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L A N O U V E L L E S E N S AT I O N


D i sponi bl e excl usi v ement a u p rè s d e s Bo u tiq u e s Ch o p a rd – www.c h o p a rd .c om


OURS

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Publisher & Creative Director

FRANK PERRIN Editor in Chief

CONTRIBUTORS FOR CRASH N° 80 THE CINEMA ISSUE

ARMELLE LETURCQ Fashion Director

Texts

ANDREJ SKOK

PAUL ARDENNE STÉPHANIE BUI APOLLINE FRIMONT DOROTHÉE DUPUIS YAN CEH MANOU FARINE

Fashion Editors

LEOPOLD DUCHEMIN ZOE JAMES LISA JARVIS MELISSA LEVY ERIK RAYNAL JESSICA DOS REMEDIOS Managing Editor

ANNA CERAVOLO Editorial Assistant

NOÉMIE FOURMEAU SARAH KONTÉ SASKIA MAITREPIERRE Graphic Designer

JULIE OOGHE-TABANOU English Version

BRIAN MEYER

CRASH MAGAZINE IS A CRASH PRODUCTION PUBLICATION CRASH MAGAZINE IS PRINTED IN BELGIUM WITH PLANT-BASED INKS.

Images

RAFFAELE CARIOU ALEXANDRA CATIÈRE THOMAS COOKSEY DOUG INGLISH ROGER DECKKER DORA DIAMANT JORDAN HEMINGWAY MARC HIBBERT JAMES MOUNTFORD HANS NEUMANN TORBJØRN RØDLAND SHUBHANKAR RAY MARTIN SCHOELLER HENRIKE STAHL BENJAMIN VNUK JULIEN D’YS MARIJO ZUPANOV ADVERTISING. SARAH@CRASH.FR PUBLISHERS. ARMELLE LETURCQ & FRANK PERRIN SUBSCRIPTION. WWW.CRASH.FR ISNN. 1276-4108 CRASH PRODUCTION, SARL AU CAPITAL DE 21 573 EUROS. COMMISSION PARITAIRE 1202K78040. DÉPOT LÉGAL À PARUTION. PÉRIODICITÉ TRIMESTRIELLE © CRASH. TOUS DROITS DE REPRODUCTION RESERVÉS. LA REPRODUCTION MÊME PARTIELLE D­­­ES ARTICLES ET ILLUSTRATIONS PARUS DANS CRASH EST INTERDITE SANS AUTORISATION PRÉALABLE. CRASH, 124 RUE DU CHERCHE MIDI 75006 PARIS TÉL. +33 1 43 45 74 61 WWW.CRASH.FR


RICARD RICA RD SAS SAS au caapita itall dde 54. 5 000. 000.000 000 euroos - 4-66 rue Berthelo Bert erthelo helot 130144 Mars a eeilll e - 303 ars 303 656 6 375 755 RCS CS Mars M eil Mar eill ei iille. e

Une création originale qui révèle toute la fraîcheur naturelle du citron vert.

L’ABUS D’ALCOOL EST DANGEREUX POUR LA SANTÉ. À CONSOMMER AVEC MODÉRATION.


EDITO

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THE CINEMA ISSUE

ROBERT PATTINSON AND SUSAN SARANDON SHARE THIS ISSUE’S COVER, TWO INTERNATIONAL STARS WHO COMMIT TO INDEPENDENT PROJECTS AND HAVE NO FEAR OF TAKING RISKS AND SHATTERING THEIR IMAGE. AT CANNES, PATTINSON WILL PRESENT AN ECCENTRIC AND PROFOUND FILM, THE SAFDIE BROTHERS’ GOOD TIME, A TINY BUDGET PROJECT THAT MADE IT INTO THE OFFICIAL SELECTION! FOR CRASH, PATTINSON STEPS ONTO THE SET OF ARTIST TORBJØRN RØDLAND, WHO CASTS THE ACTOR IN A UNIQUE AND PLAYFUL LIGHT. SUSAN SARANDON, THE LEGENDARY AMERICAN ACTRESS, DOES NOT HESITATE TO QUESTION THE POWERS IN PLACE IN HER COUNTRY IN OUR UNCENSORED INTERVIEW! IN THE SERIES FEUD, DIRECTED BY THE GENIUS RYAN MURPHY, SHE PLAYS A MAGNIFICENT BETTE DAVIS. THIS ISSUE ALSO PRESENTS A NEW GENERATION OF ACTORS COMING UP IN FRANCE, THE UK, AND THE US. ALONG WITH SOME WE ALREADY KNOW WELL: REDA KATEB, DANIEL BRÜHL, LILY COLLINS, DIANE ROUXEL…. MÄDCHEN AMICK, LEAD ACTRESS OF TWIN PEAKS, LOOKS BACK TWENTY-FIVE YEARS LATER, AS THE NEW SEASON THREE IS SET TO PREMIERE AT CANNES… LET’S NOT FORGET ALL THE ART, AS WE DISCOVER THE BEST YOUNG ARTISTS AT THE VENICE BIENNALE AND INTERVIEW ITS CURATOR, CHRISTINE MACEL. FINALLY, WE MEET WITH THE LEGENDARY CURATOR OF MAGICIENS DE LA TERRE, JEAN-HUBERT MARTIN… ENJOY THE READING AND HAVE A WONDERFUL SUMMER!

COVER WITH SUSAN SARANDON PHOTOGRAPHY : MARTIN SCHOELLER STYLIST : JESSICA DOS REMEDIOS HAIR STYLIST : BIRGITTE PHILIPPIDES FOR L’ORÉAL MAKE-UP ARTIST :  GENEVIEVE HERR FOR L’ORÉAL BALLY - TOP, CHOPARD - EARRING FROM THE “PALME VERTE COLLECTION” IN 18KT YELLOW FAIRMINED GOLD. MAKE-UP : ALL L'OREAL PARIS MASCARA SUPERSTAR XFIBER, INFAILLIBLE PAINT EYE SHADOW 102 IRRESISTIBLE ROSE, SUPER LINER LE KHÔL 101 MIDNIGHT BLACK, GLAM BEIGE POWDER LIGHT, INFAILLIBLE PAINT BLUSH 02 LES AMBRES, INFAILLIBLE LIP PAINT MAT NUDIST 209 NUDE ON FLEEK HAIR: ALL L'OREAL PARIS ELNETT SATIN HAIRSPRAY EXTRA STRONG HOLD VOLUME, ELNETT HAIRSPRAY CURLS, ELNETT SATIN

COVER WITH ROBERT PATTINSON PHOTOGRAPHY : TORBJØRN RØDLAND STYLIST : ANDREJ SKOK GROOMING : DIANA SCHMIDTKE DIOR HOMME – BLACK SHIRT WITH RED THREAT DETAILS


CONTENTS

Profils

THE CONTRAST 14 THE TAYLORING 16 THE ESSENTIAL 18 THE HOTEL 20

THE FABRIC 21 THE JEAN ATTITUDE 22

THE POST-CAPITALISM STYLE 23 THE CYBER PUNK COLLECTION 24 THE CABINET

DE CURIOSITES 25 THE RAW BEAUTY 26

THE LINES 27 THE JERSEY 28 THE GRADUATE 29 THE SOUND OF FASHION 30 Art

THE RETROSPECTIVE 32 THE COLLECTION 34 THE SINGER 35 THE APPROPRIATION 36

THE DIALOGUE 37 THE PHOTOGRAPHER 38

THE EYE 40 THE FRENCH SPIRIT 42 THE PAINTER 44 THE DISCREET 46 VENICE BIENNALE,

NEW GENERATION 50 HOW TO INVENT THE ART MUSEUMS OF THE FUTURE 62

INTO THE WEST 66 THE CURATOR 74 THE BIRD 78 Cinema

SUSAN SARANDON 90 ROBERT PATTINSON 98 GEORGE MACKAY 116 REDA KATEB 122

SOFIA BOUTELLA 128 DANIEL BRÜHL 134

CALLIE HERNANDEZ 140 MÄDCHEN AMICK 146 LILY COLLINS 152 DIANE ROUXEL 158

SOPHIE COOKSON 164 LOLITA CHAMMAH 168

FIONN O’SHEA 172 SOPHIE KENNEDY CLARK 176

MICHAEL ANGARANO 180 CONSTANCE ROUSSEAU 184 CRAIG ROBERTS 188 ANNA BREWSTER 192 Accessories

THE ADDICTIONS 196 THE PERFUMER 212 A STUDY ON SLEEP 214

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PROFILS

DIOR FALL

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The Contrast

PHOTOGRAPHER : HENRIKE STAHL - FASHION ST YLIST : ANDREJ SKOK - GROOMER : MICHAEL DELMAS - MODEL : MA XIME FRENEL AT SUCCESS MODELS / CÉLINE DEL AUGÈRE AT IMG - ST YLIST ASSISTANT : NOÉMIE FOURMEAU

Reinterpreting a Bohemian spirit so typical of Paris, Maria Grazia Chiuri, the Creative Director for womenswear at Dior, has placed the house’s Fall-Winter 2017 collection on the same path as the artists, writers, and thinkers who expressed their independence and originality in stunning fashion. Today’s climate favors opposition to mainstream art and an enthusiasm for new forms inspired by street art. Each piece in the collection adapts to the rhythms of contemporary urban living and its focus on developing a uniquely personal style. In that vein, the collection juxtaposes diverse elements whose countless combinations allow each woman to customize her own look. Relaxed silhouettes distinguish their wearers with details produced through the house’s signature expertise: embroidery, feather work, prints, and more. In addition, the collection turns on a contrast between the density of richly worked materials and the transparency of lace or veils wrapped around the body to generate a new form of urban elegance. As it celebrates its 70th anniversary this year, Dior has crafted a new vision of the Paris woman for 2017. S.B


NOUVELLE BMW SÉRIE 4. MADE 4 ELEGANCE.

NOUVELLE BMW SÉRIE 4 GRAN COUPÉ. Made 4 elegance = 4 signifie élégance. Consommations de la nouvelle BMW Série 4 Gran Coupé en cycle mixte : 4 à 7,4 l/100 km. CO2 : 106 à 172 g/km selon la norme européenne NEDC. BMW France, S.A. au capital de 2 805 000 € - 722 000 965 RCS Versailles - 3 avenue Ampère, 78180 Montigny-le-Bretonneux.

Le plaisir de conduire


PROFILS

BRIONI SUMMER

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The Tailoring This summer, Brioni is reinventing formalwear with its unique art of tailoring. Sharp cuts abound to create casual and relaxed looks: classic tailored suits, double-breasted tuxes in mohair, checked vests, and houndstooth ties rub shoulders with leather vests and military items like bombers and trench coats. Not to mention the line of essential accessories that pair with these sophisticated classics and showcase the Italian tailor’s expertise and taste for fine materials: briefcases in crocodile or supple calfskin, derbies in calfskin, and buttons in white gold. As for the color palette, it ranges from beige to brown, nuanced with lighter tones and also venturing into blues. As always, Brioni produces everything in its Italian studios, sustaining its rare expertise in tailoring through its school, La Scuola di Alta Sartoria in the town of Penne. As Italy’s only high school specializing in tailoring, the school teaches the Brioni method and all 220 steps in its manufacturing process. Its exceptional know-how has incited the Royal College of Art to partner with the establishment for the past six years. S.B


NOUVELLE BMW SÉRIE 4. MADE 4 PERFORMANCE.

NOUVELLE BMW SÉRIE 4 COUPÉ. Made 4 performance = 4 signifie performance. Consommations de la nouvelle BMW Série 4 Coupé en cycle mixte : 4 à 7,7 l/100 km. CO2 : 106 à 179 g/km selon la norme européenne NEDC. BMW France, S.A. au capital de 2 805 000 € - 722 000 965 RCS Versailles - 3 avenue Ampère, 78180 Montigny-le-Bretonneux.

Le plaisir de conduire


PROFILS

PORTS 1961 FALL

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The Essential For its Pre-Fall 2017 collection, Canadian brand Ports 1961 is celebrating the elegance of simplicity by updating its iconic piece: cotton skirts. Enough with endlessly chasing trends, it’s time to get back to basics. The new architectural silhouette adds a blend of comfort and modernity to the iconic multipurpose items designed by Natasa Cagalj, Creative Director of the brand’s women’s line since Winter 2015. Her talented hands have waved in an era of renewal for the fashion house, created in 1961 to fulfil the wish of a generous husband, Luke Tanabe: to create the perfect skirt his wife could wear all day long. That act sparked a new vision of fashion inspired by domestic and everyday objects endowed with an aura of cool. From her design studio in London – Clerkenwell to be exact – Natasa Cagalj has now set to work reinventing the classic spirit of Ports 1961. It’s a city she knows well. After graduating from Central Saint Martins in 1997, she honed her skills at studios across the British capital, notably during her time as head of design at Stella McCartney from 2005 to 2012. Prior to that experience, she also did a stint as Alber Elbaz’s right hand upon his arrival at Lanvin in 2001. S.B


NOUVELLES BMW SÉRIE 4. MADE 4 MORE.

NOUVELLES BMW SÉRIE 4 CABRIOLET, COUPÉ ET GRAN COUPÉ. Made 4 more = 4 signifie plus. Consommations de la nouvelle BMW Série 4 Gran Coupé en cycle mixte : 4 à 7,4 l/100 km. CO2 : 106 à 172 g/km selon la norme européenne NEDC. Consommations de la nouvelle BMW Série 4 Coupé en cycle mixte : 4 à 7,7 l/100 km. CO2 : 106 à 179 g/km selon la norme européenne NEDC. Consommations de la nouvelle BMW Série 4 Cabriolet en cycle mixte : 4,4 à 7,6 l/100 km. CO2 : 116 à 177 g/km selon la norme européenne NEDC. BMW France, S.A. au capital de 2 805 000 € - 722 000 965 RCS Versailles - 3 avenue Ampère, 78180 Montigny-le-Bretonneux.

Le plaisir de conduire


PROFILS

CHANEL PARIS COSMOPOLITE

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The Hotel Chanel chose the legendary Ritz Paris, a site intimately tied to its history, to present its 2016/17 Métiers d'Art collection. Under the title of “Paris Cosmopolite,” the collection unveiled an uber-sophisticated sense of Parisian chic in a beautiful tribute to the expertise of the Haute Couture house’s workshops. Immensely elegant and inspired by “the evening dresses that women used to wear to dine at the Ritz,” as Karl Lagerfeld puts it, the eminently Parisian collection features silhouettes with well-defined waists and extended shapes falling occasionally to calflength. Cream, white, navy, and black dominate, along with splashes of red and hints of sparkling gold. The feminine silhouettes also include precious embroideries like crystal jewels and rich floral motifs, or shoulders that open up like butterfly wings thanks to the delicate work of the feather workshop. Within this Café Society atmosphere, twenty celebrities and Chanel ambassadors delivered a fresh take on cosmopolitan Paris, including Lily-Rose Depp, Ellie Bamber, and Alice Dellal, as well as Cara Delevingne, Sistine Stallone, Georgia May Jagger, and others. SB


PROFILS

MA X MARA FALL

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The Fabric Inspired by a Nordic aesthetic, Max Mara’s winter collection presents a sleek and architectural wardrobe, tailored in the brand’s favorite fine materials. Cashmere, wool, alpaca, and suede hug the body to convey a sophisticated and comfortable elegance. The strict cuts and ultra-chic monochromes of high-waisted tailored pants and napped coats combine with the eminently Italian feminine touch of transparent tops and slit skirts to conjure up the perfect alchemy of materials, cuts, details, and drape of fabrics. Behind the apparent simplicity of this wardrobe lies the excellent craftsmanship of a fashion house with over fifty years of history. Isn’t it said that simplicity is the ultimate sophistication and the sign of perfection? S.B


PROFILS

CALVIN KLEIN JEANS

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The Jean Attitude One of the American brand’s most iconic pieces, the Calvin Klein jean has donned a vintage and modern spirit for Spring-Summer 2017, under the guidance of the house’s new chief creative officer, Raf Simons. As the brand gears up to toast its 50th anniversary next year, Calvin Klein is renewing its identity by crafting an exaggerated blend of contemporary trends: the new hybrid looks create urban and rebellious silhouettes notably inspired by skater culture. The centerpiece of the American brand’s wardrobe gets a new look with the Calvin Klein Sculpted Jean, reinvented based on the premium Italian jean fitted out with construction elements not ordinarily seen on this piece. This season, the athleisure trend embodied by the jean blends with the structured forms of khaki uniforms and deconstructed elements combined with graffiti motifs. A palette of light neutral colors gains intensity with striking vivid colors and metallic accents. At Calvin Klein, the sports vibe is taking on a new punk attitude! S.B


PROFILS

NAT TOFRANCO SUMMER

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The Post-Capitalism Style Based in Paris, Nattofranco was created by Franco-Japanese designer Noémie Aiko Sebayashi in 2015. Playing off of her dual nationality, the designer has managed to craft a new identity: the name of her brand combines the French prefix “franco” with “natto,” the name of a traditional Japanese dish. For her Spring-Summer 2017 capsule, she has designed a host of impressive looks that blend different techniques like embroidery, collage effects, and patches bearing variations on her effigy. Her unisex designs offer a unique interpretation of the Japanese concepts of otaku (“geek”) and aidoru (“pop idol”), which she ingeniously weaved into a spirit reminiscent of France in the 1990s. Her “anti-capitalist aesthetic,” as she calls it, conveys a streetwear vibe created with one intention: “wearing a unique piece for no one else but you.” For Noémie, the “conventional beauty” of her apparel goes against the aesthetic dictates of capitalism that her generation adopted with gusto. Nattofranco’s designs will soon be available at Barney’s: when anti-capitalism infiltrates the American market! S.K


PROFILS

MASHAMA FALL

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The Cyber Punk Young Chinese designer Mashama is already widely known in her home country, where her eponymous brand continues to open store after store. Graduating from Central Saint Martins before cutting her teeth with Alexander McQueen, she launched her own clothing line and joined the Paris Fashion Week official calendar in 2011. Since then, she has continued to show her collections in Paris. For her Fall-Winter 2017 collection, the Mashama woman is cutting a confident and defiant figure: she is declaring loud and proud both her modernity and her connection to feminine voices rising up around the world. Her emancipation is conveyed through her use of masculine uniforms, all precisely tailored in the fine English and Italian materials used in traditional costume, and whose codes she alters by playing with measurements: exaggerated shoulders contrast with extra short skirts, pants, and shorts. Outlandish details fly in the face of conformity: D-ring straps, harnesses transformed into belts, and other elements explore the history of subcultures so dear to the designer, whose inspiration comes from the London streets and their punk heritage, anarchist spirit, and rebellious youth. S.B


PROFILS

GUCCI PRE-FALL

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The Cabinet de Curiosités For the Pre-Fall 2017 collection, Gucci’s creative director Alessandro Michele revisits the unique and intimate concept of the Cabinet of Curiosities through his refined use of prints and embroideries of intricate elegance. Alessandro Michele revolutionized Gucci’s ready-to-wear lines with his juxtapositions of 70s-inspired motifs on styles reminiscent of a distinguished past, such as these dresses in an early-1900s style, as well as more modern items like bombers and hoodies. This artistic waltz between a spirit of bygone times and more avant-garde forms conjures up an aesthetic of subtlety, as though each look embodied a different imaginary character… S.K


PROFILS

FORTE FORTE SUMMER

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The Raw Beauty “Raw beauty” is the new manifesto of Forte Forte for its Spring-Summer 2017 collection. Building on its taste for fine materials, the family-owned Italian brand celebrates an authentic and Bohemian silhouette manufactured according to all the rules of the region’s traditional craftsmanship. The collection invites us to admire the regenerative power of nature as expressed through the careful working of delicate and transparent fabrics, such as linens or layered and evanescent veils. Its color palette takes the communion with nature even further, offering whiffs of tobacco, vanilla, cinnamon, warm colors like powder pink or ancient coral, and clear water tones. Immersed in the intimate universe of Forte Forte, each piece pursues a quest for mystical beauty. Rounding out the collection are silhouettes in warm colors of sacred stones, with blue and indigo nuances recalling exotic seas or the light green of aloe. Discover a simple yet noble kind of beauty in all its splendor! S.B


PROFILS

ISSEY MIYAKE PRE-FALL

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The Lines At Issey Miyake, designer Yoshiyuki Miyamae has designed a Pre-Fall collection tailored with functional and occasionally convertible cuts on garments that hang beautifully on the body. To achieve a light and textured silhouette, the fashion house produced geometric effects on silk with its 3D technique “Steam Stretch and Baked Stretch,” which uses steam in place of a craftsman’s handiwork. The technological prowess of these textured effects combines with a careful use of color, featuring gradations of colored stripes in rich tones. The house achieved these colors using Japanese artisanal dyeing techniques of shibori and itajime. The resulting palette of vivid colors recalls natural phenomena like lightning, rainbows, and aurora borealis: the inspiration for a timeless collection imbued with futuristic accents. S.B


PROFILS

ATLEIN SUMMER

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The Jersey Atlein’s head designer Antonin Tron has earned wide acclaim for his trademark mastery of jersey tailoring: in fact, he has devoted his career entirely to exploring this material and its variants. That self-imposed artistic constraint has operated as a marvelous creative engine, spotlighting the talent of the young French designer who is now one of the eight finalists for the 2017 LVMH Prize, after already winning the prestigious ANDAM First Collection Prize in 2016. Made entirely in France, his second collection for Spring-Summer 2017 reveals a fluid tailoring style in bright solid colors. At the same time, his feminine silhouettes still exude the designer’s signature sportswear vibe. A graduate of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Belgium, Antonin Tron got his start working for several major brands, such as Givenchy, Louis Vuitton, Balenciaga, and Alexander Wang. S.B


PROFILS

WANDA NYLON SUMMER

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The Graduate Wanda Nylon’s Spring-Summer 2017 collection continues her underground reinterpretation of an aesthetic that is equal parts sixties and sportswear. Her basics make a striking impression with graphic contrast stitching, translucent plastic materials, or a good girl vibe overlaid with a total electric look as in this suede effect model in fuchsia. Flaunting a bold style that playfully mocks the conformist spirit, each piece in the summer collection exudes an aura of reinvention and recreation. The fierce identity of her fashions earned designer Johanna Senyk last year’s ANDAM Prize. She first developed her skills with Anthony Vaccarello, J.W. Anderson, and the Olsen twins, before launching her own brand devoted to rain gear in 2012 and designing the trench coats that would become the iconic pieces of Wanda Nylon. S.B


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THE WOMENSWEAR FALL – WINTER 2017

PARIS ACNE 01 LAURIE ANDERSON / BRIGHT RED 02 RIVAL CONSOLES / LOOMING 03 NOVELLER / INTO THE DUNES AKRIS BOLIS PUPUL / SUN THEME

THE SOUND OF FASHION

CELINE CRÉATION ORIGINALE DE PHILIPPE PARRENO, COMMISSIONNÉ PAS PHOEBE PHILO POUR LA CRÉATION DU SET. CHANEL 01 KRAFTWERK / RADIOACTIVITY (2009 REMASTER) 02 HONEYMOON KILLERS / ARIANE 03 KRAFTWERK / AIRWAVES 04 BRIGITTE BARDOT / CONTACT 05 PIZZICATO FIVE / CONTACT FRANCAIS 06 DAFT PUNK / CONTACT (FEAT. DJ FALCON) 07 KRAFTWERK /OHM SWEET OHM 08 ELTON JOHN/ ROCKET MAN (I THINK IT'S GOING TO BE A LONG LONG TIME) CHLOE 01 THE HUMAN LEAGUE / LOVE ACTION (I BELIEVE IN LOVE) 02 THE HUMAN LEAGUE / THE THINGS THAT DREAMS ARE MADE OF 03 THE HUMAN LEAGUE / (KEEP FEELING) FASCINATION EXTENDED VERSION 04 THE HUMAN LEAGUE / DON'T YOU WANT CHRISTIAN DIOR 01 JOE JACKSON / BREAKDOWN 02 MOBY / GO (WOODTICK MIX) 03 MOBY / GO (REX THE DOG REMIX) 04 AIR / OCTOGUM 05 MOBY / GO (WOODTICK MIX) 06 MOBY / GO (REX THE DOG REMIX) 07 JOE JACKSON / BREAKDOWN 08 COMBINACION LATINA / BLUE MOON (ELVIS PRESLEY COVER) COMME DES GARCONS 01 BIOSPHERE / L'INCORONAZIONE DI POPPEA / QUAL LINEA AL CENTRO 02 JOSHUA SABIN / TERMINUS DRIFT / ARRAY 03 BIOSPHERE / L'INCORONAZIONE DI POPPEA / ALLA DILETTA MIA 04 DNGLS / LUKARNE / HILLDALE 05 JOSHUA SABIN / TERMINUS DRIFT / EKI 06 BIOSPHERE / L'INCORONAZIONE DI POPPEA / TRASFORMATI 07 BIOSPHERE / L'INCORONAZIONE DI POPPEA / MUTATA 08 JOSHUA SABIN / TERMINUS DRIFT / VIVO WISH 09 BIOSPHERE / L'INCORONAZIONE DI POPPEA / RIMANTI IN PACE 10 BIOSPHERE / L'INCORONAZIONE DI POPPEA / ALLA DILETTA MIA 11 BIOSPHERE / L'INCORONAZIONE DI POPPEA / ADAGIATI 12 BIOSPHERE / L'INCORONAZIONE DI POPPEA / ADDIO 13 BIOSPHERE / L'INCORONAZIONE DI POPPEA / TENTATI 14 DNGLS / LUKARNE / CUBE ( ALL MIXED BY FREDERIC SANCHEZ )

ELIE SAAB 01 THUNDERCAT / DRUNK (ALBUM) 02 MAX RICHTER /TRANSFORMATION 03 TROPIC OF CANCER / I WOKE UP AND THE STORM WAS OVER 04 GOLDFRAPP / ANYMORE (JOE GODDARD REMIX EDIT) 05 LESLEY BARBER / MANCHESTER MINIMALIST PIANO AND STRINGS (VARIATION) 06 CIGARETTES AFTER SEX AFFECTION 07 JOHN TALABOT - VOICES’ HERMES 01 MAX RICHTER / SHADOW JOURNAL 02 PANTHA DU PRINCE / SACH MAL BAUM 03 GLASSER / TREMEL / JAMIE XX REMIX 04 DANIEL PEMBERTON / THE NATURE OF PEOPLE ISSEY MYIAKE 01 LIVE MUSIC / RADIO WAVES / BY EI WADA JUNYA WATANABE 01 20TH CENTURY BOY / T.REX 02 CHILDREN OF THE REVOLUTION /T.REX 03 IMMIGRANT SONG / KAREN O & TRENT REZNOR & ATTICUS ROSS 04 TELEGRAM SAM / T.REX 05 METAL GURU / T.REX KENZO RIDDIM MACHINE / AN EXCLUSIVE MIX BY SLY & ROBBIE 01 MUDBONE COOPER + BAM BAM RIDDIM / BAM MACHINE 02 GWEN GUTHRIE / PADLOCK (LARRY LEVAN MIX) 03 IAN DURY / SPASTICUS, ARTISTICUS (VERSION) 04 GREGORY ISAACS / POOR MAN IN LOVE 05 GRACE JONES / WALKING IN THE RAIN 06 SUGAR MINOTT / HERBMAN HUSTLING 07 SLY & ROBBIE / BOOPS 08 GRACE JONES / FEEL UP LANVIN 01 BERTRAND BELIN / WHERE ARE WE NOW (BOWIE) 02 MICHEL POLNAREFF / LOVE ME PLEASE LOVE ME / LOVE ME PLEASE LOVE ME 03 ALAIN BASHUNG / MADAME RÊVE / MADAME RÊVE 04 MICHEL BERGER / TOUT FEU TOUT FLAMME (B.O) / DÉCOUVERTE DU CASINO PAR PAULINE 05 NANA MOUSKOURI / AU COEUR DE SEPTEMBRE / AU COEUR DE SEPTEMBRE LEMAIRE 01 LENA WILLIKENS / ASPHALT KOBOLD 02 HELENA HAUFF / TRIPARTITE ACT LEONARD 01 GOLDEN BUG & JULIENNE DESSAGNE / ACCROCHE A MOI (FEAT. JULIENNE DESSAGNE) 02 WEVAL / ONE 03 LITTLE DRAGON / MY STEP 04 CLOUDLAND CANYON / TRY FAKING IT 05 LANDSIDE / STILL THERE 06 DAVID AUGUST / JBY 07 FREUDENTHAL / ALEARCADIAN 08 AURORA / RUNNING WITH THE WOLVES (PABLO NOUVELLE REMIX) 09 COMA & DILLON / THE WIND

LOEWE 01 RICH HEBERT, PAUL BOGAEV & ORCHESTRA / CAR CHASE (A SONG BY ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER IN MUSICAL / SUNSET BOULEVARD ) 02 DEDEKIND CUT / INSTINCT 03 TIBETAN SINGING BOWLS / TRANQUILITY 04 AIRHEAD / KAZZT (MUMDANCE REMIX) 05 JEAN-CLAUDE VANNIER / L'ENFANT LA MOUCHE ET LES ALLUMETTES 06 CHARLES GERHARDT : NATIONAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA / A PLACE IN THE SUN (IN SUNSET BOULEVARD SOUNDTRACK) 07 SYSTEME / SYSTEME 08 KORELESS / RINGO 09 MICHAEL NYMAN / FISH BEACH (IN MAN ON WIRE SOUNDTRACK) 10 LINDA SCOTT / I'VE TOLD EVERY LITTLE STAR MIU MIU 01 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / INTRO 02 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / THE MAGIC NUMBER 03 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / CHANGE IN SPEAK 04 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / COOL BREEZE ON THE ROCKS 05 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / JENNIFA TAUGHT ME (DERWIN'S REVENGE) 06 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / GHETTO THANG 07 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / TRANSMITTING LIVE FROM MARS 08 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / EYE KNOW 09 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / TAKE IT OFF 10 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / A LITTLE BIT OF SOAP 11 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / TREAD WATER 12 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / SAY NO GO 13 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / DO AS DE LA DOES 14 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / PLUG TUNIN (LAST CHANCE TO COMPREHEND) 15 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / DE LA ORGEE 16 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / BUDDY 17 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / ME LYSELF AND I 18 DE LA SOUL / 3 FEET HIGH AND RISING / THIS IS A RECORDING 4 LIVING IN A FULLTIME ERA (LABEL : TOMMY BOY) MONCLER GAMME ROUGE 01 ED SHEERAN / SHAPE OF YOU / SHAPE OF YOU 02 GUSTAVO SANTAOLALLA / BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN OST / OPENING 03 ELMER BERNSTEIN / FAR FROM HEAVEN OST / AUTUMN IN CONNECTICUT 04 GUSTAVO SANTAOLALLA / BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN OST / THE WINGS 05 AMIINA / FANTÔMAS / BOURREAU SILENCIEUX 06 HANS ZIMMER / PLANET EARTH II OST / CHINSTRAP PENGUIN

MUGLER 01 BAMBOUNOU / CHALLENGER 02 CARDINI & SHAW / IN THE BALLROOM 03 GEORGE MICHAEL / I WANT YOUR SEX 04 JONATHAN KUSUMA / METRO MINI 05 SHADOW WORK & LOUISAHHH!!! 06 GEORGE MICHAEL / TOO FUNKY PAUL SMITH 01 THE BEAT GOES ON / THE PRETTY THINGS 02 LA LA LOVE YOU / THE PIXIES 03 DUST / PARQUET QUARTS 04 WORKING IN A COALMINE / DEVO 05 CHELSEA / SELFISH C**T 06 THERE'S A GHOST IN MY HOUSE / R. DEAN TAYLOR LOUIS VUITTON 01 KENJI KAWAI / MAKING OF CYBORG (IN GHOST IN THE SHELL SOUNDTRACK) 02 FRANK OCEAN / PYRAMIDS 03 KENJI KAWAI / MAKING OF CYBORG (IN GHOST IN THE SHELL SOUNDTRACK) OLIVIER THEYSKENS 01 ANNE CLARK / NOTHING AT ALL 02 ERIC SERRA / NPOKMOP (IN LA FEMME NIKITA SOUNDTRACK) 03 ANNE CLARK / OUR DARKNESS ROCHAS 01 PETER BRODERICK / VIOLIN SOLO, NO. 1 02 ABEL KORZENIOWSKI / W.E. OST / I WILL FOLLOW YOU 03 MICHAEL NYMAN - PROSPERO'S BOOKS OST / PROSPERO'S MAGIC 04 PETER BRODERICK / VIOLIN SOLO, NO. 1 05 ABEL KORZENIOWSKI / I WILL FOLLOW YOU 06 MICHAEL NYMAN / PROSPERO'S MAGIC ROLAND MOURET 01 SHIRLEY BASSEY / THE LOOK OF LOVE 02 LOÏS LANE / THE LOOK OF LOVE 03 JACINTHA / THE LOOK OF LOVE 04 DIANA KRALL / THE LOOK OF LOVE 05 SASKIA / THE LOOK OF LOVE 06 NINA SIMONE / THE LOOK OF LOVE 07 LIZA MINNELLI / THE LOOK OF LOVE 08 SHELBY LYNNE / THE LOOK OF LOVE 09 GLADYS KNIGHT & THE PIPS / THE LOOK OF LOVE 10 DIANA ROSS / THE LOOK OF LOVE 11 DUSTY SPRINGFIELD / THE LOOK OF LOVE 12 MIREILLE MATHIEU / LES YEUX D'AMOUR 13 LEONARD COHEN / I'M YOUR MAN SACAI 01 THE BEATLES / A DAY IN THE LIFE 02 OH NO / KEEP MOVIN' 03 OH NO / KM2 04 OH NO / ELECTRIC PHENOMA 05 OH NO / YOU GOTTA BRING 06 THE BEATLES / A DAY IN THE LIFE 07 OH NO / KEEP MOVIN’ SAINT LAURENT SPECIAL CREATION BY SEBASTIAN VALENTINO 01 DUSTIN O’ HALLORAN & HAUSCHKA / LION THEME (IN LION SOUNDTRACK) 02 DUSTIN O’ HALLORAN & HAUSCHKA / SEARCHING FOR (IN LION SOUNDTRACK) 03 NICHOLAS BRITELL / THE MIDDLE OF THE WORLD (IN MOONLIGHT SOUNDTRACK)


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MILAN BOTTEGA VENETA 01 PRINCE & INGRID CHAVEZ / EYE NO 02 INGRID CHAVEZ / HIPPY BLOOD 03 INGRID CHAVEZ / HEAVEN MUST BE NEAR 04 NILS FRAHM / FOUR HANDS 05 INGRID CHAVEZ / ELEPHANT BOX 06 INGRID CHAVEZ / WHISPERING DANDELIONS 07 INGRID CHAVEZ / SAD PUPPET DANCE 08 INGRID CHAVEZ / LITTLE MAMA 09 FIRST RENDEVOUS / YANN TIERSON DIESEL BLACK GOLD 01 NOT WAVING / BELIEVE 02 MAX RICHTER / PATH 5 (MOGWAI REMIX) EMPORIO ARMANI 01 ROBBIE WILLIAMS & JANE HORROCKS / THINGS 02 ARETHA FRANKLIN & GEORGE MICHAEL / I KNEW YOU WERE WAITING FOR ME 03 LOREDANA BERTÈ / IN ALTO MARE (FEAT. RENATO ZERO) 04 ELTON JOHN & KIKI DEE / DON’T GO BREAKING MY HEART 05 MINACELENTANO / A UN PASSO DA TE 06 EROS RAMAZZOTTI & TINA TURNER / COSE DELLA VITA (CAN’T STOP THINKING OF YOU) 07 LA CRUS / PENSIERO STUPENDO 08 MARY J.BLIGE / ONE (FEAT. U2) 09 MINA / STAY WITH ME EMILIO PUCCI 01 GREEN 02 FLESH 03 BLACK 04 MAROON 05 YELLO 06 BLUE 07 ROSEY 08 CRIMSON 09 WHITE ALL BY KEN NORDINE FENDI 01 ENNIO MORRICONE / INVENZIONE PER JOHN / ORIGINALE (IN GIÙ LA TESTA) 02 ENNIO MORRICONE / RITRATTO D'AUTORE (IN LA DONNA INVISIBLE) 03 ENNIO MORRICONE / NINNA NANNA PER ADULTI (IN CUORE DI MAMMA) 04 ENNIO MORRICONE / LA LUCERTOLA (IN UNA LUCERTOLA CON LA PELLE DI DONNA) 05 PINO DONAGGIO & ORCHESTRA SINFONICA DI MILANO / BODY DOUBLE (EXCERPT FROM BODY DOUBLE) GIORGIO ARMANI 01 AGNES OBEL / THE CURSE 02 HIATUS / PARKLANDS (FEAT. KIRTANAYAS) 03 AZAM ALI / ENDLESS REVERIE 04 RECONDITE / LEVO 05 HIATUS / EMPRESS (FEAT. HAYEDEH) 06 TRENTEMOLLER / MOAN (TRENTEMOLLER REMIX RADIO EDIT) 07 RONE / PARADE (DOMINIK EULBERG REMIX) 08 FELKON / LOVESONG 09 DAVID AUGUST / EPIKUR 10 HAUSCHKA / RADAR (MICHAEL MAYER REMIX) GUCCI 01 MUSICAL DIRECTION BY STEVE MACKEY 02 FRANCIS ZGORSKI / RISE

03 HENRIK SKRAM / JOHAN’S THEME AND VARIATIONS IV 04 CLIFF MARTINEZ / REPAIR 05 HENRIK SKRAM / THE WAIT 06 ABEL KORZIENOVSKI / MOTHERS 07 CLIFF MARTINEZ / IN THE PINK 08 ZIMMER / CORNFIELD CHASE 09 JOHANN JOHANNSSON / THE ROCKET BUILDER (IO PAN !) MARNI 01 3 JOHN CAGE, JAN STEEL, ROBERT WYATT / EXPERIENCES N°2 02 ERYKAH BADU / ON & ON 03 ROBERT WYATT / SHIPBUILDING ROUND 04 ROBERT WYATT MIDNIGHT ROUND MIDNIGHT MAX MARA 01 CONCERTO GROSSO IN D MINOR, OP. 3, NO. 11, RV 565_ I. ALLEGRO - II. ADAGIO E SPICCATO - ALLEGRO - ADAGIO 02 CONCERTO KOLN, WERNER ERHARD, WERNER MATZKE & ANDREA KELLER 03 VIVALDI / A.: VIOLIN CONCERTOS, RV 180, 242, 253, 362, 552 CONCERTO GROSSO, RV 565 04 CONCERTO IN B MINOR FOR 4 GUITARS & CELLO RV 580 (L'ESTRO ARMONICO NO. 10)_ I. ALLEGRO 05 ACADEMY OF ST. MARTIN IN THE FIELDS, IONA BROWN & LOS ROMEROS 06 VIVALDI / GUITAR CONCERTOS 07 CONCERTO IN B MINOR FOR 4 GUITARS & CELLO RV 580 (L'ESTRO ARMONICO NO. 10)_ III. ALLEGRO 08 VIVALDI / GUITAR CONCERTOS 09 ACADEMY OF ST. MARTIN IN THE FIELDS, IONA BROWN & LOS ROMEROS 10 LUFTSPEILING BY PRINS THOMAS KAPTEINS 11 SKJEGG BY BJORN TORSKE MOSCHINO 01 VISAGE / FADE TO GREY 02 THE FLYING LIZARDS / MONEY (THAT'S WHAT I WANT) 03 NICOLAI GEDDA/ORCHESTRA DEL TEATRO DELL'OPERA, ROMA/FRANCESCO MOLINARI PRADELLI / GIUSEPPE VERDI : RIGOLETTO / LA DONNA È MOBILE 04 GEORGE MICHAEL / TOO FUNKY 05 VISAGE / FADE TO GREY N21 DONNA 01 PERRY COMO / THE ROSE TATTOO 02 TRENTEMOLLER / BLUE HOTEL 03 CHRIS ISAAK / BLUE HOTEL 04 TALK TALK / IT'S MY LIFE 06 PAT BENATAR / LOVE IS A BATTLEFIELD PHILOSOPHY 01 ANGELO BADALAMENTI & KINNY LANDRUM / COOL CAT WALK (IN WILD AT HEART SOUNDTRACK) 02 DIALOGS : ELIZABETH TAYLOR IN “CAT HOT ON A HOT TIN ROOF” 03 THE CURE / THE LOVECATS 04 JOHN BARRY / LONDON AT DAWN (INCLUDING WESTMINSTER BRIDGE BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH) 05 JOE JACKSON / STEPPIN’ OUT 06 MARI WILSON / JUST WHAT I ALWAYS WANTED 07 THE CURE / THE LOVECATS 08 THE CURE / BOYS DON’T CRY PRADA 01 MANSFIELD TYA / CORPO INFERNO / LA NUIT TOMBE 02 LADY GAGA / BAD ROMANCE / BAD ROMANCE 03 MAX BERLIN / ELLE ET MOI / ELLE ET MOI

04 CARDOPUSHER / MANIPULATOR / EXCEPTION 05 JUSTICE / WOMAN / HEAVY METAL 06 WENDY CARLOS / CLOCKWORK ORANGE / NINTH SYMPHONY : SECOND MOVEMENT (SCHERZO) 07 GAVIN RUSSOM / MANTLE OF STARS / MANTLE OF STARS 08 LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, BEETHOVEN / CLASSICAL MUSIC FROM INGMAR BERGMAN PLAYS / SYMPHONY NO.5 IN C MINOR 09 ABBA / DEFINITVE COLLECTION / GIMME GIMME GIMME (A MAN AFTER MIDNIGHT) 10 GESAFFELSTEIN / CONSPIRACY PART II / VIOL 11 MISSY ELLIOT / THE RAIN (SUPA DUPA FLY) / THE RAIN (SUPA DUPA FLY) 12 MIKE OLDFIELD / TUBULAR BELLS / TUBULAR BELLS PART 1 13 BETTY DAVIS / ANTI LOVE SONG 4AM REMIX SPORTMAX MUSIC BY MIMI XU VERSACE MIX & ADDITIONAL PRODUCTION BY SIMON HALSBERGHE FOR MOIRÉ PRODUCTIONS 01 SHXCXCHCXSH / SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS 02 PEDER MANNERFELT / EQUALITY NOW 03 DEMDIKE STARE / HARDNOISE 04 UNDERSPRECHE INVITO ALLA DANZA / MI LUZ ES DISTINA (FEAT. SANDRA RESTREPO) 05 (PARADE) PEDER MANNERFELT / EQUALITY NOW

LONDON BURBERRY 01 ANNA CALVI / WHIP THE NIGHT 02 ANNA CALVI / NATHANIEL 03 ANNA CALVI / IT 04 ANNA CALVI / ELIZA 05 ANNA CALVI / DESIRE CHALAYAN 01 KATE BUSH / MISTY 02 TORI AMOS / WEDDING DAY DAVID KOMA 01 BLINDNOTE / CHIRAKI PAR 02 DIE WILDE JAGD / WAH WAH WALLENS 03 DANIEL AVERY,HEADMAN / BE LOVED 04 WEHBBA / ASCENT 05 SHACKLETON AND APPLEBLIM / TORN 06 JLIN / NANDI JW ANDERSON 01 PRIMAL SCREAM & KATE MOSS / SOME VELVET MORNING (FEAT. KATE MOSS) 02 MALARIA! / THRASH ME 03 FUTURE ISLANDS / CLOSE TO NONE SHARON WAUCHOB 01 SOHN / HARD LIQUOR 02 40 WINKS / WORLD WILL FIND OU VIVIENNE WESTWOOD 01 GRANDBROTHERS / EZRA WAS RIGHT 02 MELT YOURSELF DOWN / MOUTH TO MOUTH 03 GERSHWIN / RHAPSODY IN BLUE 04 JENNY HVAL / IN THE RED 05 CHINESE MAN / STEP BACK 06 WEBER / LE FREISCHUTZ NO.3 VALSE

07 FRYDMAN HEKIMIAN / TOUAREG 08 NILS BECH / WAITING 09 FLAKO / BLACK DANCE 10 PAULOR / LA RACE 11 RAMEAU / ORAGE

NEW YORK CALVIN KLEIN 01 SOPHIA ANNE CARUSO & ORIGINAL NEW YORK CAST OF LAZARUS / THIS IS NOT AMERICA 02 ROY ORBISON / IN DREAMS 03 BENJAMIN WALLFISCH / I WANNA BE SEDATED (FEAT MIREL WAGNER) A CURE FOR WELLNESS SOUNDTRACK 04 JOHN BARRY / THE MIDNIGHT COWBOY THEME (THE MIDNIGHT COWBOY SOUNDTRACK) 05 THE FLAMINGOS / I ONLY HAVE EYES FOR YOU 06 THE FIELD / FROM HERE WE GO SUBLIME 07 THE STYLISTICS / PEOPLE MAKE THE WORLD GO ROUND 08 AIR / SUICIDE UNDERGROUND (THE VIRGIN SUICIDES SOUNDTRACK) 09 SOPHIA ANNE CARUSO & ORIGINAL NEW YORK CAST OF LAZARUS / THIS IS NOT AMERICA COACH 01 SMASHING PUMPKINS /1979 JEREMY SCOTT 01 NMESH - ΞΛT THΞ ΞGGS ЭЭЭ 02 NICE AS FUCK / RUNAWAY 03 GRAM PARSONS / OOH LAS VEGAS 04 NMESH / FLΛSHBΛXXX UNLIMITΞD™ 05 EURYTHMICS / I NEED A MAN 06 NMESH / THIS IS DRUGS 07 ELVIS PRESLEY / SUSPICIOUS MINDS 08 MARILYN MANSON / PERSONAL JESUS JOSEPH ALTUZARRA 01 NICHOLAS BRITELL / THE MIDDLE OF THE WORLD (IN MOONLIGHT SOUNDTRACK) 02 NOT WAVING / HEAD BODY 03 NICHOLAS BRITELL / END CREDITS SUITE (IN MOONLIGHT SOUNDTRACK) 04 NOT WAVING / 24 05 NICHOLAS BRITELL / THE SPOT (IN MOONLIGHT SOUNDTRACK) LACOSTE 01 DAMIAN LAZARUS & THE ANCIENT MOONS / LOVERS' EYES (MOHE PI KI NAJARIYA) (DIXON REEDIT) 02 FRANK OCEAN / WHITE FERRARI (JG EDIT) 03 CLAUDJA BARRY / LOVE FOR THE SAKE OF LOVE 04 CHARLIE / SPACER WOMAN MONCLER GRENOBLE 01 MFSB FT. THE THREE DEGREES / LOVE IS THE MESSAGE (A TOM MOULTON MIX) PROENZA SCHOULER 01 SONIC YOUTH / THE BURNING SPEAR 02 SONIC YOUTH / LITTLE TROUBLE GIRL 03 IMPLOG / HOLLAND TUNNEL DRIVE 04 SONIC YOUTH / THE BURNING SPEAR TORY BURCH 01 I DARE YOU / THE XX 02 LIPS / THE XX 03 I DARE YOU / THE XX


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THE RETROSPECTIVE REI KAWAKUBO / COMME DES GARÇONS AT THE MET

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The experimental and anti-conformist world of designer Rei Kawakubo and her brand Comme des Garçons will feature in the Spring 2017 exhibition of the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The exceptional event celebrates the daring and avant-garde work of a designer who has spent over forty years exploring the concept of in-betweenness and revolutionizing conventional standards of beauty, good taste, and what it means to be “in fashion.” Through models designed as sculptures, Kawakubo’s fashion invites us to think differently about clothing, declares Thomas P. Campbell, former Director of the Met. Featuring 140 pieces, the vast exhibition aims to rethink the place of fashion in contemporary culture, according to the exhibition’s curator, Andrew Bolton. Devoted to a strong personality with a unique longevity in the fashion landscape, the exhibition is a must for fashion and art lovers alike.

“Rei Kawakubo/Comme des Garçons,” May 4 to September 4, 2017, Metropolitan Museum of Art. http://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2017/rei-kawakubo TEXT: STÉPHANIE BUI


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Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969); Courtesy of Comme des Garçons. Photograph by © Paolo Roversi; Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969). Ceremony of Separation, autumn/winter 2015–2016. Photograph by © Paolo Roversi; Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969), 18th Century Punk, autumn/winter 2016–17; Courtesy of Comme des Garçons. Photograph by © Paolo Roversi; Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969), Cubisme, spring/summer 2007; Courtesy of Comme des Garçons. Photograph by © Craig McDean; Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969). Blue Witch, spring/summer 2016. Photograph by © Paolo Roversi; Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969). Not Making Clothing, spring/summer 2014. Photograph by © Paolo Roversi; Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Arts

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Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969), Blood and Roses, spring/summer 2015; Courtesy of Comme des Garçons. Photograph by © Paolo Roversi; Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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Rei Kawakubo (Japanese, born 1942) for Comme des Garçons (Japanese, founded 1969), Body Meets Dress–Dress Meets Body, spring/summer 1997; Courtesy of Comme des Garçons.Photograph by © Paolo Roversi; Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

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THE COLLECTION BOUCHERON LAUNCHES ITS FRAGRANCE LINE

Boucheron has launched a line of six luxury fragrances, each one inspired by fine materials reinvented by the top noses working in perfumery today. The collection unfolds over a series of destinations echoing the numerous voyages throughout the Boucheron dynasty. It evokes a spirit of exploration across the countries of the Orient.

Tubéreuse de Madras, crafted by nose Christophe Reynaud, delivers an olfactory experience that captures

the spirit of the legendary city of India, with all its intoxicating charm and velvety, creamy, and bright facets. Famous nose Dominique Ropion concocted Oud de Carthage. Carthage, a trade city and interchange for all of Antiquity’s most precious materials, receives an aromatic ode through resinous and gustatory notes rising over a woody base. The city of Alexandria, known throughout the ancient world for its arts and culture, is revisited here in a harmonious blend of ingredients like spice and resin prepared by nose Jean-Christophe Hérault in Ambre d’Alexandrie, a ballad to Amber, one of the most coveted materials among jewelers. Nathalie Lorson developed two fragrances: Iris de Syracuse, a tribute to perfumery’s blue gold and its majestic reflections of Amethyst, as well as Vanille de Zanzibar, an aromatic and gustatory explosion glimmering with Citrine, a gemstone that sparkles with the rays of the sun. Néroli d’Ispahan, blended by Fabrice Pellegrin, exudes an intense fragrance bathed in the essence of Néroli. Each fragrance is bottled in a glass column, topped with a gilded metal collar inspired by Boucheron’s iconic double godron ring. Reflecting the precious gemstones that inspired them, the transparent glass allows the striking color of each elixir to shine forth.

Boucheron, Tubéreuse de Madras, 125 ml Eau de Parfum Spray - Boucheron, Oud de Carthage, 125 ml Eau de Parfum Spray - Boucheron, Ambre d’Alexandrie, 125 ml Eau de Parfum Spray - Boucheron, Iris de Syracuse, 125 ml Eau de Parfum Spray - Boucheron, Vanille de Zanzibar, 125 ml Eau de Parfum Spray - Boucheron, Néroli d’Ispahan, 125 ml Eau de Parfum Spray

TEXT: SARAH KONTE - PHOTO: HENRIKE STAHL


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THE SINGER BERTRAND BURGALAT: THE GENTLEMAN RETURNS TO POP

“Un jour nous prendrons, des trains qui partent, nos wagons quittant le sol, rejetterons une poussière, rose et puis éternelle, parfaitement acide…” [“One day we will take, trains that depart, our cars leaving the ground, kicking up dust, pink and then eternal, perfectly acidic…”] Like the winds of the Zephyr, that is how the gentleman of pop with the initials B.B. invites us to embark on a new voyage whose secret is known only to him. Ethereal, tinged with a seventies vibe, sensual, and cultivating an old-school and dainty elegance, Burgalat delivers a mix of nineteen songs and instrumental tracks. What seems like an album of maturity offers a stunning take on the chanson and a plethora of images, as in the title: “L’enfant sur la banquette arrière” [“The Child on the Back Seat”]. He declares: “Je suis l’écureuil du Grand Canyon / Le cercueil sur son tapis roulant / Qui avance en chansons / Vers le crematorium” [“I am the squirrel of the Grand Canyon / The coffin on the conveyor belt / Advancing with each song / Towards the crematorium”]. This uncompromising portrait of the artist stands as a playful blend of levity and solemnity in its emotional interpretation on the brevity of life… This is a meditative album, presented as an intimate collection of old photos, Polaroids, and Super-8 clips, “Les choses qu’on ne peut dire à personne” [“The Things We Cannot Tell Anyone”] also plays on silence, regret, and memory. Thus the moving homage to his idol, entitled “Tombeau pour David Bowie” [“A Tomb for David Bowie”] and offering a dark wave of synth that echoes the cold and solemn beauty of Bowie and Eno on “Low” and “Heroes”… “A sort of cosmic sarcophagus for Bowie,” explains the musician. Bertrand Burgalat’s melancholic turns also veer into insolence and humor, as in the ironic funk of “Ultradevotion”… After the voyage is over, all we want is to get back on the train to these celestial destinations. Bertrand Burgalat, “Les Choses Qu’on ne peut dire à personne,” Tricatel. Released on May 19. www.tricatel.com

TEXT: YAN CEH - PHOTO: ALEX BRUNET


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THE APPROPRIATION « MASTERS » BY LOUIS VUITTON AND JEFF KOONS

Louis Vuitton is releasing a new collection of bags and accessories produced in collaboration with Jeff Koons. After an initial line of items inspired by paintings in the Gazing Ball series, Jeff Koons is now appropriating timeless classics including masterpieces by Van Gogh, Fragonard, Da Vinci, Rubens, and Titian. This time the paintings are reproduced on Louis Vuitton’s iconic bags like the Speedy, Keepall, and Neverfull. Inside each bag is a short bio and portrait of the artist who painted the original masterpiece. Each work is faithfully reproduced on its new canvas to create the perfect illusion, transforming the pictorial masterpiece into an integral part of a new 3D work: the bag itself. The collaboration recalls Walter Benjamin’s groundbreaking text, “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction.” But after ready-mades and appropriationism, now it is the world of luxury, classic art from the Louvre, and the pop sensibility of Jeff Koons that collide to form an endlessly paradoxical mise en abyme…

TEXT: ARMELLE LETURCQ - PHOTO AND SCULPTURE PIECES BY JAMES MOUNTFORD


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THE DIALOGUE ETORRE SOTTSASS AND CHARLES ZANA IN VENICE

On the occasion of the 57th Venice Biennale and Ettore Sottsass’s centennial, French architect and decorator Charles Zana has collected more than sixty ceramics made by the Italian designer. Called Dialogo, the exhibition is taking place in the former Olivetti store on Piazza San Marco in Venice. The space was originally designed by famous architect Carlo Scarpa in 1956 on the request of Adriano Olivetti, who wanted to turn his store into something of a small museum to present his famous typewriters. Carlo Scarpa and Ettore Sottsass both spent time with Olivetti, serving respective terms as art directors of the brand. As an emblematic figure of postmodern design and the founder of the Memphis Group, Sottsass often simplified the forms used in his pieces to generate an emotional response with only minimal resources. Finding ideas in his encounters with various cultures during his many travels, Sottsass created forms inspired by his daily life. In India, the designer grasped the essence of color, while he discovered pop art in San Francisco and came to understand the deleterious effects of consumerism. That realization would point him towards a more spiritual and mystical form of artistic creation for the rest of his career. As Charles Zana tells, during a long hospital stay in 1962, Sottsass underwent a treatment requiring him to take several different medications. Every night he would enter a twilight sleep full of visions and deliria. From this emerged his idea to produce large ceramics composed of stacked medicines. These emblematic Totems represent the link between earth and sky, while symbolizing the spiritual edification sought by Sottsass. After closing the Olivetti store in 1997, the Generali group acquired the space and decided to preserve its original aspect. Renovations in 2011 transformed the site into a museum now managed by FAI.

TEXT: SARAH KONTÉ -PHOTO: MAT THIEU SALVAING


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THE PHOTOGRAPHER ED VAN DER ELSKEN RETROSPECTIVE – CAMERA IN LOVE

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Ed van der Elsken, Jean-Michel Mension (Pierre) et Auguste Hommel (Benny), Paris, 1953. Nederlands Fotomuseum Rotterdam © Ed van der Elsken / Ed van der Elsken Estate

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Ed van der Elsken, Jumelles sur la place Nieuwmarkt, Amsterdam, 1956. Nederlands Fotomuseum Rotterdam © Ed van der Elsken / Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

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Ed van der Elsken, Vali Myers (Ann), Paris, 1953. Nederlands Fotomuseum Rotterdam © Ed van der Elsken / Collection Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

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Ed van der Elsken, Jean-Michel Mension (Pierre) et Auguste Hommel (Benny) devant le Mabillon, Paris , 1953 Nederlands Fotomuseum Rotterdam © Ed van der Elsken / Ed van der Elsken Estate

Provocative, rebellious, and above all committed, Ed van der Elsken saw himself as a hunter of reality and authenticity, always hungry to capture real life in profoundly human images. In collaboration with the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and the Fundación MAPFRE in Madrid, Jeu de Paume is giving this exceptional artist his first retrospective in France to look back at a diverse and exciting body of work, composed of over 150 original shots in black-and-white and color, film extracts, slideshows, and publications. Ed van der Elsken trekked through the streets of world cities like Paris, Tokyo, and his native Amsterdam on the hunt for those he referred to as “my kind of people”: marginal figures betraying a natural or bohemian beauty, who caught his attention and whom he often photographed in theatrical scenes designed to capture their true essence. The exhibition takes us on a journey of discovery through the photographs he published in numerous books. From Love on the Left Bank to Bagara, his work includes raw images of youth captured in Paris after the Second World War, the daily rituals of Central African villages, Japanese cityscapes, and the marginal and dissident young people of Amsterdam. The retrospective also invites visitors to discover the Eye Love You and Tokyo Symphony slide shows compiled from his numerous color shots. It also features his documentary films tied to the Cinéma Vérité movement, such as Bye (1990), which takes a poignant look at the photographer’s own ailment. A unique personality in photography and cinema, Ed van der Elsken defies classification with his transcendent work that radiates a limitless freedom. With this unprecedented retrospective, Jeu

de Paume enables audiences to discover all the complexity and rich variety of a body of work both stunning and poetic, modern and nonconformist, and occasionally erotic, all captured with a focus on technique and a drive to cross disciplines by Camera in Love.

Camera in Love, an Ed van der Elsken

retrospective, will take place at Jeu de Paume from June 13 to September 24, 2017.

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TEXT: APPOLINE FRIMONT


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THE EYE UMA THURMAN PRESIDENT OF CANNES UN CERTAIN REGARD JURY


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Defined by Thierry Frémaux as “the Official Selection’s own counter-program,” Un Certain Regard invites viewers to discover new talents while showcasing unique and innovative films. It runs parallel to the main selection and offers almost as many films. It awards its prizes on the day before the festival’s closing ceremony, while the top films go on to compete for the Caméra d’Or. At the 70th Cannes Film Festival, actress and producer Uma Thurman was chosen to preside over the jury for Un Certain Regard. She is the second American actress, after Italian-American actress Isabella Rossellini in 2015, to receive this prestigious mission. Already

a

jury

member

for

the

official

selection in 2011, which was presided over by Robert de Niro, Uma Thurman is now renewing her experience as a cinephile. At 47, the actress has starred in over forty films. Discovered at just 17 in Stephen Frears’s Dangerous Liaisons, in which she played the seductive role of Cécile de Volanges, Uma Thurman sealed her star status in 1994 with her role in Quentin Tarantino’s Pulp Fiction. Although she did not take home the Best Supporting Actress award she was nominated for, the movie earned the Palme d’Or at that year’s festival. She teamed up with Tarantino once again in the 2000s to play the vengeful heroine in the two volumes of Kill Bill. In addition, the actress is also known for her comedic roles: Sweet and Lowdown directed by Woody Allen (1999), My Super Ex-Girlfriend directed by Ivan Reitman (2006), The Accidental Husband directed by Griffin Dunne (2008), and Playing for Keeps directed by Gabriele Muccino (2012). In 2013, she played in Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac, before working with the director again in The House That Jack Built, alongside Matt Dillon and Bruno Ganz. That film is set for release in 2018. This year, Un Certain Regard includes 16 films in its selection, including Barbara directed by Mathieu Amalric – which will open the category – Lucky from Italian actor and director Sergio Castellitto, and Before

We Vanish by Japanese director Kiyoshi

Kurosawa. The jury will announce the award winners on May 27.

TEXT: SASKIA MAITREPIERRE - PHOTO: SHUBHANK AR RAY


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THE FRENCH SPIRIT COUNTER-CULTURE AT LA MAISON ROUGE

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Alternating between counterculture and subculture, L’esprit français Contre-cultures, 1969-1989 at la maison rouge presents artworks from various creative worlds like cinema, visual arts, music, graphic arts, video, literature, and theatre. Commissioned by Guillaume Désanges and François Piron, this multidisciplinary project offers a nonhierarchical display of works by Claude Lalanne, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Annette Messager, Kiki Picasso, Michel Journiac, Pierre Klossowski, and many others. Uncovering the bold, dissident, and cynical “French spirit” and its evolution from the 70s to the 90s offers an opportunity to investigate the fundamental aspects of the French character throughout this intense historical period and its turbulent blend of brash ideologies. Emerging in the context of liberation following May ’68, the vigorous and frenetic French spirit aimed to assert its ideas and question a society in which French thought seemed to have lost its way in the psychological aftermath of the Second World War and the new era of consumerism. What has become of this ideology of protest and the intellectual offspring of the revolutionary spirit of 1789? Like the face of Citizen King Louis-Philippe caricatured as a pear during the July Monarchy – a fundamentally bourgeois regime despite its roots in the popular insurrection of the Second French Revolution – the cynical spirit of Daumier challenges the established order through artistic expression and opens the way for a burst of new thought, in which everyone’s voice has equal weight and the power to found a movement, community, or culture. To kick off its exploration of the “French spirit,” the exhibition takes as its starting point a society profoundly marked by the new thought inspired by May ’68, its desire for emancipation, and rejection of authority. This communitarian position cuts a path against the grain of the dominant society, clearing the way for hidden beauties to emerge and artistic creation to bloom on the margins of institutionalized models and trends. In this way, visitors can discover artistic expressions of all types that convey a strong and stunning aesthetic collision. This encounter between the officially recognized channels of thought, such as philosophy, literature, or theatre, with the forms of so-called popular culture – like cinema, rock, comics, and television – produces a collision of cultures that prompted artists to propose new forms of artistic creation based on militancy, societal ideals, sexuality, and violence, both internalized and expressed in the open. In this context, the exhibition attempts to stitch together a potential identity of this “French spirit 19691989.” Throughout the paradoxically endearing, captivating, and unsettling personas of antiheroes like French comic Coluche or edgy figures like Michel Journiac, new aesthetics for a new social landscape began to emerge. The exhibition organizes these countercultures into eight chapters: Fire away!, Forbidden/Tolerated, Good Sex Illustrated, Sentimental Sordid, Dancing on Ruins, Diagonal Parallels, Cold Cuts, and Inner Violence. Each chapter stages a cataclysm of the artistic forms emerging amid these cultural mutations. A profusion

of speech, abundance of publications, and desire to break down instances of domination characterize this “French spirit” and its continuous effort to open the field of expression for the popular imagination.

L’esprit français Contre-cultures, 1969-1989 runs at la maison rouge from February 24 to May 21. TEXT: SARAH KONTE


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L’esprit français, Contre-cultures, 1969-1989, Danser sur les décombres Exhibition view : Philippe Morillon, Membres des bandes des Gazolines et To the bop devant la boutique Pendora de Luxe aux Halles, 1975 © Philippe Morillon, Pierre et Gilles, Marie France, 1980 © Pierre et Gilles. Courtesy Collection François Pinault Photos In Situ © Marc Domage

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L’esprit français, Contre-cultures, 1969-1989, Exhibition view Photos In Situ © Marc Domage

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L’esprit français, Contre-cultures, 1969-1989, Exhibition view: Claude Lévêque, Conte cruel de la Jeunesse, 2016 Photos In Situ © Marc Domage

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L’esprit français, Contre-cultures, 1969-1989, Exhibition view: Michel Journiac, Piège pour exécution capitale, 1975 Photos In Situ © Marc Domage

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L’esprit français, Contre-cultures, 1969-1989, Exhibition view: Michel Journiac, Hommage au Putain Inconnu, 1973 © Archiv Acquaviva, Berlin, Courtesy Galerie Christophe Gaillard, Paris, Raymonde Arcier, Au Nom du père, 1977 © Raymonde Arcier, Courtesy de l’artiste Photos In Situ © Marc Domage

5.


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THE PAINTER DAVID HOCKNEY AT CENTRE GEORGES POMPIDOU

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Occasionally elusive, often unclassifiable, and always iconic, the work of David Hockney has continually painted the world in flamboyant colors, intense light, and daring experiments that transcend genre and define each era. In collaboration with Tate Britain and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Centre Pompidou is devoting its first retrospective to the artist to celebrate his 80th birthday and look back over six decades of complex work driven by a desire to paint the experience of life. 2.

3.

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Self Portrait, 1954 Collage 42 x 29.80 cm © David Hockney Photo : Richard Schmidt

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Schwimmbad Mitternacht (Paper Pool 11), 1978, colored and pressed paper pulpe 182.80 x 215.90 cm © David Hockney / Tyler Graphics Ltd. Photo : Richard Schmidt

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Portrait d’un artiste (Piscine avec deux personnages), 1972, acrylic on canvas 214 x 305 cm © David Hockney Photo : Art Gallery of New South Wales / Jenni Carter

This exceptional and comprehensive exhibition contains over 160 works spanning the genres of painting, engraving, drawing, books, and video installation. Beginning with the youthful paintings Hockney produced during his student days at Bradford College of Art and inspired by the vigorous realism of industrial England, the exhibition takes us through each successive period in the artist’s career: from his acrylic paintings depicting a hedonistic California like A Bigger Splash (1967), to a reconfigured Cubism made by reassembling Polaroid snapshots, as in Pearblossom Highway (1986). Next, the exhibition shows how Hockey refused to get left behind by the times and embraced new technologies to revolutionize the art world with drawings done on an iPad and shared with audiences and those near to him. In this way, this impressive retrospective takes us on a voyage through several eras to discover and rediscover Hockney’s joyous and expressive work, inspired by past masters like Picassco, Matisse, and Dubuffet. Today, Hockney stands as one of the most important artists of his generation. And now he is sharing his experience with Matthias Weischer, a young German painter who will learn from this legendary figure of the art world through the Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative created by Rolex.

The David Hockney retrospective will take place at Centre Pompidou from June 21 to October 23, 2017.

TEXT: APPOLINE FRIMONT


MEETING

CHRISTINE MACEL

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THE DISCREET CHRISTINE MACEL, THE DISCREET BUT INFLUENTIAL HEAD OF THE CONTEMPORARY AND PROSPECTIVE DEPARTMENT OF THE CENTRE POMPIDOU FOR ALMOST 15 YEARS, SHOCKED THE ART WORLD WITH HER NOMINATION AS DIRECTOR OF THE 57TH INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION OF THE VENICE BIENNALE, SET TO OPEN IN EARLY MAY. SHE TELLS US ABOUT HER PROJECT FOR THE BIENNALE CALLED VIVA ARTE VIVA, HER RELATIONSHIP WITH THE ARTISTS, HER STANCE ON FEMINISM AND POLITICS, AND WHY WE CANNOT LIMIT OURSELVES TO EITHER AN AESTHETIC OR ETHICAL DEFINITION OF ART.

A.

INTERVIEW DOROTHÉE DUPUIS


MEETING

CHRISTINE MACEL

D.D - I began my career with you ten years ago at the Centre Pompidou as an assistant curator for the Dionysiac (2005) and Airs de Paris (2007) exhibitions. I was also there for your first experience at the Venice Biennale as the curator of the Belgian Pavilion in 2007 (with Eric Duyckaerts). You taught me all about arts curating – I was studying visual and graphic arts at the time – and I can safely say that you were one of my mentors and that your influence still resonates in my practice today. I also want to point out that, like me, an entire generation of French curators passed through your office for an internship during their careers. You produced numerous major exhibitions at the Centre Pompidou, including Danser sa vie (2012) which you spent nearly ten years putting together, as well as solo exhibitions that launched several international artists (Philippe Parreno, Gabriel Orozco, Xavier Veilhan, or Damien Ortega). And yet, despite all that, you are also one of the most discreet curators in France: it seems like you keep your distance from powerful circles and polemical debates. For some, your nomination to head the Biennale came as a surprise – they expected yet another “uber-curator” like your predecessor Okwui Enwezor or Adam Szymczyk at this year’s Documenta. What do you think convinced Paolo Baratta, President of the Biennale, to pick you for this task? What is the selection process like for an event like the Biennale? Can you tell us more about it?

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B.

C.M - Paolo Baratta makes the selection after a period of reflection, and submits it to the Board of the Biennale. I think he makes his choice based on his knowledge of the curator’s projects, professional reputation around the world, and the direction he wants for the Biennale. The project I submitted upon his request turned out to match his expectations. D.D - The title, Viva Arte Viva, is a sort of refrainpalimpsest-poem. It has caused a lot of confusion among some professional audiences, who are accustomed to catastrophic and/or didactic titles that refer to the subjects of art (such as the state of the world, in recent years) rather than the art itself. Your introductory text contains a lot of references to art history, notably the 1970s, to point out that artists do not need to talk about the world in literal terms to say something relevant, and that their power lies in imagining, dreaming, and creating. Do you think contemporary curators have lost that relationship to artists, to the dream and magic of art, by focusing too heavily on a type of art that functions simply as another way of formulating knowledge or representing reality from a convenient angle?

C.

C.M - As you know well, I don’t like to limit art to a single definition that would veer too far in either direction, aesthetic or ethical. In fact, that’s one of the premises I notably mentioned in the Micropolitques exhibition at Le Magasin in Grenoble. In my opinion, Felix Gonzalez-Torres is the artist who best represents this approach, which does not separate style from content or tear apart the medium and the “message.” Art is not a form of communication. It doesn’t

A : Kananginak Pootoogook He thinks he has run out of gas, but his engine is shot....Kinggait Nunavut, 2009, ink and coloured pencil on paper, 56 x 76 cm, Private collection, Burlington, Ontario. Picture: All rights reserved B : EDITH DEKYNDT One and Thousand Nights, 2016, installation view, Wiels, Brussels. Courtesy of the artist and Greta Meert Gallery, Brussels; Carl Freedman Gallery, London; Karin Guenther Gallery, Hamburg; Konrad Fischer Gallery, Berlin. Photo: Sven Laurent C : MARWAN Untitled, 1973-1976, oil on canvas, collection of the artist. Photo: Gerhard Milting


MEETING

CHRISTINE MACEL

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convey unilateral messages. Art is an act of resistance, and not just in the political sense. As Gilles Deleuze said, a work of art is an act of resistance in itself. Or to paraphrase Malraux, art is the only thing that can resist death. In short, I don’t want to reduce art to orthodoxy. What I’ve said is that if art does not change the world, it is at least a space for reinventing it. Political realism – which we have already seen in the 19th century – is one trend in art but not the only one. I think there is a lot of enlightened false consciousness underlying these trends, to borrow a phrase from Peter Sloterdijk in his Critique of Cynical Reason. I think the choice to make art solely from an ethical or moral position conceals a sense of enlightenment that belongs above all to a bourgeoisie that knows it is bourgeois and, at the same time, feels guilty for not fighting for the principles that drive revolutions, notably freedom and equality. Moreover, politics is not always evident in art. When Mladen Stilinovic depicts the artist sleeping on the job, it’s a statement about the need to be lazy to make art, as well as a critique of labor as one of society’s fundamental values: politics is not always where we think it is. D.D - You seem to have designed a carefully staged exhibition, which unfolds like a spectacle that must be seen in the right order to fully appreciate the gradual increase in artistic and metaphysical power. What is it like to work in this direction at a time when the curating trend is more towards nonlinear, nonhierarchical wandering, which we might even interpret as an attitude of deference towards the viewer or a fear of challenging the viewer at the risk of upsetting them. C.M - It is anything but a spectacle. I choreographed the exhibition path, but viewers are free to skip chapters or read backwards as they please. My work on Jasmin Oezcebi’s architecture aims to provide the best context for the works, the best space, and above all an optimal experience of the art on display. It is focused less on categories or hierarchies than on working closely with the artworks and artists. It’s much more complex than simply letting the artist negotiate a space on their own. It’s much more detailoriented. In fact, the architecture is so fluid precisely because of this work. So visitors can wander without any handholding, because it is the artworks themselves that guide visitors.

C.

D.D - Ten years later, I think it’s interesting that the “Dionysian” pavilion, a term you once dedicated to men with your Dionysiac exhibition in 2005, now celebrates women. Most women artists in the exhibition still credit you with paying special

D. C : JEREMY SHAW Towards Universal Pattern Recognition (Bayfront Center Baptism, 1982) (detail), 2016, prismatic acrylic, archival photograph, chrome 38.3 x 43.3 x 16 cm, collection of National Gallery of Canada © KÖNIG GALERIE. Photo: Trevor Good D : RAYMOND HAINS Valises documentaires, miscalleneous documents in metallic suitcases. Archives of the artist. Photo by Thomas Hains


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CHRISTINE MACEL

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attention to this question – although it doesn’t seem to have been a priority in your practice at the time. Can you describe the thought process that led to this transformation? Do you call yourself a feminist today? C.M - The Dionysiac exhibition wasn’t dedicated to men, and the Dionysian Pavilion in Venice isn’t dedicated to women. The thinking that led me to the Dionysiac exhibition at the Centre Pompidou focused on the dialectic between the Dionysian and the Apollonian, or between excess and restriction, which is central to Nietzsche’s thought in the Birth of Tragedy. I invited two “women” artists to produce new works for the exhibition, which was one of the rules of its organization, but they were unable or chose not to do so. In the end, the only woman in the exhibition was Ariadne, the woman who captivates the god Dionysus and who was embodied by the actress Anne Brochet in John Bock’s film “Betonstube.” It was Dionysus’s declaration of love for Ariadne. As I remember, at the time I had written a thesis on Rebecca Horn for an exhibition featuring Sophie Calle, Nan Goldin, and Koo Jeaong-A, among others. The Dionysian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale is not dedicated to women, but to the notion of ecstasy and self-transcendence through eroticism, trance – notably religious trance – as well as dance, song, and music. It will feature works evoking female eroticism made by women, as well as works by Jeremy Shaw and Kader Attia on other subjects. This Biennale will show a lot of women artists. But I invited them for their works and not for their gender. I have always thought of art before gender. There is nothing worse for a woman than being constantly reminded that she is a woman artist or a woman curator. We don’t do that for men, do we? I’ve always been an everyday feminist. I’ve always taken concrete action for women, if only by hiring Emma Lavigne, Joanna Mytkowska, and recently Alicie Knock as conservators in my service at the Centre Pompidou. I also recruited three brilliant women to help me with the Biennale. I support talented people whom I believe in, whether they are men or women.

E.

D.D - Let’s conclude with a slightly tough question: the Biennale features nine “trans-pavilions” (as you have called them), which is your favorite and why? C.M - I obviously do not have a favorite. That would be like asking an author to pick a favorite chapter from their book, or a painter to cut out a fragment of their canvas. But I’m sure the audience will have fun picking their favorite Pavilion!

F.

E : SOOKYUNG YEE Translated Vase (detail), 2016, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24K gold leaf 175x125x110cm, courtesy of the artist. Photo: Kwack Gongshin F : HUGUETTE CALAND Self Portrait, 1971, ink on paper, 35,1 x 25,1 cm. Courtesy of the Caland family


PORTFOLIO

L A BIENNALE DI VENEZIA

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VENICE BIENNALE, NEW GENERATION ACCORDING TO WIKIPEDIA, “THE MILLENNIAL GENERATION IS MARKED BY AN INCREASED USE AND FAMILIARITY WITH COMMUNICATIONS, MEDIA, AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES. IN MOST PARTS OF THE WORLD, THEIR UPBRINGING WAS MARKED BY AN ULTRA LIBERAL APPROACH TO POLITICS AND ECONOMICS; THE EFFECTS OF THIS ENVIRONMENT ARE DISPUTED.” THE MILLENNIALS OF THE 57TH VENICE BIENNALE COME FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD AND DEMONSTRATE A KEEN AWARENESS OF THE CHALLENGES AWAITING US IN THE BEGINNING OF THIS CENTURY. THE WEAPON THEY HAVE CHOSEN TO CREATE CHANGE IS ART: LET’S MEET THEM TODAY.

TEXTS DOROTHÉE DUPUIS

1.


AGNIESZKA POLSKA

PORTFOLIO

L A BIENNALE DI VENEZIA

1.

“My Little Planet” 2017, Digital video 7 minutes, 57 second loop Courtesy of the artist and Overduin & Co., Los Angeles Photo credit: Brian Forrest

2.

“The Leisure Time of a Firearm” 2015, Digital video 20 minute loop Courtesy of the artist and Overduin & Co., Los Angeles Photo credit: Brian Forrest

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Installation view at Overduin & Co., Los Angeles, 2017 Courtesy of the artist and Overduin & Co., Los Angeles Photo credit: Brian Forrest

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“Glass of Petrol” 2015, Printed textile 118 x 73 1/2 in / 300 x 187 cm Courtesy of the artist and Overduin & Co., Los Angeles Photo credit: Brian Forrest

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2.

Agnieszka Polska has quickly earned a reputation as an Eastern European phenom of Postinternet Art, with sensual and unsettling videos like “I Am the Mouth II,” a clip in imperfect 3D showing a large mouth half submerged in a glimmering lake. Yet many have forgotten Polska’s first efforts in animation, such as the tender “Medical Gymnastics,” in which little paper figurines exercise in stop motion, or her more political videos playing on the clichés of Poland’s avant-garde intellectual elite shot in square format with actors. In her work, Polska riffs on the impeccable image of the artist and citizen of the former Soviet bloc, made all too aware of her position at the center of European history through the tragedies that have shaped her destiny, just as World War III looms without our even knowing the combatants.

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GUAN XIAO

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Guan Xiao is a young Chinese artist based in Beijing whose work has already gained widespread currency in Europe. Recently, we have notably seen her art displayed at the Berlin Biennale, the ICA in London, and Jeu de Paume in Paris. The artist produces sculptures, art environments, and videos that bear a clear resemblance to the Postinternet movement, though hybridized with a sort of Post-Industrial and kitschy Pop aesthetic. We may ask ourselves if this cartoonish world reveals a cultural accent specific to an Asian approach to the object, conveying an awareness of the mass production of the object in its almost monstrous simplicity and economic efficiency. Portraits of the artist frequently show her dressed up in manga costumes, striking sexy and provocative poses among groups of her sculptures. No political discourse for Guan Xiao, but instead a merry sort of acceptance of the triumphant capitalism that marked her country throughout her youth.

2. 1.

David, 2013, film still Courtesy: the artist, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin and Antenna Space, Shanghai

2.

Something Happened Like Never Before, exhibition view, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, 2014 Photo by Hans-Georg Gaul Courtesy: the artist, Kraupa-Tuskany Zeidler, Berlin and Antenna Space, Shanghai


MARCOS AVILA FORERO

PORTFOLIO

L A BIENNALE DI VENEZIA

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1.

Marcos Avila Forero is a young Franco-Colombian artist who has already sown controversy. A large portion of the art world celebrates him as a gifted visual artist, whose visceral installations and images investigate the Colombian landscapes devastated by years of civil war in a spectacular yet human way. At the same time, others see him as ambitious to appeal to European audiences by offering an exotifying look at his native country. In any case, the stories told by Avila Forero deserve to be known, also for their factual and didactic side – as when the artist exhausts the visual resources at his disposal and tends towards literal, easy images. Instead of doubting Avila Forero, we should celebrate his gift for photography and sculpture, though occasionally produced in a borrowed style that is too laden with historical and political symbolism.

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Atrato, 2014 HD video, 16 : 9, color, sound, 13’52’’, edition 3 of 5 + 2 AP, English and French version Collection Centre National des Arts Plastiques - Fonds National d’Art Contemporain (France)

2.

Cayuco - Sillage Oujda Melilla, 2012 HD video 16 : 9, color, sound, 55’, French and English version Edition 5 of 5 + 2 AP Collection Fonds Régional d’Art Contemporain Aquitaine (France) Courtesy of the artist and the Dohyang Lee Gallery


JULIAN CHARRIERE

PORTFOLIO

L A BIENNALE DI VENEZIA

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Julian Charrière is a young Swiss artist who has spent the past few years

working in Berlin. Clearly struck by the total ignorance shown by young urbanites of desert landscapes and what remains of untouched nature, as well as natural sites profoundly damaged by mankind, he sees art as an opportunity to brave the unknown and conduct experiments

– such as when he travels to Antarctica to melt an iceberg with a blowtorch for several hours, or when he collects samples of radioactive soil in Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan and distorts photos taken on site. Conversely, his installations set up within urban spaces seek to restore an unknown and savage quality to the city. We might see Julian Char-

rière’s work as a manifestation of our growing disconnection from the landscapes constituting the backdrop to that ultimate expression of modernity that is urban life. German

police recently mistook a machine the artist was building for the Antarctic Biennale for a homemade cannon. Seized after neighbors reported the item to authorities, the item lives on as a conceptual work now held in police custody.

Future Fossil Spaces, installation view, Prix culturel Manor Vaud 2014, 31.10.2014-11.01.2015, Musée Cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne, Switzerland ©Julian Charrière, VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn, Germany. Courtesy: Musée Cantonal des Beaux-Arts, Lausanne, Switzerland Photo: Clémentine Bossard


PORTFOLIO

L A BIENNALE DI VENEZIA

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ACHRAF TOULOUB

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Achraf Touloub is a Moroccan artist based in Paris whose work alternates between abstraction and figuration to generate an interesting cross between conceptualism and formalism. His two-dimensional surfaces, covered in penciled wave patterns or repetitions of contemporary faces and old-fashioned poses, flirt with the trappings of painting only to better delineate their distance from the medium, as excessively dainty frames play on the cream hues of paper and the brilliant blacks of screens, used as motifs on walls and other surfaces. His work often recalls Adel Abdessemed’s essential 2005 piece “God is Design,” which questioned one of the biggest issues in our Eurasian society with visionary simplicity.

4.

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Etude, acrylic on paper, 54 x 43 cm, 2015 Courtesy Albert Baronian, Copyright Isabelle Arthuis

2.

Untitled ( Nuits en Juin), brass ink and acrylic on paper 152 x 108 cm, 2015 Courtesy Albert Baronian, Copyright Isabelle Arthuis

3.

Untitled ( Nuits en Juin), brass ink and acrylic on paper 208 x 138 cm, 2015 Courtesy Albert Baronian, Copyright Isabelle Arthuis

4.

Untitled Ink and gouache on paper 79 x 59 cm 2014


HAO LIANG

PORTFOLIO

L A BIENNALE DI VENEZIA

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1.

Hao Liang once said in an interview: “The ideal of Shan Shui painting is the unity of man and nature. It seeks a relationship between the human body and nature. In Western landscape painting, the emphasis is on observing and dominating nature.” As we can see, the young painter trained in classic techniques like the traditional Shan Shui, which is the art of painting the mountain and water motifs so prevalent in Chinese landscape painting, has set himself apart from other young Chinese artists who focus obsessively on modernity, consumerism, and mass production. Instead, Hao Liang flexes his perfect technical mastery to convey a personal interpretation of aesthetic motifs and dynamics inherited from ancestral traditions like silk painting to create scenes often inspired by Chinese and international literature. Whether or not we like the images and stories invented by Hao Liang, we have to applaud the spiritual maturity of this young painter of 33.

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1. Eight Views of Xiaoxiang – Relics, 2015-2016, Ink on silk, 184×387 cm, private collection. Photo : courtesy of the artist 2. The Flourishing and Withering in Four Seasons,2012,Ink and color on silk, Handscroll, painting size: 46 x 410cm, scroll size: 47 x 750cm Copyright © 2007-2017 Vitamin Creative Space 3. The Tale of Cloud, 2013, Ink on silk, 45 x 1200cm Copyright © 2007-2017 Vitamin Creative Space


PORTFOLIO

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PETRIT HALILAJ

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While firmly rooted in a certain history of Western art, the works of Kosovar artist Petrit Halilaj offer an interesting example of the reverberations of European pagan influences. To a certain degree, the Balkans have remained a separate province in Europe, home to syncretic cultures influenced by the traditions of Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean Basin, and Continental Europe – all of which line up conveniently with the list of cities where the artist has worked: Bozzolo (Italy), Berlin (Germany), and Pristina (Kosovo). Mixing living and stuffed animals, wooden structures in a Medieval vernacular, precious metals, and excrement, her installations sing with poetry and a note of nostalgia of a time when individuals were defined by more than ownership, while reminding us that it was not that long ago when Europe was still able to generate exoticism based on differences observed even within such a small continent. Today, that exoticism faces the prospect of extinction under the homogenization of cultures, the dictates of capital, and the historic rise of xenophobia – the same tendency that may have set so many fires and spilled so much blood throughout the Balkans during the 20th century.

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Exhibition view Yes but the sea is attached to the earth and it never floats around in space. The stars would turn off and what about my planet?, 2014 Installation. Mixted media (soil, branches, dead leaves, stones, soap), kamel mennour, Paris, 2014 © Petrit Halilaj Photo. Fabrice Seixas & archives kamel mennour Courtesy the artist and kamel mennour, Paris/London

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Do you realise there is a rainbow even if it’s night!? (pink), 2017 Qilim Carpet from Kosovo, Flokati,

Polyester, Chenille Wire, Steel, Brass 697 x 134 x 17 cm © Petrit Halilaj Photo. Hannes Wiedemann. Courtesy the artist, Chert Lüdde and kamel mennour, Paris/London


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KATHERINE NUNEZ & ISSAY RODRIGUEZ

In Between the Lines, 2016, installation view Photo : Marika Constantino

Born respectively in 1992 and 1991, Katherine Nuñez and Issay Rodríguez are the youngest artists at the Venice Biennale. The global art world first took notice of the two Filipino artists during Art Dubai with their collective 98B COLLABoratory. For the Biennale, they are preparing a work drawing on a process the pair have used in the past and will update for the occasion, apparently evoking the very idea of “labor” involved in the production of a work of art. On the Biennale’s status as the quintessence of the Western art world in relation to the art scene in their homeland, Issay Rodríguez says: “It's like joining or cooking for a special dinner in a different village who used to send crops to you though a small hole in a wall for

years. Learning to cook it from the other side, seeing their garden once, going back and using your own tools and spices to come up with a dish you can share: this is the closest way by which I could imagine what the Venice Biennale is.”


RACHEL ROSE

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When attempting to write about her work, it is difficult to overlook the impeccable pedigree and legacy of privilege embodied by the young American artist Rachel Rose. Educated at Columbia and Yale – notably by painter Robert Reid who influenced an entire generation of artists like Matthew Barney and Sarah Zee – Rachel Rose has in five years assembled a resume of video installations equaled in their virtuosity only by her artist interviews. These compelling moments of artistic discourse have earned her the praise of prestigious institutions around the world. But what does Rachel Rose talk about? Further exploring the existential doubts of relational aesthetics (her films call to mind Parreno and Huyghe), Rose offers intelligent commentary on the duplicity of human relations, anxieties concerning technology, the beauty of landscape and nature, or many other commonplace topics – all while ambiguously respecting the spectacle she condemns.

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all pictures: (still), Lake Valley, 2016. HD Video, 8:25 min. Courtesy of the artist, Pilar Corrias Gallery, London and Gavin Brown's enterprise, New York/Rome.


TAUS MAKHACHEVA

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Taus Makhacheva is first and foremost a video artist who explores the many facets of her native region of Dagestan in Russia. Her films document landscapes, faces, and costumes through polished scenes that provide the backdrop to choreographed actions. While fiction appears here and there, it does not seem like the main goal of the artist, who focuses instead on triggering aesthetic emotions in the viewer through her precise photography and easy maneuvering between genres, from documentary and archival images, to performance and sketch comedy. Relying on actors found most likely from the street or among her friends, Makhacheva admits that she is painting a portrait of the “Caucasian world” through contemporary art. That same quest seems to have become a commonality among young “European” artists: seeking out Europe’s roots in a way that does not tumble into essentialism or supremacy.

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Landscape, 2013 - ongoing Series of wooden objects Dimensions Variable Courtesy of the artist and narrative projects, London

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Super Taus, 2014 (Installation view at narrative projects, London) Courtesy of the artist and narrative projects, London

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Super Taus* (Untitled 2), fourvideos,newspaperclippings, sculpture / 2016 Production supported by Moscow Museum of Modern Art


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MEETING

LUMA FOUNDATION

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HOW TO INVENT THE ART MUSEUMS OF THE FUTURE? MAJA HOFFMANN, FOUNDER OF THE LUMA FOUNDATION, MARIA FINDERS, DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF THE LUMA FOUNDATION, AND VERE VAN GOOL, ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF THE IDEASCITY PROGRAM AT THE NEW MUSEUM IN NEW YORK, SHARE THEIR PERSPECTIVE ON THE OCCASION OF THE LUMA DAYS, AN INNOVATIVE MULTIDISCIPLINARY WORKSHOP AND CONFERENCE SERIES TAKING PLACE IN LATE MAY AT THE LUMA FOUNDATION IN ARLES, FRANCE.

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INTERVIEW DOROTHÉE DUPUIS


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LUMA FOUNDATION

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Dorothée Dupuis - Small towns in Europe, even ones like Arles which possess important historical pasts, are currently facing an important number of challenges, whether they concern economic, environmental, or cultural issues. Rising unemployment due to deindustrialization, isolation from larger hubs, cultural and medical deserts, and the constant growth of far right politics in the region in the last 20 years have led to quite explosive situations, where it feels the central state withdrew itself without thinking about possible replacement strategies. Could you tell us a bit more about the Foundation’s vision and mission in regard to these issues?

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Maria Finders - Indeed, these are the issues we all dealing with, and of course it is not new. For the far right, culture will never be as nourishing or as job generating as agriculture, and of course it is hard to argue with that… upfront. While in the 70s disused factories around the Western world became artists’ studios and then galleries, today they become co-working and co-living spaces for a transient generation which faces the uncertainties of the “gig” economy. This is the starting point... LUMA Arles is not an event based project. It is by its size and by its ambition a turning point – even as a piece of equipment, in a city and in a region and nationally. Through its program and links with every important cultural institution around the world, it also has the potential to raise awareness on issues that can move things forward on many fronts. However, the first place to start is Arles. This is why the LUMA Days 2017 program is so focused on the City and the territory, as a starting point for a yearly rendezvous of topical encounters around art, science, technology, history, in a way tracing a path from archeology to the avant-garde. Not avoiding of course the politics of day-to-day activism, to encourage diversity and exchange, critical thinking, new means of production in respect for the environment and based on a circular economy… so many topics that for the years to come will be the building blocks of the LUMA Days. Dorothée Dupuis - Does LUMA consider itself, despite its privately funded structure, like a public institution?

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Maria Finders - The notions of public and private in France are very unique. The role of the state is still benevolent, and culture is very central, and France and culture are intrinsically linked. So behaving like a public institution in France is not applicable of course. That said, as a Foundation, LUMA is linked to a duty of putting the greater good first. Obviously the enormous commitment of the Foundation to Arles, goes much further than any other private initiative, and with that goes the reasonability to engage with all levels of the community and the public realm. Maja Hoffmann - In the next 10 years a cultural institution may need to re-define the parameters of its mission, whether it be to collect, to display, to disseminate and to preserve, or to produce art and culture. In this process, the notions of culture, nation, identity, society, and hospitality become essential points of examination for any institution outlining its place in the cultural realm.

A : The new building designed by Frank Gehry, (c) Gehry Partners, LLP B : Aerial view of the Parc des Ateliers site, Photo : (c) Hervé Hôte C : The new building designed by Frank Gehry and the foundry courtyard Forges, Photo : (c) Victor Picon


MEETING

LUMA FOUNDATION

We believe that now, more than ever, in a time of intense globalization, relations and more vivid interactions should occur between art and culture, human rights, environment, and education and research. With LUMA Arles we have created in Arles, a production platform that allows for the necessary convergence of people in order to cooperate and bring the cross-disciplinary thinking required by the era we have entered. Dorothée Dupuis - Do you feel that the different components of the public instances in Arles and beyond (even at a national level) are committed to helping you make LUMA a success and possibly a lever for cultural or community oriented innovative initiatives? Maria Finders - The presence of LUMA in Arles is very much about continuing a process that began almost ten years ago, and has always involved a very close collaboration with the City, the territory, and the State. In Arles the deep roots in the past are physical but they have never limited local ingenuity. One has to read French historian of the Mediterranean, Fernand Braudel to understand that Arles has been for centuries not only an important part of France, but also a gateway to Europe through the Rhone. This vantage point today becomes visible in other ways. One example is through the important environmental mission around the understanding and protection of the wetlands, through the Tour du Valat, and other related research organizations located in the heart of the Camargue. Culture is still central to the City, as it has been for the past 2,000 years and in a big way. Of course the Roman sites are predominant landmarks. Van Gogh is also the focus of the Foundation with the work of the Van Gogh Foundation, which accompanies the impressive work of the artist with a contemporary narrative. Photography has been part of the new history of Arles for the past forty-five years, with the yearly arrival of the Rencontres Photographiques. Arles also has many important museums that already create the ideal conditions for the ambitious art program of LUMA Arles. This program has since its inception benefited from the ongoing guidance and impulse of the Core Group: Hans Ulrich Obrist, Beatrix Ruf, Liam Gillick, Phlippe Parreno, and Tom Eccles. Furthermore, LUMA Arles recently announced a fundamental element of its program that will be centered on an evolving and living archive, and what it will generate in terms of education and exhibition. Architecture is another key, with the obvious impact to the city of Frank Ghery’s construction of the central building, and the renovations of the site of Annabelle Seldorf. By working with social designers Jan Boelen and Henriette Waal to establish Atelier LUMA, the foundation’s research and production program that uses design to study the city as source of inspiration and of local production within a bioregion, LUMA becomes an active part of the development of new ideas and even new professions. Technology is a big part of that, but so is preservation, as in Arles it concerns as much the cultural heritage, natural heritage, and industrial heritage. This creates a very interesting starting point for many conversations and projects to come.

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Dorothée Dupuis - American Museums, especially in NY, have been quite instrumental in forging the “outreach” concept, which envisions the missions of a museum going beyond its own walls and its own strict “belongings” that form a collection. IdeasCity could in that sense be quite representative of these initiatives, with the New Museum exploring territories through this program that obviously have no relation to its core public, but rather “expand” its missions conceptually — sometimes at the risk of imperialism. The IdeasCity program already occurred in Detroit and Athens — two emblems of fallen cities albeit due to very different sets of causes and contexts — and now in Arles. What does this program tells us about the New Museum’s vision of itself as a possible ideal representative of a 21st century American institution leading the way in the field of the arts? Could you expand on some of the aspects of IdeasCity in order to make this ontological statement about the nature of the institution visible? Vere Van Gool - IdeasCity was founded as the New Museum’s initiative to explore the role of art and culture beyond the walls of the museum. Inaugurating its first program in 2011 in New York where the museum is located, IdeasCity was conceived as series of encounters between 200 local partners, ranging from Chinatown resident associations, to local high schools in the Lower East Side, the Bowery Mission, city politicians, and downtown nonprofits and art spaces. This initiated collaborations and partnerships with local organizations that one normally would not see inside a museum gallery context, thus recognizing the value of the multiple actors that are contributing to art and culture, shaping cities and life around us. At IdeasCity we aim to provide a collaborative, civic, and creative platform that investigates key issues, proposes solutions, and seeds concrete action, while fostering new ideas by recognizing the importance of embracing multiple viewpoints, discussion, and debate, regardless of race, gender, class, or identity. We integrate these topics deliberately into our programs by inviting outspoken activists, social justice leaders, cultural entrepreneurs, designers, and policy members to include their voices in a cross-cultural dialogue on the future of art and the space. Since then, and hyper aware of the global shifts in paradigms concerning art and politics, IdeasCity has spread to other cities, developing into offsite Residency and Conference programs inviting emerging practitioners at the intersection of art, design, urbanism, activism, community leadership, and technology to come and work together and foster new ideas for a specific city. The first two cities chosen were Detroit and Athens, two places subjected to key economic, social, and political forces that define how people live together today. In Detroit we worked together with local community activists and the art scene on a Memorandum of Understanding, basically wondering how we can positively contribute to the narrative of the city, its art scene, as an outsider. Since then, we have held up this Memorandum wherever we go. When we say local, we actually mean local, to the point of taking French classes


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LUMA FOUNDATION

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now that we’re headed to Arles: it might seem like we're just there for a week, but it's more like a few years of preparation and groundwork. The work we've done in Athens, Detroit, and are now undertaking in Arles exemplifies this. By collaborating with local organizations like the LUMA Foundation we can offer a new reading of their city and territory by offering the outsider perspective, which can result in bringing different and new stakeholders to the same table and ultimately new collaborations. Dorothée Dupuis - Can you tell us more about the IdeasCity Arles event within the larger LUMA Days and the nature of the local and global participants involved? While the New Museum will possibly move on to another city after the program, LUMA is staying in Arles: how do you plan to prolong these local dynamics that are not strictly linked to art production or exhibition in your future program? And how does the New Museum make the grassroots work you initiated in these various cities last? How will that enduring link eventually be reactivated in the future? Maria Finders - LUMA Days sets the stage to go one step further in the work that has been engaged with the local community. With the help of the New Museum, under the direction of Lisa Philips and her team led by Vere Van Gool, along with Joseph Grima and the IdeaCities program Fellows, we will bring together over 100 local voices to join with the Fellows to look at Arles as a forward-facing city, which it has always been. So LUMA Days in 2017 is the place where all of this will be revealed and discussed around the evocation of five Scenarios for the City within a Bioregion. The collaboration of LUMA and IdeasCity will focus not only on these five scenarios, but also on five specific sites in the city and in the territory, which have already been identified by the City and the territorial administration as high-potential zones of interest. Therefore, the work we will do together will have lasting results to impulse new ideas in these plans and help to visualize scenarios that could in factbecome master plans. So this is really a rare dynamic that we hope will play out at the end of May.

The new building designed by Frank Gehry and the foundry courtyard, Photo : (c) Victor Picon

Vere Van Gool - IdeasCity is implementing projects through special seed funding in each of the residency programs. In Detroit we are supporting a new community merger organization that's developing a special policy process to ease arts initiatives for young arts organizers (who lack commercial budgets to pay legal fees to even get the permit). In Athens a group of Fellows from the Residency Program was invited by a local organization to continue their work under their umbrella. In Arles, one of the scenarios we will work on will receive seed money to get produced: later, we as IC have a voice and stage to value and highlight this to international audiences. But aside from this, each residency program – and each IdeasCity edition – brings together practitioners from all over the world, creating global connections and fostering future independent collaborations. That's where it gets really exciting!


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FRANK PERRIN

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INTO THE WEST LAS VEGAS, NEW MEXICO: THIS SMALL TOWN IN THE AMERICAN WEST EMERGED FROM THE DESERT AT THE END OF THE 19TH CENTURY, RISING TO PROMINENCE WITH THE ARRIVAL OF RAILROADS AND SIMULTANEOUSLY BECOMING THE TARGET OF MANY INFAMOUS GANGSTERS, INCLUDING SEVERAL ICONIC FIGURES LIKE DOC HOLLIDAY, JESSE JAMES, AND BILLY THE KID. WHAT WAS ONCE A LAND OF RAILWAY BANDITS IS NOW THE IDEAL SETTING FOR FILM AND PHOTO SHOOTS, AS WELL AS THE HANDFUL OF LEGENDARY ARTISTS WHO HAVE ADOPTED THIS HAMLET AS THEIR ARID RETREAT. INDEED, THIS UNIQUE DISTRICT HAS EXERCISED A SINGULAR MAGNETISM ON PEOPLE FROM EVERY BACKGROUND. THE RESULT: WITHIN THESE MOUNTAINOUS DESERT LANDSCAPES, WE CAN NO LONGER DISTINGUISH WHERE REALITY STOPS AND FICTION BEGINS. THE WESTERN, WITH ALL ITS CHARACTERS, LEGENDS, AND ITS PLACE IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF AMERICAN MYTHOLOGY, RESONATES IN EVERY CORNER HERE...

Immersed in this terrain for a two-week residency at Mayeur Projects, located in what once served as the prison cell of Las Vegas, New Mexico, whose illustrious inmates have included one Billy the Kid (among others), Frank Perrin endeavors to dig deeper into the mythology tucked away within these vast expanses. Seizing this Far Away Wild West that seems too cinematic to be true, this desert that seems to have frozen in time the most emblematic images of American legend, this Wild West of fear and fantasy, Perrin recreates and reactivates a space-time lying on the border between a more glamorous past and a present full of mirages.

The exhibition at Mayeur Projects revolves around five main themes: The Big Trail / Through a series of photographs in panoramic black-and-white format, Perrin captures figures tracing lines and geometric forms across the desert of Las Vegas, recalling the raids depicted in Westerns. Using these human characters, the series reactivates the landscape as a character in its own right. To be sure, this space is an icon unto itself, a hero, an integral part of the American imagination as conveyed in film, literature, and photography. Local Fires / In a series of photographs in cinematic color format, Frank Perrin casts everyday objects against this same desert landscape, like so many glowing embers. Symbols of abandoned vernacular fantasies, such as a rocking chair, plastic toboggan, or tricycle, emerge like the ruins of the American dream, its childhood universe burning bright in the middle of the desert. Echoing Various Small Fires by Ed Ruscha, this photo series evokes all the codes of American identity. Reality gradually intertwines with the imaginary, as the real world dons a new mask of liberation to enter a new layer of being.

Our mode of being in the world is writ here in fiery letters within these Burning Landscapes. Combining a reference to the final scene of Antonioni’s Zabriskie Point, in which the vanity of things goes up in flames in the middle of the desert, and the Deleuzian concept of “local fires and fault lines,” the Local Fires series invites the viewer on a sublime voyage into the emptiness and ephemeral winds of our condition. Moodboards / Prepared like a series of photographic panels, these arrangements of images flow like magma in black-and-white. Pinned directly to the wall and produced “in situ,” the snapshots capture the daily life of Las Vegas and its surroundings, like an architecture of immanence in construction. Accompanying these visual compositions are short texts taken from movie dialogues and conversations heard in the town streets, all woven together to form the texture of mythology at work and “on site” in the antique Las Vegas, New Mexico.

Tumbleweeds / Back on the ground, Frank Perrin arranges seven small “spheres” of wound barbed wire, like relics covered with tar and gold leaf to summon back all the mythology of wide open spaces. At the same time, the photographs reactivate and revive the Tumbleweeds that haunt and inhabit the earth, disturbing the space and remodeling the American landscape over the course of their unending transit guided by the winds... The Statement: Wind, Dust, Fire / Finally, from the depths of the space shines a neon red, glowing like a minimalist poem: “Wind, Dust, Fire.” An abstract fire that concludes this expedition in search of the personified landscape of the horizon and the field of fictional attraction of the Great Plains, all gathered into three of the most minimal elements of movement and circulation. The End. TEXT: PAUL ARDENNE


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FRANK PERRIN

FRANK PERRIN, Local Fire #01 (Bike) (2017) 71x44 inch edition of 5+2 AP Courtesy Mayeur Projects, New Mexico

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FRANK PERRIN, Local Fire #02 (Phone) (2017) 67x44 inch edition of 5+2 AP, Courtesy Mayeur Projects, New Mexico

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FRANK PERRIN, Local Fire #03 (Golf ) (2017) 66x44 inch edition of 5+2 AP, Courtesy Mayeur Projects, New Mexico

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FRANK PERRIN, Local Fire #04 (Audio) (2017) 61x44 inch edition of 5+2 AP, Courtesy Mayeur Projects, New Mexico

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FRANK PERRIN, Local Fire #05 (Rocking Chair) (2017) 66x44 inch edition of 5+2 AP, Courtesy Mayeur Projects, New Mexico

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FRANK PERRIN, The Big Trail (Arrow), 2017. 62x44 inch edition of 5+2 AP, Courtesy Mayeur Project, New Mexico

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FRANK PERRIN

FRANK PERRIN, The Big Trail (Circle), 2017 62x44 inch edition of 5+2 AP, Courtesy Mayeur Project, New Mexico

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MEETING

JEAN-HUBERT MARTIN

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THE CURATOR AS SEVERAL UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS IN FRANCE SPOTLIGHT CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN ART, INCLUDING ART/AFRIQUE AT FONDATION LOUIS VUITTON, IT SEEMS LIKE THE RIGHT TIME TO CHECK IN WITH EXHIBITION CURATOR JEAN-HUBERT MARTIN. AS A CO-FOUNDER OF THE CENTRE GEORGES POMPIDOU, JEAN-HUBERT MARTIN CONCEIVED OF THE LANDMARK EXHIBITION MAGICIENS DE LA TERRE, ORGANIZED IN 1989 AT THE CENTRE POMPIDOU AND THE GRANDE HALLE DE LA VILLETTE. FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER, THE EXHIBITION CONFRONTED WESTERN ART WITH ART FROM OTHER CONTINENTS. HE IS NOW THE CURATOR OF THE EXHIBITION L’INTERNATIONALE DES VISIONNAIRES, WHICH FEATURES WORK BY ARTISTS FROM AROUND THE WORLD WHO CAME TO PARIS TO FIND THE FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION AND INSPIRATION THEY NEEDED. – COLLECTION CÉRÈS FRANCO FROM APRIL 29 TO NOVEMBER 5, 2017.

Magiciens de la Terre marked a decisive turning point…

How did you come up with the idea for Magiciens de la Terre?

For me, Magiciens de la Terre was above all a reaction against what presented itself at that time as international contemporary art, but was really just the art of NATO countries. I wanted to broaden the spectrum and lay the groundwork for further investigation. In the subsequent years, my “colleagues” eventually understood what I had undertaken and they also began to compile statistics on the number of women or non-Westerners represented in contemporary art. However, it was not at all done in the same spirit as I had originally conceived. Today I see that there is an entire portion of the exhibition that no one ever understood. In fact, while others picked up on the decision to observe what was happening elsewhere, my colleagues largely restricted their approach to the principles of Western contemporary art, which merely expanded that concept into new countries. In fact, the countries they focused on met our own expectations and the art fit into molds we created, whereas my goal was to combine art and anthropology. For example, I think one of the most important shows was the exhibition on altars produced in 2001 in Düsseldorf. That was an essential show in my view, because it featured 70 recomposed altars displayed in their original state with a rich diversity of creativity, colors, and forms coming from all different cultures. However, it didn’t generate much buzz and very few people went to see it because religion is seen as antagonistic to contemporary art, which I think is completely absurd.

Several factors played a role in that decision. First, at the time it already seemed to me that political events in Africa and Asia were having immediate repercussions in Europe. We were already living in a world that was completely relational and close-knit. So I didn’t understand why our interests in terms of art and culture still focused on Western Europe and North America, with a little bit of South America thrown in from time to time. I traveled a lot in my youth so I could discover the world, and the Paris-Moscow exhibition I organized at Centre Pompidou brought me to Russia to meet artists and observe the incredible creativity in the Moscow art scene that went totally unnoticed at the time. I decided that we couldn’t keep doing things in the same way. I had also seen artworks in Africa. So, little by little, things fell into place. Everyone told me I had no right to show works from different cultures in the same exhibition. But I’m a bit of a rebel and so I decided to grab the bull by the horns. I also had an opportunity to see André Breton’s studio, which was full of an incredible mix of ancient works, art from different cultures, and Surrealist art – all blending together in an absolutely remarkable way to awaken the imagination and touch the senses. Also, at the Biennale of Sydney in 1982, the artists would have dinner with the curators every night, and I took advantage of that opportunity to share my idea, just as the curator of the Biennale had invited Aboriginal artists to paint on the floor of a closed room as part of a ritual. All the passionate


MEETING

JEAN-HUBERT MARTIN

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JEAN-HUBERT MARTIN

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discussion during these dinners pushed me to turn my idea into a reality. So those are the factors that led up to the exhibition.

hin a market. It’s a fine line. At least with African art we can breathe easy because there are no market pressures – that’s the positive aspect.

Does that mean you are most interested in smashing categories and shattering borders?

Centre Pompidou is celebrating 40 years of operation. Having been there from the start, how do you see this institution?

Yes, but I don’t want to break things just for the delight of breaking them. I want to do it because I think we are suffering from incredible blind spots in this area. Contemporary art thinks of itself as an extremely free, open, and even anarchical area, but in reality it is completely closed off. It’s a phenomenon that hasn’t fully sunken in yet: with the end of traditional colonialism, the eye of both modernity and colonialism have fallen on these societies, and all of a sudden we have declared that the work African artists have been doing for the past century and continue to do today is not authentic. It’s amazing to see the so-called expertise of the West which focuses exclusively on traditional African art like ancient painted masks, for example. The result is that most contemporary African art has absolutely no value for African art collectors. It’s a bizarre point of view. But it’s our Western point of view: anything ancient is automatically good and beautiful. It’s such a flagrant attitude whenever it comes to the arts of Africa or Oceania. Of course, there are plenty of ancient objects of very poor artistic quality. What do you think of the resurgence of African art with so many exhibitions organized today? Four exhibitions are currently set to open in Paris and I think it’s great. It’s something I’ve fought for and André [André Magnin was co-curator of Magiciens de la Terre and curator of Art/Afrique at Fondation Louis Vuitton] has fought for it even more than me. That was the point of Magiciens de la Terre: to generate more visibility for artists and cultures that often went overlooked. I’ve noticed a phenomenon that I find interesting and mostly positive: in general, whenever the contemporary art world begins to pay attention to a new culture or

country that it long ignored, it’s often linked to economic developments. For example, Perestroika in the 1990s led to the opening of the Russian art market, creating a bubble that burst rather quickly, in fact. Oddly enough Russian art is not widely recognized today. Unfortunately, there are no major collectors in Africa yet, and it’s tied to the fact that the economy has yet to take off in the continent. These new exhibitions are interesting because for once we are looking at a something happening independently of economic power. We already saw this phenomenon with the Africa Remix exhibition I initiated in Düsseldorf: it was an incredible success and the media covered it, despite the fact the it’s a nearly invisible market. The difficulty with contemporary art is that we are constantly bordering on conflicts of interest because we are always promoting living artists wit-

I have a totally positive view of its operation so far. We have to remember that it was originally intended just as a library. George Pompidou wanted to add a modern art museum to respond to the political and cultural movement of 1968. So it started as a half-serious, half-playful space, but it has become something fantastic! It’s the idea of presenting knowledge and creativity together in the same building right in the heart of Paris that has fascinated the whole world, especially people outside France. It’s also an open space where people can go without necessarily feeling obligated to see the exhibitions. I fought them at the time because the President of the Centre wanted to charge an entry fee. While we needed to find money to operate the site, I thought an entry fee went against the spirit of the Centre


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JEAN-HUBERT MARTIN

and so I fought against it. When the center first opened they placed the contemporary art on the first floor and entry was free. In 1977, people would walk into the place as easily as they would a department store. They had no idea what to expect and they discovered conceptual art! It was incredible. I spent six years working to organize the Centre Pompidou, long before it opened. I was still a young conservator and I didn’t have much experience. I took the exam to work at France’s national museums in 1968. After it opened I worked there from 1977 to 1982. And I later came back as a director from 1987 to 1990. Magiciens de la Terre came during the second period. I think the Centre Pompidou management team is doing a great job today. It’s easy to criticize an institution without considering all that it offers. Did you always have a penchant for contemporary art? As luck would have it I happened to meet Boltanski, Le Gac, Sarkis, and that whole gang. So clearly I was

going to be in step with the times. I was working in the painting department at the Louvre and they offered me a job when I was only 25. But then I heard about the Centre Pompidou project and I jumped at the opportunity. I worked at Centre Pompidou for five years at first, before returning as Director from 1987 to 1990. It was a three-year term. Do you think an artist today can manage to work outside of the market and without a gallery? I think it’s possible today, and I’ll tell you why. Older artists battled within a quasi-Marxist context against the market. Now with the public funding available and the vast number of institutions, universities, and art centers in operation, there is plenty of opportunity for artists to take part in residencies, win awards, participate in conference series and workshops, with no real need to produce an artwork, since they can organize a performance instead. Of course, the artist is not going to get rich in that scenario, but they can survive, which says something about the

art world in general today. There is an intellectual and institutional demand that did not exist 40 years ago and is very strong today.

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the 60s-80s, very few of whom became famous, and see what they represent today. I took the opposite approach to what is usually done: instead of grouping artists by movement or family, I focused on the works and what they represent, classifying them with no regard to chronology. Some artists appear at three different points throughout the exhibition. Some also have their works grouped together, like Roman Cieslewicz, Manuel Mendive Hoyo de Cuba, Chaïbia, or Michel Nedjar, who each have their own little room. There are also a few artists from the Figuration Libre movement, right? Yes, we borrowed works from the Cordier collection at Les Abbatoirs: Robert Combas, Dado, and Pierre Bettencourt. On the one hand we thought it was a good idea to initiate a regional collaboration with Les Abattoirs in Toulouse. On the other, the Museum of Book Arts and Crafts in Montolieu is dedicating an exhibition to the Bettencourt publishing house and it made sense to include a large work by the artist in the exhibition. It also let me include a few so-called “curiosities” from the Cordier collection that do not fit the strict definition of contemporary art. Did you have fun organizing the exhibition? Yes, I had a lot of fun with the Montolieu exhibition because I got to work with paintings and artists that I didn’t already know. I had to display it all in the right way so that it says something, creates sensations, and moves the audience. It was exciting and rewarding for me. What are you working on now? I’m spending all my time lately on one big project: it’s an exhibition that will be called Les Anciens nous ont volé toutes les bonnes idées [The Ancients Stole All Our Good Ideas] and it will take place at the Pushkin Museum in 2020. Right now the museum is in the midst of a major expansion project. It will have over half a dozen buildings that will all be connected by un-

derground galleries. In 2020, I’ll have carte blanche to create a transhistorical and transcultural exhibition spanning two floors and 4,000 square meters.

Why did you create this new exhibition, called L’Internationale des Visionnaires? First of all, because I love Montolieu. It’s a “village of books” with fifteen used bookstores, and I love reading. Next, because I was already familiar with Cérès Franco’s gallery, L’œil-de-bœuf. She worked with a lot of foreign artists who emigrated to Paris, some of whom were exiled by dictatorships or police

states – thus the exhibition’s title: L’Internationale des Visionnaires [Visionaries International]. Those were the triggering factors for me. The fun part for me was to look back at this group of artists from

PHOTO: ELISE TOÏDE / INTERVIEW: ARMELLE LETURCQ


MEETING

FRIEDEMANN VOGEL

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THE BIRD AT 37, FRIEDEMANN VOGEL IS WITHOUT DOUBT THE TOP DANCER OF HIS GENERATION. COVERED IN AWARDS, GLORY, AND HONORS, THE MODEST HERO STARTED OUT AS A CHILD PRODIGY GROWING UP IN THE ERA AFTER JOHN CRANKO, THE CHOREOGRAPHER WHO TURNED THE STUTTGART BALLET INTO A MIRACLE OF CREATIVITY AND RENEWAL. INDEED, VOGEL HAS ONE FOOT PRODIGIOUSLY PERCHED IN HIS NATIVE CITY AND BALLET, THE OTHER PRANCING ACROSS THE WORLD’S STAGES. BOLSHOI, MARIINSKY, HONG KONG BALLET, ROME OPERA, THE NATIONAL BALLET OF CHINA: THEATERS WORLDWIDE FIGHT TO HOST THIS EXTRAORDINARY DANCER AND HIS STUNNING COMBINATION OF POWERFUL LYRICISM AND FELINE ELEGANCE. BETWEEN SANTIAGO, MONTREAL, TAIPEI, AND A CREATION AT HIS HOME IN STUTTGART, LET’S MEET THE DANCE WORLD’S VERY OWN FIREBIRD.

You are performing here at the Théâtre des Champs-Elysées in Paris. It’s an avant-garde space that has seen so much talent, from Nijinski to Roland Petit. What does this type of stage evoke for you? Some places resonate energy. I’m thinking in particular of John Cranko’s (1927-1973) studio when he directed the Stuttgart Ballet. Something still resonates as soon as you walk in. The Théâtre des Champs Elysées is one of those places, with its ghosts and store of inspiration. Who did you admire as a child? What dancer did you dream of becoming? I could mention Rudolf Noureev and Manuel Legris of course, but my background is a bit peculiar. I shared the same house with my idol, because it was my big brother – who is much older than me and also a dancer. I grew up thinking that classical ballet was something completely ordinary. And yet, choosing to become a dancer as a little boy in Germany is anything but ordinary! For as far back as I can remember, I never had any doubt: I always knew this was my path. Did your family encourage you? There is a lot to say about that! My parents had five boys and I’m the youngest. We all have an artistic profession, including two dancers and one stage director.

Is there a Vogel touch on stage? Like me, my brother was a principal dancer for the Stuttgart Ballet, and now he teaches there! There is so much nobility in his movements. Even though our bodies are completely different and we each have our own language, we still share something like the timbre of a voice. It’s undefinable but it’s there. So we have a similar timbre on stage. Same strengths and same weaknesses? I don’t know about that. But I’m interested in the idea of weakness. Every time I felt I was in a position of weakness or failure, that’s when I gave my best performance. It’s common in classical dance for you to get locked into a certain type of role based on your attitude, body, and silhouette. It’s the worst thing that can happen and you have to fight against it all the time. In the end, there are roles that no one sees you in, not even yourself, and then you end up doing them for the rest of your career. Are you thinking of Ravel’s Boléro, choreographed by Maurice Béjart? Yes, among others. I never would have imagined myself alone on that table surrounded by all those men! As a child I was so fascinated by Marcia Haydee and George Donne’s performances that it was impossible for me to see myself in that role. In fact, I never saw myself in the part until the day I climbed onto the table! It was time.

PHOTO: ALEXANDRA CATIÈRE / INTERVIEW: MANOU FARINE


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MEETING

FRIEDEMANN VOGEL

Fendi - long white cotton coat and beige cotton trousers

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MEETING

FRIEDEMANN VOGEL

And that part has followed me ever since. I’m actually doing Boléro in Santiago, Chile in June. You trained in Stuttgart and then in Monaco at age 14. Was there anything you had to “unlearn” from the German school? It was like someone had removed a blindfold from my eyes. My professor was an older Russian ballerina with an incredibly open mind. It wasn’t just dance and technique, she taught you about life. She’s the one who taught me that dancing makes you better. You dance with ballets in China, Korea, Italy, Canada, Russia, and Japan, but rarely with French ballets. What does the French dance style represent for you? Knowledge, elegance, and a certain sophistication. More refined than powerful. More nuanced than brash. In 2014, you performed in French choreographer Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui’s version of The Firebird with Marie-Agnès Gillot in Paris. What do you remember about that performance? The intensity, quality, and sense of every movement. There was a unique fluidity to the movement. I remember that when I started working on the piece, I had just arrived at La Scala in Milan where I had danced in Giselle. All of a sudden I had to use my body in a more delicate way. That’s my constant challenge when moving between the classical and contemporary registers: changing the language of course, but above all changing the relationship to the body. You have worked with John Cranko, John Neumeier, Wayne Mac Greggor, Marco Goecke… Which choreographer put you most at risk either technically or emotionally? Hands down it was Marco Goecke on Orlando, based

on the Virginia Woolf novel and created in Stuttgart. Two hours non-stop on stage, constant entries and exits, and movements that had never been seen before. It was like learning a foreign language all at once. You have to find the meeting point between your own emotions and the choreographer’s body language. It’s both magical and exhausting.

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What is your relationship with discipline? It seems like a paradox, but discipline becomes second nature for dancers. We grow up with it. We learn how to adjust our bodies to fit classical forms and how to adapt into extreme, unnatural positions. Working on the same movement to the point of exhaustion is just part of life for us. And in a certain way, it’s also what sets us free. Classical ballet is based essentially on virtuosity. How do you see this aspect today? Let’s just say that there are different kinds of virtuosity. For example, I’m reminded of some foot problems I had a while ago. I had to work on a tiny little muscle that I didn’t even know existed to get over the issue. It took so much work for such a small result. It’s a secret form of virtuosity. Are you still improving your skills? Of course! As soon as you stop improving your skills, it’s over. You have danced with countless partners. But the pair you form with Alicia Amatriain at the Stuttgart Ballet is legendary. Did she force you to improve your skills? Of course. She is like family. It’s so easy to fall back into her arms. After all, we have played so many different lovers! I always know when she needs help on stage, and she knows exactly when I’m in trouble. Your relationship with your stage partner is both mysterious and crucial. When I first started out as a young dancer in Manon, there was a moment when I had to change partners. And I remember my first partner watching me as I danced with the new one. It was like I was betraying her. Dancing so intimately with another woman, right in front of her – it was just as mortifying as getting caught in the act of infidelity. Now that you are 37, are there still a few roles you don’t feel ready yet? I have never turned down a part. A dancer’s career is far too short as it is. And I’m convinced that you never know how high a mountain is until you climb it. There have been times when I look back and realize I wasn’t quite ready for a role. When I think about dancing in Giselle at 19, I know I would do a lot of things differently today, notably in terms of preparing my jumps, but also in the way I stand or walk across stage. In nearly twenty years, there have been so many partners, professors, travels… You end up dancing your life away!


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Fashion: Armelle Leturcq - Hair: Sonia Duchaussoy - Make up: Hugo Villard - Stylist Assistant: Gemma Bedini Photographer Assistant: Jérémie Monnier - Thanks to: Théâtre des Champs Elysées, Paris


Susan Sarandon

Talented and audacious, Susan Sarandon is an amazing actress who has played for the greatest directors and with the best actors throughout her career. She is now playing the part of Bette Davis in Feud and preparing a new movie with Xavier Dolan. She told us about her memories and anecdotes, shared her vision of the industry and mentioned her political and ecological commitment.Â

PHOTO: MARTIN SCHOELLER / INTERVIEW: ARMELLE LETURCQ


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CINEMA

SUSAN SARANDON

You have played in so many amazing movies that are now cult... How do you see your career now? Do you think you have been lucky to work with such incredible directors?

-----------------------------------------------Feud FX TV series created by Ryan Murphy, Jaffe Cohen and Michael Zam starring Jessica Lange, Judy Davis, Jackie Hoffman, Alfred Molina and Stanley Tucci released March 5th on FX Going Places directed by John Turturro starring Bobby Cannavale, Audrey Tautou, Gloria Reuben and John Turturro to be released late 2017

Yes, I have been very lucky to have the opportunity to work with great filmmakers and I am very lucky to have survived so long in the business. There are not so many people that start out so young and stay until they’re seventy. I am very happy and still having a good time. So many actresses of your age are not working anymore. What do you think about that? Well, I am sure that some of them just got tired of doing it and I am sure that there are others that would like to keep playing but have a hard time finding parts. There aren’t that many stories that have an older woman or an older man as their centerpiece. So it’s hard to find work. For me, I have always seen myself as a character actor so that makes it a little bit easier for me. If you don’t mind playing supporting parts, then I think you can have a longer career. But for people accustomed to playing leading ladies, it’s not always easy to make that transition. You are not afraid to play mothers, or women who are really you age… I like working but it depends mostly on the part. I don’t mind if the part is small but I hope in some way it is necessary to telling the story. If you are working with great people and interesting directors it’s amazing. I love to be part of their world, being on the set again is really delightful and challenging. I am about to start shooting a movie where I will have a small but fun part and with people I admire. I always think, what the hell that might be fun! That’s my attitude, I look at it as an enriching personal experience and at the same time, I’m getting paid! So, for you, the project is more important that the part you will play? I want to be able to play a part that challenges me but the experience is really important: who you are working with, where you are shooting. Actually, you never know how something is going to turn out. When I shot The Great Waldo Pepper with George Roy Hill and Robert Redford right after they had had a huge success with The Sting, it was not as successful. You never know what is going to happen. You have to do it for what you are going to get out of it at that moment. For me, I would never make that decision based on the money.

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You worked with Louis Malle in Pretty Baby. How was your experience with this filmmaker? I remember that at Cannes, it was a bit of a scandal. It was the first time I went to Cannes, I was just looking at some pictures from that time. Cannes was crazy but it didn’t feel as corporate as it does now. I didn’t have any designer dress on, I had no hair and make-up team. I remember hanging out with Diane von Furstenberg and Barry Diller and some of the other French actors. At the actual opening, there was a riot and I remember Louis just went ahead and we got pushed into the door. I was in shock and Diane just took my hand – I will always be grateful to her for that. Do you have the feeling that Cannes is more about glamourous and beauty now? I think it has always been about beauty and all of that. I remember Cannes at that time as being a place that had a lot of really meaningful memories. It was more about personalities as opposed to producers and all of that. Now, you are dealing with a feeling that it is less individual and more corporate. I am not criticizing necessarily, just saying it definitely feels different. Maybe it’s not only Cannes, but all the cinema industry that is now related to money… Yes, look at what happened to the old Hollywood where you used to have the crazy studios who liked to make movies. Now they are owned by corporations. It’s definitely different. Watching you work, it looks like you are still trying to work in a very independent way, right? There’s no pattern to the kind of job I choose. I do small films and big films. Do you follow the advice of your agent or do you choose your projects on your own? I will ask for a perspective from my agent but my agent definitely knows that I make up my own mind. They understand that I can be interested in certain projects that may not be successful. But at the end of the day they always support my decision. You’re now working with the amazing film maker Xavier Dolan on his next movie, The Death and Life of John F Donovan. Tell us more about this project. I love him. He is passionate about what he does. He is very brave. He is involved in every aspect – it can be the design of the wallpaper, everything! I love that he cares so deeply. His aesthetic is a little bit pushed and the film has a lot of great actors in it. I had seen Mommy in Cannes and had really liked it. I was very happy to join him for this project.


CINEMA

SUSAN SARANDON

I play the leading character’s mother and he is played by Kit Harington. He is a guy who is a pretty famous television star who is trying to become authentic with who he is. It explores his relationship with the tabloids. Jessica Chastain plays the part of the tabloid’s editor-in-chief. Kathy Bates is the manager and publicist. Adele also has a part. I really enjoyed the experience of working with Xavier. He has a great sense of humor. His vision is very clear. I think it’s very interesting that he knows all his crew very well. He has worked with the same people since his first films. It’s like a family. What about the TV series Feud? You play the part of Bette Davis and the transformation is impressive. It was a very scary project to take on because everyone knows Bette Davis. I had played real people before but I don’t think I had played anyone like her. I loved working with Ryan Murphy and Jessica Lange. I think it was important to have 8 hours to tell that story because it was based on a lot of pain. The studio and gossip columns worked hard to fuel the feud because they wanted it to be very dramatic. It’s a technique that hasn’t changed. You know, when a man and a woman do a film together, the rumor is that they are sleeping together, But when two strong and famous women make a film together, the rumor is that they fight. That’s classic. Do you think that Joan Crawford and Bette Davis were really fighting? When Bette Davis was nominated for an Oscar and Joan Crawford was not, she and a very powerful columnist turned the Academy against Bette. And then Joan called all the other nominees to try to find someone that was not going to be able to attend and accept for them. So not only Bette didn’t get the award but Joan took the Oscar stage to accept the best-actress award on behalf of Anne Bancroft! How would you describe your involvement in humanitarian aid? When we are losing our water because of oil and gas and fracking, or when my money is being spent to bomb countries that we shouldn’t be involved with, well then I think I have not only a right but a duty to give people information. Because, you know, the Dakota Access Pipeline got really no coverage in mainstream media. When bulldozers disturbed sacred burial ground, the protest saw an extraordinary convergence of tribes that had never come together in the history of the country. There were inhumane arrests, and tanks, and militarized police spraying gas on people. You had thirteen young women put in cages with numbers written on their arms. None of the violence they suffered during the protest was mentioned by Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, or any of the so-called progressives in this country. The mainstream media are not telling people what’s going on. So if you have access to information – especially online – then you can educate people

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and show them what is being done with their money in their banks. Because it’s time to start thinking of divesting from oil and gas. Not just refraining from investing in it, but divesting from the banks that are building these things. It’s time to make that connection. I also took a trip to Greece to see what was going on and discovered poor people – who were refugees because of the things that we were doing – they were living in inhuman situations. And again, the mainstream media, because of their support for Trump and his message of hate, were not talking about it. What do you think about Donald Trump? He is terrible. The only saving grace is that he is so clumsily terrible in so many areas that now a lot of people are awake who had just snoozed off during our “cool” president, who was the one who built the pipelines up to the point where Trump took over. Obama had a terrible record on whistleblowers who had reported a lot of things, but we weren’t paying attention because he was so slick at doing these things, such as our relationship with Saudi Arabia and what we did in so many countries when Hillary Clinton was Secretary of State. So now what’s happened is that people are paying attention to social justice issues and the environment. They’re activated and it’s wonderful. They’re storming their representatives’ homes and becoming active in the mid-term elections, which hardly anybody ever voted in before. So that’s a really good thing. Trump is inconsistent. He’s filled his cabinet with Goldman Sachs and people who are terrible on the environment. But it’s not the first time that these people have been in the government. They’ve always been there. Now we’re purely seeing the system that’s in place. So I certainly didn’t want Trump to be in office, but now that he is and has surrounded himself with terrible people, we can’t ignore anymore these connections, or corruption, or this absolutely huge gap between the rich and the poor. The fact that we can’t in this country get a $15 minimum wage, or the fact that Democrats don’t support smaller candidates in other states – all this is really important to change. But you can’t expect things to change if the money is still in the system. When the Democrats refused to say that in the future they would not take super PAC money, then you know that they are still in the same place. So what’s happened is that there is a lot of new blood getting involved. Bernie Sanders made it clear that you don’t need to be connected to the rich in order to win an election. You can raise money on the Internet and through small donors. The mainstream media may not talk about it, but we’re seeing a revolution. Meanwhile, we have to hope that Trump doesn’t blow the whole world up. But he has definitely awakened a lot of people to what has been going on. And slowly, a lot of people who voted for him are seeing that he didn’t drain the swamp. He’s in the swamp and has brought more swamp people along with him. But I choose to be optimistic. There is a lot of work to be done, but at least now a lot of people who weren’t paying attention before are paying attention now. So maybe that’s what we needed.

"Cannes was crazy but it didn’t feel as corporate as it does now. I didn’t have any designer dress on, I had no hair and make-up team. I remember hanging out with Diane von Furstenberg and Barry Diller and some of the other French actors. At the actual opening, there was a riot and I remember Louis just went ahead and we got pushed into the door. I was in shock and Diane just took my hand – I will always be grateful to her for that."


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Robert Pattinson

Rocketing to international star status at just 22 for his role as the vampire Edward in the Twilight saga, Robert Pattinson definitively reinvented his image in 2012 with a masterful performance in David Cronenberg’s Cosmopolis. Since then, he has sought to work on unique films and auteur projects. At Cannes, we will see him play Connie, a person living on the margins, in the Safdie brothers’ Good Time. After the festival, it’s right back to work on the set of the next film by French filmmaker Claire Denis. For Crash, he stepped onto the set of artist Torbjørn Rødland and once again shattered his image… In June, Torbjørn Rødland will hold an exhibition in the French capital at Galerie Air de Paris.

PHOTOGRAPHY: TORBJØRN RØDLAND / INTERVIEW: ARMELLE LETURCQ


CINEMA

ROBERT PAT TINSON

How was the photo shoot with Torbjørn Rødland? It was fun! It was interesting and definitely not your typical magazine shoot. But it was fun and I really like him. He’s really an artist. He usually exhibits in galleries and art museums. He’s not the usual fashion photographer. Yeah, it was definitely an interesting shoot. I liked his work a lot, and he gave me his book, too. He’s really great. Tell us about your upcoming movie Good Time. How did you meet the filmmakers, Josh and Ben Safdie? I saw a still from Heaven Knows What quite a long time ago. There was something magical about the energy in that still of Arielle Holmes, the star of the movie. So I got a hold of Josh and Benny and met them in LA. I really liked them. They’ve got an incredible energy and I just had a feeling that something good was going to come out of it. I basically committed to doing whatever they wanted to do right there in that first meeting. Based on where their careers are going, I guess I was proven right. You can feel that energy at the beginning of the film. It’s very dramatic, the music is excellent, and it’s truly original and different… And it’s also a completely independent project… I get the same feeling from the movie: it feels very much like its own thing, especially among films coming out now. It feels so strange, but also the filmmaking is very confident. No one else makes movies like these guys. So I’m excited to see how people react to it. And it’s such a small production, too… Yeah, it’s tiny. But tons and tons and tons of energy went into it. It was really long hours: a minimum of 16 hours almost every day. By the end we had enough material for three or four movies. Would you like to work with them again? For sure! I would do anything with them. In a heartbeat.

Good Time is a very moving film. It features two brothers, one with a mental disorder and his older brother who tries to help him out. How do you see their relationship?

One brother, Nick, is mentally handicapped, and Connie, who’s my character, is kind of mentally ill, as well ! He’s not just a normal guy making normal, rational decisions. He starts convincing himself he can do anything he wants, as long as it’s for his brother. But really he’s making disastrous decisions again and again. He just doesn’t relate to the wor-

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ld on a normal level. We did quite a detailed backstory of Connie and Nick’s relationship before we started shooting. Our idea was that Connie and Nick are not actually that close. Connie has just got out of prison and he’s got it in his head that he needs to reconnect with his brother, but he doesn’t really know him. So it’s kind of an unusual relationship. Connie has no real family. It’s really just his brother… Yeah, and when you look at his character, he’s definitely the type of guy who gets pushed away by pretty much every single person who’s close to him. I think everybody knows someone like that, the guy who just keeps testing the limits of what people close to him will accept. He’s definitely been kicked out by his family a long time ago. Was it important for you to see a film like this go to Cannes? Oh, for sure! Especially knowing the whole story of how the film developed. It started out just so small and it turned out so well. I loved the movie the first time I saw it. And Cannes is my favorite place to release movies. It’s an entirely different experience than anywhere else, even at other festivals. I think the Safdies really deserve to be there, especially in competition. I was so happy when they made it into competition. You’ve also done a few blockbusters and bigger productions. Is it important for you to work on smaller, independent projects, too? Yeah, though I haven’t done a big blockbuster for quite a long time now. It’s very difficult to find interesting material to do. Someone might have a really good script, but they don’t have what it takes to make a good final product. The Safdies are genuinely exciting artists. Everybody is looking to work with people like that. I just got really lucky. You also made two films with David Cronenberg. What was it like working with him? I did Cosmopolis with him about five years ago. It was a completely life-changing experience. I didn’t realize that I could ever make movies like that and work with people like Cronenberg. And because David believed in me then, it set a trajectory for my life and took me in a totally different direction. David’s the best. He’s the best filmmaker you’ve worked with? Everyone is really good, but the movies David has done are something else. I was watching Videodrome the other day. He made movies in the early 80s that still feel original today. But everyone I’ve worked with have all been amazing.

" Earlier in my career I would never be able to commit 100% to someone else’s idea. I just realized that if you let the director be the director, and you be the actor and only the actor, it’s weirdly freeing in a way. "


CINEMA

ROBERT PAT TINSON

Yes I agree, his films from the 80s were really radical. Their style was really new then and is still really new today. The idea for Cosmopolis is also very original. Was it intimidating to shoot a movie that takes place entirely inside a car and focuses entirely on you? The writing was so amazing. But I love people with an interesting moral compass. Good Time is like that, as well, in that it’s not telling you how to feel. There’s no clear good or bad. I try to find people who can see the gray areas of existence. They just end up being more intelligent people. There are a lot of similarities between the Safdies’ outlook on life and David’s, as well.

It’s crazy how some projects get canceled at the last minute. Are you also involved in producing films? Yeah, but it has to be such a specific project. I’ve only recently been able to trust directors. Earlier in my career I would never be able to commit 100% to someone else’s idea. I just realized that if you let the director be the director, and you be the actor and only the actor, it’s weirdly freeing in a way. I think you learn how to get a bit better. But I’m always looking for things to produce. I just haven’t found the perfect thing yet. It can be interesting to get involved in production, but it’s also another job…

Yeah, I’m doing a movie in Germany with Claire Denis this summer. I think I’ll be there for three months or so. I don’t know why it took me so long to work in Europe. It just worked out that way.

On Good Time I loved how open all the producers were with me. It’s nice to feel like you’re a part of the entire process, rather than just doing your job as an actor and then no one ever talks to you again until the premier. I’ll definitely try my hand in production again, but that’s a few years down the line.

Are you based in England or the United States?

You’re still pretty young for taking on those roles…

I basically live between London and LA.

But getting older! (laughs) I still think I’m really young, but I’m actually not that young.

Do you want to work in Europe more than America now?

Can you tell us about the Claire Denis movie, High life? Is it in French or English? It’s in English. It’s all set on a spaceship. It’s about a group of criminals serving life sentences who are given a chance to go on a mission into deep space. But it’s also about a father’s relationship with his daughter. There are a lot of psychosexual themes in it. All of Claire’s movies are very dense and interesting. I’m really excited about doing it. I’ve been waiting for about three years for the project to come together. Is this the first time you’ll be working with a French filmmaker? I think it is, yes. I was going to do a movie with Olivier Assayas, but it fell apart the day before we were going to start shooting. Twice in fact. So I think Claire is the first one. What happened with the Assayas movie? Did it get canceled? He was in full pre-production. I was there doing rehearsals for about two months. And then the day before we were going to start shooting, the money just collapsed. And then I went back a few months later and the same thing happened. It’s something that happens with independent films. People find the money to make them wherever they can and it’s always a little unstable. But I loved the movie. Maybe one day we’ll get back together.

You started making movies at a young age… It helps when making a movie like Good Time, where you’re shooting at night and for long hours. You can’t have too much of a life to make movies like this. You can’t have an enormous amount of responsibility to other people. But then again, I just watched King of New York the other day. That movie feels like it’s got a totally wild energy, and Abel Ferrara must be getting up there in age by now…

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What other projects are you working on? I think I’m doing a movie with Antonio Campos, who did Afterschool. It’s a kind of Southern Gothic thriller. Hopefully that will happen after I finish the Claire Denis movie. Will you start shooting the Claire Denis movie right af ter Cannes? Yeah, and it will take quite a lot of time. So I think I’m shooting all the way into fall. So no summer vacation for you… Living in LA is basically like being on vacation all the time. I’ve had enough now. (laughs) You’re so lucky! One last question: do you remember when you decided to be an actor? Was it a clear decision that you made at one point? There were a few decisions. I did my first audition at sixteen or so, when just part of me wanted to be an actor. Gradually I started to take it more seriously as time went on. Though with every job I thought it was probably going to be my last, so I just wanted to make the most of it. I don’t think I ever made a solid decision like, “this is what I want to do.” But I can’t imagine doing anything else now. I’ve spent almost half my life doing it now. It’s kind of crazy! Do you know how many films you’ve made? Twenty-three or something? I have no idea actually! That’s not too many. You have a lot lef t to do… Yeah, I’ve got to get my numbers up!

Do you move right from one film to the next? Or do you take breaks in between? Do you have enough time for yourself and your personal life? I want to go from film to film, but the projects I like take so much time to put together. So I end up pacing around my living room for months at a time, praying for the project to start. I finished Good Time a while ago and it’s just coming out now. Can you still have a “normal life” ? A few years ago it was way more intense, but I’ve got a pretty normal life now. I do very little aside from walking my dog and reading some books occasionally. I do basically nothing. I’m definitely a creature of habit. Once I get into a system of how I want to live my life, I’ll do the exact same thing for weeks. It drives everyone else crazy, but I could eat the same meal, do the exact same thing, and go to bed at the exact same time for a year…

-----------------------------------------------The Lost City of Z directed by James Gray starring Charlie Hunnam, Sienna Miller and Tom Holland released April 14th 2017 Good Times directed by Josh & Benny Safdie starring Jennifer Jason Leigh and Barkhad Abdi to be released this summer 2017 Damsel directed by David & Nathan Zellner starring Mia Wasikowska and Joseph Billingiere to be released this year tbc


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GEORGE MACKAY Lately you have been part of the miniseries 11.22.63 (2016), based on a novel by Stephen King and directed by Kevin Macdonald on the assassination of John F. Kennedy, starring opposite James Franco I have been very lucky to be involved in these productions. 11.22.63 was my first experience in a television mini-series. And it should be said also that there were a number of different directors as well as Kevin across the series: some doing single episodes, some doing two or three. It was so exciting reading each episode and having the story unfold in that manner, with a cliffhanger almost every quarter of an episode. Bridget Carpenter, and all the writers involved in creating the series, and of course Stephen King with his book, did an amazing job of taking to conspiracy theories and entwining them with fictional drama. The whole thing is orchestrated to keep you on edge, so it was a thrill and a pleasure to read and be a part of. I played Bill Turcotte in the series, and he was the only character who was created for the series. He has his roots in a character who appears in the original book, but that man is in his forties, and leaves the story much faster than Bill in the series. Bill was a storytelling device created by Bridget to ask the questions that Jake (James’s character) asks himself in the book’s internal monologue, as well as asking questions that the audience would ask in terms of plot holes as the story unfolds. In transferring the narrative from a novel to a TV series, Bridget needed to tell it slightly differently, and that is why Bill was created. I was very lucky that in doing so, Bridget gave Bill a fantastic arc of his own. And it was a real pleasure to get to be a part of Stephen King’s world, as well as to have the freedom to make him my own, informed by but also independent of the source material. I listened to a lot of bluegrass music whilst we were shooting. You also starred in Captain Fantastic (2016) wich received many awards. Tell us about the inspirations, the breakthroughs, and the challenges It was a real honor to be a part of Captain Fantastic. Not only because of the group of people who made it, but because of all that I learned in doing so. Matt is such an eclectic and fair man, and he encouraged us all to experience all that the family did in the film. We went on a two-day survival trip, slept together as a family in a hut we built made of ferns. We learned how to track, how to start a fire with a bow drill. We read a lot and learnt about the world’s political systems… We were healthy. It was through the learning that that story encouraged that I questioned, explored, and altered how I live my life now.

Captain Fantastic is a film about balance,

and I think Matt presented a very fair argument for both the positive and negative aspects of either extreme. I think fashion and technology and consumerism are an integral part of how all cultures operate. But I think that we have become too extreme. I think that extremity is in correlation with the demand for it. But the tricky thing with always progressing is that whatever the subject of that progression, that rise becomes more and more extreme as naturally it tries to outdo itself. What did you hope your audience would come away with af ter they watched Captain Fantastic? It’s hard to answer that without being somewhat aware of what people’s reactions to it have been already, and I don’t want to just cherry pick the good ones. But I hope that if and when people see the film, it will make them realize the beauty and strength of family, and that what happens in the world is an extension of attitudes we hold personally – so to take care and be kind with both. I hope it makes the person watching it think about what they are close to and how that reverberates. What makes you decide to be part of a production? What are your motivations? What are you looking or aiming for as a person and human being?

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London-based actor George Mackay will receive top billing in several upcoming productions in 2017. His passion for acting first came to light at the tender age of ten years old, when he got his first role in Peter Pan. Next, he continued to develop his unique talent by acting in a series of indie films. But it was in 2016 that he earned his breakout roles alongside Viggo Mortensen in Captain Fantastic and James Franco in the series 22.11.63.

Firstly I am very thankful to have the opportunity to work: any opportunity to work I am grateful for. What draws me to projects are a mixture of a personal draw and broader draw. I want to be part of stories that are part of a present social conversation, and that is more important than my role in them personally. In that case, as in any case actually, but especially with projects that have a social purpose far greater than my own desire to play a certain character in a certain way, my desire is to be a part in serving that project in any way I can. Most important is always the story. You are always in service to the story, and so therefore that takes precedence. You are a young actor but already have an interesting background... When you start the process of building a character, what are the things you think about? How do you get into your character? For example, Aaron in For Those in Peril (2013), for which you won Best Film Actor at the Scottish BAFTA Awards. The process of building a character changes with each character and story as there are different things asked of you by each one. The context of that character is always important, and I feel understanding them via that is very help-

PHOTO: THOMAS COOKSEY / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO

-----------------------------------------------Marrowbone directed by Sergio G. Sánchez starring Mia Goth, Anya Taylor-Joy and Charlie Heaton to be released October 2017 Where Hands Touch directed by Amma Asante starring Amandla Stenberg to be released late 2017


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ful. Where they grew up, how they speak, what they do, what’s happened to them before the story begins – all that informs how they move, talk, and express themselves, and I enjoy trying to suss that out. I don’t know if I will be able to understand or get across how they think without doing it myself. And so understanding how their context shapes them adds levels to them, which hopefully hides me trying to convincingly get across what they are thinking. With Aaron in For Those in Peril, I had the best time with Paul experimenting and playing. Aaron is the lone survivor of a fishing boat accident, and he believes his older brother, who was on the boat with him, is still alive out at sea. He believes finding him and bringing him back will make everything better again. It’s a very clear logic, and everything around that logic is what makes things sad or dangerous. To Aaron it is simple. It’s why he thinks this that is more complex. So Paul and I just worked

with varying degrees of how to show Aaron’s logic, and that came down to Paul’s writing and how we filmed the scenes. For scenes in which Aaron was on his own, and we knew the action would only be a few seconds in the final film, we would do a few very long takes to explore varying levels of that repeated action. The safety of knowing only a few seconds would be used, made us both comfortable to try things we would have shied away from otherwise. Paul would give really clear direction, too, that you could also interpret any way you want. Like during one scene with his older brother’s ex-girlfriend Jane, Paul said, “Scare her.” That is so clear, yet you can take it in so many different directions. And that was such a joy to shoot. I guess sometimes you can have a hard time getting into a character’s mind... What is your process for finding what’s inside that mind? For example,

the character development for Tim in Bypass (2014) is very interesting and radical, or Tommo in Private Peaceful (2013) who struggles between his love for his family and his homeland... What is inside the mind, and what and how it comes out, I think comes back to something that fascinates me – Nature vs Nurture. Duane, who directed Bypass, taught me a lot about that. With the nature of his work, he wanted everything to be as natural as possible. In his previous work he had worked mainly with people who had not acted before. And on Bypass he wanted to experiment with different processes of acting to have more control over creating something that was consciously created, but still felt very real. He encouraged me to spend time doing the things Tim would do often: handling money, riding his bike (even getting off and


Gucci - Embroidery men’s suiting with white shirt on it quickly), unzipping the bag he worked from. All of this was in an effort to make certain physical reactions second nature, and that helped me to understand that people can work like that emotionally, too. I think Duane cast me because he thought I had a personal affinity to Tim and how he thought. And the nature of shooting – doing scenes numerous takes and being in Tim’s head a lot – meant that the two worlds blurred into one somewhat. It was Duane who helped me to understand muscle memory in a psychological sense. With Tommo, again I felt very close to the part, and I could find strong parallels in my own life between him and myself. Therefore having a sense of things in nature, again it was about understanding the context he lived in and had grown up in, and how that nurtured what was already within him: that part of the world, that time, and how that informed the way in which the feelings both him and I share come out purely as him. All

of this is easier to look back on though. At the time of doing this, I think the process was a little less articulated. It was Pat and Duane who steered me in each film to get across what we ended up with. Now tell us about your upcoming projects in 2017: Ophelia , directed by Claire McCarthy, Where Hands Touch, directed by Amma Asante, and Marrowbone, directed by Sergio G. Sanchez.

Marrowbone is a film directed by Sergio G. Sanchez. He is the writer of The Orphanage and The Impossible, and this is the first fea-

ture film that he is directing. It is the story of an English family on the run from their past, as they have relocated to rural America. I know that is not much information about it, but it is a film full of mystery and therefore very difficult to describe without spoiling it. We had an amazing time making it, and I think Sergio and all involved

have created something truly beautiful. So I hope that people will support it. Where Hands Touch is a film written and directed by Amma Asante. It is the story of a bi-racial German girl, Leyna, living in Germany towards the end of the Second World War. It is a story of identity. It explores whether who you are is defined by what you feel inside, or whether you are defined by your context. It is about the struggle to take ownership of the self. I play Lutz, a Hitler youth boy who has built himself upon an ideal, and he and Leyna fall in love. Ophelia is a film directed by Claire McCarthy, and it is a reworking of Shakespeare’s Hamlet seen from Ophelia’s point of view. What I feel this story offers is, where the original play focuses predominantly on the psychology of one man, by taking that same story and framework and seeing it through a female character’s eyes, you see the workings of society and a broader picture of all that is going on. I play Hamlet.


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REDA KATEB I saw that Django was shown at the Berlin Film Festival…

Did you do your own research into the character of Django Reinhardt?

Yes, we premiered in competition and opened the Berlin Film Festival. All in all, the film earned a ton of visibility on the international scene. It was a symbolic choice on the part of the German organizers to open the festival with this film. In light of their history and the current political context, I think it was a smart choice.

Yes, quite a lot. I spent a year preparing for the project. Learning to play guitar like Django was a big part of it.

The film is very subdued. Your acting style is never overly dramatic. And yet at the same time your portrayal is genuinely moving, precisely because everything is evoked with finesse… That fits with the character of Django, who was both very colorful and also very timid. He was a low-key type of person. A lot of people try to play guitar like Django. What you always see in “Django style” renditions is an attempt to reproduce his virtuosity and string together so many notes in rapid-fire. But another remarkable aspect of his music is the beauty of its silence, the space he uses between notes, accelerating or slowing down the pace – it’s this hidden beauty that I find in the film. It’s true that there is very little dialogue in the film. All the emotions are communicated by other means. It’s not always clear how Django reacts to situations or how he perceives them. We feel that he is suffering and that he is lost, like the war could change everything overnight and take everything away from him… That’s right. And at the same time he finds his roots in the film. He identifies with a new truth that leads him to dedicate a requiem to his deported Romani brothers. He starts out enjoying a lot favor and pomp in the world. But once he loses everything, what remains is his most naked and authentic self. How was the film directed? Etienne Comar started out as a screenwriter. Django is the first film he has directed. He really threw himself into the project. He worked with me like a partner, as though we were sharing a cabin on a ship and had to work together. He had some very precise ideas for certain things he absolutely wanted, but he also allowed me to bring my own imagination to the film. He gave me just enough direction to leave me free enough to take flight…

Do you play all the guitar in the film? Yes and no. All the close-up shots focused on the hands are done by the musician Christophe Lartilleux, who worked with his father since he was a kid to develop a playing style like Django, using three fingers. He is a true guardian of the musical tradition and a Django fanatic. As for the wide shots or pans from the hands to the face, it’s me playing. But the actual music is neither mine nor Django’s, it’s Stochelo Rosenberg, a jazz master who recorded all the Django songs in the film. We needed the songs to sound contemporary enough to get the audience into the skin of all the people who flocked to see Django play. So the music had to resonate for today, something we could not achieve with the grainy old Django recordings that tend to crackle. Were you already familiar with the Romani people before the film? Yes, a little bit. They didn’t teach us in high school about the Romani people during the war and their genocide, which was only recognized by François Hollande in 2016…

Revealed in Jacques Audiard’s 2009 film A Prophet, Reda Kateb has only seen his reputation grow with each successive role. At ease in a variety of settings, the actor has shared the screen with the likes of Tahar Rahim, Viggo Mortensen, and Ryan Gosling. He has even worked with prestigious international filmmakers like Wim Wenders and Kathryn Bigelow. This year he stars as Django Reinhardt in Etienne Comar’s biopic Django, which opened the Berlin Film Festival.

And the Romani camps stayed in place long after the war! That’s true. Even after the war and the liberation, the Romani still suffered… all the same violence continued. But beyond that history, the poetry in their culture truly fascinated me. It’s a poetry centered on travel, both in life and in music. Back when I was a projectionist I showed Gadjo Dilo by Tony Gatlif. I loved that film. It features Romain Duris who sets off to the East and is eventually taken in by a Romani family. I took a similar kind of trip in Morocco after I saw that film. I went there after an intense year of work to find myself. I backpacked all the way to Essaouira to see the musicians… So the whole concept of the poetic voyage is part of my… Your fantasy world… Yes, my romantic side, with music as my passport. I think it’s wonderful that we can go meet people, travel, and make music, even if we don’t all speak the same language. I’ve taken similar trips in India and in other countries. I mostly played a bit of percussion and drums. It helped me connect very quickly with people.

PHOTO: ALEXANDRA CATIÈRE / INTERVIEW: ARMELLE LETURCQ

-----------------------------------------------Django directed by Etienne Comar starring Cécile de France and Beata Palya, released March first 2017 Submergence directed by Wim Wenders starring Alicia Vikander, James McAvoy and Charlotte Rampling to be released soon


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I try to forget about the stakes and approach every film in the same way. Whether it’s a big production or an indie film – which I still want to work on – I do not focus solely on the stakes of the film to make my choices. But it’s true that I feel what’s at stake for the people who invested in the film. What was new for me was spending an entire year preparing for a part. I have always wanted to do that but had never gotten the chance. I love the preparation phase, when you are free to imagine what the project can be without having to enter directly into the performance and the frantic pace of film sets. That year gave me time to think and reflect, which is a rare opportunity for most actors. Usually we dive right into the action and leave it at that. Does that mean you did nothing else during that year? I still acted in two other movies that year. But I always had my guitar with me. Anytime I got a break I would go back to my dressing room and practice scales or exercises. The two films I shot were the latest from Wim Wenders, The Beautiful Days of Aranjuez, and Paris Prestige, the first film directed by Hamé and Ekoué of the rap group La Rumeur.

The Beautiful Days of Aranjuez was pre-

sented at the Venice Film Festival in September. It was a very quiet release, because it is a 3D adaptation of Peter Handke’s play, in which a man and a woman discuss relationships between men and women while sitting in a garden with Nick Cave singing in the background. But the film was still released nearly everywhere around the world, since Wim Wenders directed it. It is very experimental and so it is intended for a certain type of audience. Aren’t you playing in another upcoming Wim Wenders film? Yes, Submergence. But I only have a supporting role. Right now I’m doing the re-recording, which means I’m dubbing myself after filming, with some of the film’s dialogue in Somali. I have to work on that today and tomorrow. How did you meet so many important directors? Wenders, Kathryn Bigelow… It all came about rather naturally. Although I am always surprised to meet these directors, because when I started out I never expected to work with such bastions of film, like Wim. He is one of the directors who truly shaped the way I watch movies… And I have to say that the most talented people I have worked with have often turned out to be the most modest, as well. I definitely had to put work and effort into these films, but I felt fully supported because these directors know how to look at you and their gaze transcends you. In a way, they help you advance just by the way they look at you. At least that’s how I see it.

Fashion: Armelle Leturcq - Makeup: Helena Henrion - Hair: Chiao Chenet

You have had quite a run of acting in big productions. While this one is part of another major production, did the stakes seem higher to you this time?

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Do you have any quiet periods? Do they bother you? That can happen and it doesn’t bother me. I think having a few quiet periods is crucial in an acting career. Because quiet periods are a part of life, too. And you have to experience these quiet periods if you hope to represent all of life. Sometimes you are flooded with things you want to express when you first start acting. But there are always quiet moments during the day… And those are the moments that have opened up new doors for me in an artistic sense. Working with Wim Wenders taught me a lot about these quiet moments, non-intentionality, and letting go. Laying low… Laying low, yes absolutely, even while acting. One of the most influential acting books for me was The Invisible Actor by Japanese actor Yoshi Oida, who worked a lot with Peter Brook. He said he wanted to be a ninja when he was a kid. And then the ninja wanted to be an actor.

How did they choose you? Was it because of a specific role you played? Yes, there was one role. It had to start somewhere and for me it was with my role in Jacques Audiard’s A Prophet . That film was popular all over the world and won the Grand Prix at Cannes. It left a mark on both the film industry and the era. That’s when Kathryn Bigelow and a few other people contacted me. And Ryan Gosling, too? Ryan Gosling saw A Prophet and Kathryn Bigelow’s Zero Dark Thirty, which I was also in. He didn’t have me do any screen tests. He just sent me the script and asked if I wanted to be in the movie. The hardest part was getting the visa! As an actor, it can be complicated to get a visa to work in the United States… Can you tell us about your upcoming projects? I can’t talk about everything, but I can mention the one I’m working on now: Territoires , directed by David Oelhoffen, who also directed Far from Men, an adaptation of an Albert Camus novella that I played in along with Viggo Mortensen. I’m playing a drug squad captain in Territoires , which also stars Matthias Schoenaerts. Have you ever acted with him? Never. But I’m excited to work with him! Though I haven’t met him yet. He is living in Antwerp, Belgium at the moment. We tried to find a time to meet, but our schedules make it tough. I think there are some similarities between you two. You both have a strong physical presence…

I think we are going to work well together. At least I am excited to have the chance to work with him. He’s an actor I like a lot. I’ll start preparing for the new film after I finish promoting Django. How do you see your career now? Do you feel like it took a while to take off ? My film opportunities came much later, when I was thirty. Even though you are still young at thirty, I don’t think I was fully ready yet with Jacques Audiard’s A Prophet . I started out in theater. Now I see myself more in film, but I still pick my projects in the same way and work hard. I just have more options to choose from. For example, I haven’t shot any films since last July. I recently had a little boy and I wanted to take some time for myself, because all the filming and promotion can take up a lot of time… You can’t work all the time, you have to live, too. It’s important to make yourself a rare commodity and only do good projects. Looking through your filmography, it’s remarkable how there are no bad choices. There may be a few things that aren’t as good as the rest. Yes, but together.

all

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I would have a lot of trouble working on a film where I didn’t feel at home. I think it would make me really unhappy… But I try not to make myself too scarce. It’s a strange business in that sense. One year, I got eight offers I thought were interesting and I did all eight, some lead roles and others supporting roles. But if I don’t receive projects that I really want to work on, then I won’t do them. I’m not interested in filming for the sake of filming.

I saw that you come from a family of artists… Yes, my father was an actor. I started learning to act with him when I was still very small. I first got on stage when I was eight. My great-uncle was an Algerian writer and I have a few other uncles who are artists… Kateb means “writer” in Arabic. Did you already know you wanted to act at a young age? What was school like? Did you start doing theater in school? Very early on. I actually started with my father. He took me on shoots with him everywhere… As an infant I spent a lot of time in a bassinet in the dressing room, with my mother nearby and my father stopping in to say hi between scenes. I also have a few memories of myself as a child, going to rehearsals and hitting the road with my father. One of my father’s friends needed a kid to act in a play when I was eight. He offered me the part and I said yes – that’s when I caught the bug. Then I told my father I wanted to be an actor, so when I was eleven he wrote a part for me in a play he was adapting from a work by Tahar Ben Jelloun. So I first started filming scenes when I was twelve…


SOFIA BOUTELLA Tell us a bit about yourself and where you come from…

focus on that. I may come back to dance eventually, but for now I have stopped.

I was born in Algeria, then moved to Paris when I was 10, and to Los Angeles when I was 24.

What does cinema bring you exactly? And what do you want to bring to others?

You grew up in France… What can you tell us about your experience in this country? How did you end up going to the USA?

I think movies have the power to inspire people, to change people’s lives, or send a message. But also the power to just entertain people and give them a window toward another world, a sense of imagination and a way to exit their everyday lives. Movies have a lot of strong powers.

I spent my whole adolescence in France and danced a lot there. It was in Paris that I switched from ballet to hip hop, so it represents quite a significant part of my life. When I came to the US, I was on tour with Madonna (Confessions Tour) in Tokyo and had been on the road for almost the entire year. When they asked me where I wanted to go back after the tour, I still had two months left on my US visa since we had rehearsed for the tour in LA. So that’s where I said I wanted to go. It was kind of a dare, maybe just for myself, but once I was there I really loved it and decided to stay. You are first and foremost a dancer. You even got invited to dance on tour with Madonna. How did that happen? It was all through Jaime King, really. When I met Jaime, he had been Madonna’s stage director for 8 or 9 years, but he was the one who first booked me for Nike. Then, Madonna was releasing Confessions on a Dance Floor and getting ready for the tour for that, so he introduced me to her and they ended up booking me for the tour as well. It was the first time I had ever danced in heels, but she told me, “There’s a first time for everything.” How did you start acting? I started acting when I was 17. I went innocently to an audition my friend had told me was happening in Paris. It was for a movie called Dance Challenge, or Le défi in French. I ended up booking it and played the love interest of the lead guy. It was a musical and I had to dance a lot in it, but I really enjoyed filming and ended up taking classes from there. For your first three productions you interpreted dancer roles. But then from 2014 you started interpreting different characters, like the villain Gazelle in Kingsman: The Secret Service or Jaylah in Star Trek Beyond… Is it something you want to develop more than dance? Or do you find a way to do both? I stopped dancing five years ago and haven’t danced professionally since. Right now I’m really committed to acting and want to

Tell us about your upcoming projects for 2017: first Atomic Blonde, directed by David Leitch and also starring Charlize Theron… Things get hot between you and Charlize! We want all the details about filming that scene… I loved filming the movie. I think Charlize is phenomenal in the film and it’s a great spy film. I think it’s very cool to see a strong woman kicking ass the way she does in the film. I appreciated that the director David Leitch, who comes from the stunt world, didn’t see me as a go-to stunt girl. Charlize is such a pro. We were very comfortable with each other and we just really went for it. But it was all much more technical than it looks. You will also star in The Mummy, directed by Alex Kurtzman, opposite Tom Cruise and Russell Crowe where you portray princess Ahmanet… Yes, I play Ahmanet, an ancient Egyptian princess who is promised to become Pharaoh. But then something happens and it is taken away from her. So she summons the gods, but makes a deal with the wrong god. When she comes back in modern day as The Mummy, she unleashes a terrifying force upon the world, driven by her revenge and bitter fury. But it was important to me that there be a psychology to her. A reason why she does what she does. I also did research on ancient Egypt and the country’s mythology, on the kings and queens and how they carried themselves. I found it very interesting that many of these people didn’t move faster or exert any more effort than they needed to. They never raised their voice and commanded from something far deeper than what meets the eye. In all your roles you’re always very dressed up… I think fashion forms an integral part of a character. Is it as much important in your private life? I wouldn’t say it’s important, but I have fun with it. I wake up feeling different every day, and have different styles in my back pocket

PHOTO: JAMES MOUNTFORD / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO

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Climbing the stairs at Cannes is a familiar exercise for Sofia Boutella. Though still little known among French audiences, the young Franco-Algerian actress is already a star across the pond after starring in several American blockbusters. Eighteen years after the first remake of The Mummy, the new version with Tom Cruise will hit French theaters on June 14. From hip-hop music videos for Rihanna, Chris Brown, Ne-YO, and Usher, to her lead role as Eva in Street Dance 2, we take a look back on the multitalented young actress’s career. that I like to try out and experiment with. I dress differently depending on how I feel when I wake up. What are you plans for the future? What would you like to do next? I’m really trying to take it one day at a time. I have a very busy summer on tour for The Mummy and promoting Atomic Blonde. But I’m also going to shoot a movie with Jodie Foster called Hotel Artemis that I’m really excited about. Ultimately I’m just looking for interesting and creative projects to explore.

-----------------------------------------------Atomic Blonde directed by David Leitch starring Charlize Theron, James McAvoy and Bill Skarsgård to be released July 2017 The Mummy directed by Alex Kurtzman starring Tom Cruise, Annabelle Wallis and Russell Crowe to be released June 2017


Louis Vuitton - Leather trench coat, large fishnet tights and shorts stylist own


Louis Vuitton - Orange sport jacket with twit suiting jacket and black ankle boots, large fishnet tights stylist own


Louis Vuitton - Twet coat/dress with leather details and black ankle boots


Fashion: Andrej Skok - Makeup: Jamie Greenberg @ The Wall Group - Hair: Andy Le Compte @ The Wall Group - Stylist Assistant: Léonard Murray


DANIEL BRÜHL Tell us about yourself… I grew up in Germany mainly, but I am the son of a Spanish mother and a German father. And interestingly I have two French aunts, so I also grew up in a French family in Germany with cousins that are half-German, half-French. So it was a very multicultural environment. Professionally speaking, I started playing in school theatre as a child. So I got in touch with the film universe and it was always something that interested me because my father was a documentary filmmaker and TV director. And then by the age of 15 I did my first film. I was immediately fascinated by it so I wanted to become an actor at that time. Your career has led you to play very different roles: Alex in Good Bye, Lenin!, Fredrick in Inglourious Basterds, Niki Lauda in Rush, Thomas in The Face of an Angel, Daniel in Colonia , or Tony in Burnt just to mention a few… I guess for an actor it’s interesting to explore all these different sides. That’s what makes it interesting and keeps you fresh and curious. Like in life, we are many things at once as human beings. So I was happy to be given the chance not to be typecast as just one thing. But it’s not easy to get the opportunity because people want to put you in a box, you know. And I suffered from that a little bit at the beginning. It was from a film which was the nicest gift and privilege and a little bit of a curse at the same time, it was Good Bye, Lenin! which just put me on the map and helped me in so many ways up until now. It’s a film that I am extremely fond of but because it was so successful, people then really thought that I am the guy from that film, that I am the nicest German guy that would do anything for his mother. So people would see in me like an ideal son-in-law who would help old people cross the street. After that in Germany I always got so many scripts to play this nice guy and that really annoyed me after a while. I really had to fight to get other opportunities and different parts. Oddly enough these opportunities to play villains came from other countries! They didn’t have that bias or impression of me… And I was so surprised when I got the call that I got the part in Inglorious Basterds or Rush for which I was playing the part of Niki Lauda - this German-speaking Austrian character. If somebody from Germany would have done this film they probably wouldn’t have chosen me because they would have thought, “Oh no! He is too nice.” And then Lauda is a bit of an asshole in that film. He’s quite cocky and arrogant. I only had one meeting with the producers in London. After that meeting they gave me the part. I remember how surprised I was on the phone and John said, “No, no. I can

see you playing that guy. I can feel it.” I’m very thankful for getting that unbiased look as an actor. What was the most difficult part for you to play? Which movie was the hardest in terms of interpreting your character and why? There were one film that I did – one of the first I did when I was 20. I played a schizophrenic in a film called The White Sound directed by Hans Weingartner, who also did The Edukators, which was invited to Cannes. That was the second film we did together. But the first one was a very experimental, intense film. I played a character who was based on one of the director’s friends who actually suffered from schizophrenia. I prepared myself with that guy, but it was very hard for me to get there because it’s a mental disorder that is very hard to understand from the outside. It was just an attempt to get close to it without fully understanding it, so there was always that feeling of it being off. It was important for me to explore my own madness that was within me, to believe in what I was doing, to convince myself. But I would suffer from that disease so it was quite difficult, one of the hardest roles.

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Discovered fifteen years ago in Good Bye Lenin!, Daniel Brühl has put together an impressive filmography. His masterful performance as a young Nazi in

Inglourious Basterds

earned him international acclaim and sealed his reputation as one of the greats on screen. He tells us about his career, his acting experiences, and his upcoming projects for 2017, when we will see him opposite Vincent Cassel and Rosamund Pike in José Padilha’s Entebbe.

Lately we have seen you on the screen in Me and Kaminski and Captain America . How was it to be reunited with Wolfgang Becker af ter all those years? With Wolfgang we have been friend ever since Good Bye, Lenin! We became very close friends. We have always been in touch and we always wanted to work with each other again, and so luckily we did. I think he is going to visit me next week here in Budapest. So yes, we are very close! Captain America to me was like going to a different planet. It is a completely different acting experience. I was very impressed by the quality of the Marvel films, because it is entertainment on a higher level. It is extremely well done and there are so many fantastic actors involved in these films. Then when I met Kevin Feige he was an incredibly smart man who holds that whole universe together. It was very inspiring to listen to him and his passion for the comic world was contagious. I felt like a little boy when I went to the set in Atlanta for the first time and saw the scale of it, how huge the production was, and how incredibly professional everybody was. To have the luxury of working with all these fantastic actors like Chris and Robert Downey, Jr. and all the others. I really enjoyed it! Now tell us about your upcoming projects for 2017… You will star as lead role in the series The Alienist along with Luke Evans and Dakota Fanning. What can you say about this experience?

PHOTO: MARC HIBBERT / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO

-----------------------------------------------Cloverfield Movie directed by Julius Onah starring Elizabeth Debicki and Gugu Mbatha-Raw to be released October 2017 The Alienist TV series directed by Jakob Verbruggen starring Luke Evans and Dakota Fanning the series will premiere in late 2017 on TNT Entebbe directed by José Padilha starring Rosamund Pike and Vincent Cassel to be released late 2017


Brioni - Navy polo shirt, APC - denim jacket


Dior Homme - Men’s full suit with shirt Nike - trainers


Dior Homme - Men’s suiting jacket and white shirt


CINEMA

DANIEL BRUHL

left: Gucci - White logo print T-shirt, APC - Camel cotton jacket right: Issey Miyake - men’s full suit, Hermes - blouson top

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CINEMA

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Stylist Assistant: Conan Laurendot - Location: Amazon Studio, London

Fashion: Andrej Skok - Grooming: Hiroshi Matsushita - Photographer Assistant: Jack Gray

Now onto film: we’ll see you next in José Padilha’s Entebbe, along with Rosamund Pike and Vincent Cassel, as well as Cloverfield Movie, directed by Julius Onah… What was new for you about filming these movies?

It is the first time that I am doing a long TV show. I have wanted to play the part for such a long time after watching so many series. I just started a couple weeks ago, but I know already that I will be as happy after 6 months in September as I am right now. It is something that I am really certain of... It is one of those projects where all the pieces come together perfectly. First of all, it is based on a wonderful book called The Alienist and that book absolutely mesmerized me. I couldn’t put it down. I was reading it like a twelve-year-old boy. It takes place during 1896 and it’s a very dark and gloomy story about a psychologist and some other guys who are hunting a serial killer. It is very sinister and has a wonderful atmosphere and quality. The adaptation of the script is fantastic. I would say the preparation is even more intense because there is so much more time that you have to spend with the character. So you have to really want to explore all the aspects. Because it is not a contemporary story, you have to dive into this universe and into that world of 1896 NYC. I read a lot about the city at that time and watched documentaries. I also read a lot of materials about psychology. I really spent many hours reading Freud and all those guys. So there is a lot to do. And obviously you have much more text and lines, so I spent time preparing my theme in advance. And then because you sometimes jump from episode to episode and you’re not always shooting in a chronological order, you have to be well prepared because you have to know what state your character is in and have that journey in mind. There is also way more space to express one character. Sometimes movies can be like a corset. You have to get to a certain point in ten minutes and so you feel limited sometimes. If you have a fascinating character you can get really disappointed because you think, “Oh, I’d love to explore more about this or that aspect of him.” So it is wonderful to have the privilege to do so in a TV series and not hear the clock ticking in your head. It is nice to have the luxury of time. I was approached by the Belgian director Jakob Verbruggen, who is a wonderful and passionate director, and all the producers involved in it are fantastic. Overall it is just a fantastic project to be involved in.

It is always new and different. In Cloverfield Movie we were in a spaceship and shot that at Paramount. It is a sci-fi thriller that happens in the future. So that was obviously a completely different experience from Entebbe, where we went back in time to the 70s and I played a terrorist hijacking a plane. I had the honor of working with Rosamund Pike who is one of my favorite actresses. They are very different films with very different settings, but I have to say that both are equally demanding and exciting. José Padilha is a fantastic director and I have been a fan of him since I watched the first and second Elite Squad. And obviously Narcos was amazing to watch. I think there is so much great cinema coming from South America. I don’t know what it is, “Latino Fire” maybe, but José definitely has it! He has a brilliant style of shooting, sometimes improvising things on the day of filming. I have been doing this for a long time but loved it. It was a documentary style of producing and approaching a story, so it was very energetic and fresh and fast. Cloverfield Movie was much more technical and visually demanding, because we were in a futuristic world. And now I’m very happy to be in 1896 New York, wearing one the fabulous suits they tailored me and being driven around in a horse-drawn carriage to recreate that wonderful city and time travel. It’s so nice to do this job! It makes you feel like a child sometimes. It is almost like in a dream. Yesterday we were shooting wide shots with probably fifteen carriages. People were going to an opera all dressed up among old buildings, gas lanterns, you know all of it. And I was sitting in the carriage and looking outside. Because it was a wide shot you needed a big space where there is nothing from nowadays. And it was absolutely breathtaking to really think for a couple of moments, “Oh my god, I’m in 1896. I’m in the past!” It’s wonderful. What would you like to change in our society today? Does cinema allow you to get involved in one way or another? I want to believe that Cinema can help and make people aware of certain things. That is why I am happy to be involved in films about social issues. Many things nowadays should be changed, but if there is one thing that I want right now it is for Europe to stick together. That means a lot to me. I grew up in a wonderful open-minded place that shares values and stands in unity. So I would love it if that would continue to be the case in the future.


CALLIE HERNANDEZ

Tell us about yourself, your journey, and where you come from…

about either of the films themselves because I haven't seen them yet.

I grew up in Texas for the most part. My dad is a holistic doctor. My mom is my best friend. I was a musician before I became conscious of the fact that I'd always wanted to be an actor. One of my closest friends was the music supervisor for Terrence Malick and asked me to come in on an audition for a very small part. I spent my first days on set sort of surrounded by cinematic heaven. The set felt like home. It was a very lucid feeling. I guess that's why they use the term "dream" for these kinds of things.

How was it to work with a director like Ridley Scott? Tell us about your role more precisely and how he directed you during the filming?

How did you start acting and why? I always knew I wanted to act. I use the term artist with more confidence these days because I wouldn't know what other word to use – I am an artist. I'd gone down every other creative avenue and nothing felt quite like home. It's something people don't much talk about openly, but I think a lot of artists spend a good amount of time avoiding their art. All my friends were and still are for the most part musicians. I wasn't privy to film. And, very suddenly, I hit a spot in life where I barely knew who I was, and just as suddenly I sort of admitted it to myself. That I was an actor. And so I just made the choice to learn everything I could about it. Lately we saw you play in the much talked about and awarded La La Land… Were you expecting such a success out of it? What do you think the audience came away with af ter they watched it? Yes, I did think people would like it. Damien is a fantastic director. It seemed like different audiences walked away each with very different opinions and feelings about the film. Some of my friends saw it over and over again. I know for my grandma, she had no idea what was going on. Tell us about your upcoming projects for 2017: Endless written and directed by Justin Benson, Under The Silver Lake, written and directed by David Robert Mitchell, and last but not the least, the new Alien: Covenant , directed by Ridley Scott… I feel beyond proud to have been a part of an Alien film. Sigourney Weaver made Alien, which holds such strong symbolism to me in terms of women's empowerment. Under the Silver Lake was my favorite film set to be a part of. It's a hyper-visual, subconscious film. It's like a lucid dream. The costumes, the actors, the set design: you could see it all even when just reading the script. I'd never gotten to read anything like it. And working on it felt akin to me. Like it's where I live. I honestly can't say much

Ridley is a visual director. Sometimes, he'd direct using a pen and paper to draw out the scene. I'd never worked with a director like that and may not ever again. I play a character named Upworth who is a communications officer on board the ship. Af ter Blair Witch in 2016 and those three new productions, you’re assembling a nice collection of dark and gloomy tales... Is it a genre you particularly like? I would never want to consider myself a dark and gloomy person, but I am definitely more attracted to that kind of thing. I am more inclined to work on anything that acknowledges darkness. A certain kind of weight or darkness is somehow more organically portrayed in films and in music. It just feels more real to me. I don't know why that is. Life is not a pop song. Horror, specifically, is more of a challenge for me because it tends to stray from that quality.

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Following the runaway success of La La Land, the young Texan Callie Hernandez has emerged as one of the most promising actresses in the film industry. This year, we will see her on screen alongside Michael Fassbender and Katherine Waterson in Ridley Scott’s wildly anticipated Alien: Covenant, set to premiere at the Cannes Film Festival.

What do you think about fashion? It is a key point in cinema and an integral part of a character… Sometimes fashion in film is nothing, sometimes it’s everything, sometimes it's just distracting. Caroline Eselin was the costume designer for Under the Silver Lake and the costumes were absolutely central to the characters and to the film itself. I think about that hot pink mohair sweater in Wim Wenders' film Paris, Texas. The wardrobe in El Topo made the film what it is. Costumes can be completely iconic. But then, I've played characters and I've watched films where the costumes were just a distraction from the central point of the story. Aside from cinema, tell us about your other passions and inspirations… I think I'm a "changer and a re-arranger." I recently found out that my great-grandfather was a lion tamer in the circus. My great-grandmother was an opera singer and a painter. My grandparents now just moved back to Texas from living in the trailer park and working at Dolly Parton's theme park, Dollywood. I think it’s in my blood. I become really enveloped in whatever it is I am doing at the time until it doesn't feel right. Acting is the first thing that feels like a lifelong thing. It doesn't feel like a choice. But I'll always pursue other creative avenues at the same time. That doesn't feel like a choice either.

PHOTO: JORDAN HEMINGWAY / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO

-----------------------------------------------The Endless directed by Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead starring Tate Ellington, Emily Montague and Lew Temple released April 2017 Under The Silver Lake directed by David Robert Mitchell, starring Andrew Garfield, Riley Keough and Grace Van Patten to be released this year Alien : Covenant directed by Ridley Scott starring Michael Fassbender and Katherine Waterston to be released May 2017


Zana Bayne - bra, Sies Marjan - skirt, Creepy Yeha - choker

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Celine - top, Alexander Wang - pant, Creepy Yeha - belt


Chanel - pre-fall full look


Issey Miyake - top and bottoms

Fashion: Lisa Jarvis - Hair: Marco Santini - Make-up: Gianpaolo Ceciliato


MÄDCHEN AMICK

Tell us about yourself and where you come from… I was born and raised in Reno, Nevada. I studied different art forms as a child, such as music, dance, and painting. I left home in 1987, at the age of 16, to pursue my dream of becoming a film actress. I have always been a very driven person, which I feel has attributed to the success of me working consistently in film and television these past 30 years. You have a distinguished career, most of it in TV series such as Mad Men, Gossip Girl, or American Horror Story, just to name a few. Can you explain your choice of focusing on TV series? What does it offer that the film industry doesn’t? My deep love is still for independent films. There's just a raw and very real quality to that style of filmmaking. And I hope that we continue to support them. But my next favorite, is streaming and cable television such as HBO, Showtime, Netflix, and Amazon. It offers a longer story arc opportunity and a more cinematic feel. There's a lot of inspiring work being done in that format. The new season of Twin Peaks directed by David Lynch is scheduled for release this May. How did you react when they told you that season 3 was confirmed? I was absolutely shocked! I had heard rumors about it returning for decades, but had been in complete denial about it ever actually happening. I just didn't feel that it could be done right on network television. It was lightning in a bottle back when it originally aired. But when David Lynch and Mark Frost announced that it was coming back and it was going to be on Showtime, I was so excited and happy that it would have just the right home to embrace the brilliance of Lynch's vision. How did you meet Lynch and have the opportunity to be part of this production? Are you two close? Is he as mysterious as people say? I met Lynch back in 1989 when the wonderful casting director, Johanna Ray, brought me in to read for him. I was in the middle of shooting the pilot for Baywatch, who wanted to add me to their permanent cast, but I just didn't feel that I was a good fit for that show. I really wanted to work on more dramatic projects. So when Lynch

surprised me and came right out in that first audition to ask me if I wanted to do a TV show with him, I simply said yes. As I always do. He is not only a wonderful mentor, but has become a great friend. I don't find him mysterious at all. He's just a big love-bug in my eyes. He is the sweetest and most generous man to those around him.

Twin Peaks was and still is revolutiona-

ry in terms of creativity! How did you see it back then and what do you think about it now, af ter all those years and the different film experiences you had? We can say it’s one of a kind… It shattered the mold of television back when it aired. It proved that audiences were hungry for intelligent and risk-taking storytelling. I knew that David Lynch on television would be something very special. I just didn't know that it would become so successful, so quickly. And the fact that it has stayed relevant all these years later, just proves how brilliantly ahead of the times Lynch and Frost were. How did David Lynch and Mark Frost come up with the idea for the story? Was it filmed chronologically?

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After an interval of twenty-five years, David Lynch’s legendary and groundbreaking TV series Twin Peaks is making its grand return, with the first two episodes of the reboot set to premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. American actress Mädchen Amick plays a lead role in the new third season. She tells us about meeting David Lynch and her first experiences with the show in the 1990s.

I'm not sure of the back story of how David Lynch and Mark Frost teamed up and came up with the concept of Twin Peaks. We filmed the original episodes in chronological order. What’s different about filming the upcoming new season? What it shot at the same place? I'm not able to talk about our filming locations in the new series. But I can say that Lynch and Frost wrote and filmed it as one long film and that it will be cut up into hours to air on Showtime. Af ter 25 years, was it easy to get back into your character of Shelly Johnson? Did you and the other actors have freedom in terms of interpretation? With the new season, too? I debated whether I wanted to rewatch the original series before returning to the character. In the end, I decided not to. I felt that Shelly would still be very present in my memory. It's been 25 years, Shelly has changed and matured, as have I. My experience has always been that David is very collaborative with actors and their interpretation of the characters they play.

PHOTO: JAMES MOUNTFORD / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO

-----------------------------------------------Riverdale CW series created by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa starring K.J. Apa, Lili Reinhart, Camila Mendes, Cole Sprouse, Marisol Nichols, Luke Perry, Casey Cott and Madelaine Petsch released since January 2017 on CW Twin Peaks (season 3) Showtime series created by Mark Frost and David Lynch to be released end of May


Ingie Paris - Sequins all in one jumpsuit and Drop pearl earring, vintage black sunglasses

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Is the new season a continuation of the last one? In the last episode of season 2, FBI agent Dale Cooper’s spirit is trapped by the villain “spirit” Bob… Is Kyle MacLachlan – who played Dale Cooper – returning? As well as the other original cast members like Bobby, Audrey, Norma, and the rest? I have been told that this will be 25 years from when we last saw the town of Twin Peaks. I'm not able to answer the question regarding any other characters. The first two episodes of this new season will premiere at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival. Do you think TV series are now acknowledged by the cinema industry? I feel like the reason Twin Peaks is being acknowledged at Cannes is more of a celebration of the beautiful cinematic work that David Lynch creates. His filmmaking transcends the usual rules of cinema and television. I feel that he should be given his own category. Well, okay maybe he already has... "Lynchian."


Ingie Paris - Black dress with volume with silver narrow cut pants, vintage flat shoes


Ingie Paris - Gold asymmetric dress and drop pearl earring, vintage flat shoes


Ingie Paris - Sequins all in one jumpsuit

Fashion: Andrej Skok - Make Up: Ericka Verrett @ TMG Agency - Hair Stylist: Andre Sarmiento @ TMG Agency - Stylist Assistant: Leonard Murray


LILY COLLINS

Tell us about yourself, where you come from… I was born in England and moved to Los Angeles when I was 5. I very much consider both places as my home, but feel more European at heart. This year you will star in the highly anticipated Okja – directed by Bong JoonHo and opposite Tilda Swinton, Jake Gyllenhaal, and Paul Dano – selected for the Cannes Film Festival… Is it the first time you will be going to Cannes? What does that represent for you? It’s a huge moment for me I’ll never forget and an incredible honor to be included in a film like this with such a stunning cast and crew. I’m excited for people to see the film and for the conversations that it may spark.

Okja tells the story of a girl who tries

everything to prevent a powerful multi-national company from kidnapping her best friend – an animal. Tell us more about the role you interpret… I play a character named Red who is part of the Animal Liberation Front. She and 4 other members try to stop the company from taking Okja and to stop what the company is doing to its pigs. How was the filming? How did Bong Joon-Ho direct you and what were the challenges of this production? Filming in South Korea was one of the most fascinating memorable experiences I’ve had. It was so foreign to me, having never traveled there. But the more time I spent immersed in our film’s world and exploring the city, the greater I began to understand it. Director Bong was such a great spirit to have on set every day. His knowledge of the characters and the story was so incredibly helpful because he knew exactly where each of us was emotionally in every moment. He was so collaborative with us when we added ideas of our own. There was a lot of CGI which was an interesting challenge but one we all quickly got used to, as well as large shots including hundreds of extras and stunt work. It was an incredibly fast-paced film and we had to make sure to keep up, which we did. I felt like I was living another life over there and it definitely came across in the film. How lucky that I am able to immerse myself so deeply in another culture for my job.

This film is more relevant than ever when you think about the way companies and industries have a negative impact on our planet. I feel like it could be considered as another wake-up call… This film is definitely politically and environmentally provocative. But that can very often be necessary in order for positive change to happen. It was a very special experience to play an animal liberation fighter and be part of such an important movement and message in the film. Fashion is very related to cinema, what’s your relation to fashion… Fashion has always been such a beautiful way for me to express myself. From a young age, I used it to tell stories and play. It’s a completely subjective art form and judgment really has no place in it. Fashion can be the ultimate experiment through which you discover yourself. You were Barrie’s brand ambassador and have been photographed by Karl Lagerfeld… How was it to work with him? Karl is an absolute genius. A true artist. He is a pleasure to collaborate with and so fascinating to watch. Sometimes he comes up with ideas in the moment out of some random inspiration and then he goes for it. His images always capture me in a new way and it’s an honor to be selected by him to represent anything he is part of and passionate about. In the opposite images we can see you wearing Chanel. What do you think about the brand and the image of femininity it reflects? I have admired Chanel as a brand since I was a little girl. Karl has made the brand his own, while always maintaining Coco’s classic timeless essence but also continuing to make it fresh and young… My grandmother was a ballerina and used to always wear Chanel ballet flats, purses, and jewelry, so there is a strong family connection for me… Sophisticated chic and yet so fresh and ever-changing. If you could give our readers some advice and inspiration… Never take being told no as “no, this isn’t for you.” Take it as “No, not right now.” Sometimes things just happen slower than we want them to, but it doesn’t mean they won’t end up working out… Everything happens for a reason.

PHOTO: DOUG INGLISH / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO

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Also a model who spends her free time writing, English actress Lily Collins will head to Cannes this year for her film Okja , directed by Bong Joon-Ho and presented in the festival’s official selection. In the film, she plays a young activist who squares off against Tilda Swinton to stand up and fight for animal rights… -----------------------------------------------Okja directed by Bong Joon-Ho starring Tilda Swinton, Paul Dano and Jake Gyllenhaal to be released June 2017 To The Bone directed by Marti Noxon starring Keanu Reeves to be released July 2017 The Last Tycoon Amazon and Sony Pictures series starring Matt Bomer and Kelsey Grammer to be released later this summer


Chanel – Knit sequins dress with long scarf

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Chanel – Embroidery large sleeves top and white pointy lace up shoes, Second hand jogging


Chanel – Embroidery dress


right: Chanel – Knit sequins dress with long scarf

left: Chanel – V neck dress with second hand blue T-shirt underneathtrousers


Photographer Assistants: Michael Clifford and Justin Melhuish - Stylist Assistant: Leonard Murray

Fashion: Andrej Skok - Make Up: Kira Nasrat @ The Wall Group - Hair Stylist: Gregory Russell @ The Wall Group -


DIANE ROUXEL

Are you filming right now? I’m preparing for my next film, Volontaire, directed by Hélène Fillières. I just did a commando training program because I’m playing a young woman who enlists in the Naval Fusiliers. Filming started on May 10 and will last two months. Did you already know Hélène Filières? I saw one film she had acted in and won a César award for her role. Then I saw her first feature, Tied. Volontaire is a love story in all but name between a young woman who randomly enlists in the Naval Fusiliers and a captain played by Lambert Wilson. It’s a platonic love story. Tell us about your career and where you’re from. I grew up in Haute-Savoie until I was seventeen. Then I spent the last year of high school in Paris before going to art school. That’s when my actress friend Pauline Acquart brought me to a few casting calls, but it was mostly just for fun. Then I was picked for Larry Clark’s film The Smell of Us. I was skating and one of my friends introduced me to Scrib, the screenwriter. The film was still up in the air at that time. I hadn’t met Larry yet, but then he came to Paris.

I’m also acting in an upcoming movie directed by Bertrand Mandico, Les Garçons sauvages. I play a teenage boy in a group of boys who have no limits and end up committing a crime together… Who is your agent? I met my agent before filming The Smell of Us. She originally agreed to help me with the Larry Clark movie, but we got along so well that we kept working together. I love her. She’s Isabelle de la Patellière from VMA. She’s wonderful. She calls me during every film to see how it’s going. She also calls the directors… You’re of ten dressed by Chanel. How would you define the brand? “Chic.” That’s the first word that comes to mind. A blend of classic and modern, that’s chic.

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Diane Rouxel was skateboarding when Larry Clark’s team discovered the budding actress and cast her in The Smell of Us. Her career has taken off since she appeared in Emmanuelle Bercot’s Standing Tall, which was screened at Cannes in 2015 and earned her a César nomination for Most Promising Actress.

-----------------------------------------------Les garçons sauvages de Bertrand Mandico avec Vimala Pons, Anael Snoek, Pauline Lorillard et Mathilde Warnier, sortie 2017

What was it like to meet Larry Clark? I was mostly familiar with his photographs, and I had seen Kids. He’s very unpredictable. He can improvise a scene at the last minute. Filming was an intense experience and it made me realize that I wanted to make movies. Anything could happen during the shoot for that film. Then I acted in Philippe Ramos’s Mad Love where I played a blind woman. It was a cakewalk compared to working with Larry Clark! Things really started to take off with Emmanuelle Bercot’s Standing Tall, which opened at Cannes. I didn’t know her very well at the time and I didn’t see her much before filming. But she created an atmosphere of confidence on set. I felt totally comfortable because I had absolute confidence in her. Was that your first time at Cannes? Any memories? My feet hurt (laughs), the opening dinner, with all the actors I love – it was so surreal!

Chanel - Trousers in gold, black and white sequin-embroidered organza, AGL - Shoes

PHOTO: ALEXANDRA CATIÈRE / INTERVIEW: ARMELLE LETURCQ


Chanel - Jacket in gold leather


Chanel - Jacket and trousers in gold, black and white sequin-embroidered organza, AGL - Shoes


right: Chanel - Jacket and skirt in off-white and black fantasy tweed

left: Chanel - Jacket and trousers in gold leather


Photographer Assistant: Jérémie Monnier - Stylist Assistant: Noémie Fourmeau

Fashion: Armelle Leturcq - Make Up: Hugo Villard - Hair: Rodolphe Farmer -


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SOPHIE COOKSON Tell us about yourself, where you come from, and your everyday life… My name is Sophie Cookson and I’m from East Sussex, England. My everyday life involves no concrete routine, even when working. As someone who likes and needs a bit of structure that can be hard, but I also relish the freedom it gives me. One thing is certain though: no matter what time it starts, every day begins with lots of coffee! How did you start acting and why? I think I always liked telling stories as a child and getting immersed in a painting, a book, or a play. I was never particularly sure where best to invest that creative energy. Luckily I had several wonderful teachers who encouraged my acting and told me about the opportunities out there. I love the constant challenge that comes with acting, since there is no right answer. That freedom is both liberating and terrifying. I think that oral tradition of handing stories down to each other, in whatever way, is essential to our well-being. We have a social responsibility to reflect society and the world back at itself. You studied at OSD. Does education represent a big part of an actor’s skills? For me it was an opportunity to immerse myself in the craft and take the time to learn about it in ways I could not have done alone. I think drama school is great in terms of learning discipline and finding out what ways you would potentially like to work in the future, but it’s not for everyone. I think the real education begins when you start working professionally, testing everything you know with much higher stakes. Tell us about your upcoming projects. How was filming? And why did you choose to be a part of them?

Gypsy is set in modern day New York. Nao-

mi Watts plays Jean, a therapist who ends up infiltrating the lives of her patients. One of her clients is my character Sidney’s exboyfriend. After hearing about me in therapy Jean then tracks me down pretending to be someone else and we end up in a rather dangerous cat and mouse game. Throughout the series we see Jean’s lies start to wreak havoc and become unraveled. As soon as I read the first page of Gypsy I knew I wanted to be a part of it. I found it incredibly appealing. It was created, written, produced, and directed by women. But also my character Sidney

was like nothing that had crossed my path before. She’s a real force of nature and incredibly complex. She required me to be completely fearless and brave.

BRITISH ACTRESS

Ashes in the Snow was a very special

A SPLASH. DISCOVERED

experience. It's set in 1940s Lithuania when the Soviet Union invaded and deported hundreds of thousands of Lithuanians to the Siberian labor camps. It follows the lives of one family going through this, with the lead played by Bel Powley. I play a young girl, Ona, who gets put on a cattle cart train for seven weeks with her newborn baby. It’s a tragic story that I knew very little about. It was the first time in my career I felt a serious duty to tell the story accurately in honor of the people that went through that. Lithuania only became independent in 1991, so it’s incredibly fresh and all of the background artists had family or were in some way connected to the atrocities committed. Filming was a very grueling but worthwhile experience. Who has inspired you in your life and why? Firstly the teachers who showed me there were doors to be opened that I never knew were in the realm of my possibilities. The ripples they created led me to meet other fascinating people along the way, who in turn told me about more doors. Secondly my mum for sticking by me through everything and never ever letting me give up. I have everything to thank her for.

SOPHIE COOKSON IS CERTAIN TO MAKE IN THE DAZZLING

KINGSMAN: THE SECRET SERVICE, SHE WILL SOON STAR IN THE

SEQUEL, KINGSMAN:

THE GOLDEN CIRCLE. WE WILL ALSO

SEE HER ON THE SMALL SCREEN OPPOSITE

NAOMI WATTS AND

KARL GLUSMAN IN THE HOTLY ANTICIPATED

SERIES GYPSY, WHICH

WAS WRITTEN, DIRECTED, AND PRODUCED

ENTIRELY BY WOMEN…

-----------------------------------------------Gypsy Netflix’s series created by Lisa Rubin starring opposite Naomi Watts and Karl Glusman to be released end of summer Kingsman: The Golden Circle directed by Matthew Vaughn alongside Colin Firth, Mark Strong, Taron Egerton, Juliane Moore, Halle Berry, Channing Tatum, Pedro Pascal and Jeff Bridges to be released September 2017 Ashes In The Snow directed by Marius A. Markevicius alongside Bel Powley and James Cosmo to be released 2017

PHOTO: ROGER DECKKER / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO


right page: Chanel – Black knitted top and laser cut knit skirt with chain long necklace with key pendant

left page: Christian Dior – Black velvet jacket, print black T-shirt, choker and transparent volume skirt with dots


Photographer Assistant: Gabor Hercz - Stylist Assistant: Seana Gavin

Fashion: Andrej Skok - Make Up: Daniel Kolaric using MAC - Hair Stylist: Federico Guezzi @ Saint Luke Artists -


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Dior - Red velvet dress and nude knit lingerie and “Les Ateliers du Cosmos� earrings in metal and clear cristals


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LOLITA CHAMMAH Can you tell us about your career?

Did you know him before filming?

I started taking drama classes at the rather young age of twelve, almost by chance. I even played in a movie when I was four, so film has always been a part of my life.

I didn’t know him at all. The director, Elise Girard, did not want us to meet beforehand, so we could use the impact of that unfamiliarity in our acting. He hadn’t acted in a long time and it all worked out wonderfully. I met the director a while ago and she wrote the film for me. It’s a long story and it took a long time to put together. We never gave up on the project but it was hard to make.

I studied at the Ecole Nationale de Strasbourg, but I didn’t finish because I was already working and I didn’t want to go to school anymore. At what point did you decide that you wanted to be an actress? It wasn’t really a decision I made. There was no aha moment. It was always a part of my life. Meeting with directors and others in the industry brought me to acting. Since your mother is an actor (Isabelle Huppert), did you ever think it would be difficult to set yourself apart? Other child actors ask themselves that same question, too. But it’s a profession of transmission, not too different from other businesses where children do the same thing as their parents. Things are harder today than they were in my mother’s day. I have to believe in myself even though people often compare me to my mother, especially since we look so much alike…

What are your other upcoming projects? I’m playing in Laura Schroeder’s film, Barrage, which was shot in Luxembourg. It’s a tense, claustrophobic story. I play a young mother who reconnects with the eight-yearold daughter (played by Themis Pauwels) she abandoned several years ago. It’s a story of rebuilding and the rediscovery of maternity. I also shot a mini-series for Arte directed by Laetitia Masson and also starring Elodie Bouchez. It’s called Aurore and takes place over three episodes. It’s about a confrontation. Elodie plays a criminal and I play the sister of a child who was murdered… Who is your agent? Gregory Weill at Adéquat, for the past four years.

A LUCKY STAR HAS PRESIDED OVER

LOLITA CHAMMAH’S ACTING CAREER.

SHE FIRST APPEARED ON SCREEN IN 1988 WHILE SHE WAS STILL A CHILD.

SHE KICKED OFF HER

CAREER BY WORKING WITH DIRECTORS

LIKE CLAIRE DENIS, MARC FITOUSSI,

OR AGATHE TEYSSIER IN THE INVISIBLE

WOMAN, IN WHICH

SHE STARS ALONGSIDE JULIE DEPARDIEU AND

CHARLOTTE RAMPLING. NOMINATED

FOR MOST PROMISING

Does she support you?

ACTRESS IN 2011

Yes, of course, and sometimes it worries her because we know it’s such a violent business, too. Acting involves a violent relationship to desire. When you are in demand it’s marvelous, but you can fall fast and hard. Even though I’ve known for a long time that there are disappointments and ups and downs, it’s still hard.

FOR COPACABANA, SHE WILL APPEAR

THIS YEAR OPPOSITE JEAN SOREL

IN STRANGE BIRDS,

You act in a lot of indie films, like the upcoming Drôles d’oiseaux [Strange Birds]. It’s a love story between a very young woman and an older man. It’s melancholic and Parisian film, in the spirit of the New Wave, about an impossible romance. It’s a movie that takes the time to observe its actors on screen. Jean Sorel, who plays the male lead, is an icon and a blast from the past. He belongs to the cinephile culture of the 1960s. It’s like a kind of feedback. He is still very handsome. And it’s like a mise en abyme within the film.

DIRECTED

BY ELISE GIRARD. -----------------------------------------------Drôles d’oiseaux [Strange Birds]directed by Elise Girard, starring Lolita Chammah, Jean Sorel, and Virginie Ledoyen | In theaters on May 31 Barrage directed by Laura Schroeder, starring Lolita Chammah and Themis Pauwels | In theaters in July

PHOTO: ALEXANDRA CATIÈRE / INTERVIEW: ARMELLE LETURCQ


Dior – White cotton voile dress, Rolex - Oyster Perpetual 36, white grape dial, domed bezel, Oyster bracelet. International five-year guarantee


Fashion: Armelle Leturcq - Make Up: Hugo Villard - Hair: Rodolphe Farmer

Photographer Assistant: Jérémie Monnier - Stylist Assistant: Noémie Fourmeau

Dior – Wool boundstooth cape and white dotted organza dress, low boot in black suede embellished with golden CD initials and “D Cameo” pattern ring in metal with antique gold finish


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Paul Smith – Men’s check suiting jacket and trousers with multicolor espadrilles


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FIONN O'SHEA Tell us about who you are and where you come from… My name is Fionn O’Shea. I’m 21 and I’m an actor from Dublin, Ireland. How did you start acting? I always used to mess around and do little impromptu performances for my parents. And one morning I must’ve annoyed them enough for them to send me to a drama class. I went along and from there I was sent for my first audition, which was also probably one of my worst auditions. But for whatever reason, they cast me in the film and I just kept at it from there. You will be playing your first major lead role this year in John Butler’s Handsome Devil, the story of a loner and a star athlete who form an unlikely friendship… How was the filming? Filming was a lot of fun, and a huge learning curve for me, too. It was certainly daunting playing the lead for the first time, especially when the story is semi-autobiographical about John’s time in school. Treasure, the production company, are great at bringing together a group of people who really care so much about what they are doing, which creates a lovely atmosphere on set. So I always felt in safe hands. Tell us more about your character Ned… Do you have any similarities with him? Ned is a complete outsider in his “rugby crazy” boarding school. He’s an effete, sensitive musician with a dry sense of humor, an eccentric dress sense, and dyed red hair, which makes him the victim of endless bullying. I don’t think I’m quite as pretentious as Ned. And in terms of experience in school, mine couldn’t be further from his. But when I read John’s script, I just understood him immediately. Our senses of humor are very alike and I went to a similar type of school to the one in the film. I was also able to take a lot from friends’ experiences in school. I feel like this movie is a kind of message for unity and education… Definitely. On the note of education, one message is certainly that it’s not always the eldest who’s the wisest, and the teachers are not always smarter than the pupils. Identity is a major theme, too. And for me, if there was one message to pick out from the film it would be that when finding your voice as a young person, it can be helpful

to reject the binary definitions we’re often taught to believe like “weak/strong,” “masculine/feminine,” “gay/ straight,” “team/individual,” and “teacher/pupil.”

AT JUST TWENTY-ONE

Do you think cinema can be used as a tool to change perceptions and the way we see the world?

IS ONE OF THE NEW

Absolutely. It allows you to be a fly on the wall and observe situations that you otherwise wouldn’t be a part of or have a chance to see. Or in other cases, it can make you take a step back and open your eyes to new ways of thinking about something that you are a part of. With Handsome Devil, I’d hope that people of all ages could watch it and see that they don’t have to “pick a side,” or be “one thing or the other.” They can be whatever and whoever they want. And that you should never speak in a borrowed voice. If you could in any way impact our communities, what would you do and how would you do it? As a society, we aren’t always great at embracing differences and are quick to push away different ideas and ways of thinking or the people who have them. If I could impact our communities in any way, it would be to make them more accepting or understanding. Films that show a different point of view can sometimes make a small contribution towards achieving that.

YEARS OLD, IRISH

ACTOR FIONN O’SHEA UPSTARTS OF THE

BRITISH FILM INDUSTRY. WE SAW HIM EARN A

NOMINATION FOR THE 2017 DUBLIN FILM

FESTIVAL’S RISING STAR AWARD FOR HIS LEAD ROLE IN LAST YEAR’S

HANDSOME DEVIL .

THIS YEAR HE WILL STAR ALONGSIDE

KEIRA KNIGHTLEY IN JAMES KENT’S

THE AFTERMATH.

------------------------------------------------Handsome Devil directed by John Butler and starring Nicholas Galitzine and Andrew Scott released April 2017 Innocent ITV1 series directed by Richard Clark and starring Tony Gardner, Daniel Ryan, Angel Coulby, and Hermione Norris to be released this Autumn 2017 The Aftermath directed by James Kent and produced by Ridley Scott starring Keira Knightley and Alexander Skarsgård to be released late 2017

PHOTO: ROGER DECKKER / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO


G-Star RAW - white T-shirt, army camouflage jacket and trousers Photographer Assistant: Gabor Hercz - Stylist Assistant: Seana Gavin

Fashion: Andrej Skok - Make Up: Daniel Kolaric using MAC - Hair Stylist: Federico Guezzi @ Saint Luke Artists


Fendi – Mens suiting jacket with multicolor stripe shirt and V neck knit jumper under the suiting


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all clothes:kennedy louis vuitton sophie clarck

Louis Vuitton – Black shearling bolero worn over black dress


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SOPHIE KENNEDY CLARK Tell us about yourself, where you come from, and your journey... I grew up in Scotland: a magical landscape, ripe for playing pretend and full of folklore to allow your imagination to run riot. My parents have been married for a million years and also created older siblings and fellow rascals Hannah and Francis. I left school at sixteen, moved to New York alone at 17, which is a hell of a story... but one for over a whiskey. Then I hit Glasgow for a good time before calling London home. Getting an agent was no easy feat, having not gone to drama school. There’s a whole lot of rejection involved when taking a path untrodden. You have to be proactive and creative in your approach. But with a whole heap of sure-fire persistence, hard work, luck, and perhaps the arrogance of youth I managed to get my foot in the door. Also another story for over a whiskey. Tell us about your previous experiences and how you started acting… You’re a young actress but you already played with some famous directors like Lars Von Trier in Nymphomaniac, Tom Hooper in The Danish Girl, and even Charlie Brooker, the creator of the TV show Black Mirror… How did you get the chance to be part of those projects? Performing and creating is just something I’ve always done, there was no aha moment.... It's a bug that you’re born with. A burden even, because you bloody well won’t be happy doing anything else! It's in your wiring and no matter how tough it is, you take it on with vim and vigor. The struggle is part of it. You put in the hours, learn your lines, create a character, don't take yourself too seriously, turn up on time and fucking give it your all. I've found certain directors to be like animals: they smell fear. If the work is controversial (which most of mine seems to be) they want someone bold but malleable. There’s a certain element of surrender when you’re performing in such a collaborative medium. Your vulnerability can be your greatest strength. You just have to trust who you’re working with and stick to your guns. All the different roles you’ve been interpreting are very strong and quite always centered around dramatic, disturbing, and even violent scenarios… Why did you choose to interpret those characters? In your opinion what message do they convey to the public? For example, B in Nymphomaniac: didn’t you feel anxious at some point about interpreting her when you know what Lars is about?

You know, folks seem quite keen on putting this little face in “dramatic scenarios.” When you look like you belong atop a Christmas tree it definitely ups the stakes. I'm also pretty fearless in my approach. It’s important for me to believe in the work that I’m doing and I like pushing the boundaries. But I’m not in it for the shock factor. I want to make films that really make people feel something strongly. Feel anything! To make people reflect and experience the full spectrum of emotions. Lars is a remarkable filmmaker. I was more curious than anxious... But then again I don’t scare easily. We are so akin to unflinchingly watching people in films being slaughtered, shot, and tortured on screen. Yet the moment someone gets naked and talks about female sex addiction the world goes crazy. Lars takes taboos and asks why. He shines a light and lets the audience decide.

YOUNG SCOTTISH

Tell us about your upcoming movies in 2017: Obey, directed by Jamie Jones, Lucid, directed by Adam Morse, and The First, directed by Jennifer DeLia… What kind of characters and roles are you playing this time? What makes you decide to be part of a production?

AND PRODUCER

ACTRESS SOPHIE KENNEDY CLARK

HAS ALREADY TAKEN PART IN ACCLAIMED PRODUCTIONS

SUCH AS TV SERIES

BLACK MIRROR

AND LARS VON TRIER’S

NYMPHOMANIAC. THIS YEAR SHE WILL STEP INTO THE ROLE OF

LEGENDARY ACTRESS MARY PICKFORD IN

THE BIOPIC THE FIRST.

Obey was one of the best scripts I had read

in a long time. It was one of those jobs I just had to have. The movie circles around the time of the Hackney Riots, rallying and intertwining the worlds of the bourgeois squatter kids and the kids from the council estates. Jamie very cleverly highlights the injustice of the system and why the riots happened. I play Twiggy, a middle class live fast die young kinda chick who lives in a squat. You would tumble down any and every rabbit hole with this girl and Leon, played by the amazing Marcus Rutherford, does just that... And it’s a hell of a trip. In Lucid I play Kat, a blue-haired cosmic Californian. This is a weird and wonderful film that touches upon mental health, lucid dreaming, escapism, and reality. Adam Morse had such vision for this. It’s complex and funny and unlike anything else. In The First I am playing Mary Pickford. Mary fucking Pickford! The grand dame of silent film who started United Artists in the early days of Hollywood with Charlie Chaplin and Douglas Fairbanks Sr. A true pioneer and the first female studio head. It was an honor to play such an unbelievable woman. She really was fearless. But her private and public life were at odds and you get to see the hollowness of celebrity and the suppression of women in that time. Jen de Lia curated an amazing cast and crew to do

PHOTO: ROGER DECKKER / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO


her story justice. We shot it in a studio, on a set, like the old Biograph films. It’s an homage to Mary and the kind of depiction that she would have relished. These last three projects couldn’t have been more different. Leading a movie is not for the faint-hearted and I shot them literally back to back, living entirely in fiction for close to five months. It was exciting and challenging, but there’s nowhere else I'd rather be than on set. You seem to be a very daring and extroverted person… Are you the same way in your everyday life? Tell us about your activities, the way you dress… I’ve always lived by the adage that “Life is only as good as the stories you have to tell”... I “think” I can take on anything, much to the amusement of my pals. I just love going down to the pub and regaling friends with ridiculous tales. I’m a real extrovert/intro-

vert mix. I have a tendency to pull disappearing acts: SKC MIA, as it’s been described. I like to be alone a great deal. Walk around, look at things, and just be a big pair of eyes. I dress in black. Only black. Pointed creepers and maybe a hat. I don’t think about fashion much. I love costume and find it incredibly transformative for characters, because when I’m me I just wanna pull something on without thinking and get out there. Do you think cinema can be used as a platform for social activism? Absolutely. Folks pay their money for that ticket and you have their undivided attention for an hour or two. To inspire, enlighten, challenge, entertain, pull emotions, and tug at their heart strings. I love all genres of film and not everything needs to hit home with a message, as I am a sucker for silliness, but most of my favorite ones do.

------------------------------------------------Tomorrow directed by Martha Pinson and starring Stephen Fry and James Cosmo released April 2017 Lucid directed by Adam Morse starring Billy Zane, Sadie Frost and Laurie Calvert to be released late 2017 The First directed by Jennifer DeLia and starring Joséphine de La Baume, Scott Haze and Allie MacDonald to be released late 2017

Fashion: Andrej Skok - Make Up: Daniel Kolaric using MAC - Hair Stylist: Federico Guezzi @ Saint Luke Artists Photographer Assistant: Gabor Hercz - Stylist Assistant: Seana Gavin


left page: Gucci – Floral print dress with bow closure, red deco ankle boots and sequins turban hat

right page: Louis Vuitton – Black high neck dress with belt closure with over knee white tight boots


Saint Laurent par Anthony Vaccarello - black denim trousers with red transparent sleeveless T-shirt and black leather coat


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MICHAEL ANGARANO Tell us about yourself, where you come from, and your debut in cinema… I started acting when I was five years old. A photographer was shooting dancers in costumes at my mother’s dance studio and suggested to my mother that I put a costume on and take pictures – that I was photogenic. For six months I was a Ford model, then I got a commercial agent. The first job I ever booked was a Sudafed commercial. I was six years old at the time. From that point on I always worked consistently and I always enjoyed it. At first, it was really more of an excuse to not go to school. But after a certain amount of time I realized I didn’t want to do anything else. I was very lucky to find what I wanted to do with my life at a young age. You already have a distinguished career. From your point of view what role does cinema play within our society? What does it offer? How can it affect people? What does it allow in terms of societal challenges and issues? Society dictates the movies that filmmakers make. Art, movies, music, dance, plays, they're all responses to personal experiences within our culture. For me, writing this movie was a response to a series of very personal, individual experiences that I had and the point in writing it was to share something that I thought was worth being shared. My perspective and my point of view can’t be articulated by anybody other than myself, and that’s what makes art so important. Everybody’s experience, though different, is similar in a lot of ways. Art bridges the gap of understanding. Now talking about your upcoming projects: you will mark your directional debut this year with Avenues (to be released in June 2017). You wrote and star in the feature as well. How did you come up with the idea of writing this movie and where did you get your inspiration? I first wrote the film when I was 22 and rewrote it until I was 26. Originally, it was a form of creative therapy. I started writing not knowing what the plot was, or who these characters where, or what the point of it was. Surprisingly, a lot of the dialogue from the first draft is nearly the same, but over time and with more clarity on the story, the plot shifted and became the story of a young guy coming to terms with the death of his older brother. I wanted to write the kind of movie I wanted to be in.

As far as inspiration, films like Carnal Knowledge, Manhattan, Before Sunrise, The Last Detail, and Breathless are some of my favorites and I used them all as visual references. Your character Max has a thing for architecture and there are references to it throughout the movie, above all when he quotes, “Architecture is not what it used to be.” How is it related to the story? I always imagined Max being the sort of person who reads the back covers of books and claims he’s read the entire thing. He appreciates architecture, but he doesn’t know a lot about it, and that’s a microcosm for his personality. At this time in his life, he’s uncommitted to change. He enjoys his lack of responsibility and freedom to have a day like he has in the film. He’s very aware that his lack of consistency will lead to eventual unhappiness and that’s what he begins to realize at the end of the film.

AT JUST 29, MICHAEL ANGARANO HAS

ALREADY COMPILED

AN IMPRESSIVE RESUME IN BOTH FILM

AND TELEVISION, WHERE HE FIRST SHOWCASED HIS TALENT IN HIS

CHILDHOOD. IN ADDITION TO APPEARANCES

IN SERIES LIKE WILL AND

GRACE, 24, ER, AND CSI, HIS FILM CAREER

IS JUST AS PROMISING.

There are also many French references: the psychological definition of “rapprochement,” Edith Piaf’s song “La Vie en Rose,” or this very funny moment when Peter yells at his girlfriend in French, “I am going to take your vagina and throw it into the see”… The French references were a very happy accident. “Rapprochement” was the working title for the film for a second, but then I thought it would be too pretentious. In my eyes, the theme of rapprochement is really the heart of the film. “La Vie en Rose” is in there because Maya Kazan, the actress who plays Maggie, and myself were at a bar discussing the script during pre-production and the song came on, and she started singing beautifully. Immediately I asked, “You can sing in French?” And she said, “I mean, I can sing this song but that’s about it.” And I knew it had to be in the film. Then with the Peter character, his girlfriend was always from Montreal in the script, and during rehearsal Nick Braun started improvising their argument in French and I thought it was one of the funniest things I’d ever seen. What are you next films? I’m going to be in the Showtime series I’m Dying Up Here about stand-up comedy in the 70s, starring Melissa Leo and Ari Granynor. And I just finished a film called In A Relationship with Emma Roberts, Dree Hemingway, and Patrick Gibson.

------------------------------------------------I’m Dying Up Here Showtime series created by David Flebotte starring Melissa Leo, Al Madrigal, Ari Graynor, Clarke Duke, RJ Cyler, Andrew Santino, Erik Griffin and Stephen Guarino to be released June 2017 Avenues written and directed by Michael Angarano starring Nicholas Braun, Ari Graynor, Adelaide Clemens, Juno Temple, Maya Kazan and Brian Geraghty to be released June 2017 Sun Dogs directed by Jennifer Morrison starring Melissa Benoist, Jennifer Morrison, Allison Janney and Ed O’Neill to be released late 2017 In A Relationship directed by Sam Boyd starring Emma Roberts, Dree Hemingway and Patrick to be released late 2017

PHOTO: JAMES MOUNTFORD / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO


Saint Laurent par Anthony Vaccarello - Gold bomber jacket, black T-shirt and black skinny jeans

Saint Laurent par Anthony Vaccarello - Tartan shirt and Black leather jacket

Fashion: Andrej Skok - Grooming: Diana Schmidtke


Saint Laurent par Anthony Vaccarello - Red tartan shirt,

Saint Laurent par Anthony Vaccarello - Red transparent T-Shirt

black skinny jeans and black leather crop jacket


Hermes - Jumper, in silk jersey double knit,

kraft beige colour, contrasted intarsia detail

Rolex - Oyster Perpetual 34, olive green dial, domed bezel, Oyster bracelet. International five-year guarantee


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NEW GENERATION

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CONSTANCE ROUSSEAU Tell us about your career, where you are from, and how you got started in theater and film… I probably imagined every career in the world when I was kid, except for acting. But then it just kind of happened, and I felt almost forced into it. But it was a lot of fun. I was studying and acting from time to time, until it became a necessity. That’s where I am. What do you aim for in your acting and what do you want to offer to others? I like acting because it keeps me in a childlike state. I hate growing up. And I prefer fiction to reality. By the time I’m an old lady, I’ll have lived a thousand lives and been a thousand women… I’ll have lived intensely. I think the purpose of film and art in general is to make the viewer feel something. No matter what they make us feel, it makes us more human. The purpose of film is to spread beauty. I know it’s open for interpretation but that’s what I aim for. I’m so thankful to the artists who offer that experience to me, and that’s what I would like to offer to others You first acted in Mia Hansen-Løve’s All is Forgiven, which made a big impression. Was it an important film for you? It was also the director’s first film. Of course it was a very important film for me, because it was my first. If Mia hadn’t discovered me outside my high school, I probably wouldn’t be here answering your questions today. The film changed my life. I wasn’t able to do anything other than film afterwards. It took me a while to understand and accept it though. I didn’t feel like I was good enough. But after acting and getting picked by filmmakers, it became my calling. That’s why Mia will always be a very special person for me. Tell us about your latest performance in Kiyoshi Kurosawa’s Daguerreotype. What was it like to meet and work with Kurosawa? It was an unexpected encounter. A few months before meeting him I had been watching one of his films, Pulse, over and over again. I was reading a lot about his work. My bedside reading was an interview with him and Japanese journalist Makoto Shinozaki about horror movies, Mon effroyable histoire du cinéma [My Frightful History of Cinema] (1).

I was fascinated by him. So imagine my joy when my agent suggested I meet with him. His producer recommended he watch Un Monde Sans Femmes [A World Without Women]. I think he was already fairly certain he wanted to work with me when casting began. He was just worried I would say no. How ironic! He seems to have directed you to act like a Rohmer actress. What do you think? He is very inspired by French film. You could not have made me any happier! Rohmer is without a doubt the filmmaker I admire the most. I’ve seen nearly all his films and I like everything he does. I think he played a large part in my education, like a parent I never met but the lineage is clear. I never met him and I think that will be a source of sadness for the rest of my life. But in this film I think that I’m more of a Kurosawa actress than a Rohmer actress. And my inspiration for the part came from a much different source than Rohmer: Franju in Eyes Without a Face, one of Kurosawa’s favorite films. What are your inspirations outside of film? Theater, literature, art? I read a lot of novels, especially classic writers. But I’m slowly starting to warm up to contemporary literature. I can’t live without music. But it’s a real struggle to keep up with today’s music. Same goes for visual arts!

AT JUST TWENTY-

SEVEN, CONSTANCE

ROUSSEAU IS A RARE JEWEL OF FRENCH

CINEMA. THROUGHOUT HER PRISTINE

FILMOGRAPHY, SHE HAS CHOSEN EACH ROLE THROUGH CAREFUL

DELIBERATION. TODAY, SHE IS A DISCREET

AND UNIQUE ACTRESS WHOSE NATURAL

BEAUTY RECALLS THE

FILMS OF ERIC ROHMER AND LEAVES US

COMPLETELY UNDER HER SPELL. FOR HER LATEST ROLE,

JAPANESE DIRECTOR KIYOSHI KUROSAWA

CHOSE HER TO PLAY MARIE OPPOSITE

TAHAR RAHIM, OLIVIER GOURMET, AND

MATHIEU AMALRIC.

-------------------------------------------------

Daguerreotype, directed by Kiyoshi Kurosawa starring Tahar Rahim, Olivier Gourmet and Mathieu Amalric, released early 2017 From San Francisco with love, directed by Yohann Kouam starring Ade Oyefeso and Charlotte Claris, to be released soon

(1) Mon effroyable histoire du cinéma  [My Frightful History of Cinema] is a collection of Kiyoshi Kurosawa interviews with Makoto Shinozaki, published by Editions Rouge Profond (2008).

PHOTO: ALEXANDRA CATIÈRE / INTERVIEW: ARMELLE LETURCQ


Fashion: Armelle Leturcq - Make Up: Hugo Villard - Hair: Rodolphe Farmer

Photographer Assistant: Jérémie Monnier - Stylist Assistant: Noémie Fourmeau

Hermes - Apron dress with flying panels, cut on the bias,

in silk cigaline, printed with the Carreau feutre motif, in imperial yellow colour, underdress in silk parachute crepe canvas, kraft beige colour


Hermes - Tapered biker blouson, in shiny calfskin, assembled

with panels, tied by hand-made bows in mercerized cotton,

pondgreen colour, T-shirt, in silk jersey double knit, imperial

yellow colour, contrasted intarsia

detail and Mid-length zipped skirt, in linen and silk taffeta, belt inlaid with shiny calfskin, tied by

hand-made bows in mercerized cotton, pondgreen colour.


Dior - Black leather bomber jacket with black knit roll-up neck and black gloves


CINEMA

NEW GENERATION

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CRAIG ROBERTS Tell us a bit about yourself, your journey, and how you started working in the cinema industry… It was pure luck. I was kind of a recluse as a kid and my parents wanted me to get out of the house, so they put me in this after-school drama workshop. I was there for a bit and then I got a job in a kids TV show. I stopped acting for a little while when I was 16 (not by choice – I just couldn’t get any work – so I say I stopped). Then I did a film called Submarine and after that it kind of snowballed into something I couldn't remove myself from. I was very lucky to find a way in. You mainly play in comedies and dramas and there is always something very real in roles you interpret… Which role was the most similar to your personality? Most of them I suppose… And in a way none of them. It’s strange, when you play a certain type of character a lot, everything seems to blend into one. It gets hard to see where the line is between yourself and the characters. I’m naturally awkward and most of the characters I’ve played are of that ilk. I can definitely relate to them all. I also got obsessed with The Graduate, so a lot of the time I just pull the Benjamin Braddock face. What is the most difficult part of being an actor in general? The not acting bit can be tough. It can sometimes get difficult to remain sane in the long periods between jobs. I saw a quote from Sam Mendez about having a backup career, just to help you sleep at night. It’s very true. You’re not only an actor but also a director. You made your directorial debut with the independent feature Just Jim and now you’re working on the production of Eternal Beauty… Will you be acting, too? Tell us a bit about this upcoming project… Fortunately for the audience (if it ever sees one), I will not be acting in this one. Unless I get desperate. I don’t know… When you hold a mirror to it, acting, writing, and directing something can sometimes make you look a little like Kanye West. And I by no means want that. For my first one I had very little money so that was the only option. And I’m no Woody Allen. For this I purely wanted to focus on the behind the camera side and make the best movie possible.

What is your aesthetic approach in Eternal Beauty? Do you use clothes, make-up, and hairstyles as a way to highlight it?

YOUNG ENGLISH

Yes. I think every department should serve as a tool for completing the story. Like a change of color in the costume as the character evolves. I think all aspects of it should complement and push each other to the final frame. One thing that bugs me is when you can tell people are wearing make-up. Maybe that’s another reason why we should go back to shooting on film.

HIS ROLE IN SUBMARINE,

You also wrote the script… Where did you get your inspiration? Are the stories you want to tell related to your own personal experiences? This one is quite a personal story, based on a remarkable lady I know. Yes, to my own experiences but hopefully they are stories that everyone can relate to. I think they have to be. Otherwise why are we doing it? We all want tales to relate to, to maybe help us find an answer and navigate through this crazy world. Why did you want to be behind the camera? As a director, do you think you can be more engaged in the challenges facing society? Is there a particular message or issue you want to share through your movies?

ACTOR CRAIG ROBERTS FIRST EMERGED WITH

DIRECTED BY RICHARD

AYOADE. SINCE THEN, HE

HAS STRUNG TOGETHER A SERIES OF COMEDIC

AND DRAMATIC PARTS, SHARING THE SCREEN WITH SELENA GOMEZ

IN THE FUNDAMENTALS

OF CARING. THIS YEAR MARKS HIS DEBUT

BEHIND THE CAMERA

WITH ETERNAL BEAUTY, A MOVIE HE ALSO WROTE HIMSELF.

I think movies can and should be used to solve issues. I also think movies can be used to escape the issues that we’re faced with in the real world. A cocktail of both seems ideal. I’m not sure what the issue is I’m trying to solve with my work, but there seems to be a theme of struggling with your identity in its DNA. If I can make a movie that people relate to and one that also tackles the issues people struggle with, then I’d be very happy. Like Kendrick Lamar is doing with rap.

------------------------------------------------Eternal Beauty written and directed by Craig Roberts and produced with his production company Cliff Edge Pictures filming started in Wales last March 2017

PHOTO: ROGER DECKKER / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO


A.


Photographer Assistants: Gabor Hercz - Stylist Assistant: Seana Gavin

Fashion: Andrej Skok - Make Up: Daniel Kolaris using MAC - Hair Stylist: Federico Guezzi @ Saint Luke Artists -

B.

C.

A. Dior Homme – Black knit roll-up neck with black suiting trousers, leather bomber jacket with leather gloves

B. Hermes – Black corduroy bomber jacket with zips, leather straight cut trousers, ankle boots

C. Brioni - Double breasted suiting jacket with trousers


Max Mara - Silk Multicolour long tube dress with long leather gloves


CINEMA

NEW GENERATION

195 - CRASH

ANNA BREWSTER Tell us a bit about yourself, your journey, and how you started working in the cinema industry… Hey I’m Anna Brewster, I’m 30, and I live between London and Paris. I started working when I was 15. I made a movie, got an agent, and then went on to complete my education while doing a few jobs in between. I then went to London College of Fashion to study styling, at which point I actually started modeling, too. Due to starting so young it took me a while to figure out what I really wanted to do, and I think probably at the age of 25 I was like, right, I’m going to act and I’m going to take it seriously. Since then things have really fallen into place. I’ve had some great roles and experiences and I really love going to work and doing my job. Tell us about your upcoming projects and roles, like the TV show Versailles and The Last Draw of Jack of Hearts, in which you’ll be playing the lead female role next to Josh Hartnett… I’ve spent nearly 3 years with this show (Versailles) and it’s my longest job to date. You work on a show for that long and it really becomes a family. I take the female lead in season 2, where things get a lot darker than season 1. We explore the Affair of the Poisons, which my character Madame de Montespan is really very tied up in. When you read about it, it all sounds so far-fetched. But this stuff happened and she is both loved and loathed by the French. It’s quite a difficult undertaking to make an audience feel the desperation of her trying to keep the king’s affection and love in what is a very competitive situation. It was a really hard 6 months of shooting, and a huge challenge to take on such a huge part, but I’m incredibly proud of the work of everyone on the show. The next film I’m shooting is Last Draw of Jack of Hearts. It’s a love triangle between myself, Jack (Josh Hartnett), and Henry (James D'Arcy)... This is a thriller though so not what you will be expecting. I’m really excited to start this shoot and just got back from Rome where I spent a lot of time with Guy Moshe (the director) discussing the journey of the character. It’s great to have someone believe in you like Guy does and, after Versailles, to have been able to play two really strong female characters.

don "cool' to more Parisian chic. I think as I’m 30 I’m trying to be a bit more grown up with what I wear. And so the DMs and trainers are out and the Gucci loafers and black boots are in. I think I just have started to invest a bit more money in my wardrobe instead of this disposable fashion. So the things I buy are more neutral and timeless and I can wear them for a long time.

LIVING BETWEEN PARIS

Are you engaged in any of the societal challenges connected to politics, climate change, or capitalism? If you could change something what would it be?

THE TUDORS AND STAR WARS: THE FORCE AWAKENS. SHE EXCELS

The world is a pretty messed up place right now. There are so many issues I don't agree with. When Brexit happened it was like a stab in the heart. Then it just felt like one thing after the other from that point to where we are today and it makes me so sad. I feel really attached to Europe and to feel like that has been taken away from me is horrible. We seem to be separating ourselves from the world around us when we actually need to unite. It’s really hard to stay engaged when you don't believe in the things happening around you and they feel out of your control. But I think it’s important that we fight and stand up for what we believe in, especially when the other side is built on lies.

AND LONDON, ANNA

BREWSTER HAS MADE A NAME FOR HERSELF AFTER APPEARING

IN PRODUCTIONS LIKE

ON THE SMALL SCREEN IN HER PORTRAYAL

OF THE MARQUISE DE MONTESPAN IN

THE NEW SEASON OF

HIT SERIES VERSAILLES. THIS YEAR, SHE WILL STAR ALONGSIDE

JOSH HARTNETT IN

THE LAST DRAW OF JACK OF HEARTS.

On a more human level it’s horrendous to see refugee families living in the streets with nothing. I think it’s a lot more in your face in France and you can’t hide from it. A friend of mine runs http://www.helprefugees.org.uk/. She set it up a while ago at the beginning of the crisis and it’s such a good cause that has grown and grown. I urge everyone to try and get involved in this organization. Or at least make yourselves aware of what is going on not so far from our homes.

Do you like to dress up? Do you use clothes and outfits as a way to define or strengthen your identity? My god, my wardrobe is huge. I have half in Paris and half in London. As I said I studied fashion and from modelling it’s something I’m really interested in. I definitely dress for a situation. And I think since being in France my identity has changed from the East Lon-

------------------------------------------------Versailles (season 2) Canal + and BBC Two series created by David Wolstencroft and Simon Mirren soon to be released

PHOTO: ROGER DECKKER / INTERVIEW: ANNA CERAVOLO


CÊline – Cotton large shirt with cotton large skirt pants


Hermes – Roll up neck top, narrow cut trousers and beige fur coat with leather details, Céline – High heel slip in sandals

Fashion: Andrej Skok

Make Up: Daniel Kolaric using MAC

Hair Stylist: Federico Guezzi @ Saint Luke Artists Photographer Assistant: Gabor Hercz Stylist Assistant: Seana Gavin

Chanel – Embroidery dress


THE ADDICTIONS

198 - CRASH

THE ADDICTIONS

B.

A.

PHOTO: HENRIKE STAHL / STYLIST: ANDREJ SKOK

A : ROCHAS – “ MADEMOISELLE ROCHAS “ eau de parfum 90 ml, CHANEL COSMETIC – (in order from left to right) retractable foundation brush and Purse Spray 7.5 ml “Coco Mademoiselle”, GIORGIO ARMANI COSMETIC – lip maestro intense velvet color and lip magnet second-skin intense matte color, GUCCI – Paper fan with owl print and bamboo handle B : LOUIS VUITTON – Carabiner key holder and District cuff men’s bracelet, MARNI –multicolor plain leather closed toe heels


THE ADDICTIONS

199 - CRASH

C.

D.

E.

C : MOYNAT - Madeleine Clutch in powder Carat calf D : CHANEL – longwear cream eyeshadow, longwear powder eyeshadow, retractable foundation brush, GIORGIO ARMANI – lip maestro intense velvet color, lip magnet second-skin intense matte color, lasting satin lip color, longwear high cover foundation E : SAINT LAURENT PARIS – “Love Box” bag black nappa leather with silver logo


THE ADDICTIONS

200 - CRASH

A.

B.

A : BURBERRY – The Medium DK88 Burberry Top Handle Bag, ROCHAS – multicolor duchess polyester skirt, MULBERRY – “T-bar” velvet eggplant sandals and Platform with pearls B : GUCCI – Mid heel platform moccasin in white leather with horsebit, pearls and studs details, Candy mousse technical jersey leggings with sylvie ribbon detail and Azure Macro New Flora printed technical jersey joggers with sylvie ribbon detail along the sides, MCM – “ Berlin Patent “ rigid crossbody bag


THE ADDICTIONS

201 - CRASH

C.

D.

C : PRADA – Red woolen turquoise embroidery skirt, ARMANI – perforated boots round toe with black zip at the back – wide heel, COACH – “Space “Glovetanned pebble Camera bag in Chalk Midnight Navy D: PRADA – “Velvet Cahier” bag and Mary-Jane pump in calf leather with satin buckle, LACOSTE – Red jogging pants


THE ADDICTIONS

202 - CRASH

A.

B.

A : DIOR HOMME – backpack in blue and black technical canvas and white pigment printed, LOUIS VUITTON – League stole red and navy scarf, CALVIN KLEIN – Blue Denim Jacket B : BURBERRY - The Small DK88 Burberry Satchel bag, CALVIN KLEIN – Men’s Underwear, NIKE – White sport jogging pants


THE ADDICTIONS

203 - CRASH

C.

E.

D.

C : VIVIENNE WESTWOOD – “soho” large gold Earring D : COMME DES GARCONS PLAY – Orange wallet with silver dots (Fragrance in order from left to right), ROCHAS FRAGRANCE – “Escapade Estivale” eau de toilette 100ml, GIORGIO ARMANI FRAGANCE – “Sky di Gioia” eau de parfum 50ml, ISSEY MIYAKE FRAGRANCE – “L’EAU D’ISSEY PURE” eau de toilette 90 ml E : DELVAUX – ivory alligator plain leather bag


THE ADDICTIONS

204 - CRASH

A.

B.

A : MONCLER GAMME ROUGE - Blue, red and silver parka B : BULGARI – rounded cat-eye sunglasses with black/gold/white enamel décor and pale gold metal frame, DIOR HOMME- black patterned and matte black frame + silver mirrored lenses


THE ADDICTIONS

205 - CRASH

C.

E.

D.

C : COMME DES GARCONS – Soda 100ml eau de toilette from Olfactory Library / Lime teamed with ginger and pepper / Perfumer Nathalie Feisthauer D : LOUIS VUITTON – “Eclipse” light monogram cabas E : DIOR HOMME – Black Sneakers with straps and neoprene, CK CALVIN KLEIN – Black denim jeans, ADIDAS – White sport socks


THE ADDICTIONS

206 - CRASH

A.

B.

C.

A : LOUIS VUITTON – “The Party “ - sunglasses gold and transparent with “ Petit Essential “ - eyeglasses gold chain, MARNI – white embellished plastic earrings B : GUCCI – Medium top handle bag in leopard-print calf hair and black matelassé chevron leather with bamboo handle and chain, torchon straps C : CHOPARD – Superfast Chrono Porsche 919 Edition Watch, steel case, mechanical self-winding chronograph movement (Chopard 03.05-M), black rubber strap with steel folding clasp. Superfast Power Contro Watchl, steel case, mechanical self-winding movement (Chopard 01.02-M), power reserve indicator, black rubber strap with steel folding clasp, CHLOE – Nile Minaudière in lambskin, Suede & Smooth calfskin Patchwork, CALVIN KLEIN – White denim sleeveless jacket


THE ADDICTIONS

207 - CRASH

E.

F.

D.

D : BOUCHERON - quatre GROSGRAIN bangle bracelets ( yellow gold and white gold ), GROSGRAIN yellow gold ring, quatre classique large ring 3 golds ( & brown PVD) and quatre black edition large white gold ( & black PVD), SWAROVSKI – Atelier Swarovski, core collection golden shadow clutch E : Flap Cover bag “Serpenti Forever” in royal sapphire nappa, Brass light gold plated snake head closure, CHRISTIAN DIOR FRAGRANCE – “Eau Sauvage” 100 ml, HERMES – “Zeta de Nathalie du Pasquier” Multicolor twill Silk Scarf F : HERMES – silver necklace “Chaine d’Ancre Punk Double”


THE ADDICTIONS

208 - CRASH

A.

B.

A : SAINT LAURENT – “New wave” black sunglasses, LANVIN – silk scarf printed “pretty wood” pattern, MARNI – silver embellished plastic earrings / drop earrings, MAX MARA – black knit top B : BONPOINT – Transparent rain coat and blue velvet bag in shape of heart, CALVIN KLEIN – Black sport bra


THE ADDICTIONS

209 - CRASH

C.

D.

C : BRIONI – Navy blue jacket with large pockets and belt closure, MULBERRY – “Anthony” Tricolor grained calfskin bag, NATTOFRANCO – White denim jeans re design D : ROCHAS – blue cashmere knit jumper, CHLOE – Off white Cotton corset top and black oversize trousers, SWAROVSKI – Atelier Swarovski by Lanvin – Cristaux deco necklace, ISSEY MIYAKE – Pink Cabas Bag


THE ADDICTIONS

210 - CRASH

A.

C.

B.

A : RIVIERAS - Red patent loafers / Red vinyl high-top shoes, LOEWE – Leather cuff bracelet with gold calla flower B : CALVIN KLEIN – Black women’s sport bra, LOUIS VUITON Women – “Hologram” gold necklace, MONCLER – Red sunglasses C : LACOSTE – Red sport tops with white zips closure


THE ADDICTIONS

211 - CRASH

E.

D.

D : “KAN I” bag - multicolored buds flowered and Fur bag jewelry E : MONCLER GAMME ROUGE – Pockets Jacket and cotton capri shorts, CK CALVIN KLEIN – White sleeveless denim jacket


212 - CRASH

THE ADDICTIONS

A.

B.

Groomer : Michael Delmas - Model : Maxime Frenel at Success Models / Céline Delaugère et IMG - Stylist assistant : Noémie Fourmeau


213 - CRASH

THE ADDICTIONS

C.

D.

A : BLUMARINE – Light pink pointed ankle boots with gold heel, WOLFORD – Black fishnet tights B : CHANEL - N°5, "L’eau" 100 ml C : G STAR RAW – White denim cotton shirt D : MCM, Incense, eau de parfum 100ml


MEETING

JÉRÔME DI MARINO

214 - CRASH

THE PERFUMER ESTABLISHED IN MUNICH IN 1976, MCM HAS SINCE MOVED ITS HEADQUARTERS TO SEOUL, ACCENTUATING ITS INTERNATIONAL SPIRIT AND REVOLUTIONIZING THE CLASSIC DESIGN OF LEATHER GOODS BY USING FUTURISTIC MATERIALS. THE HOUSE LAUNCHED ITS FIRST COLLECTION OF THREE FRAGRANCES, EACH CREATED BY THE YOUNG NOSE JÉRÔME DI MARINO THROUGH A POETIC COLLABORATION CENTERED ON THE THEME OF TRAVEL. JÉRÔME TELLS US ABOUT HIS THREE CREATIONS COMPOSED USING PRECIOUS MATERIALS AND UNCOMPROMISING QUALITY STANDARDS.

How did you start creating perfumes? What is your background?

lution of scent blends from a note of vanilla to a gourmet note.

Almost by chance. I’ve always liked making things! I started out studying design, but I didn’t finish my studies. Afterwards I studied chemistry in southern France, near Grasse, not far from where I lived. I thought chemistry would bring me closer to designing perfumes. Then I looked into the ISIPCA school in Versailles, which was founded by the Guerlain family at the end of the 19th century. It played a pivotal role in the entire perfume industry of the last century and still does today.

Turning to the new fragrances developed by MCM: why did you compose three and how did the collaboration with the house come about?

Since that school offers work-study programs with companies, I started working at Givaudan, a perfume house owned by a Swiss group. I stayed there for two years, and then I moved on to Givenchy. I was not directly involved in creating perfumes, but it was interesting to see how they developed fragrances. So I learned to work with the marketing teams and that enabled me to discover all the communication work that takes place while developing a perfume. After a year at that house, I was recruited by Takasago, a Japanese perfume house managed by Francis Kurkdjian, who trained me for two years and became my mentor. I learned all about perfumery with him. First I studied his history of perfume from N°5 and Shalimar to contemporary fragrances, so I could understand “trends.” Just like in fashion, we reinvent a lot in perfumery and we try to update the classics or styles that have been forgotten. That is the aspect of composition that Francis taught me. It helped me see what a vintage Oriental like Shalimar has in common with a recent success like La Vie est Belle. He taught me to track the evo-

When I think of MCM, I think first of all about backpacks and the spirit of travel bags. MCM contacted me to build a new connection to the Millennial generation that I belong to. I had already worked with someone from the brand on other projects, and that’s who decided to let me work exclusively on this new collection. He had total confidence in me and I developed something very personal. The original idea was to translate the brand’s DNA and understand what MCM shoppers wanted to experience. There are three fragrances because the number three resonates with the history and heritage of the brand, which began in Germany but has been managed by a South Korean group since 2008. It’s a multicultural heritage that is not rooted in one single world region. Since MCM is first and foremost a brand of bags, I wanted to translate that aspect of travel communicated through their bags by generating a sensory voyage through these three fragrances. Each of the three elixirs evokes travel: a voyage from East to West, between Germany and South Korea. The first voyage is White Tea. Does the name White Tea hearken back to Eau Parfumée Au Thé Vert created by Jean-Claude Ellena for Bulgari?


MEETING

JÉRÔME DI MARINO

215 - CRASH

No, but tea is a very common theme in perfumery. We chose white tea in particular because we wanted the entire collection to translate the quality found in MCM products, such as the fine leathers the brand imports from Italy and Germany. White tea is one of the most prestigious teas because the leaves are harvested by hand and it’s the only tea that does not undergo any processing, oxidation, or fermentation. It’s just dried. Green tea, black tea, and white tea all come from the same tree. But green tea undergoes a fermentation process, and black tea is fermented even more. That’s why the color changes from white to a darker shade. So we worked on the precise quality of white tea, which is the purest and most precious variety. We wanted to combine the note of white tea with a touch of the quality embodied by the brand, while giving it a very fresh aspect as well as a very sensual and comfortable aspect. We began with a strong bergamot note and a green tea note, accompanied with apricot effects that certain teas can have, as well as a creamy base with a musky note of san-

dalwood to give it that soft and comfortable texture. Tell us about the bottle. Did you want to echo the brand’s style? I mostly wanted to reach consumers with the scent. The communication team outlined the brand’s DNA in detail. Those elements notably appear on the cap, which plays on the shape of MCM’s flagship bag. The main goal of the collection is to create a sensory experience and tell new olfactory stories that are unique and distinct from other brands… You aim to tell an olfactory and poetic story when creating a perfume. Can you tell me about the poetic stories told by each of the three perfumes in this collaboration? Each of the stories is based on a precious and geographically specific product. The three fragrances revolve around three products: tea, incense, and iris. Tea is precious for the reasons I mentioned before. Incense embodies a rich spiritual and mystical story because it was used by the Egyptians and other cultures that burned incense as an offering to the gods. Iris, once known as blue gold, comes from Tuscany. It’s one of the most expensive products in perfumery. This blue gold was once placed delicately into the gloves of courtesans to exude an aura of enchantment… Incense is a complex material, bearing a resinous but citrusy scent. For the “Incensé” fragrance, we wanted to develop the darker aspects evoked by incense, as well as its transcendent side, while juxtaposing it with notes of grapefruit and cistus, a specific product in perfumery endowed with an especially musky scent. Cis-

tus is a shrub found primarily in the Mediterranean region. The shrub secretes a resin in the summer

months. The resin is very dark and that’s why we chose it for our project. With a center composed of incense, we accentuated its fresh side with grapefruit and its dark side with an absolute of cistus. We wanted to play on opposites, which can be surprising because the word “incense” generally evokes something very dark and mystical. We only think of the somber side. So we wanted to develop the luminous aspect that incense can give off. As for iris in perfumery, it’s not as opulent as jasmine can be. Iris is very expensive, because the flower must grow for at least three years. We don’t work with the flower, but instead the rhizome, meaning its root system, which we harvest and then dry. We have to wait three to seven years for the dried plant to produce an aroma and that’s why it’s such a precious material. Iris has an aroma that is both powdery and woody. It doesn’t have the floral scent you might expect. Instead it has more of a violet aspect, like violet candy. We wanted to give our third fragrance, Orris, an extra powdery and sensual aspect with a spicy and fresh note of pink peppercorn, accompanied by a rush of lemon and an overdose of musk, which gives it its powdery and musky texture and note of sophistication. All of the perfumes grew out of the materials and not a concept. We didn’t make any of the three elixirs for a specific gender. Men and women can wear all three of our olfactory stories. We intended them above all for anyone inspired by travel and eager to take a sensory and emotional voyage.

PHOTO: ALEX BRUNET / INTERVIEW: SARAH KONTÉ


Photographer: Hans Neumann - Fashion: Melissa Levy Hayette (left) wears Sies Marjan dress, Broken English antique earrings. Jay (right) wears Dolce & Gabbana corset from Albright Fashion Library, Broken English antique hoop earrings and ring, David Yurman bracelet


Left page: Jay wears Helmut Lang dress from the David Casavant Archive, We Love Colors tights, Broken English antique earrings, Love Adorned antique ring and David Yurman bracelet. Hayette wears Helmut Lang bra, Falke tights, Eres briefs, Broken English antique earrings and necklace, Kenzo bag. Right page: left: Helmut Lang bra, Creatures of Comfort camisole. right: Jason Wu sandals, Celine boots


Left: Jay wears Creatures of Comfort top, Araks briefs. Right: Hayette wears Helmut Lang dress, We Love Colors tights, Jason Wu shoes, Broken English antique rings and earrings. Jay wears Stella McCartney bra and briefs, Love Adorned antique gold hoops and gold band ring, Broken English antique pearl ring


Left: Araks bra. Right: Jay wears Celine dress, Broken English antique hoops and ring


Left page: left: Jay wears Jason wu dress, La Crasia gloves, We Love Colors tights, Broken English antique earrings, Love Adorned antique ring, David Yurman bracelet. right: Araks bra Right page: Hayette wears Louis Vuitton dress and body suit, Broken English antique earrings, necklace and ring


Left page: Esteban Cortazar top, Hanro briefs, Maria La Rosa Socks, Broken English antique earrings, necklace and ring. Right page: Jay wears Blumarine dress, Broken English antique gold earring, Love Adorned antique ring. Hayett wears Broken English antique necklace

Models : Hayette McCarthy & Jay Wright - Make up : Cedric Jolivet using MAC Cosmetics - Hair : Ryan Mitchell


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Crash uk issue 80 summer 2017  
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