

one feels to speak from one’s own

topics were something our students

interactions and conversations,

experiences rather than comment

wanted to engage in, they did not

someone makes note of something

on or interpret another’s thoughts,

feel comfortable nor equipped to talk

and we automatically, without

feelings, or intentions; speak one at

about it with others, especially in their

hesitation, relate it to a past instance

a time and allow space for others

residence hall.

in our lives.

to talk; allow room for questions or

When you hear someone

At The George Washington

Speak Your Truth was a

program created to give students a safe space to unpack their personal experiences and learn the tools necessary to have engaging and respectful conversations with

We live in stories.

Stories connect us and intertwine us as we are all struggling to make sense of not only our own lives, but of the world. It is a universal

ignorance without judgment; and how to effectively address when a member of the group feels offended or hurt by a statement that was made.

Before every dialogue

or session, Speak Your Truth

those who come from differing

human experience through which we

facilitators share with the group

backgrounds. Every month features a

maintain community and culture.

that

passive project – for example an art exhibit – and an active project, which

able to want to share their stories,

may include a dinner and dialogue,

a shared community or sense of

a documentary screening, a human

community must exist amongst the

library, an art journaling healing space,

group. Beginning a conversation or

20

In order for students to be

it is appropriate to respectfully challenge one another as long as they are challenging ideas, not individuals.


MACUHO

Students are encouraged to participate to their fullest ability. Conversations are often uncomfortable, but all participants are asked to lean into the discomfort instead of running from it.

The most successful event held thus far has been

the “Diversity Cupcakes” event. The event was held in a common area of a first-year residence hall, where residents were encouraged to decorate cupcakes with different colored sprinkles/icing based on their answers to a series of questions asked. Some of the prompts included: “If you are from the West Coast, put blue sprinkles on your cupcake”; “If you are majoring in International Affairs, put pink frosting on your cupcake”; “If you are involved in a political student organization on campus, put pink sprinkles on your cupcake”; and “If you are an international student, put blue frosting on your cupcake.”

In knowing and understanding the demographic of

the student body that lived in that hall, the prompts were crafted in a way that a good number of students could identify with them to acknowledge the similarities amongst

queer, put purple frosting on your cupcake.” A group of students stood and put frosting on their cupcakes. From addressing the issue of race head-on, they then felt comfortable sharing their own experiences and diverse backgrounds. This is an example why as a facilitator it is vital to role model the ground rules of the

By being vulnerable and by discussing difficult topics, you give This caused the room to go silent, as two residents stood students the space to identify how up and proceeded to put frosting on their cupcake. As a facilitator of social justice their stories fit into the greater discussion. conversations, you need to be Every student has a story to tell. Our lived comfortable with silence, but you experiences are our daily truths also have to be comfortable with that affect the way in which we noting the reason for the silence. I interact with each other and the asked the question, “Why did it go silent when I shared world. Feeling compelled to share our stories gives us the last prompt?” Slowly, students started to answer the residents. The last prompt was, “If you have ever been called a racial slur, put yellow frosting on your cupcake.”

activity.

with statements like, “Usually race and inequality isn’t a

the power to define who we are as individuals, rather than

topic that people talk about comfortably,” and “It’s not

confine ourselves to the boxes that society gives us. It also

something that I’ve really talked about before. I just dealt

gives us the power to inspire others.

with it.” I then told them my own story of hearing hateful

words that were directed at me and how that affected me.

the safety and comfort of the residence hall community,

From this conversation, I adapted the activity and let them

you allow students to form bonds, feel a greater sense of

choose their own prompts.

compassion, and give them the tools to go out into the

world fueled and equipped to change it. ◆

One resident inserted, “If you identify as

When you bring social justice conversations into

21


WINTER 2017

2016 Volunteer Incentive Program for Students (VIPS) Update

In 2001, Lisa A. Pierce started the Volunteer Incentive Program for Students. The program continues to provide

an opportunity for undergraduate students to attend the MACUHO Annual Conference, network with MACUHO membership, volunteer, and learn more about student affairs as a future profession. The VIPS experience is memorable and inspiring for everyone involved.

This year, 16 undergraduate students participated in the program. Each participant had a professional staff

member to mentor them at the conference. They engaged in sessions presented by one of the Expert in Residence, Dr. Ann Marie Klotz and MACUHO members. The VIPS participants learned about the legacy of Lisa A. Pierce from Lisa’s father, Mr. Thomas Pierce. MACUHO Past President, Brooke Clayton spoke to the VIPS participants and helped answer questions they had regarding the profession and what it takes to become a leader in the field.

It is crucial to note that the Volunteer Incentive Program for Students would not be possible without the ongoing

support and involvement from the MACUHO membership. There are many past VIPS participants active in MACUHO, many MACUHO members who have encourage students to apply for the VIPS opportunity, served as a mentor, and or donated to the Lisa Pierce Endowment through ACUHO-I. The impact of one person’s idea has stretched to impact and engage so many. Knowing this, we leave you with this final thought from Taylor Donahue, a 2016 VIPS participant. Taylor’s statement is a reminder to why we do the work that we do in Housing & Residence Life and Student Affairs:

“I’ve spent four years as a university student. On paper, I’ve had a bumpy road since starting school: I dropped out once, transferred institutions, switched majors, added and dropped a series of minors, and changed my career plans at least twice. Despite all these changes, though, I’ve had an amazing experience as a student. I’ve studied abroad, worked as a resident assistant, and founded an internationall competing club sports team. Most significantly, though, I figured out something important: everyone gets twenty-four hours a day, and how we spend them is a choice. I am pursuing a career in student affairs because I am choosing to spend as many of my twenty-four hours as possible loving the work I do and the people I work for. To me, student affairs is a field where we keep empathy turned up full blast to learn more about other people. It’s a field where we build bridges across canyons of difference to make the world better for students, who then go out and make the world better for everyone. I am pursuing a career in student affairs because I know what it’s like to be a student who doesn’t take the path they expected, and what it feels like to finally find the right way. Without all the student affairs professionals who helped me, I have no idea where I would be now. If I can be a resource for even one student finding their path, I’ll know my twenty-four hours are wellspent.”

...everyone gets 24 hours a day,...

22

...For a list of our 2016 VIPS go to page 28


MACUHO

23


WINTER 2017

November 9th: A Day My Muslim Privilege

BENT…But Did not BREAK By: Moe Samad, John Hopkins University As a Muslim male,

my family and self-care. For the first

institution that took charge to create a

I have privilege. You

time in my career, my students and

space for staff to engage in dialogue,

read that correctly, and the privilege

staff took a back seat, which not only

support one another, and promote

I possess has troubled me far before

made me uncomfortable, but also

self-care. In those spaces surrounded

the early hours of Wednesday,

unrecognizable.

by colleagues, words took a backseat

November 9, 2016.

to emotions. It was a day during

must take care of self before taking

which we wore our feelings on our

care of others,” seemed to dominate

sleeves.

To say the night was

sleepless is an understatement. That

The cliché saying of “one must take care of self before taking care of others,” seemed to dominate the day.

I considered taking a personal day, constant. The thoughts of value and worth, persistent.

The cliché saying of “one

For the first full day in my

professional career, I was at a loss. My emotions were my own, but words escaped me. I went through the motions of a daily routine, but

the day. I went through that day

was not present. Individuals in

grasping to that concept and ended

my presence, serving as blurred

in failure every time my thoughts

silhouettes. I wanted to be there for

ventured to my being. I walk around

our students, but my calm-collected

with a privilege.

being denied all possibilities of

putting anyone or anything in front of

at Johns Hopkins University, an

24

I have the honor of working

Additionally, the institution

made a decision to create varying environments for students to process and ask questions, share in community, and express emotions. To accommodate to each other’s needs, quiet reflection and a Restorative Justice Healing Circle allowed for each person to share at their own comfort level.

Outside of my professional

community, friends knew the impact of uplifting messages, posts, texts,


MACUHO

and calls. There was great strength in those attempts to provide the correct words a day which I was at a loss for my own,

Reflections even my outlook could not erase, but knew others do not even have to consider any of the aforementioned questions, which stripped away at my privilege.

showed the courage and power of speaking of the obvious.

As Student Affairs professionals we often talk about addressing situations in

meaningful, yet direct approaches. My community, professional and personal, was able to accomplish the unwavering.

In the aforementioned day long reflection, I was reminded of openness, both

physically and through technology, by the sincerity expressed. Colleagues and friends were honest, straightforward, empathetic, and considerate without hint of awkwardness. Without knowing my background or beliefs, I fit whatever mold you care to perceive.

I spent the majority of November 9th thinking of family, in particular the women

of my life and unborn child, ready to make his entrance into this world. When my wife, mother, mother-in-law, sister-in-laws, and aunts decided to show their faith by wearing the hijab, contrary to popular belief, it was a choice. A choice to express their beliefs just as an individual would sport a cross in any form or a cloth kippah to signify their religious or spiritual principles.

In a life filled with questions, my Wednesday was consumed with unanswered thoughts, fear, emptiness. My

partner’s well-being and the inability to do my half in the protection of the family scared me. Thoughts as simple as taking a road trip, planning out gas, restroom stops, and locations to dine raced my mind. Thoughts as deep and real as choosing an ethnic-centered name for our child and the long-term effects in school, jobs, and social settings, drowned my ability to help my students and staff. Reflections even my outlook could not erase, but knew others do not even have to consider any of the aforementioned questions, which stripped away at my privilege.

What will happen in those moments when we are refused service, someone utters a slur, profiling occurs, and/

or violence ensues? Wednesday, November 9th was that slap in the face, a moment in which my jaw was constantly dragging on the pavement.

Wednesday, November 9th tried to hold me down, and admittedly, it

won. However, within those moments of reflection, questioning, and blurriness, I was reminded of civility, compassion, family, and love. Though I walk around campus without an identifier, unless we’ve engaged in meaningful dialogue, I felt the weight of a target on my spiritual and religious views.

I was reminded of the work we choose to accomplish on a daily basis.

Moments spent engaging students in dialogue and not shying away from the noticeable will lead to impactful discussion, regardless of stance. Moments our students and staff look to us, a sense of uneasiness, for direction, courage, and hope.

Admittedly, I was able to circumnavigate my impact for a day, but

Moments spent engaging students in dialogue and not shying away from the noticeable will lead to impactful discussion, regardless of stance.

have and will continue to encourage, myself and others, though words may be minimal at times. Being present trumps silence. ◆ 25


WINTER 2017

A to Z: Accommodating Tomorrow’s Students A Characteristic Overview

By Jenna Konyak, Seton Hill University

It appears that new things never travel alone. In 2016 we have had a new Olympic arena, a new iPhone, a new

presidential election…and a new generation entering college. Colleges and universities across the country have begun to accept and support students that no longer identify as millenials. Instead, our youngest and newest students are categorized as Generation Z. Where there is a new generation, there are new characteristics to understand and new accommodations that need to be made.

The following article is the first of an ongoing column centered around Generation Z and the needs and wants

they bring to our campuses. With the help of Seemiller and Grace’s (2016) new book, Generation Z Goes to College, the author will guide you through a brief description of various characteristics and ideals of this new generation. She hopes to spark your interest in wanting to get to know these new students and guides you to best help them as they change our campus cultures as we know them. 26

Before we can dig deep into what makes Generation Z tick, we must first explore a characteristic overview.


MACUHO

Generation Makeup Generation Z consists of those individuals born between the years 1995 – 2010. Currently, this generation makes up nearly 1/4 of the U.S. population, but is believed to soon overpower more than 1/3 of it. Furthermore, Generation Z should be proud to wear the badge of being the most diverse generation to date; the last one with those identifying as Caucasian overpowering the majority.

A Tech-Shaped Mindset This generation grew up with a bottle in one hand and technology in the other. These students have no idea that people once used a different device to call someone, read something, add and divide numbers, and get directions to a destination. Instead, they can do all of these things (and more) with one device. With this easy and constant connection to technology, the Internet has shaped the way they view the world. Generation Z has seen the tragedies of 9/11 and the economic market crash of 2008 through the lens of Internet newsfeeds. They have witnessed exploding rates of unemployment and two presidents in office through social media. Technology and the easily accessible connection to worldwide news have shaped the way Generation Z sees their impact on the world around them. People are asking if Generation Z will be the generation that changes the world.

Self-Description Through Seemiller and Grace’s (2016) study, Generation Z was given the opportunity to self identify with various characteristics. A majority of participants stated that Generation Z consists of individuals who are loyal, thoughtful, compassionate, open-minded, and responsible. Loyal: Generation Z is concerned for those around them. They are focused on issues that affect all rather than just themselves. Thoughful: Generation Z is constantly connected to technology. They have seen war and worldwide concerns. Furthermore, they feel for the issues and concerns of their loved ones that are posted on social media. Compassionate: Generation Z has grown to care for people that they do not have direct contact with. They care for the world and its people. Open-Minded: Generation Z has been exposed to new ways of thinking. They are exposed to different religions, socioeconomic statuses, sexualities, and gender identities. Generation Z has begun to make the strides towards making an inclusive community. Responsible: Generation Z has come to recognize that they are in charge of making the most out of their life. They want to get as much as they can out of their education and conversations with others. In the end, Generation Z appears to be full of driven individuals, people who do not want to give up on their dreams of impacting worldwide crises. Furthermore, Generation Z prides itself on the relationships they build with others and working towards something they care about. They choose not to engage in competition with peers and are unmotivated by public recognition. They strive to live each day in a way that will make a difference in the lives of others. Please join us in each upcoming magazine as we dive deeper into different characteristics and needs of this new generation, Generation Z. ◆

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VIPS...continued from page 22

Meet our 2016 VIPS Class David Nicole Tiara Taylor Brittany Kyle Breanna Matthew Luciano Jacob Mary Dan Alessandro Ireisha Gene Maria

28

Brown Clark DeGuzman Donahue Ferrara Hartman Hyde Jones Mastrangeli Mellow Norton Page Sparacio Vaughn Washington Siddiqui

The College Of New Jersey Delaware Valley University Rutgers University- Camden Mansfield University of PA Drew University Bloomsburg University Indiana University of PA Marshall University Stevenson University Shepherd University Marshall University University of Maryland College Park Saint Joseph’s University Seton Hall University Montclair State University Rutgers University - New Brunswick


MACUHO

Humans of MACUHO By Sinclair Ceasar

We have so many wonderful members in our region, but we don’t always get to learn more about them.

Humans of MACUHO is a project designed to do just that: get beneath the surface. During the annual conference, several people were asked to participate. At some point, others heard about the project and volunteered to share pieces of their story as well. If you’d like to learn more about the short stories you read, feel free to follow up with the individual. This is a great way to meet someone new!

My closest friends go to me for a lot of things. One thing - sometimes - is advice. I think that I am the person that’s more willing to share. Positivity is my number one strength. I feel that people will come to me, because they like to have support, and they know that I can cheer them up. CURTIS CHAN, Residence Life Coordinator, Rutgers New Brunswick

Hanging out with my significant other makes me smile. We go try different things, check out concerts, and spend quality time together. Sometimes we plan for the future. Those things make me smile. APRIL STEVENS, Resident Director, Bowie State University

Busch Gardens was probably one of the places where I had the most fun (the one in Virginia). I sat down at one point when I was walking around with my daughter. I just sat to relax. Three people came out to do a play in the park. The next thing I know, they plopped a crown on my head, and I got to play the king in the Taming of the Shrew. It was a great time. TOM PIERCE, Author of

the Last Rose

29


10 Topics

WINTER 2017

Diversity

on for 2017

By: Kurtis Watkins, Diversity Committee Co-Chair

Originally posted to the Diversity Committee Blog in January 2017

The year 2017 is officially here and marks a time of reflection, resolution, and insightful projections for the next

365 days. Our country is rapidly changing and with every new year we move closer to an imminent tipping point that will dramatically shift our national demographics. In three years, the U.S. Census Bureau predicts that 50% of all children under the age of 18 will be from a “minority race or ethnic group.” Within higher education, cultural competency is the new institutional currency and conversations around diversity will continue to be at the forefront for administrators and the campus community. Here are 10 areas that the MACUHO Diversity Committee is watching for 2017:

1. Undocumented Students: In 2012, President Barack Obama’s administration

introduced a program that allowed undocumented students additional protections and opportunities in higher education. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) has had a major impact on providing access for thousands of otherwise ineligible students. However, with a new administration on the horizon there is a heightened concern if DACA will continue to exist. Many institutions are moving in solidarity as sanctuary campuses, signaling to undocumented students that they are supported. Other schools have eschewed the designation, including several states that have not supported DACA since its inception. Still, several regional institutions such as Saint Peter’s University have responded purposefully by providing advocacy and resources for undocumented students, while working intentionally to erase the stigma and barriers to access.

2. Students and Staff Mental Health: Numerous universities have implemented

behavioral intervention or case management teams that seek to support students in crisis; yet many campus community members are not trained to help a student in a mental health crisis. Schools such as the University of Pennsylvania have established a task force on student health that includes the provost and faculty senate in collaboration with student counseling to improve mental health awareness and response. External organizations such as Active Minds, American College Health Association, Mental Health America, and the JED Foundation are leading the conversation on mental health support and awareness, and are active collaborators with many of our universities. One area that will continue to 30


MACUHO be discussed in 2017 is how do we as professionals operate with self-care and support when our own mental health is in jeopardy; and how will administrators support both students and professionals with this new awareness?

3. Implicit Bias: We all have an implicit bias that affects our decisions and how we interpret

the world we live in. When individuals and communities are adversely affected because of implicit bias, the results can impede campus unification efforts. Bias prevention and bias response teams like at Lafayette College, highlight strategies to address bias and typically involve several campus partners. Institutions must provide spaces to confront bias through meaningful programming along with student, staff, and faculty training. Resources such as the Implicit Association Test can be used as a starting point for measuring individual bias.

4. The Words We Use: Language is not fixed. Students, scholars, activists, and others are

redefining the language we use to articulate issues on equality, inclusion, and social justice practices. This evolving verbal landscape requires a comprehensive use of welcoming language that avoids stereotypes, evades jargon, and eliminates microaggressions. The words we use are being reconsidered in all facets of our institutions. ADA compliance officers implore that we look at the person first, not the disability, and to use language that is person-centric. LGBTQ+ thought leaders and human resources continue to shape the evolving language in describing identities within a rich community. Student affairs professionals must be engaged in the dialogue that is taking place within our communities around race, gender, and other critical areas, but must equally be aware of how language can be used to divide our campuses. We also cannot use our voices as professionals to continually marginalize communities and claim negligence in our conversations, meetings, presentations, social media, or other areas. Likewise, there is a need to be kind and understanding to individuals who may not have the full knowledge and vocabulary to articulate critical concepts.

5. Food Security: For an increasing number of college students, the ability to have consistent

meals is a luxury they simply cannot afford. Student hunger has become a significant issue as students navigate financial decisions based on growing tuition cost, books, fees, transportation, and reducing or eliminating meal plans when possible. Many institutions are joining an emerging movement of supporting students who experience food insecurities or gaps in meals through campus pantry programs. The College and University Food Bank Alliance (CUFBA) partners with over 400 member institutions, including several in the MACUHO region. At schools like Montclair University and Rutgers University, students are very appreciative of the service.

6. Non-Traditional Students: According to the National Center for Education Statistics

(NCES) non-traditional students are classified as students who work full-time, are enrolled part-time, have financial

independence and/or meet other criteria. Yet the population of non-traditional students entering our institutions at places like Shippensburg University are rapidly increasing, thanks to an increased community of veterans at schools like the University of Pittsburgh, and working professionals returning to schools like Rider University for continuing studies certificates. Non-traditional students must be fully embraced and welcomed to our campuses, with the support services they need in order to be successful. Reconnecting with point #4 on language, the term non-traditional student is one that is in flux and may soon be replaced as criteria and definitions shift, and criticisms of its categorization stigmatize students.

7. Class and Affordability: Study after study has indicated the value of obtaining a college

degree for social mobility and career attainment. However, a person’s socio-economic status (SES) can affect if they go to college, where they can go, and how they ultimately navigate the college system. A person’s SES, though no fault of their own, can potentially eliminate the one opportunity that can improve their lives and change their class status. ...continued on page 33 31


WINTER 2017

32


MACUHO 10 TOPICS ON DIVERSITY..continued from page 31 Students with low SES and first generation college students have the most to gain with a college education. When access to college is linked to affordability, institutions limit the students that can attend due to financial limitations. Many students finance college through loans and the ability to secure loans and repay debt is a challenge that far too many students face. Our government and organizations must continue to keep access to higher education as a top priority.

8. Intersectionality: Working directly with students requires an understanding of their multiple

identities including ability, age, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, and social economic status. A truly

student-centric institution will, through its mission and services, offer multi-levels of intentional support and strategies for every student. Higher education must continue to provide high impact practices and inclusive experiences on campuses through residential education, reformed policies, student advocacy, affinity groups, and ongoing campus-wide initiatives. Progressive institutions are working towards inclusivity in areas such as gender inclusive housing at schools like Stockton University and Bloomsburg University; and gender inclusive bathrooms at schools like Ramapo College of New Jersey. Where as race and sexual orientation tend to dominate conversations on diversity, we must equally consider religion, ability, and other factors that resonate with our students.

9. Social Justice: Students will continue to react to current events, campus culture, fundamental

rights, and politics as a means of voicing their concerns and seeking justice. With student activism at an all-time high, colleges are looking for ways to support and manage student dissent. Schools like New Jersey Institute of Technology and several other regional institutions are keeping pace by either creating or modify existing policies around free speech and students’ right to protest. Yet as vibrant as student activism has been nationally, there is growing movement to curtail demonstrations, even banning social justice as a campus practice. Students and administrators will need to consider where they stand on social issues, and be willing to have meaningful conversations on both ends of the spectrum.

10. MACUHO Resources: The MACUHO Diversity Committee is developing new resources on

diversity education, programs, and more for our members to utilize effectively on their campuses. Visit www.macuho.org/ resource/dynamic/blogs/20170120_134655_14575.pdf to view the MACUHO Diversity Resource Guides. â—†

33


WINTER 2017

Student Staff Live-In Conference 2016

Moving Mountains, One Student at a Time

On October 15, 2016, 340 student and professional staff

from across the MACUHO region traveled to the mountains of Morgantown, West Virginia to participate in the annual Student Staff Live-In (SSLI) Conference hosted at West Virginia University.

The conference featured 30 different programs with both a

Student Staff track that challenged our incredible student leaders across the region to present and share their experiences with their colleagues and a new Professional Staff track option to allow supervisors and other professional staff an affordable, drive-in conference option.

Along with the great program presentations from the

student and professional staff, MACUHO was honored to have Tom Segar, Vice President for Student Affairs at Shepherd University, to provide an inspirational keynote address.

Additionally, MACUHO Past President

Brian Medina delivered moving closing remarks in his trademark style. At the end of the day, students and professional staff alike left Morgantown better connected, motived, and educated.

The 2016 SSLI Host Committee would

like to thank everyone who visited SSLI 2016, MACUHO in the Mountains and we hope to see MACUHO in West Virginia again soon.

If anyone is interested taking on the

rewarding challenge of hosting SSLI in the future, it is never too early to begin planning. For questions, contact the REC Committee at macuhorec@gmail.com and keep an eye out for the official call for bid packets later this year. 34


MACUHO

35


WINTER 2017

2016

ANNUAL CONFERENCE

36


MACUHO

37


WINTER 2017

38


MACUHO

Academic Excellence Awards Fall 2016 MICHAELA DUTTON 4 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE RENEE HUNSBERGER 4 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE JULIANNE LOWENSTEIN 4 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE REBEKAH TURBETT 4 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE REBECCA MORGIS ABOVE 3.7 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE PAOLA BONILLA ABOVE 3.7 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE ALYSSA KATES ABOVE 3.7 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE JADE STERN ABOVE 3.7 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE ALESHA MOLITOR ABOVE 3.7 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE DAVE BASILE ABOVE 3.7 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE ALEX KUBACKI ABOVE 3.7 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE SIAN CARTER ABOVE 3.7 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE MICHALIA HUMPHREY ABOVE 3.7 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE KAELA EDWARDS ABOVE 3.7 ALBRIGHT COLLEGE FELIX SON VU 4 ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY HALEY ROBB 4 ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY WHITNEY BROWN 4 ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY SHAMIKA LANGEVINE 4 ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY P.J. GRANT 4 ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY TYLER DRAKE 4 ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY MATTHEW

PELOQUIN

4

ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY

ALIA NOLAN ABOVE 3.7 ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY NICHOLETTE

TORSIELLO

ABOVE 3.7

ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY

CEILIDH KEMPTON ABOVE 3.7 ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY HANNAH PRONTIKER ABOVE 3.7 ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY TREY CHEATHAM ABOVE 3.7 ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY CALLUM DOYLE ABOVE 3.7 ALDERSON BROADDUS UNIVERSITY CHRISTOPHER THOMAS 4 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY CRAIG GROHOSKI 4 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY ZACHARY SEAMAN 4 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY HANNAH SLAWECKI 4 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY TYLER ARNOLD 4 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY MEREDITH MCCARTHY 4 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY JEREMIAH CLINCHOC 4 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY JUAN PAULA ABOVE 3.7 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY COURTNEY DUMAIS ABOVE 3.7 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY HALEY BALIN ABOVE 3.7 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY ERICA LUNA ABOVE 3.7 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY MATTHEW

AMATRUDA

ABOVE 3.7

ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY

SHELBY HONTZ ABOVE 3.7 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY MICHAELA O’HERN ABOVE 3.7 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY KYLE FARRELL ABOVE 3.7 ALVERNIA UNIVERSITY NATALIE BARRICK 4 CALIFORNIA UNIVERISTY OF PA 39


WINTER 2017 NICOLETTE HUGHES 4 CALIFORNIA UNIVERISTY OF PA THERON PETERS 4 CALIFORNIA UNIVERISTY OF PA SHATASHA REEVES 4 CALIFORNIA UNIVERISTY OF PA MADISON

THRASHER

4

CALIFORNIA UNIVERISTY OF PA

JANA

BARNHART

ABOVE 3.7

CALIFORNIA UNIVERISTY OF PA

MADISON

DULION

ABOVE 3.7

CALIFORNIA UNIVERISTY OF PA

CALVIN

SZEWCZYK

ABOVE 3.7

CALIFORNIA UNIVERISTY OF PA

JILLIAN THORN ABOVE 3.7 CALIFORNIA UNIVERISTY OF PA SHAUNA ZUPAN ABOVE 3.7 CALIFORNIA UNIVERISTY OF PA JOEY GALANTUOMO 4 CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE KRYSTYNA STOPYRA 4 CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE TAYLOR WILLIS 4 CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE KAITLIN IAVECCHIA ABOVE 3.7 CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE KATIE JOE

LANG

ABOVE 3.7

CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE

ELIZABETH LEGESSE ABOVE 3.7 CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE DAVID TULLOCH ABOVE 3.7 CHESTNUT HILL COLLEGE EMELINE

CHONG

ABOVE 3.7

CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC

ALEC

HOLCOMB

ABOVE 3.7

CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC

BRAIZAHN

JONES

ABOVE 3.7

CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC

XIAOBO

PU

ABOVE 3.7

CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC

HELOISE

CARLEAN-JONES

ABOVE 3.7

CURTIS INSTITUTE OF MUSIC

JORDAN JACOBS 4 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY TANAE THOMAS 4 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY ZANAE NASH 4 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY DAIJA GRIER 4 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY EDGAR ORTIZ 4 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY NYEIRAH CARSON ABOVE 3.7 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY ALIYAH PEARSON ABOVE 3.7 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY MORGAN

JOHNSON

ABOVE 3.7

DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY

BRIAUNA YANCEY ABOVE 3.7 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY LEISHA CASON ABOVE 3.7 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY SHANICE REID ABOVE 3.7 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY COURTNEI

PARKER-MORGAN

ABOVE 3.7

DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY

TATIANA SCANTLEBURY ABOVE 3.7 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY ARIEL RANDAL ABOVE 3.7 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY MICHAEL BROOKS ABOVE 3.7 DELAWARE STATE UNIVERSITY EMILY SJOGREN 4 DELAWARE VALLEY UNIVERSITY ARIA LANTS ABOVE 3.7 DELAWARE VALLEY UNIVERSITY JOHANNA MARANO ABOVE 3.7 DELAWARE VALLEY UNIVERSITY MARGARET

GADOMSKI

ABOVE 3.7

DELAWARE VALLEY UNIVERSITY

MATT WENZ 4 DICKINSON COLLEGE CHING ZHAO 4 DICKINSON COLLEGE NATALIE POPE 4 DICKINSON COLLEGE SKYLAR MEAD 4 DICKINSON COLLEGE NALANI SAITO 4 DICKINSON COLLEGE AMY HUDAK ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE PRABUDDHA TULADHAR ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE JAKE COSTELLO ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE SOPHIE HAAS-GOLDBERG ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE KITSON SMYTH ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE JOOJO OCRAN ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE 40


MACUHO LYDIA FOX ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE TRUNG NGUYEN ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE IVY GILBERT ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE KARL LYN ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE LANEA PEARSON ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE SAM EATON ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE EMMA BATCHELDER ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE CHEYENNE MOORE ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE SKYLAR SUMMERS ABOVE 3.7 DICKINSON COLLEGE JARED SUTTON 4 DREW UNIVERISTY SAMANTHA BOOTH 4 DREW UNIVERISTY JESSICA FORTIER 4 DREW UNIVERISTY O’NEIL VAN HORN 4 DREW UNIVERISTY ILIANA MENDEZ ABOVE 3.7 DREW UNIVERISTY JENNY STEIN ABOVE 3.7 DREW UNIVERISTY AUTUMN MELVAGE ABOVE 3.7 DREW UNIVERISTY RIO PETERSON ABOVE 3.7 DREW UNIVERISTY RENATTA CHIRINOS ABOVE 3.7 DREW UNIVERISTY RACHEL TAVANI ABOVE 3.7 DREW UNIVERISTY ABD ELHADY ABOVE 3.7 DREW UNIVERISTY ABBIE YOUNG ABOVE 3.7 DREW UNIVERISTY SIERRA FOX 4 FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY - METROPOLITAN CAMPUS SANDY THAN 4 FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY - METROPOLITAN CAMPUS JASMINE

MONROE

ABOVE 3.7

FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY - METROPOLITAN CAMPUS

STEPHANIE

COLLINS

ABOVE 3.7

FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY - METROPOLITAN CAMPUS

SEDONA HILLL ABOVE 3.7 FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY - METROPOLITAN CAMPUS AARON

MCCLENDON

ABOVE 3.7

FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY - METROPOLITAN CAMPUS

GABRIELLE

BAMBERSKI

ABOVE 3.7

FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY - METROPOLITAN CAMPUS

RASHANNA BUTLER ABOVE 3.7 FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY - METROPOLITAN CAMPUS SAMUEL DURHAM ABOVE 3.7 FAIRLEIGH DICKINSON UNIVERSITY - METROPOLITAN CAMPUS TAKAWIRA USHENDIBABA 4 FAIRMONT STATE UNIVERSITY KAITLYN CARTER 4 FAIRMONT STATE UNIVERSITY EMILY DEVALL 4 FAIRMONT STATE UNIVERSITY BRIAN KNIGHT 4 FAIRMONT STATE UNIVERSITY OLIVIA OOTEN ABOVE 3.7 FAIRMONT STATE UNIVERSITY DAVID KADIRI ABOVE 3.7 FAIRMONT STATE UNIVERSITY KIRA GUIER ABOVE 3.7 FAIRMONT STATE UNIVERSITY SAMANTHA DEBOLT ABOVE 3.7 FAIRMONT STATE UNIVERSITY JOHNATHAN TRIPP 4 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY STUART MOSKOVITZ 4 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY HAYLEY MCDONALD 4 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY MICHAEL BORKOSKI 4 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY MICHELLE DUNAWAY 4 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY GARBIELLE GRENIER 4 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY JONATHIN RICHARDSON 4 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY MCCALUP TIAJU 4 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY WADE AILI 4 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY PRELOG ABIGAIL 4 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY DANIELLE PRICE ABOVE 3.7 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY DANIELLE PRICE ABOVE 3.7 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY BOWSER BRITTANY ABOVE 3.7 FROSTBURG STATE UNIVERSITY 41


WINTER 2017 CODY FEIKLES 4 GANNON UNIVERSITY MARGARET MCKERNAN 4 GANNON UNIVERSITY RANDY CLAPP 4 GANNON UNIVERSITY RACHEL NYE 4 GANNON UNIVERSITY KATIE RESSLER 4 GANNON UNIVERSITY KRYSTA WAGNER 4 GANNON UNIVERSITY SETH JAUSSEN ABOVE 3.7 GANNON UNIVERSITY NICHOLAS BENGAL ABOVE 3.7 GANNON UNIVERSITY MARIA COLT ABOVE 3.7 GANNON UNIVERSITY KRISTA BLASK ABOVE 3.7 GANNON UNIVERSITY LEIGH TISCHLER ABOVE 3.7 GANNON UNIVERSITY MARKUS WESLEY ABOVE 3.7 GANNON UNIVERSITY ANNMARIE ROSA ABOVE 3.7 GANNON UNIVERSITY MACKENZIE WEYRICK ABOVE 3.7 GANNON UNIVERSITY EVAN DEFALCO ABOVE 3.7 GANNON UNIVERSITY GIONA DIMARCO ABOVE 3.7 GANNON UNIVERSITY BRANDON JACES ABOVE 3.7 GANNON UNIVERSITY ROBERT CORTES 4 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY CHARLOTTE GLASSER 4 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY TOMA SALVAREZ-BELON 4 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY SARAH FLOYD 4 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY EMILY LAU 4 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY WILLIAM LOWERY 4 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY ALEXANDER FELTES 4 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY IDANIS PEREZ-ALVAREZ 4 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MYLAN METZGER ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY CONNOR MAYTNIER ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY KATHERINE AMARELL ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY EVA REST ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY DAVID SAID ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY DEVIKA RANJAN ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MARY KECKEISEN ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY ALEXANDER ALONSO ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MADISON FISHER ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MARISSA ILNITZKI ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY GEN SHIRAISHI ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY JEFFERY BAI ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY KIERAN JOYCE ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MATTHEW KUKOWSKI ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY SDYNEY WAWRZYNIAK ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MORGAN BURRELL ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY KEVIN MURPHY ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MARK TREMOGLIE ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY BRITTANYÂ

JAWORSKI

ABOVE 3.7

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY

ALEXIS CAMPBELL ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY GABRIEL KATSUYA ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MADELINE MOORE ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY LIZ VARGO ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY HANNAH WINGET ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY NINA CAUDILL ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY LAIXIN LI ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY 42


MACUHO ATREYA TADEPALLI ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MARGARET GACH ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MINA GHEBRIAL ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY JOSEÂ

VILLALOBOS GONZALEZ

ABOVE 3.7

GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY

MICHAEL HOU ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY YONG HO LEE ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY STEPHANIE RICHARDSON ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY JACK DOBIN ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY DUY MAI ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY KYLE RINAUDO ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY VICTORIA SANTIAGO ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MATTHEW SIMMIONS ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY DANIEL MARSHALL ABOVE 3.7 GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY MATTHEW WEED 4 HOLY FAMILY UNIVERSITY KRYSTAL

ACEVEDO

ABOVE 3.7

HOLY FAMILY UNIVERSITY

JACLYN TIMONEY ABOVE 3.7 HOLY FAMILY UNIVERSITY REECE YOUNG ABOVE 3.7 HOLY FAMILY UNIVERSITY AUTUMN DIETRICH 4 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA CORY LEITZEL 4 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA ROY LYNN 4 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA KYLIE SMITH 4 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SAMANTHA

ADAMS

ABOVE 3.7

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

LAURA ALFIERI ABOVE 3.7 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA VICTORIA

COTTER

ABOVE 3.7

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

NICHOLAS

DELEONE

ABOVE 3.7

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

MEGAN DISHER ABOVE 3.7 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA SHYDIYAH

GARDNER

ABOVE 3.7

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

DELANEY

HALLINAN

ABOVE 3.7

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

SAVANNAH

HEATON

ABOVE 3.7

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

MICHAEL HOARE ABOVE 3.7 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA DANIELLE

JONES

ABOVE 3.7

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

PATRICK KALIE ABOVE 3.7 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA KRISTINA KURELJA ABOVE 3.7 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA ANNA LANG ABOVE 3.7 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA BRIDGET

MCCREADY

ABOVE 3.7

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

NAJEY

MCDUFFIE

ABOVE 3.7

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

VICTORIA

NALBONE

ABOVE 3.7

INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA

ANDREW PALMER ABOVE 3.7 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA TESSA TINLEY ABOVE 3.7 INDIANA UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA JOSEPH DELLANGELO 4 KUTZTOWN EMILY DIETRICH 4 KUTZTOWN SASHA-LEE HAYWARD 4 KUTZTOWN MELISSA JENKINGS 4 KUTZTOWN ANNIKA NAUMANN 4 KUTZTOWN OLIVIA JACKSON ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN SAMANTHA CEBALLO ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN JILLIAN ANDREWS ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN MADISON COLACO ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN GABRIELLE CRUZ ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN CASSANDRA FERREE ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN ALLISON LANDINO ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN 43


WINTER 2017 LANA GONZALEZ ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN JENEIL JONES ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN SAMANTHA JIMENEZ ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN DAVID MOYER ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN SHIYI DING ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN KEVIN SNINSKY ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN ROSEMARY LUCIANO ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN SARA WINGERT ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN PETER GRUPICO ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN JACOB GERMAN ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN NOAH HISH ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN KATHLEEN WHALEN ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN MEGAN BRADY ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN AMANDAMAE BAETTCHER ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN BRIANNA BUSH ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN JENNA KANYAK ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN NINA HUNTER ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN SHANNON GOLDEN ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN FELICIA TRIEVEL ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN JONATHAN MCCABE ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN CHLOE MARKS ABOVE 3.7 KUTZTOWN LUIS NAVEDO 4 LA ROCHE COLELGE RYAN NORKUS ABOVE 3.7 LA ROCHE COLELGE CHARLEIGH SMITH ABOVE 3.7 LA ROCHE COLELGE KINDRA SMALLS ABOVE 3.7 LA ROCHE COLELGE VICTORIA ALBERT ABOVE 3.7 LA ROCHE COLELGE ALANA ANNUNZIATO ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY ANNE BREWER ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY HANNAH BROUGH ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY IANA GARRICK ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY KEVIN GOMEZ ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY STEPHAN GRAHAM ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY MEGHAN HEYDUK ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY HOANG LE ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY BRITTANY LUTEK ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY ANNA MARCHETTI ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY ISOBEL MCCREAVY ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY KIERSTEN

MCDONALD

ABOVE 3.7

LA SALLE UNIVERSITY

CAITLIN PAJUS ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY WILLIAM PILNY ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY ANNA PIROZZI ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY JOSEPH ROGERS ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY CHLOE SCHULTZ ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY TANAWAN

SUKONTHAPANICH

ABOVE 3.7

LA SALLE UNIVERSITY

LINDSAE SUNNY ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY BECKETT WOODWORTH ABOVE 3.7 LA SALLE UNIVERSITY MEGAN COOK 4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE CASEY DOMBROSKI 4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE JOELLE GODFREY 4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE KELLY JACOBS 4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE ALYSSA KLEIN 4 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 44


MACUHO KELLY BRUCE ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE SARAH GROW ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE ROBIN MCANALLY ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE JASMINE OLVANY ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE CHLOE MCCARTY ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE VIDYA LALA ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE CHELSEY STEELE ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE STEPHANIE

MARSHALL

ABOVE 3.7

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE

DANIELLE BURNS ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE EMILY WALAK ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE CESAR FLORES ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE ALEXA LANTZ ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE KYLE BEISSEL ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE SAMUEL MANNING ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE TEANNA SHUTT ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE BRENDON IRVING ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE MEGHAN OWENS ABOVE 3.7 LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE DOM BEHE 4 LEHIGH UNIVERISTY ANGIE RIZZO 4 LEHIGH UNIVERISTY YAZ BHOTE ABOVE 3.7 LEHIGH UNIVERISTY TROY EGAR ABOVE 3.7 LEHIGH UNIVERISTY GRIFFIN MOONEY ABOVE 3.7 LEHIGH UNIVERISTY JOYCE ESEDEBE 4 LINCOLN UNIVERISTY CAROLYN COLEMAN ABOVE 3.7 LINCOLN UNIVERISTY MARQUIS

BUTLER

ABOVE 3.7

LINCOLN UNIVERISTY

ANTOINE SMITH ABOVE 3.7 LINCOLN UNIVERISTY SHANAE WILSON ABOVE 3.7 LINCOLN UNIVERISTY ALAZE CLAUSELL ABOVE 3.7 LINCOLN UNIVERISTY TAE’JUAN PAYNE ABOVE 3.7 LINCOLN UNIVERISTY SHANTEL WONG ABOVE 3.7 LINCOLN UNIVERISTY MALLORY ELEANOR 4 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND MARCHIO ANNA ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND MAHOLAGE DALE ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND KEENAN KELLY ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND RYAN MICHELE ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND CINQUEGRANI

MARIA

ABOVE 3.7

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND

ZOLLIE COFFER JORDAN ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND PERINI ALYSSA ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND PETRONE

STEPHANIE

ABOVE 3.7

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND

ELTON TAYLOR ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND REINAH JAMIE ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND BAROSIN JENNELLE ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND PENA YAMILEX ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND MULHEARN

BRENDAN

ABOVE 3.7

LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND

GEORGES SARAH ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND DEEGAN JONATHAN ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND AFFIGNE VICTORIA ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND CALDERON ERIKA ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND SWEENY EMMA ABOVE 3.7 LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND CORAL CHIARETTI 4 LYCOMING COLLEGE MEGAN KEARNS ABOVE 3.7 LYCOMING COLLEGE 45


WINTER 2017 NGUYEN HUYNH ABOVE 3.7 LYCOMING COLLEGE ANNE BASS 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY LAUREN REASOR 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY TAYLOR ADKINS 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY HANNAH BASHAM 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY ERIN BASS 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY AMANDA MAYNUS 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY MAYA MENKING-HOGGATT 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY JACLYN STEGEL 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY KRISTYN MULLINS 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY ANTHONY WILKINSON 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY GLEN GODBY 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY NATHANIEL STEPHENSON 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY HALEY STAFFORD 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY AMANDA YOUNG 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY DYLAN LAGEMAN 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY IBRAHIM MOHAMMED 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY HEIDI DENNISON 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY CAROLINE ECKELS 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY ALEXIS PATTERSON 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY ERIN SEARS 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY JORDAN THOMAS 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY PHUNG HONG 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY NICOLE LANE 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY MARTHA ELLIS 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY MARY-KATE BOSTICK 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY AUSTIN MCCLANAHAN 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY HANNAH FETTY 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY KADE BRADLEY 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY CASEY HUDOCK 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY LACEE EMERY 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY JACOB BRADLEY 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY KAITLIN HACKWORTH 4 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY EMILY JARVIE ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY GUILHERME PETTY ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY CHRIS PRICE ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY JENNIFER GIBBS ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY JADE HUMPHREY ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY BRITTANY JONES ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY KELSIE TYSON ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY BLAKE WEEKLEY ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY LOURDES VALDESPINO ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY ZACHARY BUTLER ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY MARIA OVALLE ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY SHANNON FAULKNER ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY JONATHAN RUSSELL ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY SARAH BOSTIC ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY MATT JONES ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY JACK FOLWELL ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY ANH NGUYEN ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY BRUCE GIBSON ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY 46


MACUHO LAKYN BAILEY ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY HAYDEN STURGELL ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY KALYNN MITCHELL ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY RAEKWON TIMMONS ABOVE 3.7 MARSHALL UNIVERSITY NIA GIPSON 4 MCDANIEL COLLEGE JOCELYN DIAZ 4 MCDANIEL COLLEGE TYLER VAN DYKE 4 MCDANIEL COLLEGE KELLY EDULLANTES ABOVE 3.7 MCDANIEL COLLEGE BRANDON LU ABOVE 3.7 MCDANIEL COLLEGE LACEY UTZ ABOVE 3.7 MCDANIEL COLLEGE ERIN ELPHICK 4 MESSIAH COLLEGE EMILY LA BIANCA 4 MESSIAH COLLEGE REBEKAH LINDE 4 MESSIAH COLLEGE ELLIOT ROSSOMME 4 MESSIAH COLLEGE DAYREN SOTO 4 MESSIAH COLLEGE RICHARD SPEENEY 4 MESSIAH COLLEGE TYLER HEATH ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE MIRIAM THURBER ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE GEORGE PORT ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE EMILY HEPLER ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE JOEL JOHNSON ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE PAUL TAJIRI ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE CHLOE STOKES ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE KARA HOFFMAN ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE MADISON NEIMER ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE JENNIFER SAYRE ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE JOSEPH YOON ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE ADDISON HURST ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE DANA GANGITANO ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE LINDSAY BUZZEE ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE COLLIN GALLAGHER ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE JOSEPH LORGUNPAI ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE MADISON GROFF ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE CHRISTIAN DONNELLY ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE CALEB BORNMAN ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE MARIE JOHNSON ABOVE 3.7 MESSIAH COLLEGE BLYSSALYN BIEBER ABOVE 3.7 MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY MELISSA BOSTJANCIC ABOVE 3.7 MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY JULIANNE CARIOLA ABOVE 3.7 MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY LAUREN HAYDEN ABOVE 3.7 MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY JENNA MILLS ABOVE 3.7 MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY KARLEE NAYLON ABOVE 3.7 MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY MICAELA RHONE ABOVE 3.7 MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY JACQUELINE

STRAUSSER

ABOVE 3.7

MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY

MICHAEL TRYGAR ABOVE 3.7 MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY CHRISTINE ZOPF ABOVE 3.7 MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY ERIK SMITH 4 MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ COURTNEY

MOTTOLA

4

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

JOSH MANNING 4 MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ AMANDA MICHKO 4 MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ BRYAN EPSTEIN 4 MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ 47


WINTER 2017 STEPHANIE

ROONES

ABOVE 3.7

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

HARRY

TERMYNA

ABOVE 3.7

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

JENNIFER

HALLAM

ABOVE 3.7

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

JANISTE MEDINA ABOVE 3.7 MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ MICHAEL

MATT

ABOVE 3.7

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

MARY

FITZGERALD

ABOVE 3.7

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

ROUSHAN

DAMAGHI

ABOVE 3.7

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

JULIE

SILVESTRI

ABOVE 3.7

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

REBECCA

COLUCCI

ABOVE 3.7

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

FRANCESCA

PETRUZZELLA

ABOVE 3.7

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

MARK

MARRONE

ABOVE 3.7

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

GREG

NARDIELLO

ABOVE 3.7

MONMOUTH UNIVERSITY NJ

CAMILA AGOSTO 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY VATSALA ANUJ 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY JENNIFER BARTLETT 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY STEPHEN BLAZEJEWSKI 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY MADELINE

DELLA PESCA

4

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

ALIYAH DELPOPOLO 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY LAYAL ISSA 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY JUSTIN MATHAI 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY MEREDTH PIRCHER 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY ALFREDO RAMIREZ 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY ALLISON WHITTY 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY RACHEL BELSKY 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY ROSALIE CUTCHALL 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY AUSTIN GREITZ 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY ALLYSIA GUZMAN 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY LAUREN HABERSTROH 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY DELANEY HOFFMAN 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY VALERIE NEUHAUS 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY CAITLIN CRONK 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY MATTHEW LISO 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY JESSICA RODRIGUES 4 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY JAD

ABOUSLEIMAN

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

JOSHUA

BISHOP-MBACHU

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

STEVEN DYAS ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY LEILONI BRADDY ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY KATHLEEN

RAMOS

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

EVA SHAPIRO ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY JOANNA

KENNEDY

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

MARIE DENISE

SULIT

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

CHRISTY

CAMPBELL

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

ROBERT

ESPOSITO

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

EMILY LOUKA ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY ZULEMA RUBIO ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY GREGORY

MILLER

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

SHANNON

MCCARTHY

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

EFRAIN

MONTERROSO

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

ARIANNI PIERRE ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY JOCELYNN

MATTINGLY

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

SALVATORE

SWAIN

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

48


MACUHO JUAN

SANTANA

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

CA’MARRAH

HUDSON

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

CHERESE

JACKSON

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

CHRISTIAN

LAEMMERHIRT

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

IKEA

VANDROSS

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

DAVID

CHRISTIANSEN

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

LEVENDA

MOORE

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

KATHERINE

DEMARCO

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

BROOKE

CRACCHIOLO

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

TAMIAH WILSON ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY JESSICA PETINO ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY ANGELINA

CAMPOMIZZI

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

CHRISTOPHER

CLEMENT

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

SCHYLER

EDWARDS

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

MASHAUNDA

JOHNSON

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

KORIE

PORTNOY

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

GERTRUDE

ASANTE-ADDO

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

REBECCA

LABADIE

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

KOEDI SHAKIR ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY CHRISTINA

HAAG

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

DESMOND

MORGAN

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

ERIN DEMAIO ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY JENNA

PATTISON

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

JOANNE WEIGEL ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY JAILISSE ACOSTA ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY MARIA

BRUCATO

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

PAUL KELUSAK ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY TERREL MOSS ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY RYAN KIERNAN ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY BRIAN

COURTNEY

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

HAROLD GARCIA ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY FRANCESCA

RICOTTA

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

MICHAEL GELMAN ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY DANIEL

CYCKOWSKI

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

HUMBERTO

ARGUETA

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

ALEXIS DANIELS ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY JESSICA

FETHERSTON

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

JADEN

JACKSON

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

KELLY

SZCZERKOWSKI

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

ANDREA

PERRICELLI

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

DANIEL

PADIERNA

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

KEVIN

BENTANCUR

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

LINDSAY

DEL DUKE

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

OLIVIA TARRIO ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY ERICA EVANS ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY MARISSA RICKLEFS ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY CARIESHA

BLACK

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

CLARA MIKAEIL ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY CHRISTOPHER

CURRY

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

MARVIN DURAND ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY BRIANA

RUZANSKI

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY 49


WINTER 2017 ANGELICA

SANTIAGO

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

JULIA HISMEH ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY BETHANY

KISSER

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

TYLER

JOHNSON

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

TONIANN

SEALS

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

ALEXIS KARPF ABOVE 3.7 MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY REBECCA

LINDNER

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

SHANNON

CREHAN

ABOVE 3.7

MONTCLAIR STATE UNIVERSITY

TYLER BERGSMA 4 MORAVIAN COLLEGE JACKIE COOK 4 MORAVIAN COLLEGE CHRISTINA DUDDY 4 MORAVIAN COLLEGE MICHAEL GUARINO 4 MORAVIAN COLLEGE ABIGAIL JEFFRIES 4 MORAVIAN COLLEGE RIVER JORDAN 4 MORAVIAN COLLEGE SHAUN PATEMAN 4 MORAVIAN COLLEGE SABRINA SIGNORELLI 4 MORAVIAN COLLEGE NATHAN ARNOLD ABOVE 3.7 MORAVIAN COLLEGE THOMAS BRIM ABOVE 3.7 MORAVIAN COLLEGE KENDRA KRAMER ABOVE 3.7 MORAVIAN COLLEGE ALLISON PARKES ABOVE 3.7 MORAVIAN COLLEGE CURTIS WETZEL ABOVE 3.7 MORAVIAN COLLEGE JADA BOYD 4 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY RAIGAN WHEELER 4 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY AMBRIA DAVIS ALEXANDER 4 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY ASIA GOFFIN 4 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY JAMIELLE DAVIS 4 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY MINJA RANKOV 4 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY OLUWAKAYODE JASANYA 4 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY SIDNIE

CHRISTIAN

ABOVE 3.7

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

TAYLOR MOORE ABOVE 3.7 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY BRIANNA

RHINEHART

ABOVE 3.7

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

KOREY

MATHEWS

ABOVE 3.7

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

CORNELIUS

MIDDLETON

ABOVE 3.7

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

AMIR

WHITAKER

ABOVE 3.7

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

JOINES JORDAN ABOVE 3.7 MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY KEION

HOWARD

ABOVE 3.7

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

NIKELENE

MCLEAN

ABOVE 3.7

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

OLUWAKOREDE

OLUWASUJI

ABOVE 3.7

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

TANYA

JOHNSON

ABOVE 3.7

MORGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

REBECCA GOODMAN 4 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE ANGELA GRASSI 4 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE DYLAN ASHTON 4 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE TIMOTHY JANOVSKY 4 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE THOMAS LEMONS 4 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE TREVOR LUCK 4 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE EMILY NELSON 4 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE LARA ROSETO 4 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE DREW SWEDBERG 4 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE BAADAL VACHHANI 4 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE ANTHONY DEMARTE ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE REBECCA PHILLIPS ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE 50


MACUHO JESSICA SPERBER ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE CHRISTINE CIMPIAN ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE TAYLOR BECKMAN ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE JINBAI LI ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE JORDAN SIMMONS ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE MALCOLM MCCLAIN ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE ALYSSA SCARTOZZI ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE LOUISA OMOREGIE ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE GENEVIEVE POST ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE EMILY UNRUE ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE MAHSHEED MAHJOR ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE ROBERT MADANI ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE JENNA LOWRY ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE KIARA RYAN ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE ALEXANDRA AVILES ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE DEVAN C ALLAHAN ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE JAKE GORDON ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE ANGE

SANDRINE UWISANZE

ABOVE 3.7

MUHLENBERG COLLEGE

MADELINE FALCO ABOVE 3.7 MUHLENBERG COLLEGE MENGXIN HE 4 NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ALEXANDRA NITA 4 NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY ASAAD CHAUDHRY 4 NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LUKE

PARSONS

ABOVE 3.7

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

ARLENE

DAVIS

ABOVE 3.7

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

MOBIN

MALIK

ABOVE 3.7

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

BRIANNA

BOHN

ABOVE 3.7

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

JACOB

PONULAK

ABOVE 3.7

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

KHARI

DAVIS-FLETCHER

ABOVE 3.7

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

NEHA

SYAL

ABOVE 3.7

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

JASON

POPPE

ABOVE 3.7

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

LILIANA

TORRES

ABOVE 3.7

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

ASHLEY

FITZSIMMONS

ABOVE 3.7

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

LINDSEY

ARMOUR

ABOVE 3.7

NEW JERSEY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

KRYSTAL HUBER 4 PENN STATE HARRISBURG ALEXANDRA MAUGER 4 PENN STATE HARRISBURG ABBIE GALL 4 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY NATALIE FOX 4 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY NEILAH LIZWELICHA 4 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY DANA LOGUE 4 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY NICOLE MIEHLE 4 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY REMY VICTORIA ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY LUKE ARCONA ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY JACOB BROSIUS ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY SEAN DEBLASIO ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY RACHEL STROHM ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY MELODY GAJEWSKI ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY NATALIE DUPONT ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY ARMANI JOHNSON ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY WILLIAM WEI ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY JALA HAMADA ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY PENELOPE SEGURA ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY 51


WINTER 2017 RACHAEL BAKER ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY JOHN ORTIZ ABOVE 3.7 PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY SEINT SANDY AUNG 4 RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ ISABELLA SANTOS 4 RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ JONATHAN CEDENO 4 RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ MICHAEL VOGT 4 RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ PAOLA VILLANUEVA 4 RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ PRINCEP SHAH 4 RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ PRITHA

AGGARWAL

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

SAMANTHA

MARTIN

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

JAMES

GRISSMAN

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

DANIELLE

MERCADO

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

MEGAN

QUINLAN

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

JOSE

CARRILLO

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

ANTONINO

LAROSA

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

DEVASHRI

PARIKH

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

LAWRENCE

SANTOS

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

VICTORIA

EICHENLAUB

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

SARAH

CAREW

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

LUISA NASIEK ABOVE 3.7 RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ KARLO

MENDOZA

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

THANUKA

UDUMULLA

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

ANTHONY

MORALES

ABOVE 3.7

RAMAPO COLLEGE OF NJ

MICHELLE BRANDT 4 RIDER UNIVERSITY JENNIFER SWEENEY 4 RIDER UNIVERSITY DELIA BARRIENTOS ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY ALYSSA BELARDO ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY AMY BRANDT ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY MATTHEW CARUSO ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY SAMANTHA CEPIN ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY GABRIELLA FLAMINI ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY KHADIJAH GREENE ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY WILL HARMONAY ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY ALEXANDRA LIVESEY ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY YASLYN LORA ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY GABRIELLE MAGWOOD ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY LORETO MARTINO ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY SANDRA MISSERI ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY ALEXANDRA RUSSO ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY LAUREN SANDER ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY DILLON STELTZ ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY MCKENZIE STERNER ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY JANAE WALTERS ABOVE 3.7 RIDER UNIVERSITY ANTONIA

ADELAKUN

ABOVE 3.7

RIDER UNIVERSITY

SAVANA GOSHEY 4 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY ROSE HOMISON 4 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY ANDREW MILLER 4 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY HANNAH ARNOLD ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY TYLER AXELSON ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY BEN BARBER ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY ANDREW BIRK ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY 52


MACUHO MARISSA CUTLER ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY ANDREW MASON ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY ALEXANDER SOWA ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY ZACH KAISER ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY KATELYN MAIONE ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY SPENCER MILLER ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY DYLAN MILLER ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY SARAH NGUYEN ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY MAUREEN NKOMO ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY KENNEDY RICHEY ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY JON SEITZ ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY ERIC STAUFFER ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY CARLY SWINGLE ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY MICHAEL WALKOWIAK ABOVE 3.7 ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY TRISTAN BAKER ABOVE 3.7 ROSEMONT COLLEGE GRACE MUGUWE ABOVE 3.7 ROSEMONT COLLEGE NAOMI GULAMA 4 RUTGERS UNIVERSITY - NEWARK SEKINAT KUKU 4 RUTGERS UNIVERSITY - NEWARK JESSCIA PACHECO 4 RUTGERS UNIVERSITY - NEWARK REBECCA WALTERS 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK CASSANDRA OGBOZOR 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK LINDSAY JEFFERS 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK SARA WENGROWSKI 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK HSIU-FEN LIN 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK NICOLE DILEO 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK HANNAH GIBBS 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK SHAIL PATEL 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK EMILY SCHLEE 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK CHRISTINE STATON 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK EMILY DING 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ALEX LIN 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JUSTIN MATHEW 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JOSHUA LEE 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK COLIN RIZZO 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK NICOLE CHAN 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK THERESA RIORDAN 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK DANNA ALMEIDA 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK LAUREN MCGOWAN 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK CALEB ROGERS 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK TANUSHREE BANSAL 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK BRIELLE BRACK 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JOHNNY YOUNG 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JAN SIESS 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK KIMBERLY BOSCODOSS 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK VINCENT PICCIRILLO 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK HOPE MCCRAW 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ANTOINETTE GINGERELLI 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ALANA CHMIEL 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK LAUREN PALENA 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK WILLIAM BAUMLE 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK IAN LETTIRE 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK 53


WINTER 2017 RONNIE BRUMANT 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JILLIAN DEEGAN 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK BROOKE SCHLEYER 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK FRANCIS POLICASTRI 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK EMMANUEL LEE 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ROSALIE CARVALHO 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK PAIGE TOWNLEY 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK KURT DEVONSHIRE 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK AUTUMN WINTER 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK OLIVIA COUZZI 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK SAMANTHA GLASS 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ELIAS GUSEMAN 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JASMINE JONES-BYNES 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK SARA PAGANO 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK BRIAN PIRAPAKARAN 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK BRIAN DOS SANTOS 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK STEVEN WYNEN 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MARGARET MULLER 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ALEYA NELSON 4 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MICHAEL MAXHAM ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK SEAN GRIFFIN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MARINA MARTINEZ ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JOSHUA TEDESCO ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MARGARET WOODRUFF ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK HENNA AKBARZAI ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MACI NORDONE ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK SRIDHAR SRIRAM ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK KIMBERLY LIVINGSTON ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK NESSREEN MESTARI ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ARLENIS FERREIRAS ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ALEXANDER BAI ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MARIA

SIDDIQUI

ABOVE 3.7

RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK

AYAMI KOIKE ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK SHREYAAS ARAVINDAN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MATTHEW MOLINARI ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK DANIEL REGAN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK NINA SCOTT ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK DEANNA HICKMAN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK KAYLA PETERS ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ANITA OMAMBIA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JAKE COMITO ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JOSEPH MARKMAN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ROCKY TRIFARI ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK EMILY ROSADO ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK OLIVIA WALLDEN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK DEREK MILLER ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ANUSHA REDDY ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK RYAN GAMADIA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK TAVEL FINDLATER ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK KAMEL LIHMAIDI ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JUILEE MALAVADE ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK 54


MACUHO SUBHAM RUSTAGI ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK NADINE AZARI ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK DIVYA MURALI ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK PEARL JASMIN LARIZA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK EVA RYAN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK RICHARD ALLEYNE ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK DEANNA WASHINGTON ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK GERMAN BLANCO ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK KRISTEN TSE ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK CECILIA SALAZAR ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JENNIFER GARCIA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK DARIA MARTIN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ERIK RASMUSSEN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK TREVOR STANTON ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK BRIANNA GALADA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ELIZABETH LAMORTE-WRIGHT ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ALEXANDRA SPITZER ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ALISA BONDARENKO ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK NICHOLAS ADDO ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK FRANCES AMAEFUNA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ADEDOLA ADEFOWOJU ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JAYME BRATHWAITE ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK STEPHANIE ACEVEDO ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MONICA TORRES ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK RICHIE CHU ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ARIELLE KAFKER ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ARIANA SIMON ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK TRAVIS THIEL ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK CHRISTOPHER BRIANIK ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK CHELSIE RICHE ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MAULINE ONSOMBI ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ARLIM

GUERRERO ENCARNACION ABOVE 3.7

RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK

SWETA PATEL ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK DARSHAN NANDHA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MORGAN DODDS ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JAYSHREE CHAUHAN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ANDRIA LINFANTE ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK CHRISTINE RIVERA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK PRIYA PATEL ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK STEVEN REYES ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MELISSA MCINTOSH ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK EILEEN YOUNG ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK TIFFANY CORTESE ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK EMILY AVERSA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK AELANA FREEMAN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JORDAN RICHARDSON ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK KESHAV PATEL ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ANAND ARIKAREVULA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ANTHONY MEYER ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK SAMANTHA DONOVAN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MAXIMILLIAM CABRERA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK 55


WINTER 2017 NICHOLAS DASS ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK RITA PORTENTI ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK ELIZABETH MCGINLEY ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK JASON ORCIUOLO ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK MARISSA CASTRO ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK AUTUMN LOICHLE ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-NEW BRUNSWICK SAMANTHA BUCHNER ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-CAMDEN ALYSSA MARTIN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-CAMDEN RYAN MCCARTHY ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-CAMDEN PARTH LALAKIA ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-CAMDEN TIARA DEGUZMAN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-CAMDEN RADHA PRABAKARAN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-CAMDEN JAKE COLLETTE-NIPPINS ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-CAMDEN ADELA EIN ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-CAMDEN LAKHAYA LONDON ABOVE 3.7 RUTGERS-CAMDEN JESSICA HENDERSON 4 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY RACHEL SMITH 4 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY TAYLOR THURNHERR 4 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY JORDAN TROXELL 4 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY REBECCA LARKINS ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY ELIZABETH SOHMER ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY CAMILLE SMITHBAUER ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY HARRY OLAFSEN ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY TAYLOR JAMES ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY REBEKAH KRUPA ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY HAYDEN ELLIOTT ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY PAUL KASUNIC ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY AMY O’HEARN ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY RYAN GROSIK ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY BLAINE ARNEY ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY TOM BRADY ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY JARED SAPORITO ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY RACHEL HOHMAN ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY ALAN ROBINSON ABOVE 3.7 SAINT FRANCIS UNIVERSITY MORRIS DONALD 4 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY SPARACIO GIOVANNI 4 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY UNGER MATTHEW 4 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY ERFLE DAVID 4 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY VERGHESE MOLLY 4 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY NEECE JOHANNA 4 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY LORD KATHERINE 4 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY BOUVETTE

ELIZABETH

ABOVE 3.7

SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY

BAUMLEY

JENNIFER

ABOVE 3.7

SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY

PAPARO ANTHONY ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY RIGA MICHAEL ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY FENTON GEORGE ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY FANNICK ASHLEY ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY HALL LAUREN ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY GORMAN ABIGAIL ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY BOGANSKY EMILY ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY MELNICK SAMANTHA ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY 56


MACUHO WENSEL LAURYN ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY VARGHESE ASHLEY ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY STOKES BRITTANY ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY SPARACIO

ALESSANDRO

ABOVE 3.7

SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY

HOUSTON EMILY ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY THORPE JESSICA ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY KAROLY PAUL ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY MALIGA SEAN ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY WERNER SOPHIE ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY O’BRIEN KELLIE ABOVE 3.7 SAINT JOSEPH’S UNIVERSITY SAHIL TRIVEDI 4 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY TONY VARUGHESE 4 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY BRIELLE ASHFORTH 4 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY SARAH KUEHN 4 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY EMILY SILKOWSKI 4 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY PATRICIA BOCCARD 4 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY AUGUSTINE GLAZOV 4 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY AZHANE JACKSON ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY MICHAEL

CAPPELLUTI

ABOVE 3.7

SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

CARLY LAVALLEE ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY WALKER MONDT ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY BRANDON ROSARIO ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY ELIANNI DELACRUZ ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY ADAM MOWRER ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY SHERILYN

MORSE

ABOVE 3.7

SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

RICHEL LARTEY ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY HEATHER KWITYN ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY HALEY ZENNA ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY SIOBHAN MCGIRL ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY CARTER MCINTOSH ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY ROBIN NAGEL ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY JOSEPH NALBONE ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY LEAH

MEISSNER

ABOVE 3.7

SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

SPENCER

OCHNER

ABOVE 3.7

SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

DOMINIQUE

HAMILTONMOORE

ABOVE 3.7

SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

LUKE RIZZOLI ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY ZACHARY

LAUBERNDS

ABOVE 3.7

SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

CHRISTOPHER

MORBELLI

ABOVE 3.7

SETON HALL UNIVERSITY

TIFFANY CALLANAN ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY TIMOTHY IVERSEN ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY CHRISTINA MENDES ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY EMILY OSBORN ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY MARY SAYDAH ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY DANIEL CHEMEY ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY EDWARD COLOMBO ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY PATRICK FLYNN ABOVE 3.7 SETON HALL UNIVERSITY EMILY FROST 4 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY OLIVIA RAKAS 4 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY PAIGE KOVALCHIK 4 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY STEPHEN BARNHART 4 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY CATRINA ABBOTT 4 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY 57


WINTER 2017 ANGELA BOBAK 4 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY BENJAMIN MAYRO 4 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY SAVANNAH BURCH 4 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY MADELEINE ROBBINS 4 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY AARON LINES 4 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY PAULA

CARVAJALINO-OVALLE

4

SETON HILL UNIVERSITY

KAITLYN CULPEPPER 4 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY MARGARET

GERTHOFFER

ABOVE 3.7

SETON HILL UNIVERSITY

JOSHUA IGBEARE ABOVE 3.7 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY KYLIE ZUIDERHOF ABOVE 3.7 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY LINDSAY BONNETT ABOVE 3.7 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY JULIA FORSMAN ABOVE 3.7 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY AMELIA SHUBERT ABOVE 3.7 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY VICTORIA

KASACZUN

ABOVE 3.7

SETON HILL UNIVERSITY

SAM KOVALCHIK ABOVE 3.7 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY RYAN WHITEMAN ABOVE 3.7 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY RYAN KIRDAHY ABOVE 3.7 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY HARRISON HOWES ABOVE 3.7 SETON HILL UNIVERSITY ETHAN CARRICO 4 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY EMILIE EMBREY 4 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY MADDIE HOBBS 4 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY JOHN MICHAELS 4 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY CONNOR O’SHEA 4 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY SAMANTHA BARNES ABOVE 3.7 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY STEVE WELTI ABOVE 3.7 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY JACOBY STEELE ABOVE 3.7 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY TONI MAY ABOVE 3.7 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY RAVEN WEBSTER ABOVE 3.7 SHEPHERD UNIVERSITY NOAH CONNOR 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY ALEIA PLENTY 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY JELINDA EASO 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY NATE HENDERSON 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY LUKE MASTRANGELI 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY LAUREN NOVSAK 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY AUDREY YANKAH 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY CORY OTT 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY DENEEN WATSON 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY SAMIY AKING 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY JESSICA EISENBERG 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY HANNE WILBURN 4 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY TYLER PRICE ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY CAROLYN ADDO ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY EVAN SAUTER ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY COURTNEY PARTO ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY MATTHEW PATTI ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY ERIN SKODA ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY SHAHROSE NOMAN ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY CAROLINE IZZI ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY LINDSEY WEISHAAR ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY SHANELLE ABDULLAH ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY BRIANNA LASSISTER ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY 58


MACUHO MARIAH MCCARTHY ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY KARLEY ANDREWS ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY BRITAIN CASTELLANO ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY EDDIE BENNETT ABOVE 3.7 STEVENSON UNIVERSITY GIA CHAWALA 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY NORA FRANCO 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ADAM GRAUBART 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY GUILLERMO MARTINEZ 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY LAUREN PETERSIL 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY NICHOLAS PRENDERGAST 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY CONNOR ROSENBERG 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY CECILIA ROSSI 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SARAH SEMPLE 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ABIGAIL SYMONS 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY JULIA WEISS 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY HANNA WILLWERTH 4 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SASHA PAUL ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY RICHARD RYNGEL ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY KIRA SOMMER ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY DANIEL

COOKSEY

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

LENIN

HERNANDEZ

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

DOROTHY

MONZA

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

MILES HEALY ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY FIONA

MORTELL

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

KIMBERLY

TANNER

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

PRIYANKA

WALIMBE

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

ROBERT WINTHER ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY THOMAS

MAGNAN

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

AUDREY STAM ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ANNIE

MCDONALD

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

ALLISON FISH ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY WEI “ALICE”

TIAN

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

KATHERINE

JONES

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

ERIC MARTER ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ROSA ARAIZA ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MADELEINE

COOK

BENJAMIN MORDECHAI-STONGIN

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

AKSHAYA SADRAS ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MAYA BLAIR ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SHELLY SHARMA ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY WILLIAM

CHRISTIAN

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

SAMUEL

FINNERAN

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

LAURA

GOMEZ CADENA

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

STELA JANKU ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY DINAL

SANJANA JAYASEKERA

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

HALLEY ROGERS ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY CODY ETLIN ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY OLIVIA GARCIA ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SAMUEL EPPLER ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ASHLEY ATILANO ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MAKENZIE

BRIGLIA

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY 59


WINTER 2017 HALEA

KERR-LAYTON

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

TAYLOR KIRK ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ANGELO STAM ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY AARON

TIELEMANS

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

JOHN

VENEZIA

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

KYLE

WALDMAN

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

YONA

WEISSMAN FABRA

ABOVE 3.7

THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY

ANGELO DELEO ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SHERIN NASSAR ABOVE 3.7 THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ALEXIS LAMBERT ABOVE 3.7 THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY CONNOR

KOLLAR

ABOVE 3.7

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

AISLYNN

MACKENZIE

ABOVE 3.7

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY

SAMANTHA SMITH 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY REYAN ABDELMONIEM 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY HANNAH ARIS 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY RAMON HILLIARD 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY HANNAH MATHWICH 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY SHANNON COLE 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY ARIZONA GUZMAN 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY THAYJUS PANCHOLI 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY DANA PIRZCHALSKI 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY MIA RICKENBACH 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY OLUWASEUN ODIBO 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY TRENT BAE 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY SHAWN BASTANI 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY MARK EBEID 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY DANA KOBRIN 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY DORJAN LEKA 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY BAILEY ROUK 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY MARINA MIZELL 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY ARDY SOWE 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY JOCELYN

WILKINS

4

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

LUKE BYRNE 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY MERVAT ALI 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY JESSICA DENG 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY HEATHER

FRANK

4

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

EVODIA HOFF 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY SOPHIA LOPRESTI 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY GABRIEL

MARGARIDA

4

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

JESSICA WILLIS 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY AUSTEN EDELENBOS 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY CHRISTINA

NORDMARK

4

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

BENJAMIN PRICE 4 UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY RAYMOND

ROBINSON

4

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

JESSICA

HASSELL

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

KWAME

ROBERTSON

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

SARA

MEHR

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

NOAH

NORMAN

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

CONNOR

CRAFT

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

GABI

SALAS

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

ROOPA

MISTRY

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

JUSTIN

HOSTEN

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

60


MACUHO MATTHEW

WRIGHT

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERISTY OF MARYLAND, BALTIMORE COUNTY

LAKERERA LITTLE 4 UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE LESLIE

HENDRICKSON

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

KEAIR

CLARKE

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

SABRINA

TOWNSON

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

SHARON

MILLS

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND EASTERN SHORE

TYLER LOOKABAUGH 4 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG TARA

RITENOUR

4

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG

AMANDA SMITH 4 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG KATE

ANDREWS

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG

SADE

BANKS

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG

KATIE

BYERS

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG

EMILY

FRYE

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG

SARA

MCCONNELL

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG

DAN

SPANNER

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT GREENSBURG

JAKEB RISING 4 UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT JOHNSTOWN JEFFREY

ADAMS

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT JOHNSTOWN

MALIN

VEROSTICK

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT JOHNSTOWN

JEFFREY

KOLENY

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT JOHNSTOWN

JENA

YOUNG

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT JOHNSTOWN

RYAN

SIATOWSKY

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT JOHNSTOWN

RYAN

WILSON

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT JOHNSTOWN

JARED

HESCHKE

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT JOHNSTOWN

YVONNE

NGUYEN

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH AT JOHNSTOWN

MATTHEW MARSHALL 4 UNIVERSITY OF THE SCIENCES JOHN GERGES 4 UNIVERSITY OF THE SCIENCES SEAN OLASO ABOVE 3.7 UNIVERSITY OF THE SCIENCES GABRIELLE

SAGE

ABOVE 3.7

UNIVERSITY OF THE SCIENCES

KENNY CICCOLI, JR. 4 WESLEY COLLEGE BETTY LEE 4 WESLEY COLLEGE KAITLIN BRENNAN ABOVE 3.7 WESLEY COLLEGE YAA YAMOAH ABOVE 3.7 WESLEY COLLEGE FRANCIS

QUARTEY

ABOVE 3.7

WESLEY COLLEGE

BREA’NA MORGANFIELD ABOVE 3.7 WESLEY COLLEGE JULIE BELLING 4 WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY DANIELLE SHERMAN 4 WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY BRYCE CLEVELAND ABOVE 3.7 WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY SARA DRIGGERS ABOVE 3.7 WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY ERICA HOWARD ABOVE 3.7 WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY SHEALYN MILES ABOVE 3.7 WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY MELISSA MORGAN ABOVE 3.7 WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY MICHAEL PAGE ABOVE 3.7 WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY DERYN FINK ABOVE 3.7 WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY AMANDA

NOLE

ABOVE 3.7

WEST CHESTER UNIVERSITY

ALEXANDRA OVITS 4 WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY AILEEN RUIZ 4 WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY ASHLEY NUNEZ 4 WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY COURTNEY FRANKS 4 WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY BRITTANY LINE 4 WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY WALESKA

HERRERA

ABOVE 3.7

WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY

KELLY

DRISCOLL

ABOVE 3.7

WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY

JESSIE CUSSAC ABOVE 3.7 WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY 61


WINTER 2017 SARA

VETTER

ABOVE 3.7

WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY

DERRICK

DORPH

ABOVE 3.7

WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY

AMANDA

BLAZKIEWICZ

ABOVE 3.7

WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY

SAVANNAH

CRIPPEN

ABOVE 3.7

WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY

ANDREW

MASSEFSKI

ABOVE 3.7

WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY

ALEXUS VASSELL ABOVE 3.7 WILLIAM PATERSON UNIVERSITY DESTINEE TUNSTALL 4 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE DIXIE SHAHAN 4 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE HOLCOMB RYAN 4 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE SHAWNA CLAYTON 4 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE SARAH CAMPBELL 4 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE JOSHIAH BOSLEY 4 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE ALICIA

ALDERMAN

ABOVE 3.7

WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

TABITHA

SWANSON

ABOVE 3.7

WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE

AURORA SNYDER ABOVE 3.7 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE THOMAS HAINES ABOVE 3.7 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE ANNA FLESHER ABOVE 3.7 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE SARAH FIZER ABOVE 3.7 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE CAYLA COLLETT ABOVE 3.7 WEST VIRGINIA WESLEYAN COLLEGE KELSEY EGI 4 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY SYDNEY LUTHER 4 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY OLIVIA MIRANDA 4 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY SARAH HASLEBACHER 4 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY DAVID-MICHAEL

BUCKMAN

ABOVE 3.7

WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY

JOSH NEAL ABOVE 3.7 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY JOHN LANGENSTEIN ABOVE 3.7 WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY LAUREN MATTEO 4 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA SIANI WIDMAN 4 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA REBECCAH CLIFTON 4 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA HAYLEY DAVINO 4 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA HOLLY LOBB 4 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA RACHEL CARLIN 4 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA LASMIR MITCHELL 4 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA CARSON JENKINS 4 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA CARISSA

MCQUADE

4

YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA

RYAN

STYPINSKI

ABOVE 3.7

YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA

MICHAYLA

GRAVES

ABOVE 3.7

YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA

EMALIE SHAFFER ABOVE 3.7 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA ROSS JONES ABOVE 3.7 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA CHANTEL

VEREEN

ABOVE 3.7

YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA

SIERRA

LUCKHARDT

ABOVE 3.7

YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA

JACOB RHODES ABOVE 3.7 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA LEAH ALLNUTT ABOVE 3.7 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA ABIGAIL BRITTON ABOVE 3.7 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA EMMA FRAZIER ABOVE 3.7 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA AMANDA

O’DONNELL

ABOVE 3.7

YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA

JOHN GAETA ABOVE 3.7 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA LASMIR MITCHELL 4 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA RACHEL CARLIN 4 YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA ABBIE

BRITTON

ABOVE 3.7

YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA

SIERRA

LUCKHARDT

ABOVE 3.7

YORK COLLEGE OF PENNSYLVANIA

62


LOOKING BACK INTO MACUHO’S PAST

MACUHO

63


WINTER 2017

64


MACUHO

65


WINTER 2017

66


MACUHO

67


WINTER 2017

68


MACUHO

69


WINTER 2017

70


MACUHO

71


WINTER 2017

72


MACUHO

73

MACUHO Magazine Winter 2017 (Past, Present, & Future Edition)  

Read MACUHO Magazine's Winter 2017 Edition. It is our Past, Present, and Future Edition focused on celebrating where we have been as an orga...

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