Page 1


+

Register Now and Save

+

THE EVENT THAT

CAN CHANGE YOUR LIFE

OV ER SIX T Y INF OR M AT I V E & INSPIR ING SPE A K ER S

Brenda Davis, RD

Hans Diehl, DrHSc, MPH, FACN

Joel K. Kahn, MD

Michael Greger, MD

Lani Muelrath, MA

Dr. Richard Oppenlander

Lead Dietician in a major diabetes reversal project in the Marshall Islands, author of Defeating Diabetes, Becoming Raw and Becoming Vegan

Founder of the Lifestyle Medicine Institute and Clinical Professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine at Loma Linda University’s School of Medicine

Vegan Preventive Cardiologist; author of The Whole Heart Solution: Halt Heart Disease Now with the Best Alternative and Traditional Medicine

Author of the best selling book How Not to Die: Discover the Foods Scientifically Proven to Prevent and Reverse Disease; founder NutritionFacts.org

Author of The Plant-Based Journey: A Step-by-Step Guide for Transitioning to a Healthy Lifestyle and Achieving Your Ideal Weight; Fitness Nutrition Specialist

Author of the award winning books, Food Choice and Sustainability: Why Buying Local, Eating Less Meat, and Taking Baby Steps Won’t Work and Comfortably Unaware

The place to learn about healthy vegan living! MEET OTHERS OF LIKE MIND Over 700 attendees of all ages, from beginners to seasoned vegetarians; singles, couples and families. An ideal setting for building lasting friendships! Social gatherings for everyone. FUN FOR EVERYONE! Music, humor, dancing, games and much more!

CUTTING EDGE EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS Health and Nutrition + Food Demonstrations + Lifestyle Issues + Animal Rights + Exercise + Fitness + Earth Stewardship + Compassionate Living

DELICIOUS WHOLE FOOD VEGAN MEALS Our meals are designed to accommodate a variety of diets, with gluten-free and raw food options. Prepared under the direction of award winning Chef Mark Reinfeld of Vegan Fusion.

July 6 – 10

+

ENLIGHTENING SPEAKERS Doctors, dieticians, chefs, authors, social activists and other educators will share their knowledge and experience. “Summerfest is excellent! I can’t believe it’s taken me half my life to experience it.” - R.B. (NY)

Johnstown, PA

Scan the QR Code to learn more about Vegetarian Summerfest

42nd Annual Conference of the North American Vegetarian Society

vegetariansummerfest.org or call (518) 568-7970


march 2016 features 54 VEG WORLD: AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO THE IRISH CAPITAL Veg-friendly dining in Dublin. BY SUSAN MORRELL 60 5 INGREDIENTS: REVVED-UP RICE The everyday side dish gets five tasty makeovers with these quick fixes. RECIPES BY ABIGAIL WOLFE 66 VEG BY THE BOOK: NINJA IN THE KITCHEN In her new book, vegan author Terry Hope Romero packs extra protein into everything from mac and cheese to cookies. RECIPES BY TERRY HOPE ROMERO 72 1 FOOD 5 WAYS: CHAYOTE The versatile squash is the perfect antidote to the winter food blues. BY MARY MARGARET CHAPPELL 78

EASY ENTERTAINING: SLEEPOVER MAKEOVER Skip the junk food, and instead serve this stealthily healthy slumber-party fare that kids will actually eat. RECIPES BY CASEY EASTON

on the cover 28

New Probiotics: Keep Your Belly Happy

72

30 Spring Veggies to Plant Now 36 No Time? Fast Meals from Starter Soups

45 Hearty & Healthy Make-Ahead Dishes 60 5 Easy Rice Dishes 66 Protein Ninja: New Dishes from Terry Hope Romero

78

Veg Dishes Kids Will Love COVER PH OTO G RA P H Y Jennifer Olson | FOOD STYLING Eric Leskovar | PROP STYLING Nicole Dominic vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 1


Steep a cup of Yogi tea and you have something more than delicious. Every intriguing blend of herbs and botanicals is on a mission, supporting energy, stamina, clarity, immunity, tranquility, cleansing or unwinding.

Ž,Š2015-2016 East West Tea Company, LLC

Every cup is a gift to mind, body and spirit.


departments TRENDING VEG

85 CAN’T LIVE WITHOUT IT

17

Acclaimed Chef Shawn McClain knows how to bring out the best flavors in fresh foods. BY NICOLE GREGORY

20 HEADY TIMES: THE RISE OF VEGAN BEER Get a taste of the vegan-beer scene. BY LORIE PARCH

88 LAST BITE

Issue 428, Vol. 42, No. 4. Vegetarian Times (ISSN 0164-8497, USPS 433-170) is published monthly except February, August, and December by Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc., an Active Interest Media company. The known office of publication is at 5720 Flatiron Pkwy, Boulder, CO 80301. Periodicals postage paid at Boulder, CO, and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send all address changes to Vegetarian Times, PO Box 420235, Palm Coast, FL 32142-0235. SUBSCRIPTIONS: Basic Rate: $19.90 per year (9 issues); Canada: $31.95 per year; all other international orders: $43.95 per year (U.S. funds only).

COMMUNITY KITCHEN Moby’s new vegan restaurant extends his animal-rights message. BY NICOLE GREGORY

23 CAN DOGS AND CATS GO VEGETARIAN? Vets weigh in on whether—and how—your pets can go veg and stay healthy. BY NICOLE GREGORY 25 TASTE TEST We took on the hard job of trying these rich, sweet organic syrups. BY KRISTEN KUCHAR

17

32 GARDEN TO TABLE

30

SOME LIKE IT COOL Five vegetables for earlyspring planting. BY THERESE CIESINSKI

32 SOIL SMARTS Success in gardening starts from the ground up. BY SCOTT MEYER

36 30 MINUTES

26 STOP THE RUMBLING A plant-based diet can cause stomach troubles at first, but simple solutions can set things right again. BY NICOLE GREGORY 28

PROBIOTICS FOR TUMMY TROUBLES Probiotics can treat tummy troubles and help prevent them in the first place—if you get the right amount. BY DAVID KALMANSOHN

45

35 LOSE THE GLUTEN THE ULTIMATE GLUTENFREE HOT CEREAL Combining gluten-free grains is the secret to making the perfect bowl of hot cereal. BY MARY MARGARET CHAPPELL

HEALTHY VEG

MICROGREENS AND SPROUT SALAD WITH CARROT-GINGER DRESSING Tired of winter? Treat yourself to a salad of fresh, tender shoots and leaves that are the very taste of spring. BY MARY MARGARET CHAPPELL

SOUP’S ON! com inations and comb d s make k prepare red d s ide deal a mea eal--he h lp per e s. s SAN NGI G RARD RD DI

45

5 6 10 86

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR CONTRIBUTORS COMMUNITY RECIPE INDEX

EK KEN END D WH W IZ Z LAV AVO ORS ou ur weekkni n ghtt meeal as internatiton onal a lyy al tré r ess. TEN ENAG A LI AG LA

23 vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 3


g Bake and enjoy your treats knowing they’re made with 100%

sun-sweetened pure cane sugar that’s sustainably grown. Our sugar cane is grown with

earth-friendly care because we know what begins on our farm, ends at your table.

Ea Earth Friendly. Uniquely Delicious. ©2016 Domino Foods, Inc.

For recipes and to learn more about how we are Sweet to Mother Nature, visit floridacrystals.com.


PHOTO OF MICHELE: RICK CUMMINGS; HAIR/MAKEUP: BETH WALKER; PHOTO OF GIRLS: JULIA VANDENOEVER; PEA-SOUP PHOTO: COURTESY OF NATURAL GOURMET INSTITUTE

Was one of your New Year’s resolutions to improve your plantbased nutrition know-how and amp up your cooking skills? Vegetarian Times has partnered with the Natural Gourmet Institute, a New York–based culinary school, to develop a comprehensive online course: Foundations of Plant-Based Nutrition. Led by Kayleen St. John, RD, the course combines an in-depth review of nutrition science with hands-on techniques, recipes, and tips— a terrific opportunity for anyone who wants to implement healthy vegan or vegetarian nutrition practices at home, or anyone contemplating a vegetarian food-related career. VEGETARIANTIMES.COM/NUTRITION

IN PRAISE OF PEA SOUP One of many delicious dishes you’ll learn to make in our online course Foundations of Plant-Based Nutrition, presented in partnership with the Natural Gourmet Institute.

FACEBOOK.COM/VEGETARIANTIMESMAG

SPRING IS COMING! IT WAS ONLY 8˚F today at sunrise here in northern Colorado, but we’re still happy to bring you a March issue full of the promise of spring. Let’s start with gardening: It’s nearly time to put down those seed catalogs and start digging in the dirt for blockbuster crops of edibles. How good is your garden soil? Does it need improvements? Gardening expert Scott Meyer explains it all in “Soil Smarts” (p. 32). And if you’re eager to start planting, check out Therese Ciesinski’s “Some Like It Cool” (p. 30) for a rundown of five cool-weather veggies that you can plant now and enjoy as early as Memorial Day. My favorite spring vegetable is the oddly cute chayote squash, which gets a starring role in this issue’s 1 Food 5 Ways (“Chayote,” p. 72), lending a hint of summer to a roasted salad, corn pudding, salsa, and more. Do you have kids who are showing signs of spring fever? Throw a slumber party with easy, healthy but kid-friendly dishes (“Sleepover Makeover,” p. 78). The colorful Easy, Cheesy Homemade Pizza, irresistible Oatmeal Cookie Pancakes, and Strawberry “Ice Cream” Cake were From left: Olivia Pierce, Sofia Pelletier, huge hits with the high-energy crew Natalie Korczak, and Madeleine of girls (left) at our photo shoot. Vandenoever, fueled by vegetarian— Already dreaming about your next and sneakily healthy!—eats vacation? Take a culinary trip with (“Sleepover Makeover,” p. 78). “World Flavors” (Weekend Whiz, p. 45), featuring easy weeknight meals with international flavors, including an amazing Green Vegetable Curry. This section includes a cooking timeline and shopping list to get delicious dishes on the table ASAP. Our final salute to spring: a delicately flavored microgreens salad (“Spring Green,” Last Bite, p. 88). The Carrot-Ginger Dressing has already become a staple in my fridge. Thanks to everyone who sent feedback about the VT redesign: We read every word you send—look for more great changes ahead based on your feedback. Keep the comments coming to editor@vegetariantimes.com.

@VEGTIMES PINTEREST.COM/VEGTIMES INSTAGRAM.COM/VEGETARIANTIMESMAG

Michele Crockett Editor in Chief vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 5


SWOON OVER THE TEMPTING

TASTE OF SOYMILK

WE ASKED OUR CONTRIBUTORS,

“What are some flavors you’ve tried and loved?” Susan Morrell A travel, food, and sustainable-lifestyle writer from New England, who lives and works in Dublin, Ireland, and wrote “Dublin: An Insider’s Guide to the Irish Capital” (p. 54). “The salt and chocolate combination has been big for years, but I recently had a dark chocolate and sea salt gelato that blew my mind. It’s handmade in an unassuming chip shop in my neighborhood (you’d never guess that they also make the best Italian gelato in Dublin), and it’s worth the cold hands to enjoy it even on a wet and windy Irish day.”

Josie Rubio A New York City–based writer and editor whose byline has appeared in numerous publications, including VIVmag, Shape, and Columbus. She wrote “Can Dogs and Cats Go Vegetarian?” (p. 23). “Vegan vanilla cardamom ice cream that a friend served at her housewarming party, and the Ample Hills Star Wars ice-cream flavors.”

Terry Hope Romero

Remember the

The author of several cookbooks, including Salad Samurai, Vegan Eats World, and Viva Vegan!, she’s also the co-author of Veganomicon, Vegan Cupcakes Take Over the World, Vegan Cookies Invade Your Cookie Jar, and Vegan Pie in the Sky. Hope Romero lives, cooks, and eats in Queens, New York. Recipes from her new cookbook, Protein Ninja, are featured in “Ninja in the Kitchen” (p. 66).

smooth, delicious taste of Silk® Soymilk? It's time to get reacquainted. Silk.com/ LoveSoymilk ©2015 WhiteWave Services, Inc.

“Fuyu persimmons, dried kimchi chips, chocolatecovered Sacha Inchi seeds.”


FALL BACK IN LOVE

WITH SOYMILK No other leading dairy-free milk brand gives you more protein! With 8 GRAMS of PLANT- POWERED PROTEIN per serving, low saturated fat and no cholesterol, delicious Silk® Original Soymilk gives you plenty to love.

Silk.com/ LoveSoymilk

©2015 WhiteWave Services, Inc.


VP & GENERAL MANAGER Kim Paulsen PUBLISHER Joanna Shaw 800-443-4974 x709 jshaw@aimmedia.com

EDITOR IN CHIEF Michele Crockett ART DIRECTOR Wis Mollerud Holt [ E D I TO R I A L ]

[ SALES ]

FOOD EDITOR

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER & EAST COAST FOOD & SUPPLEMENT SALES DIRECTOR

Mary Margaret Chappell ASSISTANT EDITOR

Kristen Kuchar COPY CHIEF

Matt Samet

Dan Vincent 770-437-0861 dvincent@aimmedia.com

[ ART & PRODUCTION ]

MIDWEST FOOD & SUPPLEMENT SALES DIRECTOR

CONTRIBUTING DESIGNERS

Lisa Dodson

Larissa Davis Eleanor Williamson Kimberly Haugh

Address editorial correspondence to:

Vegetarian Times, 2520 55th St., Suite 200, Boulder, CO 80301 Fax: 303-625-1602 We assume no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts and/or artwork, which must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. FOR EDITORIAL QUESTIONS, CALL 303-625-1600 Subscription inquiries, address changes, renewals: CALL 877-717-8923 (U.S. & Canada); VISIT vegetariantimes.com/customerservice FOREIGN ORDERS, CALL 386-447-2398

800-443-4974 x703 ldodson@aimmedia.com EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN

Cynthia Lyons

WEST COAST FOOD & SUPPLEMENT SALES DIRECTOR

Tanya Scribner

Andrew W. Clurman

PRODUCTION MANAGER

tanya@scribmedia.com

Mark Stokes

DETROIT AD SALES

PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Keith Cunningham [ C O N T R I B U TO R S ]

248-763-0526 kcunningham@aimmedia.com

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

CLASSIFIEDS & MARKETPLACE SALES

Nicole Gregory Don Rice RECIPE DEVELOPERS

Stacy Adimando Susan Morrell Victoria Abbott Riccardi Joyce Sangirardi Sarah Tenaglia Abigail Wolfe RECIPE TESTERS

Casey Easton Lisa Turner NUTRITION CONSULTANT

Antonina Smith

Efrem Zimbalist III PRESIDENT & CEO EXECUTIVE VP & CFO

Brian Sellstrom EXECUTIVE VP, OPERATIONS

Patricia B. Fox VP, CONTROLLER

Joseph Cohen

Elizabeth Regan

VP, RESEARCH

303-625-1625 eregan@aimmedia.com

Kristy Kaus VP, FINANCE

Craig Rucker [ MARKETING & WEB ]

DIRECTOR OF INTEGRATED MARKETING

Greg Brenton gbrenton@aimmedia.com SENIOR EXPERIENTIAL MARKETING MANAGER

Copyright © 2016 by Cruz Bay Publishing, Inc. VEGETARIAN TIMES® is a registered trademark. Please use the content of Vegetarian Times wisely. It is intended to educate and inform, not to replace the care of a health professional.

Rachel Van Buskirk MARKETING COORDINATOR

[ A I M H E A LT H Y U ]

Lindsey Carrier

DIRECTOR OF CONSUMER EXPERIENCE

MARKETING DESIGNER

lcarrier@aimmedia.com

Michael Daecher

Tanya Cantu

[ CONSUMER MARKETING ]

COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR

CIRCULATION DIRECTOR

Jenny Desjean DIRECTOR OF RETAIL SALES

Susan Rose

tcantu@aimmedia.com

Dayna Macy dmacy@aimmedia.com GROUP DIGITAL DIRECTOR

Timothy R. Zura SENIOR DIGITAL DIRECTOR

RESEARCH MANAGER

Lori Rodriguez

8 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

Made in the U.S.A.

Alan Zucker

Excited for spring planting? See “Some Like It Cool” for tips [ p. 30 ].


Only Ester-C® gives you all of these benefits: đ Clinically studied to stay in white blood cells longer than regular vitamin C^ đ Patented formula with 24/7 immune support*‡ đ Non-acidic so it’s gentle on the stomach đ Once daily Ester-C® Capsules, Tablets or Delicious Orange Eff ervescent. Available at health, natural food and vitamin specialty stores.

The Better Vitamin C.

®

, Ester-C ® and The Better Vitamin C ® are registered trademarks of The Ester C Company. U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,197,813 & 6,878,744. ^White blood cells are an important part of your immune system ‡From one daily serving of Ester-C® *These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Learn more at AmericanHealthUS.com ©2016 American Health Inc.

|

15-AH-1213


TELL VT What new foods have you recently tried and loved?

ied is tabbouleh The newest dish I’ve tr mbers and made with Persian cucu wheat. quinoa instead of bulgur and lighter. Higher protein content— n —Dona Mueller Masti We cut out meat and turned to a mainly veggie diet (I’d say 90 percent of the time) in 2015, and roasted cauliflower has been a revelation! We enjoy it seasoned with fajita spices, roasted with peppers and mushrooms, and served in soft tortillas for delicious fajitas; or seasoned with za’atar spice and a squeeze of lemon as an excellent side dish. It’s the future! —Fiona Brook My food project for the next few weeks is to experiment with lesser-known grains. Tonight’s dinner was my first time eating farro. Coming soon are freekeh, amaranth, and millet. —Lucianne Pugh

*Responses are edited for clarity.

JOIN US ONLINE FACEBOOK.COM/VEGETARIANTIMESMAG

@VEGTIMES PINTEREST.COM/VEGTIMES INSTAGRAM.COM/VEGETARIANTIMESMAG

10 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

Persimmon. —Rosanne Rousseau

Fenugreek! And tomatillos!

Oven-roasted chickpeas (I am new to the vegetarian lifestyle). So delicious! —Suz Strong-Taylor

—Jaime Oleh

Baba ghanoush … on everything! Cherimoya—so good.

—Kaye Tripp

—Nanci Lawson

Dragon fruit. —Jessica Cadieux

Marinated artichokes! They make the absolute best salads! —Amber Renee Sprague

PHOTO: ISTOCK/IVANMATEEV

Every issue, we ask a foodrelated question, and our VT community responds!


©2015 Eden Foods 08673


VEGANIZED CLASSICS FEATURED BLOG: OLIVES FOR DINNER olivesfordinner.com

Erin Wysocarski, an ethical vegan, is the creator of the blog Olives for Dinner. She handles recipe development and food styling while her husband, Jeff, does the site’s food photography. In this recipe, Erin loved transforming rockhard beets into something silky and luscious by slow-roasting them in a bed of salt—a simple technique that’s worth the wait!

SALT-ROASTED GOLDEN BEETS WITH TERIYAKI S AUCE A ND NO RI DUST SERVES 22 SERVES 2 cups coarse salt, plus more if needed 1 lb. golden beets (3 small beets), stems and bases trimmed 1 Tbs. toasted sesame oil 1 tsp. coconut vinegar or apple cider vinegar ¼ sheet nori or ochazuke wakame seasoning 1 cup steamed rice 4 tsp. prepared teriyaki sauce, optional 4 green onions, thinly sliced on sharp bias (½ cup) 1 Tbs. sesame seeds 1 cup steamed broccoli

1 Preheat oven to 375°F. Pour salt into 9-inch-square baking dish. Rinse trimmed beets, and place in salt while wet. (Make sure that beet has a good layer of salt on the bottom and does not touch bottom of baking dish.) Roast beets 2 hours. Cool beets slightly and remove from salt. Peel beets and slice thinly with mandoline or sharp knife while still warm.

2

Whisk together sesame oil and vinegar in medium bowl. Add beets, and toss to coat. Cover, and marinate in refrigerator 4 hours, or overnight.

3 Grind nori sheet to fine powder in spice or coffee 4 Spoon rice into two bowls. Spoon 2 tsp. teriyaki sauce, if using, onto two serving plates. Sprinkle with green onions. Lay sliced beets in two 5- to 6-inch rows, overlapping onion slices. Roll each row into a flower or swirl pattern. Set in center of serving plate and sprinkle with nori dust and sesame seeds. Serve with rice and broccoli.

12 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

PER SERVING (1 BEET ROLL) 439 CAL; 13 G PROT; 10 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 69 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 298 MG SOD; 9 G FIBER; 13 G SUGARS

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF OLIVES FOR DINNER

grinder.


#1 FOR A REASON - Standardized black elderberry extract with guaranteed flavonoid BioActives,® Bioavailability/activity tested plus the widest variety of delivery forms: syrups, gummies, lozenges, liquid drops, softgels and fizzy drink mixes

TSPINScan 52 weeks ending 10/04/15. *This statement has not been evaluated by the Food & Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.


LIKED RECIPE This Roasted Mushroom and Gouda Cheese Sandwich reached more than 230,000 people, with more than 3,000 likes on Facebook and hundreds of comments and shares. GET THE RECIPE vegetariantimes.com/recipe/ roasted-mushroom-and-gouda-grilled-cheese-sandwiches

JOIN OUR FACEBOOK COMMUNITY: FACEBOOK.COM/VEGETARIANTIMESMAG


Don’t let YOUR greatest moments be ruined by digestive discomfort. The probiotic strains in our award winning, scientiďŹ cally proven formula distinguish themselves by becoming distinctive to your body’s speciďŹ c needs. Dr. Ohhira’s ProbioticsÂŽ takes probiotic support to a whole new level by: Q Providing the restorative biogenic ingredients (produced by living bacteria through the fermentation process) needed to support YOUR exclusive probiotic â€˜ďŹ ngerprint’* Q Q

Promoting your digestive and whole health*

Enhancing the absorption of nutrients from food and other supplements*

N-

T I M E WI N R

SEV

NE

E

Discover the Dr. Ohhira Difference™ and Embrace Life’s Big Moments.

R

SEV E

NE

&IND$R/HHIRAS&ORMULASATBETTERHEALTHFOODSTORESNATIONWIDEsWWW%SSENTIAL&ORMULASCOMs   * These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

N-

T I M E WI

N


The ƂTUVJGTDCNDTCPF with both Non-GMO and TRU-ID™ certification


Community Kitchen

Moby's vegan restaurant embodies his animal-rights activism By Nicole Gregory

WHEN THE SINGER-SONGWRITER Moby was 19, he had an epiphany. As he described it last

PHOTOS: COURTESY OF LITTLE PINE RESTAURANT

year in Rolling Stone, he was sitting on the steps of his home with his cat Tucker, whom he’d rescued from a dump as a kitten, when he realized that he did not want to eat animals. “I thought, ‘I love this cat,’” he wrote. “‘I would do anything to protect him and make him happy and keep him from harm. He has four legs and two eyes and an amazing brain and an incredibly rich emotional life. I would never in a trillion years think of hurting this cat. So why am I eating other animals who have four (or two) legs, two eyes, amazing brains, and rich emotional lives?’ And sitting on the stairs in suburban Connecticut with Tucker the cat, I became a vegetarian.” Today, at age 50, Moby is an animal-rights activist and has just opened a vegan restaurant/shop in Los Angeles called Little Pine. We asked him about his vegan lifestyle and philosophy.

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 17


VT How do you get the message across to people that not eating meat is important? MOBY One of the really exciting things about animal-rights activism is that there are so many ways of reaching people to advance our cause. You can talk about climate change, health, animal welfare, rainforest deforestation. But a powerful, nice, real-world example of what we’re really trying to do is a beautiful neighborhood restaurant—this makes it all tenable.

PHOTO: COURTESY OF LITTLE PINE RESTAURANT; PORTRAIT: MELISSA DANIS

VT Do you currently have any pets? MOBY I live close to Griffith Park in L.A., so my life is filled with animals. I see coyotes daily, as well as rattlesnakes, spiders, raccoons, and the occasional bobcat. Because of my schedule, I don’t have any companion animals in my house right now. But I do feel connected to animals by virtue of living next to one of the biggest urban parks [in America]. VT It seems that the idea of your new restaurant is to encourage community—true? MOBY Yes. It’s located across the street from two schools, in a very community-centric spot. The hours are from 7:30 a.m. to midnight, seven days a week. I got the idea from when I lived in France, and around the corner was a humble bistro that served breakfast, lunch, afternoon tea, and dinner—it was an extension of the neighborhood, a community kitchen.

VT Do you have a favorite dish from the Little Pine menu? MOBY The one that I pushed my chef to do is a vegan cassoulet. When I lived in France in 1987, there was an old vegetarian restaurant in Paris, Le Grenier de Notre Dame, and they made a vegan cassoulet that was so interesting. In French cooking, cassoulet is the heaviest, meatiest thing. [Chef] Anthony Bourdain said once that most cassoulets are too much for him. Ours is more tomato based: It has several different types of heirloom tomatoes, white beans, homemade [vegan] sausage, garlic, onions, and breadcrumbs. VT What keeps more people from becoming vegan? MOBY There are two impediments: The biggest is that our and the European agriculture system both support subsidies for animal production. If animal products weren’t subsidized, no one could afford them—a glass of milk would cost $5 and a hamburger would be $20. If the vegan movement could do one thing, it could get the government to stop subsidizing products that kill animals. Second, people are so familiar with the food they grew up with—bacon, sausage, ham—the cheap, easy food we grew up with. Transitioning away from that can be scary for a lot of people, especially men. Even if you tell them that they’ll live longer, be thinner, not have erectile dysfunction, not get

heart disease, they’re scared and will often respond with anger and belligerence. VT Since you travel so much, do you have favorite vegan restaurants around the country? MOBY The biggest resource for traveling vegans is Happy Cow [happycow.net]. That Web site has saved me so many times. One of my favorite restaurants is Mother’s Café in Austin, Texas—I love Tex-Mex food. In New York, there’s Candle Cafe, Blossom, and Angelica Kitchen. VT Have you ever been stuck somewhere with no food you could eat? MOBY My advice to travelling vegans: Get some oats, raisins, walnuts, and cinnamon in a big plastic bag and take it with you—you can always get boiling water. I was once in a regional airport in Canada near Calgary. The flight was delayed 10 hours—I don’t know what I would have done if I hadn’t had this bag of oats, raisins, walnuts, and cinnamon. VT Are you working on any other animal-rights projects? MOBY I have a few ideas. I was very impressed by something

Karl Rove started calling the “echo chamber” during the Bush years: A message would come from the White House, and all sorts of people repeated that message. I really want

something like that in the world of animal activism, so that when a statement comes from, say, Farm Sanctuary or Mercy for Animals, a network of 10,000 other animal activists will repeat that message. Also, I’d like to start a production company for vegan-based documentaries like Cowspiracy, Forks Over Knives, Earthlings—films that advance the vegan agenda. Animal rights—it’s my life work.

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 19


Not only are more vegan craft brews showing up at vegfests like LA’s and Portland’s Vegan Beer & Food Festival and the Toronto Vegan Food and Drink Festival, but even Ireland’s 256-year-old Guinness is going animal free, due to pressure from vegetarians and vegans. The company announced last November that by late this year it will alter its centuriesold brewing technique to forgo a filtering process that uses fish byproducts.

What is vegan beer, anyway? “There’s long been a misperception that all beer is vegan,” says John Schlimm, author of The Ultimate Beer Lover’s Happy Hour (Cumberland House, 2014) and a member of the Straub Brewery family of Pennsylvania. “But people are starting to ask questions about what’s in their beer,

20 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

and more specifically how it’s produced.” It is often in the making that some brews lose their animal-free status. At the filtering stage, manufacturers may use isinglass (made from fish bladders) and other animal products, such as egg whites and seashells. This is more common among craft brewers, in fact, since many large breweries can afford sophisticated filtration techniques that don’t require these animalderived products. A beer may also be vegetarian, but not vegan, if dairy (as in a milk stout), honey, or other ingredients from animals are added.

Your favorite beer: Is it vegan? If you’re not sure whether your brew of choice is vegan, here’s a super-simple way to find out: Plug a beer name into Barnivore.com, the definitive online

directory of vegan-friendly alcohol. The database currently has more than 22,000 entries (which also include wine and liquor) from around the world, the great majority of them suggested and vetted by the Barnivore community, says co-founder Jason Doucette, who’s been vegan for 18 years. Doucette says Barnivore encourages people to write to companies that they’re interested in to check if a beer and its manufacturing and bottling processes are in fact completely animal free. Since so many craft beers have limited and very local distribution, and since many are made seasonally and in limited runs, Barnivore relies on its users to keep the site’s entries as up-to-date as possible. Also available: Download a Barnivorepowered app to your phone or tablet, such as Vegaholic ($2 for iPhone) or Vgan ($2 for Android).

SEASONAL BEER CHART ADAPTED FROM THE ULTIMATE BEER LOVER’S HAPPY HOUR, BY JOHN SCHLIMM. CUMBERLAND HOUSE, AN IMPRINT OF SOURCEBOOKS, INC. COPYRIGHT © 2014.

VEGAN BEER is having its moment.


By Lorie Parch

A number of beer styles were historically brewed for a particular season. While examples of all beer styles are now available year-round, there’s still some magic to enjoying certain styles in particular seasons. Use this chart and its suggested pairings to help you explore the many brews out there. A general rule of thumb, though, is to drink what you want, when you want it! —John Schlimm

PHOTO: ISTOCK/INHAUSCREATIVE

Spring » Belgian Abbey Tripel » Cream Ale » Golden Ale » India Pale Ale » India Pale Lager » Maibock

Summer » American or English Pale Ale » German Hefeweizen » Kölsch » Pale Lager » Pilsner » Saison

Fall » Belgian Abbey Dubbel » Brown Ale » Dunkel » Oktoberfest » Vienna Lager

Winter » Barley Wine » Doppelbock » Dunkelweizen » Russian » Imperial Stout » Scotch Ale

Don’t expect vegan beers to taste different from non-vegan ones. Says Schlimm, “It’s the same as with beer in general, since most are naturally vegan-friendly. You have the styles you like: If you like hopheavy beers, you go after those. If you like malt, you choose those. There are some good, specifically ‘vegan’-labeled beers and some you’d dump down the drain.” Since the availability of types of beer—and of craft beer, in particular—varies so much depending on the season and where you live, it can be hard to recommend specific bottles.

Schlimm says that a side effect of the growing love for vegan beer has been an interest in beer and plant-based food pairings. “That’s the hottest trend in entertaining,” he says. “With all the great vegan recipes out there, vegans can enjoy the same level of delicious food. It’s all about matching the flavor profile of the beer and food, and having fun with it.”

Lorie Parch is a veteran health writer and editor based in Long Beach, California.

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 21


“Love me because I’m healthier

than you thought.”

I can’t help it if my rich, buttery taste seems a bit indulgent. I’m really an all-natural, vegetarian snack packed with nutrition. Hey, does all this thiamin and manganese make my Omega-3’s look fat? (Don’t worry, it’s the “good” fat.) OK, I’m clearing my schedule. How does mid-day look? After your workout? Whenever you’re hungry, I’m here.

That’s me at your local store, waiting for you in the snack aisle.

AVAILABLE IN SIX DELICIOUS VARIETIES:

RoyalHawaiianOrchards.com © 2016 Royal Hawaiian Macadamia Nut, Inc.


Can Dogs and Cats Go Vegetarian? By Josie Rubio

BUYING MEAT-BASED commercial pet food for your dog or cat presents an ethical quandary for vegetarians and vegans. The good news? Some pets can adapt to a plantbased diet. “One of the main criticisms is that [a veg diet] isn’t natural,” says Armaiti May, DVM, a Los Angeles–based vegan vet. “However, there are many things we do to our animal companions that are not completely natural—including giving them regular meals and veterinary care, luxuries they would not have in the wild.” Before switching your fourlegged friend to a plant-based diet, it helps to understand two important facts:

PHOTO: ISTOCK/BRIAN ZANCHI

Dogs are omnivores “Dogs you can definitely make vegetarian,” says Justine Lee, DACVECC, DABT, the CEO of VETgirl and author of It’s a Dog’s Life … but It’s Your Carpet. In fact, studies have indicated that as humans started to eat a starch-based diet with the advent of agriculture, dogs also adapted to foods like wheat, barley, and corn. “Having the ability to digest carbohydrates allowed dogs to become domesticated more easily,” says May. Adult dogs need about one gram of protein per pound of body weight daily, a requirement that legumes and whole grains can meet. However, Lee says, “Dogs prefer, for palatability, meatbased protein.”

Cats are obligate carnivores (they must have meat) Cats need certain amino acids and vitamins from consuming meat. “It can be life threatening when the diet is off-balance,” says Lee, adding that vitamin deficiencies are even at the root of some cat-food recalls. A deficiency in the amino acid taurine, for example, could cause dilated cardiomyopathy, a serious heart disease. A vegetarian diet is “a huge no-no for a cat,” says Lee. May, however, says that despite cats being carnivorous, in many cases they can adapt to a nutritionally appropriate vegan diet. One risk with this switch is that cats’ urine can become too alkaline, which can lead to the formation of bladder crystals and a potentially life-threatening (if not treated) urethral obstruction in male cats. However, says May, many cats thrive on well-balanced vegan formulas as long as their urinary tract is monitored. “It is important that their body weight be monitored, as well as the new appearance of bladder crystals or changes in the pH of the urine,” May says. If your kitty refuses a veggie diet, assuming he’ll eventually become hungry enough to eat is dangerous, Lee says. “After four to five days without eating, cats go into liver failure,” she says.

1. Follow your vet’s advice. First and foremost, talk to a veterinarian before making any dietary changes. 2. Introduce new food gradually. “Patience is often required,” May says. Mix the meat- and plant-based foods in varying proportions, increasing the vegetarian food until it’s the only food given. 3. Consider your pet’s age. “Regarding puppies, kittens, and senior animals, consult with a vet before abruptly changing the diet or feeding exclusively vegan food,” May says.

4. Ensure a balanced diet. Vets recommend pet food approved by the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO). Want to make your own pet food? May and Lee recommend consulting a veterinary nutritionist, who can create a diet balanced in trace minerals, vitamins, and amino acids. 5. Supplement with supervision. “Some [supplements] may be inappropriate for certain animals, depending on their breed, life stage, and any underlying health conditions,” says May. Ask your vet before givng any supplments to your pet.

Josie Rubio is a cat lover and New York City–based writer.

vegg eta vegetariantimes.com ttaa rria riia ian nttii m nti mes es e s .co .cccoo m

MARC MA MARC MARCH CH 22016 0 6 23 01 3


TA S T E T E S T

MAPLE SYRUP TOP: ISTOCK/PROFETA. BOTTOM ROW, FROM LEFT: WHOLE FOODS 365; CROWN MAPLE SYRUP; COOMBS FAMILY FARMS; SHADY MAPLE FARMS; TREES KNEES SPICY SYRUP

By Kristen Kuchar

Maple syrup can make or break that pancake stack or fluffy golden-brown waffle. That’s why we took on the “tough” job of reviewing these rich, sweet organic syrups to make sure they passed the test—and we weren’t disappointed.

Whole Foods 365 Organic Grade A Maple Syrup This amber syrup comes from certified organic trees in the Northeastern United States and Canada. A smooth, balanced syrup, it reminded us of traditional ones from years past. $8.99/12 fl. oz.; Wholefoodsmarkets. com

Crown Maple Syrup Produced in Dutchess County, New York, this 100 percent pure organic syrup has a strong maple flavor and a delicious kick. $13.99/12.7 fl. oz.; Crownmaple.com

Coombs Family Farms Maple Syrup The Coombs organic syrup is harvested sustainably on a small family farm in Vermont. It’s bold, thick, and very rich. $8.49/8 fl. oz.; Coombsfamilyfarms. com

Shady Maple Farms Maple Syrup This 100 percent pure organic maple syrup tapped from Canadian trees is a dark amber, and its flavor is sweet and smooth. $15.99/12.7 fl. oz.; Thrivemarket.com

Trees Knees Spicy Syrup This organic maple syrup from the Catskill Mountains is infused with a mix of chile peppers for a pop of balanced heat that would be delicious with roasted sweet potatoes. $13.99/13.5 fl. oz.; mixedmade.com

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 25


Stop the

RUMBLING A PLANT-BASED DIET MAY CAUSE STOMACH TROUBLES AT FIRST, BUT SIMPLE SOLUTIONS CAN SET THINGS RIGHT AGAIN By Nicole Gregory

26 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com


NEW VEGETARIANS AND more plant-based diet gradually, what you eat and how your vegans who enthusiastically pile their plates with whole grains and vegetables may be dismayed to experience bloating, gas, or other stomach upsets—and mistakenly think they have a food allergy or that this diet isn’t for them. Not so! Shift to a

PHOTO: ISTOCK/STOCK_COLORS

Problem

and most likely your body will adjust just fine to a vegetarian or vegan diet. Even if you love whole foods, go easy at first. “No pigging out,” says Mindy Hermann, RDN, a New York– based dietitian. Instead, monitor

Legumes can cause stomach discomfort and gas. The culprit? The carbohydrates, says Hermann: “They go undigested into the large intestines where they’re finally broken down—and the byproduct of that process is gas.”

Problem

Solution

Eat fruit with other food, and make sure the fruit is ripe. “Less-ripe fruit contains indigestible carbohydrates,” says Hermann. And watch out for dried fruit—it can be a laxative, she adds. Limit your portions and introduce dried fruit into your diet slowly, paying attention to your gut’s tolerance. As for those nutritionpacked but gas-producing veggies? Keep them in your diet but combine them with other less gas-creating vegetables.

Make sure beans are well cooked. “Beans don’t do any good cooked al dente,” says Hermann. “They need to be soft on the inside. The firmer they are, the harder they are to digest.” Rinsing beans after soaking but before cooking also helps by getting rid of some of the non-digestible elements. During cooking, skim off any foam that forms. If you soak beans overnight, rinse them well before cooking. If you’re using canned beans, empty the liquid and rinse the beans before using them. Beano or other over-thecounter preparations can help prevent gas problems. Probiotics containing Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus may also help reduce gas and bloating, according to a Harvard Medical School special report on food allergies, intolerance, and sensitivity.

“The acid in citrus fruit can cause stomach trouble,” says Hermann, as can melons, apples, and other fruits. Meanwhile, vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower can also cause gas.

Solution

body tolerates each food. Still, certain cooking and food choices can make digestion easer. Here are four main food groups and the common digestion problems they can cause in vegetarians or vegans— as well as some simple solutions.

Problem

Problem

Eating a lot of whole grains can cause abdominal discomfort because their outer coatings can be hard to digest, says Hermann.

Many vegetarians lean heavily on dairy products, but some find that as they age, their digestive systems are less able to handle lactose, (a form of sugar in dairy products) because they have less lactase—the enzyme in our guts that breaks down lactose. When lactose can’t be broken down in the intestines, it goes to the colon where bacteria do the job, causing gas, bloating, and diarrhea, according to a Harvard Medical School special report.

Solution Introduce whole grains in small portions and start with a gentle grain like brown rice, which is not all that high in fiber, as opposed to, say, wheat berries. Cook whole grains well, and also try introducing whole wheat as flour in baked products. “When it’s ground up, whole wheat is easier to digest,” Hermann says.

If you regularly suffer from bloating, heartburn, gas, or other digestion problems, take a look at A Woman’s Guide to a Healthy Stomach: Taking Control of Your Digestive Health, by Jacqueline L. Wolf, associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. The book is filled with everyday solutions, and information for those with irritable bowel syndrome, celiac disease, and other digestive issues.

Solution Taking Lactaid or a similar product will break down the lactose. Also, look for products that are lactosefree—they are pretreated with enzymes that break down lactose. Yogurt, cheese, and sour cream don’t contain as much lactose, so may cause no problems, according to the Harvard special report. “And many brands of yogurt contain probiotic bacteria that can improve your digestive tract,” says Hermann, including its ability to break down lactose.

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 27


SUPPLEMENT SMARTS: PROBIOTICS FOR

Probiotics can contribute to strong bones and boost other functions, if you get the right amount—and that’s the challenge By David Kalmansohn

IT USED TO be that when you had a stomachache, you’d reach for the Pepto, or maybe a cup of peppermint tea. Today, you might consider popping a probiotic. The growing popularity of probiotics speaks to their potential both to treat tummy troubles and prevent them in the first place. But how are they best used, and are they for everyone? “Probiotics may be beneficial for those with poor diets, stress, older age, and who are taking medications—such as antibiotics—that alter the microorganisms in our bodies,” says Kelley Wilson, MS, RD, CD, clinical nutritionist at the Digestive Health Center at UW Health in Madison, Wis.

Probiotics are “good” bacteria that correct symptom-producing imbalances in the gut by preventing “bad” bacteria from multiplying; they also give the immune system a bad-bacteria-battling boost. Probiotics are found in foods like live-culture yogurt or in supplements that use freeze-dried single or multiple bacterial strains. Some supplements add prebiotics, which are non-digestible carbohydrates that help keep good bacteria healthy; prebiotic-rich foods include asparagus, bananas, oatmeal, and legumes.

Use It Right

Watch Out For

Manufacturers often suggest taking probiotic supplements once a day for health maintenance and twice a day for treating active symptoms, but bacterial strains and effective dosages vary from person to person. “Choosing a probiotic can be confusing; an appropriate health professional should assist you,” cautions Wilson. “One probiotic might be preferred for antibiotic-associated diarrhea, while another may be effective for symptoms related to travel. Patients may need to try different types to find the one that works best.”

Mild stomach upset is possible. Patients undergoing surgery or those with acute infections or immune conditions should avoid probiotics. Some supplements may have significantly less bacteria than stated on their labels, so choose a trusted brand or one that’s been independently tested. Check directions for proper storage. PROBIOTIC

FIND YOUR IDEAL PROBIOTIC Finding the right probiotic for health maintenance or specific symptoms can be complicated. Talk to your health-care practitioner about which of the following products might be best for you. American Health Controlled Delivery Probiotic CD $29.99/60 vegetarian tabs; americanhealthus.com

Culturelle Health & Wellness Probiotic $29.99/30 vegetarian capsules; culturelle.com

Country Life Realfood Organics Probiotic Daily Powder $36.99/3.1 oz. powder; countrylifevitamins.com

Enzymedica Digest Gold +Probiotics $32.99/45 vegetarian capsules; enzymedica.com

Garden of Life RAW Probiotics Women $52.45/90 vegetarian capsules; gardenoflife.com NOW Foods Probiotic-10 25 Billion $29.99/50 10-strain veg capsules; nowfoods.com

FOODS TO TRY Buttermilk Kefir Miso Kimchi Tempeh Yogurt (with live and active cultures)

Renew Life Everyday Ultimate Flora Probiotic 15 Billion $21.99/30 vegetable capsules; renewlife.com Solgar Probi 30 Billion $39.98/30 vegetable capsules; solgar.ie

Los Angeles–based writer David Kalmansohn has a long history of covering issues of mind, body, and spirit. He is the former executive editor of Natural Health and the former deputy editor of Men’s Fitness.

28 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

PHOTO: ISTOCK/VIKIF

Power Source


probiotics never tasted so good...

Strawberry, Blueberry, Banana, Mixed Fruit. American Health

®

• 100% Delicious Natural Fruit Flavors

chewable Acidophilus delivers 1 billion microorganisms to

• 1 Billion Bio-Active, Hardy Cultures

JGNR MGGR [QWT OKETQƃQTC KP DCNCPEG  'CEJ YCHGT EQPVCKPU

• Helps Maintain Digestive Health*

the “good” bacteria to help keep your digestive system feeling

• Supports Optimal Intestinal Balance and Nutrient Absorption*

Ų

good all day, every day.* Support your digestive health*...delicious Chewable Acidophilus from American Health . It’s good health made simple . ™

®

Ų

• Promotes Overall Immune Health* Available at health, natural food and vitamin specialty stores.

www.AmericanHealthUS.com *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Ų

At time of manufacture. | © 2016 American Health Inc.

15-AH-1212


Some Like It Cool 5 vegetables for early-spring planting By Therese Ciesinski

boots for garden clogs, rejoice, for planting season is upon us. Too cold, you say? Not for crops like lettuce, peas, and spinach, which grow best in the cool soil and air of early spring. Plant them in the next few weeks, and you’ll enjoy homegrown vegetables before Memorial Day. Start from seed or buy transplants. Transplants are faster, but seed lets you choose the varieties you want. The ground should be thawed, and the soil temperature above 35°F. To measure, use

a soil thermometer, or let nature show the way: When forsythia and daffodils begin to bloom, it’s time to sow spinach, lettuce, and peas. When the lilacs are in first leaf, sow broccoli and kale seeds. The soil should be moist, not wet. Squeeze a clump in your hand. If it stays in a squishy, wet ball, it’s too early to plant. If it holds together when squeezed but crumbles when you jostle it, dig in. Follow the instructions on the seed packet or label as to planting depth and spacing. For specifics on growing conditions in your area, contact your county’s Cooperative Extension Service.

BROCCOLI

KALE

LETTUCE

PEAS

SPINACH

Sow seed when the soil temperature is 50°F or warmer. Broccoli initially forms a large center head. Once it is cut off, smaller heads sprout from stalks on the sides. Keep picking or the plants will flower, ending the harvest. Try Blue Wind, Amadeus, or Everest.

This nutritional powerhouse comes in flatleaved or curly varieties, and cold sweetens the leaves. Sow seed when soil is 50°F. Harvest outer leaves when 8 to 10 inches long; large ones get leathery. Varieties to try are Redbor, Winterbor, or Toscano.

Lettuce matures quickly—about 40 days when started from seed. Sow seeds when soil is 40°F. Lettuces bolt (flower and go to seed) when air temperatures reach 80°F. This turns the leaves bitter. Try Flashy Troutback or Little Gem (romaine), Tom Thumb or Buttercrunch (butterhead), and Green Deer Tongue or Merlot (leaf).

For some, it’s tradition to plant peas on St. Patrick’s Day, but if your soil is too cold and wet, the seeds will rot. Wait until soil is 45°F. Treat pea seed with inoculant before planting (buy it where you get your seeds). Tasty ediblepod varieties include Sugar Snap and Sugar Ann; Alderman and Lincoln are dependable shelling peas.

Spinach is a coolweather classic. Seeds can germinate in soil that’s only 35°F, though 5° to 10° warmer is preferable. Pick as baby leaves once 3 to 4 inches long, or allow leaves to mature to full size. For a continuous harvest, sow seed every seven days. Varieties to try are Corvair, Tyee, and Yukon.

Therese Ciesinski has written for Garden Design, This Old House, and Coastal Home magazines, Houzz. com, and The Philadelphia Inquirer. She lives and gardens in Southeastern Pennsylvania.

DO amend the soil a few weeks in advance of planting (see p. 32).

DO loosen and break up the soil to aerate it, and weed the bed before planting.

30 MARCH 2016 vegetariantimes.com

DO harden seedlings off by gradually exposing them to outdoor conditions over the course of a week or so.

DON’T step on the planting area. It compacts the soil so air and water can’t get through.

DON’T let seedlings freeze. Cover if frost is predicted. Mature plants can tolerate some frost.

DON’T forget to fertilize. Vegetables, especially broccoli, benefit from regular applications of an organic fertilizer.

PHOTOS CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: ISTOCK/VICUSCHKA, ISTOCK/CANYONOS, ISTOCK/ANJELAGR, ISTOCK/LICHTMEISTER PHOTOGRAPHY PRODUCTIONS E.U., ISTOCK/BOZENA_FULAWKA, ISTOCK/NATA_VKUSIDEY

IF YOUR INNER GARDENER can’t wait to ditch the snow


Discover Why This Health-Conscious Vegetarian Uses BioSil for Her Skin, Hair, and Nails! CHRISTIE BRINKLEY at 61

Look Youthful, Look Beautiful, Look Healthy at Any Age You don’t look this youthful, beautiful and healthy at 61 without making some very smart choices. That’s why Christie eats healthy organic foods, gets in 10 to 20 minutes of exercise a day, and takes the first and only advanced collagen generator, BioSil Hair, Skin, Nails.† Why BioSil? It’s simple... “After the age of 21, we women lose about 1% of our collagen every year,” says Christie. Collagen is directly responsible for “plumping” skin, removing wrinkles, and creating vital skin elasticity. What’s more, collagen increases nutrient-rich blood flow to the scalp giving you thicker, stronger, and shinier hair. “I was drawn to BioSil because of the clinical trial results I saw in medical journals.” BioSil gives you the ability to re-gain lost collagen, add new collagen, and protect both new and existing collagen.† “I am amazed at the difference I see in my skin, hair, and nails,” Christie says smiling. “I also appreciate that BioSil works naturally and contains no animal parts.” Christie’s other secrets to looking great at any age…

Clinically Proven BioSil®

• Reduces Fine Lines & Wrinkles 30% ‡† • Strengthens & Thickens Hair 13% **† • Improves Skin Elasticity 89% ‡† • Strengthens Nails ‡† As demonstrated versus placebo in the published clinical trials: ‡ Barel et al. 2005, Archives of Dermatological Research 297, 147-153. ** Wickett et al. 2007, Archives of Dermatological Research 299, 499-505.

Exfoliate everyday, always wear sunscreen (even on cloudy days), and be beautiful on the inside by caring about all living creatures! See Christie’s Daily 15-Minute Health & Beauty Routine

www.BioSilUSA.com/VTA216

The First and Only Advanced Collagen Generator® – One Very Smart Choice!

Available at natural health stores nationwide

©2016 Bio Minerals NV. Manufactured by Bio Minerals NV, Belgium. ch-OSA, BioSil, the ch-OSA logo and Advanced Collagen Generator are registered trademarks of Bio Minerals NV. † This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This Product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.


Soil Smarts

Success in gardening starts from the ground up By Scott Meyer

THE KEY TO GROWING an abundant harvest of delicious homegrown vegetables and fruits is right below your feet. Pay attention to building fertile soil when you start your garden (even if it’s in containers), and do so every season thereafter, and little ongoing maintenance will be required. Here are the critical steps: Established Garden

1. Start with a test. You get vital information about your soil’s nutrient content, pH, and organic matter with a simple lab test, available at a low cost or for free from your state’s agricultural university. The results will include suggestions on additives to improve those measurements, if needed. 2. Dig down or build up. Loose, crumbly soil allows roots room to spread out, giving them access to more nutrients and water. Use a garden fork or shovel to break up the soil down to about 12 inches. If that’s not possible, mound soil at least 4 inches high atop the surface to create raised beds.

1. Sow green manure. Legumes (such as alfalfa), and grains, such as buckwheat, are known as “green manure” because they add nutrients to the soil as they grow and after they decompose. Plant them between growing seasons to pump up your garden’s fertility. 2. Skip the tilling. A powerful machine that breaks up tough ground is helpful when you’re starting a garden, but repeated tilling damages the soil’s structure, compacting it and inhibiting water flow. Mechanical tilling also kills worms and other small invertebrates that help decompose organic matter into nutrients. 3. Rotate crops. Many garden pests and diseases are specific to individual crops or families (such as squash), and those troublemakers tend to live in the soil from one season to the next. Changing up what and where you plant disrupts the problem cycle and keeps your soil healthy.

3. Pile on organic matter. In nature, plants draw nutrients from decomposing leaves and other once-living materials. To fortify your soil the same way, blend in organic matter after you loosen the soil. Compost is best because it has already begun to break down into nutrients, but barring that, you can mix dried grass clippings, shredded leaves, and/or straw into the soil when you start the garden, and keep a 1- to 2-inch layer on the surface throughout every growing season.

Container Garden 1. Choose a balanced blend. You can grow just about any vegetable in a pot, but soil you dig up is not ideal for containers because it’s too

32 MARCH 2016 vegetariantimes.com

dense. Instead, use a potting-soil mix containing coir (coconut fiber), or perlite or vermiculite (volcanic minerals that capture and disperse moisture), and compost. 2. Add worm poo. Farmers rely on livestock manure to maintain soil fertility. Worm castings are an even more concentrated source of nutrients, and they’re ideal for container soil. You can buy worm castings in bags or make your own castings with a worm bin, in which the crawlers feed on your kitchen scraps. 3. Hold the chemicals. Synthetic fertilizers promise miraculous growth that’s “non-toxic” to the environment, but they are high in salts, which accumulate and eventually leave the soil too acidic for healthy plant growth. Stick to organic fertilizers when feeding your crops, wherever you happen to grow them. Scott Meyer is editorial director of Blue Root Media, author of The City Homesteader, and former editor of Organic Gardening magazine. He lives with his wife and two children, and tends a small but productive garden, at his home near Philadelphia.

PHOTO: ISTOCK/HALFPOINT

New Garden


Biochar is an ancient technique that’s now all the rage among growers both large and small. A charcoal made by slow-heating dead plants, “Biochar does not bring fertilizer or water to plants, but its highly porous nature tends to increase soil resilience to water and nutrient stresses, improving overall plant nutrition,� explains Caroline Masiello, PhD, a soil chemistry researcher at Rice University in Houston. You can buy bags of biochar alone or mixed with compost; whichever you choose, check that the supplier is a member of the International Biochar Initiative, which sets quality and environmental standards.

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 33


Learn to cook the way nature intended ENROLL NOW! Join the Clean Eating Academy online and get the culinary

skills and nutrition training you need to master clean cooking in the comfort of your kitchen.

Sign up at aimhealthyu.com/cea + ENTER TO WIN A FREE ONLINE COURSE!


Mixed-Grain Magic T H E U LT I MAT E GLU TE N-FR EE H OT C E R EAL

biinin is the secret to making the perfect bowl of hot cereal By Mary Margaret Chappell

SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Equal parts quinoa, millet, and amaranth yield a rich, creamy hot cereal that has endless possibilities. Doctor it up with the flavor suggestions (right), or make it ahead for reheatand-serve breakfast ease on busy mornings. The ratio used in this basic recipe is 1 cup (total) grains to four cups liquid. To make a batch that stays smooth and creamy for 4 days in the fridge, increase the grain-to-liquid ratio to 1 to 5, or 1 cup grains to 2½ cups milk plus 2½ cups water. 13 ⁄ 13 ⁄ 13 ⁄ 2 13 ⁄

cup quinoa, rinsed and drained cup millet, rinsed and drained cup amaranth, rinsed and drained cups low-fat milk or vegetable milk tsp. salt

Heat quinoa and millet in large saucepan over medium heat 5 minutes or until fragrant and toasted, swirling often. Stir in amaranth, then milk or vegetable milk, salt, and 2 cups water. Cover, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 30 to 40 minutes, or until most of liquid is absorbed and cereal is creamy. PER ½-CUP SERVING 112 CAL; 5 G PROT; 2 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 19 G CARB; 3 MG CHOL; 109 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

Customize your morning porridge with these treatinspired add-ins:

Blueberry Muffin Stir in 1 to 2 tsp. vanilla sugar, and sprinkle with ¼ cup fresh or frozen blueberries. Add a dollop of plain yogurt or sour cream.

Cinnamon Roll Stir together ¼ cup dark brown sugar and 1 Tbs. ground cinnamon. Sprinkle 1 to 2 Tbs. cinnamon-sugar and then 1 to 2 Tbs. chopped pecans over cereal. Garnish with dollop (1 Tbs.) whipped cream cheese.

Chocolate-Chip Banana Stir ¼ cup mashed banana into hot cereal. Sprinkle with 1 to 2 Tbs. chocolate chips. Piña Colada Sweeten cereal with your favorite sweetener, then top with ¼ cup diced fresh pineapple and 1 to 2 Tbs. shredded coconut.

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 35


Soup’s On! Start with a box of soup By Joyce Sangirardi

//

Photography by Rick Cummings

Cool flavor combinations and rich textures make boxes of prepared soup ideal meal-helpers

G IN GE RE D CAR R OT AND EDAMAME SOUP SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Edamame and sizzled tofu turn prepared cashewcarrot-ginger soup into a protein-packed meal. The soup base gets a flavor boost from sesame oil and red pepper flakes. Tbs. toasted sesame oil oz. extra-firm tofu, drained, patted dry, and cut into ½-inch cubes 1 small red bell pepper, cut into 1-inch strips (1½ cups) 1 32-oz. box cashew-carrot-ginger soup 3 cups thinly sliced napa cabbage 1 cup frozen shelled edamame 1 3 cup) 3 green onions, white and green parts thinly sliced (⁄ 1½ tsp. unseasoned rice vinegar ¼ tsp. red pepper flakes

1 Heat large non-stick saucepan over medium-high heat. Add sesame oil and tofu, and cook 4 to 5 minutes, or until tofu cubes are browned on one side. Flip with tongs, and cook 3 minutes more, or until starting to brown. Add bell pepper, and sauté 3 minutes, or until softened. Stir in soup, scraping up any bits of tofu. Cover, and bring to a boil.

2 Stir in cabbage and edamame, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer, uncovered, 5 minutes, or until cabbage is wilted and edamame is tender. Remove from heat; stir in green onions, rice vinegar, and pepper flakes, and season with salt, if desired. PER 1½-CUP SERVING 239 CAL; 10 G PROT; 12 G TOTAL FAT (4 G SAT FAT); 25 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 734 MG SOD; 6 G FIBER; 10 G SUGARS

36 MARCH 2016 vegetariantimes.com

FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

1 7


PROMOTION



ON YOUR TABLET

    

 

 

 

               

         

    



     

    

The lightly sweet, ultra-creamy liqu id also boasts just half the total fat content of heavy cream and zero added sugar. Bes t of all, boosting the flavor of reci with coconut milk pes is as easy as crac king open a can (or carton) foun d in just about any supermarket.

 

 





    

  

 

"

    

%!$"$ !(&%%# $&% $$&#  #$$"#% !& ( &%$ &"! !&#!##



) &"$&# "$ !!%#!  %!$  !(%%#$'% *0!).* 6%)! !$!.  ,   ! */) &%)#+)1%.$ $!,.-$+! *,%)$, 3 *.1%.$**&%)#-+, +,$(!).++!,)



".  *.

#.*.'". #-.    ' #+, ,#-*  #"%!, #-/# #, (#$*' (

: NICOLE BARCLAY; PROP STYLIST

+!&-"*,(*' )/+ .! !##1$%.!-%).*$**' (%2./,!*' ,!(%)%)#   )*-.,!&-,!(%)+,! %).1* %.%*)-/).%' *, &! .* (%)/.!%)+,!+,! +)) ) %)!).!,*(!-*/.'! /).%'.**.$+%&%)-!,.! .$!)/)(*' ) **' **' (%)/.!-%)+) & *(+'!.!'3*)1%,!, #,$**'.!)  ! ( ,%)#-/ /! -(''-/!+)!  /+1.!,.**%'%) ,! (%)/.!-*, (%2./ **& ) $!..*'*1 ) 3 *) 5 6 !- /).%'.!(+!,./,!,!$ /.! .$!,(*(!.!,**' (%)  !,-$!!.*"+,$(!).*, '!&!*),&*0 3 ).*+*"&!) #!).' '4!* */, +!, 12+ !-!.'4! !,-% ,%+*0  +) -+,! .**0!,.* **'.$!)-!,0!

FOOD STYLIST: COLIN

%2!,/).%'-*".

.,%(

!.!##1$%.!-1%.$!'! .! !##1$%.!-%).*$**'

: ERIC LESKOVAR; ASST OEVER; FOOD STYLIST

(%)/.!*,/).%'+ *, 1$%-&%)'(*) "'*/, $**'.!(%2./,!.$!) #,*/) $4!')/.-

PHOTOS: JULIA VANDEN

) !##3*'&-

&.*#!.$!,-/#, !)1$%'!1$%-'!3! ''*1$%-&3*'&-%).*

DOMINIC

1'-!.*0!,

-/!+)*"-%((

    

 " "  



              

) /..!,%)',#!*

!'.$**'.!!,%)# 1.!,

       

     

 

 of ethnic recipes, coconut has now become milk a well-rounded kitchen essentia Rich and luscious l. , yet the purest versions healthful in moderate amount s, can supply imm une-boosting vitamins C and E and heart-healt hful magnesium.



 !        !               

#  #  ! "     !  "  " 

Packed with all the delicious recipes, inspiring photography, and smart nutrition advice youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve come to expect interactive features and seasonal bonus recipes and tips!

get started at vegetariantimes.com/tablet iPad is a trademark of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries.


PROMOTION

VEGETARIANTIMES.COM The world’s largest collection of vegetarian recipes YOUR SOURCE FOR  Quick & easy vegetarian dishes  How-to cooking videos  Delicious vegan & gluten-free meals  Printable shopping lists  Veg celebrity Q&A’s  Sweepstakes & contests  Veg Daily Blog  And more!


CRE A MY B A R L EY-B U T T ER NU T RI S OT TO POTATO AND EGG COCOT TES SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Butternut squash soup plumps barley to a creamy consistency and infuses it with flavor as it cooks. Finely chopped vegetables cook in the same amount of time as the barley, for a one-pot meal that’s ready in about 20 minutes. ½ 2 2 ½ 2½ 1 1 2 ⁄3 2

cup chopped walnuts cups cauliflower florets Tbs. fresh parsley leaves, plus more for sprinkling 12.3-oz. pkg. silken firm tofu, drained cups prepared creamy butternut squash soup, divided cup quick-cooking barley Tbs. chopped fresh sage cup chopped carrots cups baby kale

SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Oeufs cocotte (baked eggs in ramekins) are a comfort-food favorite in France. Here, we’ve improved on the idea by adding a bed of potatoes and mushrooms that turns the homey dish into a hearty meal. 1 1 2 1 1 2 12⁄3

1 Preheat oven to 350˚F. Spread walnuts on baking sheet, and toast 8 to 10 minutes, or until lightly browned; set aside.

1 4

2

Meanwhile, pulse cauliflower and 2 Tbs. parsley in food processor, or until cauliflower is shredded. Transfer to bowl. Purée tofu in food processor 15 seconds, or until creamy; set aside.

3 Bring 2 cups soup to a boil in medium saucepan. Stir in cauliflower mixture, barley, and sage. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer, covered, 10 minutes, or until soup is absorbed, stirring occasionally. Add remaining ½ cup soup, carrots, and tofu. Cook, covered, 5 minutes, or until thickened, stirring occasionally. Serve risotto on bed of kale, sprinkled with walnuts and parsley. PER SERVING (SERVING SIZE: 1 CUP RISOTTO WITH ½ CUP BABY KALE) 339 CAL; 12 G PROT; 12 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 49 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 583 MG SOD; 8 G FIBER; 7 G SUGARS

lb. baby potatoes Tbs. olive oil cups sliced shitake mushrooms (4 oz.) cup sliced cremini mushrooms (2 oz.) small onion, thinly sliced (1 cup) cups baby spinach (2½ oz.) cups prepared creamy portobello mushroom soup cup shredded fontina cheese (4 oz.) large eggs

1

Place oven racks in center and top positions, and preheat oven to 400˚F. Coat four 1-cup ramekins with cooking spray.

2

Microwave baby potatoes on high power 8 minutes, or until just fork-tender.

3 Meanwhile, heat oil in large non-stick skillet over high heat. Add mushrooms and onion, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cook 5 minutes, or until onions are softened and mushrooms start to turn golden. Stir in spinach and soup; cook 2 minutes, or until soup is bubbling around edges of pan and spinach is wilted.

4 Lightly mash potatoes with potato masher or large serving fork. Divide among ramekins. Scatter half of cheese over potatoes; pour soup mixture on top. Scatter remaining cheese on top. Crack 1 egg over cheese in each ramekin.

5

Bake on center rack 13 to 15 minutes, or until bubbly. (Eggs will not be fully cooked.) Transfer pan to top rack, and increase oven heat to broil; broil 1 to 2 minutes, or until egg whites are firm and yolks are still runny. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. PER SERVING 306 CAL; 15 G PROT; 14 G TOTAL FAT (5 G SAT FAT); 32 G CARB; 202 MG CHOL; 733 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 39


P R O M OT I O N

YOGAforMOMS build strength, beat stress

REGISTER TODAY FOR A CHANCE TO PRACTICE WITH JANET STONE FOR FREE! Join internationally recognized yoga teacher and mother of two Janet Stone for this five-part series to help you feel grounded and strong during any stage of motherhood.

Course highlights 5- to 60-minute practices for busy moms to mix and match the poses they need most in the moment Healthy recipes for delicious, anytime energy Poses and practices to handle stress, master patience, create stability, strengthen and heal your abdominal muscles and pelvic floor, and re-energize your body An emphasis on asana, breath, meditation, and core work throughout will help you stay centered no matter what life throws your way

We’ll be selecting one winner each week to win YOGA FOR MOMS for free before the course launches in April!

Don’t miss this unique opportunity to work with one of the world’s most dynamic and nurturing teachers to find your best, most authentic self– as a woman and a mom.

Register today! yogajournal.com/yoga-for-moms


QUICKIE BL ACK BEAN TACOS SERVES 8 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

The rich, saucy filling for these tacos gets its velvety texture from prepared corn and poblano chowder. We’ve kept the add-ins pared down for recipe-prep ease, but you can always pile on favorite extras, such as sour cream, green onions, prepared salsa, and hot sauce. 1½ ½ 1 1 1 8 1 ½ 1

cups prepared corn and poblano chowder cup sun-dried tomatoes (not in oil), cut into ¼-inch-thick slices 15.5-oz can no-salt-added black beans, rinsed and drained small avocado, sliced Tbs. lime juice 6-inch corn tortillas, warmed cup crumbled queso fresco cup thinly sliced red cabbage cup lime wedges, for serving

1 Bring chowder and sun-dried tomatoes to a boil in medium saucepan over medium-high heat; simmer 2 minutes. Stir in beans, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 5 to 8 minutes, or until slightly thickened.

2 Toss avocado with lime juice in small bowl. 3 Fill each tortilla with ⁄ cup bean mixture and 2 Tbs. queso fresco; 13

top with red cabbage and avocado slices. Serve with lime wedges. PER TACO 246 CAL; 9 G PROT; 9 G TOTAL FAT (4 G SAT FAT); 34 G CARB; 1 1 MG CHOL; 500 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 4 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 41


PROMOTION

PHOTO BY NEIL GANDHI

We’ve got you covered

INTRODUCING THE NEW & IMPROVED

+

Affordable Liability Insurance for Yoga Teachers & Studios

Benefits Including…

One year subscription to Yoga Journal I Free teacher profile listing on the YJ Directory Free “Yoga for Core Strength” online course I 15% off online courses like “Vinyasa 101” and “Goddess Yoga” at aimhealthyu.com I 15% discount to Yoga Journal LIVE! $200 discount to the Business of Yoga I And much, much more…

yogajournal.com/teachersplus


ULTRA-EA S Y POT PI E SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

You can have all of the ingredients on hand for this pot pie and whip it up any time you need a hot, satisfying meal. 2 13 1⁄ ½ ¼ 2 1

Tbs. cornstarch cups prepared vegan creamy potato-leek soup tsp. dried crushed rosemary tsp. ground cumin 10-oz. pkg. frozen mixed vegetables, thawed and drained sheet vegan puff pastry, from 17.3-oz pkg., thawed

1 Position oven racks in middle and bottom positions, and preheat oven to 450˚F.

2

Whisk 2 Tbs. cold water into cornstarch in medium saucepan. Whisk in soup, rosemary, and cumin, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium, and simmer 3 to 4 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat, stir in vegetables, then spread mixture in 9-inch deep-dish pie pan.

3 Unfold puff pastry, and place over vegetable mixture; allow pastry to drape over pie pan. Trim pastry edges with scissors or sharp knife so that it fits tightly in pan. Prick pastry all over with fork or knife. Bake 15 to 18 minutes, or until puff pastry is puffed and golden. PER 1-CUP SERVING 373 CAL; 9 G PROT; 17 G TOTAL FAT (5 G SAT FAT); 42 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 607 MG SOD; 6 G FIBER;2 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 43


PROMOTION     

Vegetarian Times is

BIGGER & BETTER for 2016

      

         

 

 



  

     

   



  

YOU TOL D U S, and we listened!





  

  

     

  



     

 

   

More quick-and-healthy recipes Fresh, updated look and feel Meal planning guides Healthy eating know-how Easy edible gardening Veg chefs, restaurants, bloggers, trends

And all your favorites â&#x20AC;Ś 30-minute meals fast, healthy, and ďŹ lling 1 Food 5 Ways new ways with common staples 5 Ingredients make hearty meals in a ďŹ&#x201A;ash Lose the Gluten good-tasting and gluten-free

and get

SUBSCRIBE TODAY FREE ISSUES FREE GIFTS! Visit vegetariantimes.com

For more delicious recipes and plenty of plant-based eating inspiration, visit us at vegetariantimes.com


PHOTOGRAPHY: JENNIFER OLSON; FOOD STYLIST: ERIC LESKOVAR; ASSISTANT FOOD STYLIST: COLIN BARCLAY; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

world flavors Spice up your weeknight meals with these internationally inspired entrĂŠes By Sarah Tenaglia

READY TO TAKE Taco Tuesday to the next level? These four recipes will let you fill your week with ready-to-eat main dishes that span the globe in terms of flavor but can be made with ingredients found right in your local supermarket.

Mushroom, Poblano, and Black Bean Tostadas, p. 48

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 45


In Weekend Whiz, we give you four simple, tasty recipes to make on the weekend (in about two to three hours) and enjoy during the coming week. Everything you need is right here, including a cooking timetable and a shopping list. And even if you aren’t doing the weekend-chef thing, each recipe is great all on its own.

THIS WEEK’S LINEUP MUSHROOM, POBLANO, AND BLACK BEAN TOSTADAS [ p. 48 ] GREEN VEGETABLE CURRY [ p. 48 ] EGGPLANT AND CHICKPEA PITAS [ p. 50 ] ROSEMARY-ROASTED ROOT VEGETABLE AND POLENTA BOWL [ p. 52 ]

1

Roast vegetables (at 425˚F) for RosemaryRoasted Root Vegetable and Polenta Bowl. While the vegetables are roasting, prepare topping for Mushroom, Poblano, and Black Bean Tostadas.

2

Roast eggplant for Eggplant and Chickpea Pitas (at 400˚F). Prepare topping for Tostadas.

3 Prepare Green Vegetable Curry. 4 Sauté mushrooms, make broth, and bake polenta (at 350˚F) for Rosemary-Roasted Root Vegetable and Polenta Bowl.

5 Stir together ingredients for Eggplant and Chickpea Pitas filling.

6

Chop cabbage for cabbage slaw on Tostadas; steam rice to go with Green Vegetable Curry, if desired.

7

Pack all the components in lidded containers, label, and store in the fridge, or freezer, as recommended.

*optional ingredients

PRODUCE AND DAIRY 4 red onions 2 heads garlic 3 bunches cilantro 2 limes 2 lemons 2 poblano chiles 13⁄4 lb. cremini mushrooms (10 cups quartered) 1 4 head red or green cabbage ⁄ 1 6-oz. bag baby spinach 2 12-oz. pkg. cubed butternut squash 4 parsnips 7 carrots 4 Japanese eggplants 1 avocado 3 sprigs fresh rosemary *1 Kaffir lime leaf *1 cup crumbled goat cheese 1 2 cup crumbled feta cheese *⁄ 1 4 cup grated Parmesan cheese ⁄ 2 Tbs. butter

DRY INGREDIENTS AND SEASONINGS Vegetable oil Olive oil 1 15-oz. can black beans 2 15-oz. cans chickpeas 1 13-oz. can light coconut milk 4 tostada shells 4 whole-wheat pita breads 1 cup polenta or corn grits *8 pitted dates 1 3 cup Thai green curry paste ⁄ 1 piece fresh ginger Ground cumin Ground coriander Ground cinnamon 1 2 oz. dried porcini mushrooms ⁄

46 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com


For over 100 years, Joyva Sesame Tahini has been providing a delicious complement to meals everywhere.

Email info@joyva.com for a free e-recipe cookbook. J OY VA CO R P 5 3 VA R I C K AV E B R O O K LY N , N Y 1 12 3 7 ( 71 8 ) 4 9 7 - 0 17 0

Rich in antioxidants, gluten-free with no trans-fats or cholesterol, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great and tasty way to stay healthy. Enjoy some today!


ME X IC AN M O N DAY: M USH RO O M, P O B L ANO, AND BL ACK BEAN TOSTADAS SERVES 4

Tostadas are a tasty alternative to tacos—with the same satisfying flavors. Serve with your favorite salsa and hot sauce. Topping 2 2 1 4 1½

Tbs. vegetable oil poblano chiles, cut into ½-inch-wide strips large red onion, quartered and thinly sliced (2½ cups) cups quartered cremini mushrooms (12 oz.) cups cooked black beans, or one 15-oz. can black beans, rinsed and drained 1 Tbs. ground cumin ½ tsp. ground coriander 2 cloves garlic, minced (2 tsp.)

Slaw 2 cups thinly sliced red or green cabbage 1 cup chopped cilantro 2 Tbs. lime juice (from 2 limes)

Tostadas 4 tostada shells 1 avocado, sliced ½ cup crumbled feta cheese, optional

T H A I T UESDAY: GREEN VEGETABLE CURRY SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Thai curries are fast and easy meal solutions when you start with a prepared curry paste and doctor it up with fresh herbs. Check the ingredients list on the curry-paste label to make sure it doesn’t contain fish sauce for flavoring. Serve with steamed rice. 1 1¼ 13 ⁄ 1 2 1 ¼ 1½

6-oz. bag baby spinach (8 cups), divided cups packed cilantro, divided cup Thai green curry paste 2-inch piece (½ oz.) peeled fresh ginger, cut into 4 pieces large garlic cloves, peeled Tbs. vegetable oil tsp. ground coriander cups cooked chickpeas, or one 15-oz. can chickpeas, rinsed and drained 1 13-oz. can light coconut milk 1 12-oz pkg. cubed butternut squash (3 cups) 2 medium carrots, sliced on diagonal into 1-inch pieces 1 Japanese eggplant, halved and cut into 1-inch slices 1 Kaffir lime leaf, optional

1 Blend 1 cup spinach, 1 cup cilantro, curry paste, ginger, garlic, oil, and coriander to coarse paste in food processor.

2

heat. Add chiles, onion, and mushrooms; cook 12 minutes, or until mushrooms begin to brown. Add beans, cumin, coriander, and garlic; sauté 1 minute to heat through.

Bring curry paste mixture, 1 cup water, chickpeas, coconut milk, butternut squash, and carrots to a simmer in large saucepan. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 5 minutes. Add eggplant and kaffir lime leaf, if using. Cover and simmer 5 minutes more, or until vegetables are tender.

2 To make Slaw: Toss together all ingredients in medium

3 Stir in remaining spinach, and cook 1 minute, or until just

1 To make Topping: Heat oil in large non-stick skillet over high

bowl. Season with salt, if desired.

wilted. Sprinkle curry with remaining ¼ cup cilantro.

3 To assemble Tostadas: Spoon ½ cup Topping onto each tostada shell. Top with ¼ cup slaw, ¼ avocado, and 2 Tbs. cheese, if using.

Make-ahead instructions: Prepare curry through step 2, and store three to five days in fridge. Reheat, and stir in spinach and sprinkle with cilantro (step 3) just before serving.

Make-ahead instructions: Topping can be refrigerated three days or frozen up to three months.

PER 1½-CUP SERVING 284 CAL; 10 G PROT; 11 G TOTAL FAT (6 G SAT FAT); 37 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 154 MG SOD; 9 G FIBER; 10 G SUGARS

PER SERVING 371 CAL; 12 G PROT; 18 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 47 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 338 MG SOD; 14 G FIBER; 6 G SUGARS

48 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com


ITâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S IMPOSSIBLE T O B E A T C A N C E R. A L O N E.

Julie Bowen SU2C Ambassador

It takes all of us to beat cancer. Doctors, researchers, volunteers, and most importantly, people like you. Join the movement to beat cancer at StandUp2Cancer.org

Stand Up To Cancer is a program of the Entertainment Industry Foundation (EIF), a 501(c)(3) charitable organization. Photo Credit: Randall Slavin


WORLD CUISINE WEDNESDAY: EGGPL ANT AND CHICKPEA PITAS SERVES 4

These hearty sandwiches, which taste good hot or cold, are great options for busy weeknights when dining times are different for everyone in the family. You can also take leftovers as lunch the next day. Serve with a baby-spinach salad. 3 4 3 ⁄4 3 ⁄4 3 1 2 2 1 ½ 8 1½

Japanese eggplants, halved and cut into 1-inch pieces Tbs. olive oil, divided cup chopped cilantro cup chopped red onion Tbs. lemon juice (from 2 lemons) Tbs. grated lemon zest cloves garlic, minced (2 tsp.) tsp. ground cumin tsp. ground cinnamon tsp. ground coriander pitted dates, thinly sliced (½ cup), optional cups cooked chickpeas, or one 15-oz. can chickpeas, rinsed and drained 1 cup (4 oz.) crumbled goat cheese, optional 4 6½-inch round whole-wheat pita breads, warmed and halved

50 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

1 Preheat oven to 400°F. Toss eggplant with 2 Tbs. oil on large baking sheet, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Roast 20 minutes, or until golden brown and tender, turning once or twice. Cool.

2

Stir together remaining 2 Tbs. oil, cilantro, onion, lemon juice, lemon zest, garlic, cumin, cinnamon, and coriander in medium bowl. Fold in dates, if using. Add chickpeas and eggplant, and toss to combine, then season with salt and pepper, if desired. Let filling stand 2 hours at room temperature.

3 Fold goat cheese into filling, if using. 4 Spoon generous ½ cup filling into each pita half. Make-ahead instructions: Prepare pita filling through step 2, then refrigerate three to five days. Assemble pitas with optional goat cheese just before serving. PER PITA 384 CAL; 13 G PROT; 11 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 63 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 442 MG SOD; 13 G FIBER; 9 G SUGARS


4 days

1 you classes otall

PHOTO: NEIL GANDHI

rans orm

APRIL 8-11 HILTON NEW YORK YJEVENTS.COM/NY Save 15% on a class pass of your choice with code VT15 PRESENTING PARTNERS


EN D-O F-T H E-WEEK I TA L I A N: ROSEMARY-ROASTED ROOT VEGETABLE AND POLENTA BOWL SERVES 4

For hearty that’s healthy, you can’t beat a roasted veggie-polenta combo. Lots of great do-aheads in the recipe make this an ideal dish for entertaining, too. Vegetables 1 4 5 2 2 1½

12-oz. pkg. cubed butternut squash (3 cups) medium parsnips, cut diagonally into 1-inch pieces medium carrots, cut diagonally into 1-inch pieces large red onions, cut into 1-inch wedges Tbs. olive oil Tbs. chopped fresh rosemary

3 To make Mushrooms and Broth: Melt 1 Tbs. butter in large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Add cremini mushrooms; sauté 5 minutes, or until golden. Add 1 tsp. garlic, and cook 10 seconds. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Set aside.

4

Polenta 1 1 1 ¼

2

To make Polenta: Preheat oven to 350°F. Mix 3 cups water, polenta or corn grits, garlic, rosemary, and ½ tsp. salt in 8-inch-square metal baking dish. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Bake, uncovered, 30 minutes, or until all liquid is absorbed and polenta is tender. Sprinkle with cheese. Cover with foil, and cool. Cut into 4 squares.

cup polenta or corn grits clove garlic, minced (1 tsp.) tsp. coarsely chopped fresh rosemary cup (2 oz.) finely grated Parmesan cheese

Boil 2 2⁄3 cups water, porcini mushrooms, and remaining 3 tsp. garlic in medium saucepan 15 minutes, or until reduced to 1 1⁄4 cups. Whisk in remaining 1 Tbs. butter. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

5

Mushrooms and Broth 2 1 4 ½

Tbs. butter, divided lb. cremini mushrooms, quartered (6 cups) cloves garlic, minced (4 tsp.), divided oz. dried porcini mushrooms, coarsely ground in spice mill or coffee grinder (¼ cup ground) Coarsely chopped fresh rosemary or Italian parsley

1 To make Vegetables: Preheat oven to 425°F. Toss together all ingredients in large bowl. Season with salt and pepper, if desired, and divide between two large baking sheets. Roast 30 minutes, or until vegetables are tender and brown in spots, tossing occasionally and switching baking sheets halfway through baking.

52 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

Place 1 Polenta square in each bowl. Top with 1 cup 1 4 cup Mushrooms. Sprinkle with rosemary, Vegetables and ⁄ 1 4 cup Broth over top. and spoon ⁄ Make-ahead instructions: Prepare recipe three to five days ahead through step 4, and refrigerate components. Warm Polenta, Mushrooms, and Vegetables on baking sheet in 400˚F oven 8 to 10 minutes. Reheat broth in saucepan on stove. PER SERVING 511 CAL; 13 G PROT; 15 G TOTAL FAT (6 G SAT FAT); 87 G CARB; 20 MG CHOL; 461 MG SOD; 16 G FIBER; 16 G SUGARS


promotion

Join Director of Nutrition at Natural Gourmet Institute, Kayleen St. John, MS and RD, as she teaches you the fundamentals of plant-based cooking, giving you the secrets to make nutritious, balanced and delicious meals in your own home!

COURSE HIGHLIGHTS Perfect for beginners and advanced cooks alike! Starts with the basics and works through in-depth concepts and techniques. Each lesson includes thorough course materials featuring the latest research, interactive activities, video how-tos, recipes & quizzes to help get you the most out of the course. Simply registering for NGI’s Foundations of Plant-Based Nutrition between now and the April launch date automatically enters you for a chance to take the class for FREE (A $400 value! One REGISTER winner will be chosen each week.) TODAY TO LEAR N TO COOK FOR PHOTOS: COURTESY OF NATURAL GOURMET INSTITUTE

Don’t miss this incredible opportunity to work with one of Natural Gourmet Institute’s leading instructors to advance your cooking.

Register Today! vegetariantimes.com/nutrition


An Insider’s Guide to the Irish Capital

DINING IN DUBLIN doesn’t have to mean meaty stews and pints of porter. Visiting veggies can belly up to the bar for pints of craft beer, tour the farmers’ markets to see an expanding array of fresh, local produce, and stop in at forward-thinking eateries for

54 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

some seriously good bia agus deoch (Irish for “food and drink”). Read on to learn where you can find the best vegetarian bites in Dublin, plus how to make them with recipes from a few select chefs, so you can have a bit of craic (“fun”) back home on this side of the Atlantic.

FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC; ILLUSTRATION: ISTOCK/BGBLUE

By Susan Morrell // Photography by Rick Cummings


SPRING VEGETABLE CRUMBLE IN BROWN RICE TAHINI SAUCE WITH OAT AND SEED CRUMBLE SERVES 8

Vegetarian Dubliners love Blazing Salads for its seasonal, macrobiotic dishes, such as this vegan vegetable crumble. Vegetables 1 1 1 6 1 1 1

Tbs. vegetable oil leek, cut into ½-inch-thick slices (1½ cups) cauliflower, cut into bite-sized florets (6 cups) baby carrots, halved cut into 1-inch-thick slices (1½ cups) tsp. fresh thyme leaves, chopped cup fresh or frozen peas 12-oz. bunch spinach, beet tops, or collard greens, trimmed and torn into 1-inch pieces

Crumble 4 1 2 1 1 1 2 1 1

Tbs. vegetable oil, divided small onion, finely diced (1 cup) Tbs. brown rice flour bay leaf tsp. tahini paste tsp chopped fresh parsley tsp. low-sodium tamari sauce cup quick-cooking oats Tbs. each toasted sesame, sunflower, and pumpkin seeds

1 Preheat oven to 375˚F. 2 To make Vegetables: Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium heat. Add leek, and sauté 5 to 7 minutes, or until soft. Cover leek with ½ inch water. Set cauliflower florets and carrots on top of leek, and sprinkle with thyme. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cover pan, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 3 minutes. Add peas and greens, cover, and cook 10 minutes more, or until all vegetables are tender.

3 Meanwhile, to make Crumble, heat 1 Tbs. oil in medium saucepan over medium heat. Add onion, and sauté 3 to 5 minutes, or until soft. Stir in brown rice flour, and cook 1 to 2 minutes. Remove from heat, and whisk in 1 cup water. Add bay leaf, and cook 3 to 4 minutes over medium heat, or until sauce thickens, whisking constantly. Stir in tahini, parsley, and tamari.

4 Stir together oats, seeds, and remaining 3 Tbs. oil. Sprinkle over Vegetables and sauce. Press down lightly. Bake 40 minutes, or until topping is golden. PER SERVING 253 CAL; 7 G PROT; 15 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 24 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 141 MG SOD; 6 G FIBER; 6 G SUGARS

Blazing Salads 42 DRURY STREET DUBLIN 2 blazingsalads.com

This Dublin veg institution has evolved from a macrobiotic restaurant and store in Temple Bar to a bustling deli on hip Drury Street, making it a great spot to refuel after a day’s shopping. At lunchtime, expect to find a line out the door as devotees queue up for creative salads, vegan pizzas, and signature savory treats like brown-rice balls, turnovers, and samosas.

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 55


Graze The Elbowroom 32 NORTH BRUNSWICK STREET, DUBLIN 7 the-elbowroom.com/ graze-vegetarian-food

This sunny vegetarian café tucked within The Elbowroom wellness center sources its produce as locally as possible. Their superfood bento boxes, hot pots, raw truffles, and juices taste good and do good: Café profits fund the studio’s special-needs children’s services.

POTATO BREAD WITH SPRING ONION, LEEK, AND CABBAGE

1 To make Bread: Preheat oven to 350˚F. Coat loaf pan with

SERVES 4

Whisk together all ingredients in large bowl. Spread in prepared loaf pan, and bake 35 minutes, or until tip of knife or fork inserted in center comes out clean. Cool.

2

For a different take on Ireland’s national root vegetable, chef Caitriona Nic Philibin creates a nostalgic dish of potato bread with buttery leeks and cabbage, a meal she fondly remembers eating in her mother’s kitchen. Bread 3 1 1 1 1 1 ½ ¼

cooking spray.

cups cooked mashed potatoes cup self-rising flour egg bunch green onions, finely chopped (1 cup) bunch fresh parsley, finely chopped (½ cup) bunch chives, finely chopped (¼ cup) tsp. salt tsp. freshly ground black pepper

3 To make Vegetables: Heat 3 Tbs. olive oil in Dutch oven over medium heat. Add leeks and onion, reduce heat to mediumlow, and cook 20 minutes, or until onion and leeks are soft and beginning to brown. Stir in cabbage and butter. Cook 5 to 8 minutes, or until cabbage has softened. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

4 Slice Bread into eight ½-inch-thick slices. 5 Heat remaining 1 Tbs. oil in large skillet over medium heat. Add 2 bread slices, and pan-fry until golden on both sides. Repeat with remaining bread slices. Serve Bread slices topped with 1 cup Vegetables. Pass around remaining Vegetables.

Vegetables 3 2 1 1

Tbs. olive oil, plus 1 Tbs. for pan-frying large leeks, thinly sliced (3 cups) medium onion, thinly sliced (1½ cups) small head savoy cabbage, outer leaves removed, inside finely sliced (8–10 cups) 4 Tbs. butter

56 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

PER SERVING (2 BREAD SLICES AND 2 CUPS CABBAGE) 746 CAL; 14 G PROT; 41 G TOTAL FAT (11 G SAT FAT); 90 G CARB; 77 MG CHOL; 794 MG SOD; 12 G FIBER; 11 G SUGARS


Cornucopia POTATO BOXT Y WITH TENDERSTEM BROCCOLI AND COCONUT MIRIN SAUCE SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Chef Tony Keogh updates the traditional Irish potato pancake with spring-fresh Tenderstem broccoli (Broccolini in the U.S.). Boxty 2 2 1 13 1⁄ 16 ¼

lb. russet potatoes, peeled and coarsely grated Tbs. lemon juice tsp. salt cups all-purpose flour green onions—white parts chopped, green top parts chopped and reserved for Sauce (1 cup) cup vegetable oil, plus 2 Tbs. for frying

19/20 WICKLOW STREET DUBLIN 2 cornucopia.ie

Since 1986, Cornucopia has been warming the bellies of Dublin’s vegetarians. The restaurant is constantly expanding to accommodate loyal crowds, who love the vegetarian sausages and people-watching at breakfast, and the hot dishes, salads, organic wines, and vegan desserts throughout the rest of the day. The restaurant regularly hosts talks with themed meals and live harp and guitar music.

Broccoli and Sauce ½ 2 16 12

cup mirin 15-oz. cans light coconut milk green onion greens (from above), chopped (1 cup) oz. Broccolini, cut into 3-inch pieces

1 To make Boxty: Stir together potatoes, lemon juice, and salt in large bowl. Squeeze mixture with hands to remove liquid from potatoes, but do not drain. (This starchy liquid will help bind all other ingredients.) Add flour, white parts of green onions, and ¼ cup oil, and stir to combine. Shape mixture into 6 patties.

2

Heat remaining 2 Tbs. oil in large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat. Add patties, and reduce heat to medium. Fry 3 patties 5 minutes on each side, or until golden brown. Transfer to paper-towel-lined plate to drain. Repeat with remaining patties. Keep warm.

3 To make Broccoli and Sauce: Simmer mirin in small saucepan over medium heat 1 minute, or until reduced by half. Stir in coconut milk, and simmer 5 minutes more, or until reduced and thickened. Stir in green-onion tops. Remove from heat, and blend with immersion blender until smooth.

4 Meanwhile, blanch Broccolini in medium saucepan of boiling, salted water 2 minutes. Drain.

5

To serve: Flood each plate with ¼ cup sauce, and top with 1 boxty and 3 or 4 broccolini stems. PER SERVING 580 CAL; 9 G PROT; 32 G TOTAL FAT (11 G SAT FAT); 64 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 386 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 12 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 57


Thursday Café DUBLIN FOOD CO-OP NEWMARKET, DUBLIN 8 facebook.com/Thursday CafeDublinFoodCoop

Thursday Café (in fact open from Thursday through Sunday) is located in the upand-coming Newmarket area, an industrial neighborhood now home to produce markets, coffee stalls, and Teeling, Dublin’s newest whiskey distillery. Chef Aga Sierpinska sources the ingredients she uses in her café from the Dublin Food Co-op, which is housed in the same building.

ORANGE CAKE WITH ALMONDS SERVES 8

3

Ground almonds keep this orange cake gluten-free, Quarter cooked oranges, and remove seeds. Pulse orange while giving it a wonderful crumbly texture. quarters (skin and all) in food processor until finely chopped. Set aside. 3 large unpeeled oranges 6 eggs, separated 1 cup unrefined Demerara or turbinado sugar 2 cups ground almonds or almond meal 1 tsp. baking powder ¼ cup slivered almonds Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting

1 Place whole oranges in saucepan, and cover with 2 inches water. Boil 30 minutes, or until soft. Drain oranges, discard water, and cool.

2

Preheat oven to 350˚F. Line bottom and sides of 9-inch springform cake pan with parchment paper.

58 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

4 Whisk together egg yolks and sugar in large bowl 4 minutes, or until mixture is thickened and pale yellow. Stir in orange pieces. Fold in ground almonds.

5

Beat egg whites with electric mixer until soft peaks form. Fold egg whites into cake batter, then fold in baking powder. Spread batter in prepared pan, and sprinkle with slivered almonds.

6 Bake 60 minutes, or until cake is golden, and toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pan. Unmold, then dust with confectioners’ sugar before serving. PER SLICE 329 CAL; 10 G PROT; 15 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 42 G CARB; 124 MG CHOL; 110 MG SOD; 7 G FIBER; 31 G SUGARS


Antoinette’s Bakery 6 KEVIN STREET LOWER, DUBLIN 8 antoinettesbakery.com Everything at this tempting cake shop is gluten-free, and some of the items are also free of dairy, eggs, sugar, or soy. What they’re not free of is sweetness and creativity. Treat yourself to a peanut butter brownie or vegan donut with a coconut-milk hot chocolate or almond-milk latte.

Govinda’s 4 AUNGIER STREET, DUBLIN 2 83 MIDDLE ABBEY STREET, DUBLIN 1 govindas.ie With two city-center locations, Govinda’s has long been a favorite of hungry students and office workers, thanks to generous portions of vegetarian comfort food. Choose from several hot daily specials and multiple salads. Just don’t forget to try the paneer.

L. Mulligan. Grocer 18 STONEYBATTER, DUBLIN 7 lmulligangrocer.com Mulligan’s set the standard for craft beer pubs in Dublin, by preserving the trappings of a traditional Irish pub and adding a menu of modern pub fare and a mile-long beer and whiskey menu. Stop in and try their meatless twist on a Scotch egg.

Murphy’s Ice Cream 27 WICKLOW STREET, DUBLIN 2 murphysicecream.ie Pop into this ice cream shop and sample a few scoops of Irish brown bread or Dingle gin ice cream, to name just a couple of the locally inspired flavors. All of the creamy treats are made with organic sugar and cream from County Kerry. Murphy’s also harvests their own sea salt and makes sorbets using distilled rainwater (yes, really) from the Dingle Peninsula.

BLACKBOARD PHOTO: ISTOCK/ANILAKKUS; ILLUSTRATION: ISTOCK/FOREST_STRIDER

HappyFood Phoenix Park Tea Rooms

27 CAMDEN PLACE, DUBLIN 2 theyogahub.ie Hidden down an alleyway behind the pubs and clubs of Camden Street, this chilled-out café inside a yoga studio is an oasis of healthy vegetarian eats that are also primarily vegan and gluten-free. Choose from superfood smoothies, protein burgers, and vegan breakfast options, or indulge your sweet tooth with treats like vegan chickpea brownies.

CHESTERFIELD AVENUE, DUBLIN 8 phoenixpark.ie The Victorian-era tearooms sit amid the greenery and grazing deer of Dublin’s Phoenix Park, one of the largest city parks in Europe. The café’s menu often features vegan and healthy options, like raw date and nut brownies and wheat-free ginger cookies.

Honest2Goodness

Temple Bar Food Market

136A SLANEY CLOSE, DUBLIN INDUSTRIAL ESTATE, GLASNEVIN, DUBLIN 11 honest2goodness.ie Check out into this natural-food market for local delicacies—from traditional sourdough loaves to gluten-free and paleo products. Or grab a vegan meal from the Shoots and Roots stall. Open Saturdays, 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m.

MEETING HOUSE SQUARE, TEMPLE BAR, DUBLIN 2 facebook.com/TempleBarFoodMarket Stop by this bustling city-center farmers’ market on Saturdays—the Irish teas, artisan sorbetto, and freshly baked savory pastries make this a delicious place to start the weekend. Open Saturdays, 10 a.m.–4:30 p.m.

_ BEYOND THE BLACK STUFF _

Until Guinness goes vegan (at the end of 2016), there are plenty of options for a tasty pint in Dublin. Galway Bay Brewery is building a mini-empire of craft-beer pubs, with seven locations in Dublin,

including the Beer Market near Christchurch Cathedral. All but one of their Galway Bay brand beers (a chocolate-milk stout) are vegan. See galwaybaybrewery.com for locations.

Another fave is Eight Degrees Brewing, whose full range of beers is vegan and widely available. Their Knockmealdown Irish Stout and Sunburnt Irish Red Ale are worth a try (or two).

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 59


Rice

Revved-up

MEDITERRANEAN RICE WITH WILTED SPINACH AND FETA [ P. 65 ]

SPICY CAJUN RICE [ P. 62 ] 60 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com


RICE WITH MELTED LEEKS AND DRIED FRUIT [ P. 63 ]

SPICY EMERALD RICE [ P. 62 ]

RICE WITH ROASTED GARLIC, LENTILS, AND MUSHROOMS [ P. 64 ]

The everyday side dish gets five tasty makeovers with these quick fixes By Abigail Wolfe Photography by Rick Cummings

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 61


S PI CY EM ERA LD RI CE MAKES 2 CUPS | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Cilantro, green onions, and jalapeños add color and flavor to cooked rice. Serve as a side dish with enchiladas or chili, or roll it into a burrito. 1 cup cilantro leaves 4 green onions, roughly chopped (½ cup) 2 pickled jalapeño chiles, stemmed, seeded, and chopped (2–3 Tbs.) 2 Tbs. avocado oil or vegetable oil 2 cups cooked jasmine rice, warm

1 Bring small saucepan of salted water to a boil. Blanch cilantro and green onions 15 seconds in boiling water, or until green onion tops are bright green. Drain and transfer to mini food processor.

2

Add jalapeños and oil to processor, and blend until smooth.

SPIC Y C A JU N R I C E SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Serve this dish with steamed greens and roasted or stewed tomatoes, and you’ve got a full-on Southern-style meal. Frozen peppers and onions are used as a time-saving way to season the dish, but you could also use fresh chopped onion and bell pepper.

3 Stir green sauce into warm cooked rice, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. PER ½-CUP SERVING 157 CAL; 2 G PROT; 7 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 21 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 73 MG SOD; <1 G FIBER; <1 G SUGARS

1 Pulse frozen pepper-and-onion blend in food processor until chopped.

2

Heat oil in medium saucepan over medium heat. Add chopped frozen vegetables, and sauté 5 minutes, or until most of liquid has evaporated. Stir in rice and Cajun seasoning. Pour in 2 cups water, cover, and reduce heat to medium-low. Cover, and simmer for 12 minutes, or until all of liquid has been absorbed. Stir in black-eyed peas, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Let stand, covered, 5 minutes before serving. PER ½-CUP SERVING 159 CAL; 5 G PROT; 3 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 29 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 162 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 2 G SUGARS

62 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

2 cups frozen pepper-and-onion blend 1 Tbs. olive oil ¾ cup rice 1½–2 tsp. Cajun seasoning 1 cup cooked black-eyed peas


RICE WITH MELTED LEEKS A N D D R I ED F R U I T SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Sweet and savory, this fragrant, colorful side dish can be served hot or at room temperature. Garam masala, the spice mix used for flavor, is a curry-powder-like blend from Northern India. If you don’t have any on hand, substitute 1 teaspoon curry powder. 2 Tbs. unsalted butter 2 medium leeks, whites and tender green parts finely chopped (3 cups) 1 cup mixed dried fruit, diced into ¼-inch pieces 2 tsp. garam masala, plus more for garnish (optional) 2 cups cooked basmati rice

1 Melt butter in large skillet over medium-low heat. Add leeks, sprinkle with salt and pepper if desired, and stir to combine. Cook 10 to 15 minutes, or until leeks are very soft, stirring occasionally.

2

Add dried fruit, garam masala, and 2 Tbs. water, and cook 2 to 3 minutes, or until fruit has softened slightly. Fold in cooked rice, and cook 2 to 3 minutes more, or until heated through. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Serve dusted with additional garam masala (optional). PER ½-CUP SERVING 234 CAL; 4 G PROT; 4 G TOTAL FAT (3 G SAT FAT); 45 G CARB; 10 MG CHOL; 50 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 17 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 63


RICE WITH ROASTED GARLIC, LENTILS, AND MUSHROOMS SERVES 10

The ultra-versatile combination of rice and lentils can be served as a protein-rich side dish or an easy entrée. Green French lentils, which hold their shape when cooked, will give the dish a firmer texture, while softer red lentils will give it a creamier, dal-like consistency. 1 1 3 1 2

medium bulb garlic lb. sliced button or cremini mushrooms (6 cups) Tbs. prepared balsamic vinaigrette, divided cup green French or "Puy" lentils or red lentils cups cooked brown rice, or wild rice blend

1 Preheat oven to 350˚F. Slice top off garlic bulb to expose cloves, and discard top. Place bulb on small square of foil and pour 1 Tbs. water over it. Fold up corners of foil to seal. Roast garlic in oven 45 to 50 minutes, or until soft when gently squeezed.

2

Line large baking sheet with parchment paper. Toss sliced mushrooms with 1 Tbs. balsamic vinaigrette in large bowl, and season with salt and pepper if desired. Spread on prepared baking sheet in single layer. Roast mushrooms 20 to 30 minutes in oven with garlic, or until tender and browned, stirring halfway through.

3 Meanwhile, bring lentils and 2⁄ cups water to boil in small 12

saucepan. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 to 25 minutes for green lentils, 10 to 15 minutes for red lentils, or until tender. Drain, and transfer to medium bowl. Stir in 1 Tbs. balsamic vinaigrette. Cover and keep warm.

4 Cool garlic until easy to handle. Squeeze out roasted garlic into small bowl and discard skins. Mash garlic with fork until smooth. Fold mashed roasted garlic into lentils. Stir in mushrooms, hot rice, and remaining 1 Tbs. balsamic vinaigrette. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. PER ½-CUP SERVING 270 CAL; 15 G PROT; 4 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 47 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 96 MG SOD; 8 G FIBER; 4 G SUGARS

64 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com


MEDITERRANEAN RICE WITH WILTED SPINACH AND FETA SERVES 6

1 Heat oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add 4 cups

Fresh spinach is simmered with olive tapenade and feta cheese for a tangy base to this rice dish. Some prepared tapenades are made with anchovy paste, so be sure to read the label before buying.

spinach, and cook 2 minutes, or until wilted. Push wilted spinach to outer edge of skillet, forming a ring. Add remaining spinach and cook, 1 to 2 minutes more, or until all spinach is wilted, mixing together with first batch.

1½ 8 3 ¼ 2

Stir in tapenade and feta, and simmer 2 to 3 minutes. (Mixture will be saucy.) Fold in rice and cook 1 to 2 minutes more, or until heated through. Serve sprinkled with additional crumbled feta and olive tapenade, if using.

Tbs. herb- and garlic-infused olive oil cups baby spinach (4 oz.) Tbs. prepared olive tapenade, plus more for garnish, optional cup reduced-fat feta cheese, plus more for garnish, optional cups cooked white or brown rice

2

PER ½-CUP SERVING 132 CAL; 3 G PROT; 6 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 16 G CARB; 2 MG CHOL; 143 MG SOD; <1 G FIBER; <1 G SUGARS

Substitute chopped sun-dried tomatoes for the feta cheese.

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 65


Vegan author Terry Hope Romeroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new book packs everything from mac and cheese to cookies with extra protein By Mary Margaret Chappell Recipes excerpted from Protein Ninja: Power through Your Day with 100 Hearty Plant-Based Recipes That Pack a Protein Punch, by Terry Hope Romero. Reprinted courtesy of Da Capo Lifelong Books.

66 MARCH 2016 vegetariantimes.com


PRO MAC [ P. 68 ]

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 67


PROTEIN-FORTIFIED RECIPES aren’t just for athletes and bodybuilders. Just ask Terry Hope Romero, whose latest book, Protein Ninja: Power through Your Day with 100 Hearty Plant-Based Recipes that Pack a Protein Punch, deliciously explains how to sneak more protein into vegan recipes. “We all know now that vegans and vegetarians easily get enough protein, but it might be a good idea to get a little more, especially as we age and have a tendency to lose muscle mass,” she explains. “When I eat proteinfortified recipes, I do notice the difference. I feel a little more satiated and have a little more boost.” Here, Romero shares three “protein-ninja” recipes from her new cookbook.

PRO MAC SERVES 6

High-protein pasta shells, pea protein, and butternut squash purée give this dairy-free take on mac and cheese a huge hit of healthy. If you like your mac and cheese creamy, Romero suggests underbaking the casserole slightly or even just broiling it to brown the topping. Serve with your favorite hot sauce. Pasta 3 ⁄4 cup raw cashew pieces 10 oz. high-protein pasta shells, spirals, or elbows, such as quinoa pasta or brown rice pasta 2 cups low-sodium vegetable broth 1 cup butternut-squash purée ½ cup pea protein powder 3 Tbs. nutritional yeast 1 Tbs. Dijon mustard 2 tsp. garlic powder ½ tsp. ground turmeric ½ tsp. salt

68 MARCH 2016 vegetariantimes.com

Breadcrumb Topping 1¼ cups whole-wheat or gluten-free breadcrumbs 2 Tbs. nutritional yeast 2 Tbs. hulled hemp seeds 2 Tbs. olive oil ½ tsp. salt Roasted Broccoli 4 cups broccoli florets 2 Tbs. olive oil 1 shallot, minced (¼ cup) ½ tsp. salt Lemon juice and red pepper flakes, to taste


1

To make Pasta: Cover cashews with 2 inches hot water. Soak 20 minutes, or until softened. Drain, and discard water.

2 Cook pasta 2 to 3 fewer minutes than package directions. Drain, and rinse under cold water in colander.

3

Preheat oven to 400˚F, and coat 11- x 7-inch baking dish with cooking spray. Line large baking sheet with parchment paper.

4

Puree cashews, broth, butternut purée, pea powder, nutritional yeast, mustard, garlic powder, turmeric, and salt in blender until smooth. Transfer to bowl, and stir in pasta. Pour into prepared baking dish.

5

To make Breadcrumb Topping: Toss together all ingredients in bowl. Spread Topping over Pasta, and cover with foil. Bake 20 minutes.

6

To make Roasted Broccoli: Toss together all ingredients in large bowl. Spread on baking sheet.

7

Protein Powders Romero boosts the protein content of her recipes with plant-based protein powders made from peas, hemp seeds, and brown rice. Pea protein powder has a pronounced legumelike flavor, hemp protein powder is nutty with a greenish hue, and brown rice protein powder is the mildest of the bunch, but can be grainy. Mixing and matching is encouraged. “Maybe you’ll hack these recipes to a new level of greatness,” Romero writes.

Remove foil from casserole, place on upper rack in oven, slide broccoli onto lower rack, and bake both 15 to 20 minutes, or until broccoli is tender and tips are lightly browned, and Breadcrumb Topping on casserole is golden brown. PER 1-CUP SERVING 520 CAL; 28 G PROT; 20 G TOTAL FAT (3 G SAT FAT); 60 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 768 MG SOD; 11 G FIBER; 5 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 69


OL IV E RO SEMAR Y B I S C U I T S MAKES 8 BISCUITS

“I’ve really been getting into savory scones and biscuits,” Romero admits. “They’re great breakfast food, but you can also stuff them with a smear of spreadable vegan cheese and pile them with some greens for a snack.” ¼ 1¼ 1 1¾ ½ 1

½ 1 1

cup olive oil, plus more for hands (for forming) cups unsweetened soymilk or other non-dairy milk Tbs. lemon juice cups all-purpose flour cup brown rice protein powder Tbs. baking powder tsp. salt cup roughly chopped oil-cured black olives Tbs. dried rosemary or 3 Tbs. fresh rosemary, roughly chopped

1

Pour ¼ cup oil into small plastic container, and freeze 20 to 25 minutes, or until very thick and cloudy. (Oil should have consistency of sorbet.)

2

Preheat oven to 425˚F, and line baking sheet with parchment paper.

3

Whisk together soymilk and lemon juice in liquid measuring cup. Set aside 5 minutes to curdle.

4

Meanwhile, stir together flour, rice protein powder, baking powder, and salt in large bowl. Scoop frozen oil into flour, then use fork or a pastry cutter to cut oil into flour to create a crumbly mixture. (If oil starts to get too soft, set bowl in freezer for a few minutes, then remove.) Form a well in center of flour mixture.

5

Pour curdled soymilk into well. Stir only enough to moisten dry ingredients. Fold in olives and rosemary. (Dough will be soft.) Lightly rub hands with oil, then divide the dough into 8 equal pieces. Shape into balls, transfer to baking sheet, and flatten slightly.

6

Bake 20 to 24 minutes, or until bottoms of biscuits are golden brown. Serve hot, or when cool split in half and toast on a griddle. PER BISCUIT 251 CAL; 10 G PROT; 18 G TOTAL FAT (3 G SAT FAT); 27 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 396 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; <1 G SUGARS

70 MARCH 2016 vegetariantimes.com

ALMOST-FR OIL Many of Romero’s recipes in Protein Ninja use what she calls “almostfrozen oil.” Chilling oil in the freezer causes it to thicken and solidify, meaning it can be used as a substitute for butter or margarine. Almostfrozen oil gives the Olive Rosemary Biscuits (left) a light and tender crumb you wouldn’t get if the oil had been added in its liquid form.


½ 13 ⁄ ½ 2 1½ ¾ ½ 13 ⁄ ¾ ½

1

cup light brown sugar cup granulated sugar cup unsweetened soymilk tsp. pure vanilla extract cups old-fashioned rolled oats cup all-purpose unbleached flour cup whole-wheat pastry flour cup plain hemp protein tsp. salt cup salted roasted peanuts, roughly chopped

Preheat oven to 350˚F, and coat 12-cup muffin tin with cooking spray.

soymilk, and vanilla in large bowl with electric mixer until

butter mixture until combined.

3

Divide dough among muffin cups, pressing it evenly

Bake 12 to 15 minutes, or until cookie is firm and slightly and transfer to rack to cool completely. Store in loosely covered container. PER COOKIE 321 CAL; 9 G PROT; 16 TOTAL FAT (7 G SAT FAT); 36 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 183 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 16 G SUGAR

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 71


FOOD

WAYS

This versatile squash is the perfect antidote to the winter food blues

By Mary Margaret Chappell

//

Photography by Jennifer Olson

JUST WHEN YOU THOUGHT you couldn’t eat another leafy green or cube another butternut squash … chayote to the rescue! The summery-tasting vegetable “falls somewhere between a cucumber and a zucchini,” explains Robert Schueller, director of public relations at Melissa’s Produce, where chayote has been one of their best-selling items since the company’s inception. “In fact, chayote is a very multifaceted, unique vegetable that works just as well in slaws and salads as it does in stews. It’s a staple in Latin American, South American, Caribbean, and Cajun cuisines,” Schueller says. VT has put together this collection of recipes to help you get to know the puckered, pale-green squash and all the ways to use it in your kitchen.

72 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com


RECIPES CLOCKWISE FROM BOTTOM LEFT

CHAYOTE-CORN PUDDING [ P. 75 ] MIRLITON SLAW [ P. 77 ] “SECRET INGREDIENT” MANGO SALSA [ P. 76 ] CHAYOTE RATATOUILLE AND RED BEANS [ P. 76 ] “THE FULL MONTE” ROASTED CHAYOTE SALAD [ P. 74 ]

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 73


FOOD

WAYS

“THE FULL MONTE” ROASTED CHAYOTE S A L A D SERVES 4

This recipe is modeled after VT Editor in Chief Michele Crockett’s favorite salad at the recently closed El Monte Grill and Lounge in Fort Collins, Colo. Cubes of chayote are roasted until crisp, then added to a hearty salad with a jalapeño-laced dressing. Roasted Chayotes 3 2

medium chayotes (10–12 oz. each), pits removed, cut into 1-inch cubes Tbs. olive oil

Dressing 1 ¼ 3 2 ½ 1 ½ ½

cup cilantro leaves cup lime juice Tbs. vegetable oil Tbs. olive oil jalapeño chile, seeded and chopped tsp. ground cumin tsp. agave nectar, optional tsp. salt

Salad 4 1 1 1 ½ 8 ½ ½

cups baby arugula or baby spinach cup frozen, thawed edamame, or fava or lima beans avocado, diced (1 cup) cup halved cherry tomatoes small red onion, thinly sliced (½ cup) radishes, thinly sliced (½ cup) cup crumbled Cotija cheese, optional cup roasted, salted pepitas, optional

1 To make Roasted Chayotes: Preheat oven to 425˚F. Line baking sheet with parchment paper, or coat with cooking spray.

2

Toss chayotes with olive oil on prepared baking sheet. Roast 20 to 25 minutes, or until edges are browned, turning once or twice.

3 To make Dressing: Blend all ingredients in mini food processor or in jar with handheld blender until smooth.

4 Toss Roasted Chayotes with 1 tsp. Dressing in bowl. 5 To assemble Salad: Toss arugula with 2 Tbs. Dressing, and place in bowl Skip the cheese and instead double up on avocado or pepitas.

or divide among serving plates. Top with warm chayote, edamame, avocado, cherry tomatoes, red onion, and radishes. Sprinkle with Cotija and pepitas, if using. Serve remaining Dressing on the side for drizzling, if desired. PER SERVING 265 CAL; 6 G PROT; 19 G TOTAL FAT (3 G SAT FAT); 23 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 101 MG SOD; 10 G FIBER; 7 G SUGARS

74 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com


CHAYOTE-CORN PUDDING

1 Preheat oven to 350˚F. Coat 2-qt. baking dish with cooking

SERVES 6

spray. Cook chayote in large saucepan of boiling, salted water, 5 minutes. Drain, and set aside in colander.

Corn pudding is a casserole favorite in the South, but it’s usually served as a side dish. Here, we’ve filled it out with chayote for a satisfying entrée that can be served with bread and a green salad.

Meanwhile, bring corn, milk, 4 Tbs. butter, and garlic to a boil in medium saucepan. Remove from heat, and set aside.

2

medium chayotes, peeled, halved, pitted, and cut into ¼-inch-thick slices (4 cups) 2 cups fresh or frozen corn kernels 1 ½ cups low-fat milk 6 Tbs. butter, divided 1 clove garlic, minced (1 tsp.) 1 small onion, diced 3 eggs 3 Tbs. all-purpose flour 1 cup grated extra-sharp white Cheddar cheese (4 oz.) ½ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. freshly ground black pepper 1 cup panko breadcrumbs

2

3 Wipe out saucepan used to cook chayote, add 1 Tbs. butter, and melt over medium heat. Add onion, and cook 5 to 7 minutes, or until soft. Remove from heat, and stir in chayote.

4 Drain corn, and set aside milk mixture. Stir corn into chayote mixture.

5

Whisk eggs with flour in small bowl. Whisk in milk mixture. Stir milk mixture and ¾ cup cheese into chayote mixture. Season with salt and pepper. Transfer to prepared baking dish.

6 Stir remaining 1 Tbs. butter and remaining ¼ cup cheese into breadcrumbs in bowl. Sprinkle over casserole, and bake 45 minutes, or until golden brown on top and toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool 5 minutes before serving. PER 1-CUP SERVING 372 CAL; 13 G PROT; 22 G TOTAL FAT (13 G SAT FAT); 4 G CARB; 31 MG CHOL; 510 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 7 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 75


CH AYOT E RATATO U I L L E A N D RE D B E ANS SERVES 8

When chayote is simmered, it takes on a zucchini-like texture and tenderness, making it a perfect cold-weather substitute in this Provençal vegetable dish. We’ve added kidney beans for extra protein so you can serve this as a main dish over couscous, rice, or pasta. 3 2 2

1 Heat oil in large saucepan or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add onions, bell peppers, and fennel, and sauté 5 to 7 minutes, or until vegetables are translucent. Stir in garlic, then chayote, tomatoes, thyme, oregano, bay leaves, harissa paste (if using), and 1 cup water. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 30 minutes.

2

Add kidney beans, and cook, covered, 10 to 15 minutes more, or until chayote is tender. Adjust seasoning with harissa paste, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. PER 1-CUP SERVING 162 CAL; 6 G PROT; 6 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 24 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 332 MG SOD; 7 G FIBER; 8 G SUGARS

“SECRET INGREDIENT” M A NG O S A LS A MAKES 3½ CUPS | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

What to do when you want fresh-tasting salsa before tomatoes are in season? Blend a can of tomatoes with a chayote, then embellish the base with your favorite flavors. Chayote adds cucumberlike texture to this salsa, without cucumber’s distinctive flavor. Serve with chips, or as a condiment to your favorite Mexican dishes. 1 1 8 1 4 1 1 ½

15-oz. can diced tomatoes chayote, peeled, pitted, and cut into chunks green onions, cut into 1-inch pieces clove garlic, peeled tsp. lime juice tsp. olive oil large or 2 small mangos, peeled and finely diced tsp. hot sauce, such as Cholula, optional

Blend tomatoes, chayote, green onions, garlic, lime juice, and olive oil in food processor until smooth. Transfer to bowl, season with salt and pepper, if desired, and stir in mango and hot sauce, if using. PER ¼-CUP SERVING 38 CAL; <1 G PROT; <1 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 8 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 207 MG SOD; 1 G FIBER; 6 G SUGARS

76 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

FOOD STYLIST: ERIC LESKOVAR; ASSISTANT FOOD STYLIST: COLIN BARCLAY; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

Tbs. olive oil small onions, quartered and thinly sliced (2 cups) small red, orange, or yellow bell peppers, cut into thin 1½-inch-long strips 1 large fennel bulb, trimmed, cut into eighths, and thinly sliced (2 cups) 3 cloves garlic, minced (1 Tbs.) 4 chayotes, peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks (8 cups) 2 15-oz. cans chopped tomatoes 4 sprigs fresh thyme 4 sprigs fresh oregano 2 bay leaves ½–1 tsp. harissa paste, optional 1½ cups cooked kidney beans, or one 15-oz. can kidney beans, rinsed and drained


M I RLI TO N S L AW SERVES 8 Choose squash that are smooth, firm, and bright green (like a Granny Smith apple), with no bruises or blemishes. Chayote skin is edible, but can be tough and chewy when cooked in soups, casseroles, and stews. Peel with a vegetable peeler, then give the squash a quick rinse to remove the sticky sap under the skin. Slice in half, and remove the (also edible) seed, then cut into desired size.

Mirliton is the French Creole word for chayote and is also the name the vegetable goes by in Cajun cuisine. Chayote holds a lot of moisture, so be sure to squeeze out as much liquid as possible once it has been grated to keep the dressing from getting too watery. Dressing 3 3 ½ ½ 1 ½

Tbs. vegetable oil Tbs. cider or white-wine vinegar tsp. celery seed tsp. mustard seed pinch red pepper flakes tsp. sugar

Slaw 3 2 ½ ½ ½ ½

chayotes, seeded and coarsely grated (6 cups) medium carrots, coarsely grated (1 cup) 1 2 cup) medium red onion, finely chopped (⁄ 1 yellow bell pepper, finely chopped (⁄2 cup) cup chopped fresh parsley cup toasted pecans, optional

1

Bring all dressing ingredients to a boil in small saucepan. Remove from heat, and let cool while preparing Slaw.

2

To make Slaw: Place grated chayote in strainer, and squeeze out as much liquid as possible. Transfer to bowl, and stir in Dressing, then stir in carrots, red onion, bell pepper, and parsley. Chill 30 minutes, or up to 2 days. Sprinkle with pecans, if using, just before serving. PER 3⁄4-CUP SERVING 78 CAL; 1 G PROT; 6 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 7 G CARB; <1 MG CHOL; 14 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 77


Skip the junk food, and instead serve this stealthily healthy slumber-party fare that kids will actually eat 78 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com


By Casey Easton Photography by Julia Vandenoever Models (from left): Olivia Pierce Sofia Pelletier Natalie Korczak Madeleine Vandenoever

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 79


EA S Y, CHEES Y HOM EM A DE P I ZZA SERVES 8

Healthy homemade pizza crust and sauce are easier than you think! Here, the crust lets you sneak whole-wheat flour and flaxseeds into a kids’ favorite, while the 3-ingredient sauce keeps things simple and healthful. For extra slumber-party fun, prepare the dough and sauce, then put the toppings in bowls so kids can decorate their own pies. Just be sure to have extra veggies available so they can snack while they create.

Crust

STRAWBERRY “ICE CREAM” CAKE

1 1 2 1

SERVES 12

Sssshhh … don’t tell kids this delicious dessert is actually just good-for-them yogurt and fruit with a few graham crackers and waffle cones thrown in for crunch. 15 5 1 1 2

1 cup all-purpose flour 1

full graham crackers waffle cones 20-oz. bag whole frozen strawberries 32-oz. container honey-flavored Greek yogurt Tbs. honey

1 1 1

1 1 1

Simmer 5 to 10 minutes, or until soft and liquid starts to fill bottom of pan. Cool completely.

5 Stir together yogurt and honey. Set aside. 6 Press graham cracker crumbs on bottom of prepared springform pan. Spread half of yogurt, then half of strawberries, then half of crumbled waffle cones in pan. Repeat layering, ending with a sprinkling of waffle cones. Freeze at least 3 hours, or until frozen. Let sit at room temperature 1 hour before serving. PER SLICE 250 CAL; 6 G PROT; 8 G TOTAL FAT (5 G SAT FAT); 39 G CARB; 10 MG CHOL; 107 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 25 G SUGARS

80 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com

FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; PROP AND SET STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

4 Bring strawberries to a simmer in small saucepan over medium heat.

tsp. olive oil clove garlic, minced (1 tsp.) 24-oz. can crushed tomatoes

Toppings

crumbly and moist. Transfer to bowl.

separate bowl.

Tbs. olive oil, plus more for coating bowl

Sauce

1 Line 9-inch springform pan with parchment paper, and set aside. 2 Pulse graham crackers in food processor with 1 to 2 tsp. water until 3 Pulse waffle cones in food processor until crumbly. Transfer to

0.25-oz. pkg. active dry yeast tsp. sugar cups whole-wheat flour cup ground flaxseeds or flaxseed meal

cup part-skim shredded mozzarella cheese cup broccoli florets, cut into ½-inch pieces small orange bell pepper, cut into ½-inch pieces (1 cup) 1 cup cherry tomatoes, halved 8 basil leaves, optional


1 To make Crust: Combine 1½ cups hot water (105–115˚F), yeast,

3 To make Sauce: Heat oil in medium saucepan over medium heat.

and sugar in large bowl, electric-mixer bowl, or food-processor bowl. Add remaining ingredients, and knead 10 minutes by hand, 5 minutes with mixer dough hook, or 2 to 3 minutes in food processor, or until dough holds together in a ball and is no longer sticky when touched.

Add garlic, and cook 1 minute. Add tomatoes, cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 20 minutes. Remove from heat, and cool.

2

Transfer dough to large bowl coated with oil, cover with clean dish towel or plastic wrap, and let rise 1 hour in warm place, or until doubled in size.

4 Preheat oven to 425˚F. Divide Crust dough into 2 rounds, and flatten into 10-inch disks with rolling pin or your hands. Transfer to 2 baking sheets, and add Toppings. Bake Pizza 20 minutes, or until cheese has melted and Crust is golden brown. PER SERVING (2 SLICES) 273 CAL; 13 G PROT; 11 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 36 G CARB; 9 MG CHOL; 259 MG SOD; 10 G FIBER; 5 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 81


SNACK AT TACK CEREAL MIX SERVES 8 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Pretzels, breakfast cereals, and nuts are lightly seasoned and toasted in the oven for a guiltfree snack that both kids and adults love. 2 1 2 1 2 ½ ½

Tbs. olive oil Tbs. vegan Worcestershire sauce tsp. garlic powder cup brown puffed-rice cereal cups multigrain-square cereal or rice-square cereal cup pretzel twists and/or snaps cup shelled raw pistachios or pumpkin seeds

1 Preheat oven to 350˚F. 2 Whisk together oil, Worcestershire, and garlic powder in small bowl.

3 Combine puffed rice and multigrain cereals, pretzels, and pistachios in large bowl; toss with oil mixture until well-coated. Spread in single layer on baking sheet, and bake 10 minutes. Stir, then bake 10 minutes more, or until lightly golden. Cool. PER ½-CUP SERVING 222 CAL; 5 G PROT; 8 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 34 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 191 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

Make the pancake batter and the yogurt topping for Oatmeal Cookie Pancakes the night before, cover, and store in the fridge. If batter thickens overnight, thin it with water or milk.

82 MARCH 2016

vegetariantimes.com


OATMEAL COOKIE PANCAKES SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

What’s in a name? When you sell oat- and raisin-laced pancakes as “oatmeal cookie” pancakes and drizzle them with a cookie look-alike glaze, kids won’t notice the healthy add-ins or miss the maple syrup they usually pour over pancakes. Pancakes 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 cup old-fashioned rolled oats 1 3 –½ cup light-brown sugar ⁄ 2 tsp. ground cinnamon 1 tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. salt 2 large eggs 1 cup low-fat milk 1 Tbs. butter, melted 2 tsp. vanilla extract 1 cup raisins ¾ cup pecans ½ cup chocolate chips

Maple Topping 2 6

cups plain low-fat yogurt Tbs. maple syrup

1 To make Pancakes: Stir together flour, oats, sugar, cinnamon, baking powder, and salt in medium bowl.

2

Whisk together eggs, milk, butter, and vanilla in separate bowl.

3 Fold flour mixture into egg mixture. Stir in raisins, pecans, and chocolate chips.

4 Coat skillet or griddle with cooking spray, and heat over medium-high heat. Ladle ½ cup batter for each pancake, and cook 3 to 5 minutes, or until bubbles form on surface all the way to middle of pancake. Flip, and cook 3 to 5 minutes more, reducing heat to medium, if necessary. Repeat with remaining batter.

5

To make Maple Topping: Whisk together yogurt and syrup in small bowl. Drizzle over Pancakes. PER SERVING (2 PANCAKES with 2 TBS. MAPLE TOPPING) 399 CAL; 9 G PROT; 15 G TOTAL FAT (4 G SAT FAT); 62 G CARB; 52 MG CHOL; 260 MG SOD; 4 G FIBER; 36 G SUGARS vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 83


21 VEGETARIAN ITALIAN DISHES WITH A ZESTY MEDITERRANEAN FLAIR

1

vegetariantimes.com

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION


Spice up your weeknight menu with these satisfying vegetarian Italian dishes—from classic pasta dishes to fresh pizzas! You’ll also find crowd-pleasing appetizers, healthy soups and salads, and new twists on mouthwatering Italian desserts.

APPETIZERS Artichokes Stuffed with Arugula Pesto, p. 3 Roasted Red Pepper Crostini with Balsamic Reduction, p. 4 Bruschetta with White Bean Paste and Tomato Chutney, p. 4

SOUPS Spicy Sun-Dried Tomato Soup with White Beans & Swiss Chard, p. 5 Pasta e Ceci (Pasta with Chickpeas), p. 6

SIDES & SAL ADS Sicilian-Style Roasted Vegetables with Balsamic Syrup, p. 7 No-Cook Cannellini Salad with Pesto Dressing, p. 7

PIZZAS Gluten-Free Pizza Margherita, p. 8 Grilled Salad Pizza, p. 9 Chewy GF Pizza Crust, p. 9 Zucchini-Goat Cheese Pizza, p. 10 White Pizza with Broccoli and Mushrooms, p. 10 BRUSCHETTA WITH WHITE BEAN PASTE AND TOMATO CHUTNEY [ P. 4 ]

MAIN DISHES Puttanesca Sauce with Fried Capers over Linguine, p. 11 Tempeh Triangles with Piccata Sauce, p. 12 Spring Vegetable Risotto, p. 12 Linguine in Lemon Cream Sauce, p. 13 Italian-Style Spaghetti Squash, p. 13 Tofu and Spinach Stuffed Shells, p. 14 Wild Mushroom Ravioli in Sage and Brown Butter Sauce, p. 14

DESSERTS Prosecco-Poached Pear Tiramisu, p. 15 Lemon-Rosemary Butter Cookies, p. 16

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION

vegetariantimes.com

2


ARTICHOKES STUFFED WITH ARUGULA PESTO

1 small lemon, sliced 1 tsp. sea salt, optional 4 large artichokes, stems trimmed to ½ inch 3 cups tightly packed chopped arugula ½ cup raw or roasted unsalted cashews ½ cup olive oil 2 Tbs. thinly sliced basil 2 Tbs. lemon juice 2 small garlic cloves, peeled 2 tsp. nutritional yeast ¾ tsp. salt ½ tsp. red pepper flakes ½ tsp. low-sodium soy sauce or wheat-free tamari ½ tsp. ground black pepper

SERVES 4

Whole steamed artichokes have a natural elegance, but leaf-dipping can get messy. We’ve solved the problem by filling artichokes with a thick arugula pesto, which turns the de-choked centers into individual dipping bowls. Extra pesto can be served on the side or spooned over the artichokes as desired.

1

Bring 4 qt. water, lemon slices, and sea salt (if using) to a boil in large pot. Add artichokes, and return to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer 30 to 45 minutes, or until outer leaf pulls off easily and base of leaf is tender.

2 Purée all remaining ingredients in blender until smooth.

3

Transfer artichokes from boiling water to bowl in sink and rinse under cold running water to cool. Leave cooking water in pot. Place cooled artichokes on cutting board, and cut off stems. Carefully open leaves to reveal center chokes. Scoop out spiky chokes with small spoon, and discard. Return artichokes to cooking water 2 minutes to reheat.

4 Spoon ⁄ cup pesto in center of each 14

artichoke, and gently open outer leaves. Serve with remaining pesto for dipping. PER ARTICHOKE 309 CAL; 9 G PROT; 22 G TOTAL FAT (4 G SAT. FAT); 25 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 620 MG SOD; 10 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

3

vegetariantimes.com

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION


ROASTED RED PEPPER CROSTINI WITH BALSAMIC REDUCTION SERVES 6

When allowed to reduce or cook down, balsamic vinegar becomes slightly sweet and thick. Here, it adds full-bodied flavor to light, crunchy appetizers. 3 3 1 3 1½ 1½ 3

½ 1 6

Tbs. pine nuts large red bell peppers red jalapeño chile tsp. olive oil, divided Tbs. chopped fresh parsley Tbs. chopped fresh mint cloves garlic, minced (1 Tbs.), plus 1 whole garlic clove, peeled, divided cup balsamic vinegar Tbs. agave nectar 1 3 -inch-thick slices ⁄ ciabatta bread, toasted

1 Toast pine nuts in skillet over medium heat 3 to 4 minutes, or until browned, shaking pan constantly. Set aside.

2 Preheat broiler, and place oven rack in highest position. Coat bell peppers and jalapeño with 1 tsp. oil. Place on baking sheet, and broil 15 minutes, or until blistered and partially blackened on all sides, turning often. Transfer to bowl, cover, and cool. Peel and seed. Slice bell peppers into thin strips, finely chop jalapeño, and transfer to bowl. Add pine nuts, parsley, mint, minced garlic, and remaining 2 tsp. oil; toss to combine. Season with black pepper, if desired.

3 Meanwhile, bring vinegar and agave nectar to a simmer in small saucepan over medium heat. Cook 10 minutes, or until mixture reduces to about 3 Tbs. and coats bottom of pan when pan is tilted, stirring occasionally. Stir 1 Tbs. balsamic syrup into roasted pepper mixture. Marinate roasted pepper mixture 30 minutes, or chill overnight. Rub toasted bread slices with halved garlic clove. Top crostini with roasted pepper mixture, and drizzle with remaining balsamic reduction. PER 1 SLICE BREAD WITH 2 TBS. PEPPER MIXTURE 133 CAL; 3 G PROT; 5 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 21 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 103 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 10 G SUGARS

BRUSCHETTA WITH WHITE BEAN PASTE AND TOMATO CHUTNEY MAKES 16 BRUSCHETTA

White beans give a welcomed creaminess to this bruschetta topped with a spicy fresh-tomato chutney.

Balsamic Glaze

Chutney

1 cup balsamic vinegar 2 Tbs. Sucanat or unrefined cane sugar

4 Roma tomatoes, seeded and finely chopped (2 cups) 1 red Fresno chile, seeded and finely chopped (¼ cup) 2 Tbs. finely chopped shallot 2 Tbs. finely chopped fresh basil 2 Tbs. lime juice

White Bean Paste 1 15-oz. can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained 2 oz. grated Parmesan cheese (½ cup) ¼ cup fresh orange juice 2 Tbs. olive oil ½ clove garlic, minced (½ tsp.) SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION

Bruschetta 16 slices French baguette 2 Tbs. olive oil

1

To make Balsamic Glaze: Simmer vinegar and Sucanat in saucepan over medium-low heat 20 minutes, or until syrupy. Cool.

2

To make White Bean Paste: Blend all ingredients in food processor until smooth. Season with salt and pepper, if desired.

3 To make Chutney: Combine all ingredients in bowl. 4 To make Bruschetta: Preheat grill or grill pan. Brush baguette slices with oil, and grill 2 to 3 minutes on each side. Spread 1 Tbs. White Bean Paste on each grilled bread slice. Top with 2 Tbs. Chutney; drizzle with Balsamic Glaze. PER SLICE (WITH TOPPING) 186 CAL; 7 G PROT; 5 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 28 G CARB; 3 MG CHOL; 309 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 6 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

4


SPICY SUN-DRIED TOMATO SOUP WITH WHITE BEANS & SWISS CHARD SERVES 8 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Finishing this satisying soup with torn basil leaves adds a pop of freshness. 2 3 ½ 1 2 2 1 ½ 2 2 1

Tbs. olive oil cloves garlic, minced (1 Tbs.) tsp. red pepper flakes medium onion, chopped (1½ cups) medium carrots, sliced (1 cup) ribs celery, chopped (½ cup) small zucchini, sliced (1 cup) tsp. chopped fresh rosemary cups low-sodium vegetable broth 15-oz. cans diced tomatoes 15-oz. can small white beans or cannellini beans, rinsed and drained ½ cup oil-packed sun-dried tomatoes, drained and chopped, plus 2 Tbs. oil from jar ½ bunch (6 oz.) Swiss chard, chopped ½ tsp. chopped fresh thyme 1 cup torn fresh basil

1

Heat oil in large saucepan over medium heat. Add garlic and red pepper flakes, and cook 1 minute, or until garlic is fragrant. Stir in onion, carrots, celery, zucchini, and rosemary, and cook 10 to 15 minutes, or until onions are soft.

2

Add broth, 1 can tomatoes, and beans. Scoop 1 cup mixture into food processor or blender, and add remaining can of tomatoes, sun-dried tomatoes, and sun-dried-tomato oil. Purée until smooth, stir mixture into soup, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Simmer 10 minutes.

3 Add Swiss chard and thyme; simmer 5 minutes more, or until chard is wilted. Remove pan from heat, and stir in basil. 1 2-CUP SERVING 169 CAL; 5 G PROT; 8 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); PER 1 ⁄ 21 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 367 MG SOD; 6 G FIBER; 6 G SUGARS

5

vegetariantimes.com

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION


PASTA E CECI (PASTA WITH CHICKPEAS) SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

A cousin of pasta e fagioli, this cozy, classic Italian soup features chickpeas instead of white beans. 1 1 3 2 3

Tbs. olive oil medium onion, chopped (1½ cups) sprigs fresh rosemary cloves garlic, minced (2 tsp.) plum or Roma tomatoes, seeded and chopped (2 cups) 1 15-oz. can chickpeas, rinsed and drained, or 1½ cups cooked chickpeas

4 ½ ½ 6 2

cups low-sodium vegetable broth cup ditalini or tubetti tsp. freshly ground black pepper Tbs. grated Parmesan cheese Tbs. (6 tsp.) finely chopped fresh basil or parsley, for garnish

1

Heat oil in large soup pot or Dutch oven over medium heat. Add onion and rosemary sprigs, and sauté 5 to 7 minutes, or until onion has softened. Add garlic, and sauté 30 seconds. Add tomatoes, and season with salt, if desired. Sauté 3 to 5 minutes. Remove rosemary sprigs.

2 Add chickpeas, and slightly mash with fork or potato masher to thicken soup, leaving some chickpeas whole

3 Add broth, and bring to a boil. Add pasta, and cook 1 minute less than package directions suggest.

4 Season soup with salt and pepper, if desired. Garnish each serving with 1 Tbs. Parmesan and 1 tsp. basil. PER 1 CUP SERVING 160 CAL; 7 G PROT; 5 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 23 G CARB; 4 MG CHOL; 545 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 4 G SUGARS SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION

vegetariantimes.com

6


NO-COOK CANNELLINI SALAD WITH PESTO DRESSING SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

SICILIAN-STYLE ROASTED VEGETABLES WITH BALSAMIC SYRUP SERVES 8 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Lemon juice and orange zest and juice brighten up this dish with a fruity flair. 1 1

lb. green beans, trimmed large red bell pepper, sliced lengthwise into ½-inch-thick strips 2 Tbs. olive oil ½ tsp. sea salt

¼ 13 ⁄ ¼ 1 1

tsp. freshly ground black pepper cup balsamic vinegar cup fresh orange juice tsp. fresh lemon juice tsp. grated orange zest

1

Preheat oven to 375°F. Toss green beans and bell pepper strips with oil, salt, and pepper in large bowl. Spread in single layer on baking sheet, and roast 20 to 25 minutes, or until vegetables are crisp-tender and beginning to brown, stirring occasionally.

A cook who has a delicious prepared pesto within arm's reach is a bit like a woman who owns a perfect little black dress: Both are ready at a moment's notice to face an expectant public. In this recipe, the pesto is tossed with white beans to create an elegant salad in a flash. 2 19-oz. cans cannellini beans, rinsed and drained 3 cups shredded red cabbage 2 ⁄3 cup thinly sliced green onions 2 Tbs. prepared basil pesto 1 Tbs. chopped capers

Combine all ingredients in large bowl. Let stand 15 to 30 minutes to allow flavors to meld. Serve at room temperature. 1 2-CUP SERVING 285 cal; 13 G PROT; PER 1⁄ 7 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 42 G CARB; 2 MG CHOL; 490 MG SOD; 12 G FIBER; 4 G SUGARS

2 Bring vinegar to a boil in small saucepan over medium-high heat. Simmer 5 to 7 minutes, or until vinegar is thick and syrupy, stirring occasionally.

3

Toss green bean mixture with orange juice, lemon juice, and orange zest in large bowl. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Transfer to serving dish, and drizzle with balsamic vinegar syrup. 1 2-CUP SERVING 65 CAL; 1 G PROT; 4 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 8 G CARB; PER ⁄ 0 MG CHOL; 104 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 4 G SUGARS

7

vegetariantimes.com

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION


1

GLUTEN-FREE PIZZA MARGHERITA

2

MAKES 2 11-INCH ROUND PIZZAS

The crust on this traditional pizza is nothing short of revolutionary. A thin homemade dough is spread on baking sheets and par-baked before the pizza is assembled for a crispy base that showcases the simple toppings.

Gluten-Free Crust 1 2 1 1½ 1 1 2 1½ 3

To make Gluten-Free Crust: Stir yeast, flaxseed meal, and sugar into 2 cups warm water. Let stand 10 minutes, or until liquid is cloudy.

0.25-oz. pkg. active dry yeast (2¼ tsp.) Tbs. flaxseed meal tsp. sugar cups tapioca starch cup brown rice flour cup white rice flour tsp. xanthan gum tsp. salt Tbs. olive oil, plus more for hands and pan

Meanwhile, whisk together tapioca starch, rice flours, xanthan gum, and salt in large bowl. Stir yeast mixture into flour mixture until soft dough begins to form, then stir in oil.

3

Coat two 13-inch round pizza pans or one 18- x 13-inch baking sheet with oil. Divide dough between round pans or scoop into baking sheet, and coat hands with oil. Gently press and shape dough by hand to fit prepared pan(s). Set dough aside in warm place to 1 2 hours. (You won’t see rise 1 ⁄ much, but the yeast will be working.)

4

Pizzas 2½ cups marinara sauce 16 oz. fresh mozzarella, sliced 3 cups halved cherry tomatoes ½ cup fresh chopped parsley ½ cup chopped fresh basil ¼ cup chopped chives

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION

To make Pizzas: Preheat oven to 425°F. Par-bake pizza crusts 15 to 20 minutes, or until just golden brown. Spread marinara sauce over parbaked crusts, then top with fresh mozzarella and cherry tomatoes. Bake 5 to 7 minutes, or until cheese is bubbly. Remove from oven, and top with parsley, basil, and chives. PER SLICE 271 CAL; 6 G PROT; 11 G TOTAL FAT (4 G SAT FAT); 38 G CARB; 16 MG CHOL; 130 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

8


CHEWY GF PIZZA CRUST

GRILLED SALAD PIZZA MAKES 1 12-INCH PIZZA

We've chosen a thick and chewy gluten-free pizza crust (right) as a base for the fresh flavors of a salad pizza, but you could also make this pie with prepared refrigerated pizza dough—simply follow the baking instructions on the package. Vinaigrette 2 Tbs. balsamic vinegar 2 tsp. honey 1 tsp. Dijon mustard 1 small clove garlic, minced (½ tsp.) 3 Tbs. olive oil

Pizza 1 recipe Chewy GF Pizza Crust 3 Tbs. grated Parmesan cheese 1 cup arugula 1 cup sliced romaine lettuce 1 head red endive, halved and sliced (1 cup) ½ cup thinly sliced fresh fennel ¼ cup thinly sliced red onion Shaved Parmesan for garnish, optional

MAKES 1 12-INCH PIZZA

A combination of wholegrain gluten-free flours makes a satisfyingly chewy pizza crust. 1 1 1 ½ ½ 2 1 ½ ½ 3

1

To make Vinaigrette: Whisk together vinegar, honey, mustard, and garlic. Whisk in oil, and season with salt and pepper, if desired. Let rest 30 minutes.

2

Prepare Chewy GF Pizza Crust, and sprinkle with grated Parmesan. Place pizza on middle rack in oven, and preheat oven to 350°F with pizza in oven. Once oven reaches 350°F, bake Chewy GF Pizza Crust 25 minutes, or until bottom is crisp and brown. Remove from oven, and turn oven setting to broil.

3

Brush Chewy GF Pizza Crust with 3 Tbs. Vinaigrette. Toss arugula, lettuce, endive, fennel, and onion with remaining Vinaigrette. Top pizza with arugula mixture, and place under broiler 2 to 3 minutes, or until greens begin to wilt. Serve garnished with Parmesan curls, if using.

PER SLICE (1/8 PIZZA) 254 CAL; 3 G PROT; 12 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 36 G CARB; 2 MG CHOL; 344 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 4 G SUGARS

0.25-oz. pkg. active dry yeast Tbs. sugar cup potato starch cup brown rice flour cup teff flour tsp. xanthan gum tsp. salt tsp. garlic powder tsp. onion powder Tbs. olive oil

1

Combine yeast, sugar, 1 2 cups warm water in and 1⁄ measuring cup. Let stand 10 minutes.

2

Combine starch, flours, xanthan gum, salt, garlic powder, and onion powder in bowl. Stir in yeast mixture, then oil. Cover, and let dough rise in warm place, 20 minutes.

3

Scoop dough onto oiled pizza pan. Place hand in plastic bag, and press dough flat.

4

Garnish with toppings and place pizza in oven. Preheat oven to 350°F. Once oven temperature reaches 350°F, bake 25 to 30 minutes, or until bottom is crisp and brown, and cheese, if using, is melted. PER SLICE 186 CAL; 2 G PROT; 6 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 32 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 294 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER;2 G SUGARS

9

vegetariantimes.com

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION


WHITE PIZZA WITH BROCCOLI AND MUSHROOMS SERVES 6

ZUCCHINI-GOAT CHEESE PIZZA

Paired with a two-cheese white sauce, broccoli makes a wonderful pizza topping. The secret to a crisp crust is preheating the baking stone or sheet. And if you like extra-crispy pizza, prebake the dough 3 to 4 minutes before adding toppings. 2

Tbs. nonhydrogenated margarine or butter, divided 6 oz. mushrooms, sliced (2 cups) 8 oz. broccoli florets (3 cups) 1 Tbs. all-purpose flour 1 cup low-fat milk 2 cloves garlic, minced (2 tsp.) ¼ tsp. salt ½ cup shredded mozzarella, divided ¼ cup grated Parmesan, divided 1 13.8-oz. pkg. refrigerated pizza dough

MAKES 1 10-INCH PIZZA

Cheese pizza is a perennial veg favorite, but it often comes with a hefty calorie count. Here, goat cheese and thinly sliced veggies offer lighter alternatives to shredded mozzarella. Pizza 2 Tbs. olive oil, divided 8 oz. (½ pkg.) prepared refrigerated pizza dough 1 3.5-oz. log goat cheese, thinly sliced or roughly chopped 1 zucchini, peeled into thin strips 1 small red bell pepper, cut into rings Sauce 1 6-oz. can no-salt-added tomato paste 2 Tbs. finely minced onion 2 cloves garlic, minced (2 tsp.) 2 tsp. dried oregano 2 tsp. olive oil ½ tsp. red wine or red-wine vinegar

1

To make Pizza: Preheat oven to 450°F. Brush large baking sheet or pizza pan with 1 Tbs. oil. Spread pizza dough in prepared pan.

2

To make Sauce: Stir together all ingredients with fork in small bowl.

3

Spread Sauce on dough. Top with half of goat cheese. Spread zucchini strips over goat cheese, top with bell pepper rings, then remaining goat cheese. Drizzle with remaining 1 Tbs. oil. Bake 10 to 15 minutes, or until cheese is melted and bubbly. Cool 10 minutes, then cut into 6 slices.

PER SLICE 213 CAL; 8 G PROT; 11 G TOTAL FAT (3 G SAT FAT); 26 G CARB; 8 MG CHOL; 285 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 6 G SUGARS

1

Place pizza stone or baking sheet in center of oven, and preheat oven to 425°F.

2

1 2 Tbs. margarine or butter in skillet over medium-high heat. Melt ⁄ Add mushrooms, and sauté 4 to 7 minutes, or until beginning to 1 3 cup water. Cover tightly, and steam broccoli brown. Add broccoli and ⁄ in skillet 3 to 4 minutes, or until tender.

3

1 2 Tbs. margarine or butter in saucepan over Heat remaining 1⁄ medium-high heat. Add flour, and cook 2 minutes, or until pale golden, stirring constantly. Stir in milk, garlic, and salt. Cook 3 to 4 minutes, or until mixture thickens and begins to boil, stirring constantly. Remove 1 4 cup mozzarella and 2 Tbs. Parmesan. from heat. Stir in ⁄

4

Shape pizza dough according to package directions. Remove pizza stone from oven, and place dough on hot stone.

5

1 2 inch of edge, and top Spread white sauce over dough to within ⁄ with broccoli mixture. Sprinkle remaining mozzarella and Parmesan over top. Return to oven, and bake 18 to 20 minutes, or until edges of pizza are golden and center is hot and bubbly. Cool slightly before slicing and serving.

PER SLICE 275 CAL; 13 G PROT; 9 G TOTAL FAT (4 G SAT FAT); 38 G CARB; 10 MG CHOL; 746 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 7 G SUGARS SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION

vegetariantimes.com

10


PUTTANESCA SAUCE WITH FRIED CAPERS OVER LINGUINE SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

This versatile sauce also works great spread on crostini, spooned over soft polenta, or served with poached eggs. 1 2

Tbs. olive oil Tbs. capers, drained and patted dry with paper towels 1 red onion, chopped (1 cup) 3 cloves garlic, minced (1 Tbs.) ½ tsp. red pepper flakes 1 lb. cherry tomatoes, halved (3½ cups) 1 cup fresh basil leaves, thinly sliced, divided ¼ cup pitted Kalamata olives, coarsely chopped 12 oz. linguine

1

Heat oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add capers, and fry 1 to 2 minutes, or until many capers have split. Remove capers with slotted spoon, and drain on paper towels. Add onion to skillet, and cook 3 to 5 minutes, then stir in garlic and red pepper flakes, and cook 1 minute more. Stir in tomatoes, and cook 5 to 7 minutes, or until tomatoes begin 1 2 cup basil and olives, to break down. Stir in ⁄ and remove pan from heat.

2

Meanwhile, cook pasta according to package directions. Drain pasta, reserving 1 2 cup cooking water. Add drained pasta ⁄ to skillet, and toss to combine with sauce, adding some pasta water if mixture seems too thick. Serve garnished with remaining 1 2 cup basil and capers. ⁄ 1 2-CUP SERVING 395 CAL; 14 G PROT; PER 1 ⁄ 7 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 74 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 254 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 8 G SUGARS

11

vegetariantimes.com

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION


SPRING VEGETABLE RISOTTO SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

TEMPEH TRIANGLES WITH PICCATA SAUCE

This fast, no-stir risotto calls for a pressure cooker, which slashes the cooking time to just 15 minutes (compared with the 45 minutes it usually takes to make risotto). Try this technique with other risotto recipes as well. 2½ 2 8 1 5 1½ 3½ 1

SERVES 6 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

Tempeh cutlets are pan-fried, then topped with a lemony caper sauce for a fast, elegant entrée. Serve with pasta or rice to soak up the extra sauce. Piccata Sauce 1½ tsp. minced garlic 2 cups dry white wine ½ cup fresh lemon juice 1 Tbs. capers, drained ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. black pepper 1 Tbs. cornstarch dissolved in 3 Tbs. water

Tempeh Triangles ½ cup plain soymilk 1 Tbs. Dijon mustard ½ cup cornmeal ¼ cup all-purpose flour 2 Tbs. chopped fresh sage ½ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. black pepper 2 8-oz. pkg. tempeh 2 Tbs. olive oil Lemon slices, for garnish

1

4

tsp. olive oil small fennel bulbs, chopped (2 cups) green onions, chopped (1 cup) small leek, white and light green parts chopped (1 cup) cloves garlic, minced (5 tsp.) cups Arborio rice cups low-sodium vegetable broth cup chopped fresh mixed herbs, such as dill, tarragon, and basil, divided oz. aged goat cheese, grated (1 cup)

1

Heat oil in pressure cooker over medium heat. Add fennel and green onions, and sauté 6 minutes, or until softened and beginning to brown. Transfer half of fennel mixture to small bowl; cover and keep warm.

2

Stir leek and garlic into remaining fennel mixture in pressure cooker, then stir in rice. Add broth, and bring mixture to a boil.

3

Lock pressure cooker lid in place. Increase heat to high, and bring to high pressure. Lower heat just enough to maintain high pressure, and cook 5 minutes.

4

To make Piccata Sauce: Roast garlic in skillet over medium heat, 20 seconds. Add wine, lemon juice, capers, salt, and pepper; simmer 10 minutes. Stir in cornstarch mixture; cook 5 minutes more, or until sauce is thickened. Remove from heat, and keep warm.

Reduce pressure according to equipment instructions. Gently remove lid, taking care to avoid escaping steam. Stir in 1 2 cup chopped fresh herbs, and season with salt and pepper, if ⁄ desired.

2

5

To make Tempeh Triangles: Whisk together soymilk and mustard in bowl. Combine cornmeal, flour, sage, salt, and pepper on wax paper.

3

Cut each tempeh piece into 3 squares. Cut each square into 2 triangles. Dip triangles in soymilk mixture, dredge in cornmeal mixture, and set aside.

Divide risotto among 6 bowls. Top each serving with reserved fennel mixture, remaining herbs, and goat cheese.

1 3 CUP SERVING 219 CAL; 8 G PROT; 9 G TOTAL FAT PER 1 ⁄ (5 G SAT FAT); 26 G CARB; 20 MG CHOL; 360 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

4 Heat 1 Tbs. oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add 3 tempeh triangles, and cook 3 minutes per side, or until golden brown. Repeat with remaining oil and tempeh triangles.

5

Arrange Tempeh Triangles on serving plates, and top with Piccata Sauce. Garnish with lemon slices. PER SERVING (2 TRIANGLES AND ¼ CUP SAUCE) 320 CAL; 16 G PROT; 10 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 28 G CARB; 510 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION

vegetariantimes.com

12


ITALIAN-STYLE SPAGHETTI SQUASH

LINGUINE IN LEMON CREAM SAUCE SERVES 4 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

SERVES 4 | VEGAN

The Italian version of this dish calls for heavy cream, which we’ve replaced with equally rich-tasting light cream cheese.

The noodlelike strands of spaghetti squash are topped with a simple, chunky, homemade tomato sauce.

8 ½ 2 1 ½

oz. dry linguine cup light cream cheese Tbs. olive oil lemon, juiced, and 1 Tbs. zest, grated cup chopped parsley

2

lb. spaghetti squash, halved lengthwise and seeded 2 Tbs. olive oil 1 medium-sized red onion, thinly sliced 1 zucchini (8 oz.), diced 4 medium tomatoes, diced (4 cups) ¼ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. coarsely ground black pepper ½ cup reduced-fat grated Parmesan cheese for garnish, optional 1 small lemon, sliced

1 Cook linguine according to package directions in pot of boiling salted water. 2 Warm cream cheese, oil, and 2 Tbs. lemon juice in saucepan over low heat. 3 Drain pasta, reserving ⁄ cup cooking water. Stir reserved cooking water into 12

cream cheese mixture. Add pasta, lemon zest, and parsley; toss to coat. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. PER 1-CUP SERVING 343 CAL; 11 G PROT; 14 G TOTAL FAT (5 G SAT FAT); 45 G CARB; 21 MG CHOL; 294 MG SOD; 2 G FIBER; 4 G SUGARS

1 Preheat oven to 350˚F. 2 Place squash halves, cut side down, in baking 1 4 cup water, and cover dish with foil. Bake dish. Add ⁄ 30 minutes, or until tender. Cool slightly.

3

Meanwhile, heat 1 Tbs. oil in large skillet over medium-high heat. Add onion, and cook 3 minutes, or until onion is translucent. Add zucchini, reduce heat to medium, and cook 4 to 5 minutes, or until zucchini begins to brown. Add tomatoes, salt, and pepper. Reduce heat to low, and cook, uncovered, 10 minutes.

4

Scrape squash strands into bowl with fork. Toss with remaining 1 Tbs. oil. Mound squash in centers of four pasta bowls. Spoon vegetable mixture around or over squash strands, dividing vegetables equally among bowls. Drizzle with more oil, if desired, and garnish with Parmesan cheese. Add lemon slices, and serve. PER 1-CUP SERVING 160 CAL; 3 G PROT; 8 G TOTAL FAT (1 G SAT FAT); 22 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 190 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 7 G SUGARS

13

vegetariantimes.com


WILD MUSHROOM RAVIOLI IN SAGE AND BROWN BUTTER SAUCE SERVES 5

TOFU AND SPINACH STUFFED SHELLS

Wonton wrappers found in the refrigerated section of the supermarket make these homemade ravioli a cinch. 1 1 1

Tbs. olive oil small shallot, minced (2 Tbs.) 4-oz pkg. “gourmet blend” mushrooms (shiitakes, oyster mushrooms, and baby bellas), diced 2 Tbs. white wine 1 tsp. fresh thyme leaves 20 square wonton wrappers ¼ lb. (1 stick) unsalted butter 4 fresh sage leaves, plus more for garnish 2 Tbs. grated Parmesan cheese

SERVES 6

Olive oil–poached garlic gives tofu a deep, mellow flavor, while miso and vinegar provide a cheeselike tang. 16 12 ¼ 1 2 2 2 5 1 2 2

oz. jumbo pasta shells cloves garlic, peeled and thinly sliced cup olive oil 16-oz. pkg. firm tofu, drained, rinsed, and patted dry Tbs. apple cider vinegar tsp. lemon juice tsp. white miso paste oz. baby spinach leaves (6 cups) 24-oz. jar prepared pasta sauce Tbs. chopped Kalamata olives, optional Tbs. chopped green olives, optional

1 Preheat oven to 375°F. 2 Cook pasta shells according to package directions. Drain, rinse, and drain again, then place on clean kitchen towel to cool and dry.

3

Bring garlic and olive oil to a simmer in small skillet over medium heat. Reduce heat to low, and simmer 15 minutes, or until garlic is soft and golden. Remove from heat, and set aside.

4

Crumble tofu into bowl of food processor, and blend with vinegar, lemon juice, miso, garlic, and oil until smooth. Transfer to medium bowl.

5

Heat large saucepan over medium heat. Add spinach and 2 Tbs. water, and cook 3 to 4 minutes, or until leaves are wilted. Transfer to strainer, and squeeze out excess liquid. Roughly chop, and stir into tofu mixture.

6

Spoon 2 Tbs. filling into each pasta shell, and place in single layer in large baking dish. Cover with pasta sauce, sprinkle with olives (if using), and bake 45 minutes, or until sauce is bubbling. Let stand 10 minutes before serving. PER 3 STUFFED SHELLS 343 CAL; 13 G PROT; 14 G TOTAL FAT (2 G SAT FAT); 42 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 562 MG SOD; 5 G FIBER; 11 G SUGARS SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION

1

Heat oil in skillet over medium heat. Add shallot, and sauté 2 minutes. Add mushrooms, and cook 7 to 10 minutes, or until softened. Add wine and thyme, and cook 2 minutes, or until all liquid has evaporated. Season with salt and pepper, if desired. Cool.

2

Cut 1 wonton wrapper in half, to form 2 rectangles. Brush edges of wonton half with water, and place 1 tsp. mushroom mixture on one side. Fold wonton wrapper in half to make square ravioli, pressing on edges to seal. Place on baking sheet. Repeat with remaining wonton wrappers and filling.

3

Melt butter in large skillet over low heat. Add sage leaves, and cook 8 to 10 minutes, or until fatty solids in butter sink to bottom of saucepan and turn nutty brown.

4 Meanwhile, cook ravioli in large pot of boiling salted water 2 minutes, or until they float to top. Transfer to skillet with slotted spoon, and toss to coat with brown butter sauce. Season with salt and pepper, if desired, and sprinkle with cheese. PER SERVING (8 RAVIOLI) 298 CAL; 5 G PROT; 25 G TOTAL FAT (13 G SAT FAT); 21 G CARB; 53 MG CHOL; 336 MG SOD; <1 G FIBER; <1 G SUGARS


PROSECCO-POACHED PEAR TIRAMISU SERVES 12

There’s not much wasted in this coffee-free version of the Italian dessert classic: Sparkling wine is used to poach the pears and to plump the ladyfingers. Pears 2 cups Prosecco 1 cup sugar 1 strip lemon zest ½ vanilla bean 3 Bartlett, Bosc, Comice, or Concorde pears, peeled, quartered, and cored Tiramisu 2 8-oz. pkgs. light whipped cream cheese ½ cup light sour cream ¼ cup confectioners’ sugar ¼ cup low-fat milk 1 vanilla bean 3 3.5-oz. pkgs. ladyfingers ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder ½ cup grated bittersweet chocolate

1

To make Pears: Combine Prosecco, sugar, and lemon zest in saucepan. Split vanilla , scrape seeds into saucepan, and add vanilla pod. Bring to a boil. Add pears, reduce heat to low, and simmer 15 minutes, or until pears are tender, but not soft. Cover, and cool pears in liquid. Drain cooled pears, remove vanilla pod, and reserve poaching liquid. Slice pears.

2 To make Tiramisu: Pulse cream cheese, sour cream, confectioners’ sugar, and milk in food processor until smooth. Scrape seeds from vanilla bean into mixture, and pulse until combined.

3 Line 11- x 7-inch baking dish with ladyfingers. Brush with poaching liquid. Top with half of pear slices. Spread half of cream cheese mixture over 1 4 cup cocoa powder and 1 4 cup chocolate. Repeat layering with remaining ladyfingers, poaching liquid, pear slices, cream Pears, and sprinkle with ⁄ ⁄ cheese mixture, cocoa powder, and chocolate. Chill overnight. 1 2-CUP SERVING 320 CAL; 7 G PROT; 10 G TOTAL FAT (6 G SAT FAT); 53 G CARB; 77 MG CHOL; 367 MG SOD; 3 G FIBER; 38 G SUGARS PER ⁄

15

vegetariantimes.com

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION


LEMON-ROSEMARY BUTTER COOKIES MAKES ABOUT 40 COOKIES

The rosemary and lemon aromas of these cookies will make your kitchen smell like an Italian bakery. 4 ¼ 1 ½ 2 1 1 13 ⁄ 1½ ¼ ½

oz. (1 stick) butter, softened cup sugar tsp. finely chopped rosemary tsp. finely grated lemon zest egg yolks tsp. vanilla extract cup flour cup corn flour or fine cornmeal tsp. baking powder tsp. salt cup turbinado or sanding sugar for decorating

SPECIAL RECIPE SECTION

1

Beat butter, sugar, rosemary, and lemon zest with electric mixer 3 minutes, or until creamy. Beat in egg yolks and vanilla.

2

Whisk together flours, baking powder, and salt in bowl. Add to butter mixture, and beat until just combined. Shape into two 1-inch-wide logs. Wrap in wax paper, and chill 2 hours.

3

Preheat oven to 325°F. Spray 2 baking sheets with cooking spray. Slice 1 3-inch-thick rounds. Place turbinado sugar in bowl and press one cookies into ⁄ cut side of cookies into sugar. Place sugar-side up on baking sheets. Bake 15 minutes, or until golden brown on bottoms. Transfer to wire racks to cool. PER COOKIE 48 CAL; 1 G PROT; 2.5 G TOTAL FAT (1.5 G SAT FAT); 6 G CARB; 16 MG CHOL; 63 MG SOD; 1 G FIBER; 3 G SUGARS

vegetariantimes.com

16


advertisement

F RE SH FINDS A selection of promotions & events from our partners

VEGAN ESSENTIAL LIVING OILS

EVERYTHING YOU NEED IN ONE DELICIOUS SERVING

Two-time Clean Choice Award Winner, Dr. Ohhira’s Essential Living Oils, are a clean, vegan alternative to Fish Oil. Providing the beneficial fats you

With 34g of plant-based protein, 10g fiber, and 20 vitamins and minerals, Nature’s Food® All-In-One Meal provides the nutrition of a well-balanced, healthy, vegan meal. Plus, it tastes great and is free of GMOs, soy, lactose and gluten!

Omega-3, 6, and 9, it contains eight high quality oils from non-GMO plants and seeds.

naturesfoodnutrition.com

essentialformulas.com

THE ANTI-STRESS DRINK Multi-award-winning Natural Calm is the best-selling magnesium supplement in the natural products market. Natural Calm supports heart and bone health, better sleep, natural energy production and natural stress reduction!

NaturalVitality.com

ZING™ ZERO CALORIE STEVIA SWEETENER What’s amaZING? The moment you find a perfect sweet taste without a funny aftertaste, and zero calories. Zing™ Stevia Sweetener – the taste of sweet excitement.™

zingstevia.com

EAT FREELY WITH ENJOY LIFE! Our new vegan baking mixes are free-from the top 8 most common allergens including wheat, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, egg and soy. What they aren’t free-from is taste! Packed with 5 grams of plant-based protein and a patented allergen-friendly probiotic, our 5 varieties allow you to bake creatively without worry! We believe you deserve a happy, worry-free experience – even if you have a dietary restriction or two.

enjoylifefoods.com/our-foods/baking-mixes/


This acclaimed chef knows how to bring out the best flavors in fresh foods. He shares his insights with V T. By Nicole Gregory

SHAWN McCLAIN,

PHOTO: JEFF KAUCK

chef and owner of Green Zebra, a vegetarian restaurant in Chicago, creates dishes that bring vegetarian food to a whole new level of taste. McClain, who the James Beard Foundation in 2006 named Best Chef in the Midwest, has been a major force in demonstrating just how creative, flavorful, and satisfying vegetarian dishes can be. He does this in part by working with local farmers to bring fresh, pure ingredients to his customers’ plates every day. What dish would he offer a diner to show the rich possibilities of vegetarian food? “A nice, hardy vegetarian stew composed of numerous root vegetables, onions, Indian spices, and sweet dried fruit like currants, figs, or dates,” McClain says. “It would immediately invoke a feeling of richness and complexity without having to add a meat protein.”

McClain took a few minutes out of his busy schedule to share with VT his cooking philosophy as well as a few food favorites and go-to items in the kitchen. KEY KITCHEN UTENSILS My knives (mostly Japanese), an immersion circulator, a dehydrator, a cold smoker, and a good set of Microplanes. FAVORITE INGREDIENTS Tomatoes, citrus, sweet potatoes, cold-pressed oils, any type of grain, aged sherry vinegar, fermented black garlic, fresh mint, coconut. COOKING PHILOSOPHY Bringing to light the amazing qualities of the very best the seasons offer at the table. It’s about using creativity and modern thinking to create dishes that are at once perfectly fresh, visually mouthwatering, uniquely flavored, and naturally healthy. DISHES ON YOUR MENU YOU’RE ESPECIALLY PROUD OF

• Sylvan Acres Farm Duck Egg with smoked potato & toasted country sourdough

• Roasted Hokkaido Squash Dumplings with Chinese Greens & Five Spice Broth

• Heirloom Tomato Salad with Zingerman’s Burrata, Brioche & Sweet Onion Soubise COMFORT FOODS YOU LOVE Curries, toast with almond butter and honey, and pretty much anything fried! vegetariantimes.com

MARCH 2016 85


GLUTEN-FREE

LOW-CALORIE

LOW SATURATED FAT

30 MINUTES OR LESS

DAIRY-FREE

VEGAN

Q  Q

APPETIZERS

Q

Q

Q

Q

“Secret Ingredient” Mango Salsa, p. 76 SALADS & SIDES

Q  Q  Q

Q

 Q  Q

Q

Q  Q

Q

Q

Q

Q

Q

Q

  

Q

 Q  Q

Q

Q

Chayote-Corn Pudding, p. 75 Microgreens and Sprout Salad with Carrot-Ginger Dressing, p. 88 Mirliton Slaw, p. 77 Olive Rosemary Biscuits, p. 70 “The Full Monte” Roasted Chayote Salad, p. 74 SOUPS & STEWS

Q

Gingered Carrot and Edamame Soup, p. 36 ENTREÉS

Q

Q

Q

Q

 Q  Q  

  Q  Q

Q Q

Q

Q

Q

Q

Q

Q



Q

Q

Q





Q

Q

Q







Q



Q

Q

Q

 Q  Q  

Q

 Q  Q Q Q

 Q  Q 

Q

Q

Q

Q

Q

Q

Q

  Q

Q  Q Q  Q

Q Q

Q  Q

Q

Q

Q

 Q  Q

Q

Q

Q

 

Q

Q

Q

 Q  Q  

Q

Q Q

Chayote Ratatouille and Red Beans, p. 76 Creamy Barley-Butternut Risotto, p. 39 Easy, Cheesy Homemade Pizza, p. 80 Eggplant and Chickpea Pitas, p. 50 Green Vegetable Curry, p. 48 Mediterranean Rice with Wilted Spinach and Feta, p. 65 Mushroom, Poblano, and Black Bean Tostadas, p. 48 Potato and Egg Cocottes, p. 39 Potato Boxty with Tenderstem Broccoli and Coconut Mirin Sauce, p. 57 Potato Bread with Spring Onion, Leek, and Cabbage, p. 56 Pro Mac, p. 68 Oatmeal Cookie Pancakes, p. 83 Quickie Black Bean Tacos, p. 41 Rice with Melted Leeks and Dried Fruit, p. 63 Rice with Roasted Garlic, Lentils, and Mushrooms, p. 64 Rosemary-Roasted Root Vegetable and Polenta Bowl, p. 52 Salt-Roasted Golden Beets with Teriyaki Sauce and Nori Dust, p. 12 Spicy Cajun Rice, p. 62 Spicy Emerald Rice, p. 62 Spring Vegetable Crumble in Brown Rice Tahini Sauce with Oat and Seed Crumble, p. 55 The Ultimate Gluten-Free Hot Cereal, p. 35 Ultra-Easy Pot Pie, p. 43 DESSERTS, SNACKS & DRINKS

Q  Q  

Q

Q

 Q  Q         

86 MARCH 2016

Q Q

vegetariantimes.com

Crunchy Nutty Peanut Butter Hemp Cookies, p. 71 Orange Cake with Almonds, p. 58 Snack Attack Cereal Mix, p. 82 Strawberry “Ice Cream” Cake, p. 80


Unscented fragrance additives for women and men

a gathering of unique products and services for healthy living and exceptional cooking. To receive free information from these companies go to vegetariantimes.com/vegmarket

Dr. Cutler

VT

GET ATHENA PHEROMONES™ TO INCREASE YOUR ATTRACTIVENESS Published science proves this trade secret formula works for 74%. Created by Dr. Winnifred Cutler, the biologist who codiscovered human pheromones in 1986. From $98.50 for a 6 mo. supply. Free Shipping. Athena Institute, Braefield Rd, Chester Springs, PA 19425. “People are always so friendly and extra special sweet when I am wearing it!” Jill (AL)

610.827.2200

www.AthenaInstitute.com

DRINKING WATER SCAMS EXPOSED!

SWEETNESS THE WAY MOTHER NATURE INTENDED!

Free! Special report ($15.00 value) exposes water scams. Shocking truths revealed about alkalized, clustered, distilled, mineral, spring, filtered, bottled, well, reverse osmosis and more. Which one should you drink? We should consume about 2,920 glasses (182 gallons) every year . . . be waterwise . . . discover the best water!

Since 1984, Suzanne’s has been a manufacturer of natural and organic sweeteners. Retail products include Spreadable Fruits in 4 varieties, Rice Nectar including our Original Brown Rice syrups as well as Organic Maple, Chocolate and fruited versions. Organic favorites also include Organic Agave syrup, Organic Wildflower Honey, Molasses and Barley Malt.

f l b h surgery AND have everyone wondering who your surgeon was! Implants and best fat transfer (lipo) are needlessly kept injurious in light of the dramatic secret perennial enlargement that can be of the well endowed organically achieved w/NW®.

800.874.9028 ext 794

800.762.2135

www.waterlies.info

www.suzannes-specialties.com

s from necrosis). Health advances with breast size. Holistic, and only product of its kind.

“plant-vs-implants”

.com om o m e:: 77

HERBS & SUPPLEMENTS www.AmeriHerb.com

“You’re not a number you’re a name.”

SUPER ANGEL JUICER

WORLD’S FINEST EYE CREAM!

Enjoy fresh, enzyme-rich living juice. It’s perfect for leafy greens, vegetables, fruits, wheatgrass and more, featuring easy to clean, whisper quiet, high yield juicing, all stainless steel heavy duty construction.It comes with 10 year warranty. For more information, visit us online at: www.superangeljuicers.com EMAIL: info@superangeljuicers.com

Given a 5 star rating on Oprah’s iVillage, refreshing, anti-aging Airbrush Eye Refining Treatment hydrates, soothes, reduces crow’s feet and puffiness, and promotes collagen for younger, brighter looking eyes. 20% off! Code: 2VEG at:

877.870.1004 714.731.0045

800-542-0026 OPEN 7 DAYS

www.superangeljuicers.com

www.dremu.com

Bulk Herbs & Spices • Same Day Shipping • No Minimums Call for a FREE Or write: Ameriherb Wholesale Catalog P.O. Box 1968 (800) 267-6141 Ames, IA 50010-1968

Vegetarian Times is the only source and leading authority for the growing population of vegetarians and those who are trying to reduce their meat intake.


M I CROG REENS A ND SPROUT SAL AD WITH CA RROT-G I NG ER DRES S I NG SERVES 8 | 30 MINUTES OR LESS

SPRING GREEN

The trick to dressing microgreens and sprouts is finding a sauce that will stick to the delicate tendrils without weighing them down. Here, we’ve chosen a sweetand-spicy combination that’s thickened with puréed raw carrots. Toss the salad with the dressing right before serving for optimal flavor and texture. Extra sauce will keep two weeks in the fridge.

Tired of winter? Treat yourself to a salad of fresh, tender shoots and leaves that are the very taste of spring

Carrot-Ginger Dressing 4 1 3 13 ⁄ 3 1½

By Mary Margaret Chappell

green onions, cut into 1-inch pieces 1 3 cup) medium carrot, peeled and sliced (⁄ quarter-sized coins/rounds peeled fresh ginger cup vegetable oil Tbs. fresh orange juice tsp. gluten-free tamari sauce

4 2 2 1 2

cups microgreens cups pea shoots cups alfalfa or other small sprouts cup thinly sliced radishes (8 radishes) Tbs. finely chopped nuts, optional

1 To make Carrot-Ginger Dressing: Place green onions, carrot, and ginger in bowl of mini food processor, and pulse until finely chopped. Add remaining ingredients, and pulse until thick sauce forms. Season with salt and pepper, if desired; set aside.

2

To make Salad: Toss together microgreens, pea shoots, and sprouts in medium bowl, pulling apart any clumps of greens or sprouts. Add CarrotGinger Dressing, and toss to coat. Divide among 8 serving plates, and sprinkle with nuts, if using. Serve immediately. PER 1-CUP SERVING 110 CAL; 2 G PROT; 10 G TOTAL FAT (<1 G SAT FAT); 5 G CARB; 0 MG CHOL; 74 MG SOD; 1 G FIBER; 2 G SUGARS

88 MARCH 2016 vegetariantimes.com

PHOTO: RICK CUMMINGS; FOOD STYLIST: NANCY ZAMPARELLI; PROP STYLIST: NICOLE DOMINIC

Salad


PROMOTION

INFORM

EDUCATE

ENGAGE

List your business in the NEW

yoga directory REVAMPED look, feel & functionality!

OPTIMIZED for mobile

teachers studios retreats workshops events vacations

GET LISTED at

yjdirectory.com

at yjdirectory.com year-round

Grow your business Promote your event

DI RECTORY email directory@yogajournal.com


YOUR NEW

S C

TW

IN THE

PON

ITCH N

C

P U

Add into delicious savory dishes, sauces, marinades and dressings.

Quickly sweeten breakfast foods like pancakes, oatmeal, cereal and yogurt.

IX

Easily blend into hot and cold beverages — great for sweetening smoothies and summer drinks.

Sweeten and bake all of your favorite desserts - brownies, bar cookies and pies.

Domino® and C&H® Organic Blue Agave Nectars are delicious syrups made from the core of the blue agave plant and are perfect for all of your sweetening needs.

the

©2016 Domino Foods, Inc.

RtoealdoWay Sweet!

TM

dominoagave.com | chagave.com

19sdfghkjhf  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you