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HANDBOOK

A DETAILED REFERENCE FOR USE THROUGHOUT YOUR TIME IN THE PROGRAM

EXCELLENCE Begins with the simple belief that I CAN, Takes root in the decision that I WILL, And materializes in the philosophy I DO, Despite all else.

www.harrisoninstrumentalmusic.org


CONTENTS PRELIMINARIES ......................................................................................................................4 THE PURPOSE OF THIS SOURCE/REFERENCE NOTEBOOK ..........................................................4 WELCOME TO THE HARRISON HIGH SCHOOL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC PROGRAM ............................5 A NOTE FOR PARENTS .....................................................................................................5 DISCLAIMER ..................................................................................................................5 PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE ........................................................................6 PURPOSE .....................................................................................................................6 ORGANIZATION .............................................................................................................6 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC STAFF ...........................................................................................6 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC BOOSTERS EXECUTIVE BOARD .............................................................6 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC LEADERSHIP TEAM ...........................................................................7 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC BOOSTERS .....................................................................................7 COMMUNICATION .................................................................................................................7 STAYING INFORMED........................................................................................................7 CONTACTING THE INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC TEACHER ................................................................7 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC STUDENT LEADERSHIP TEAM..............................................................8 ENSEMBLE PRESIDENT .....................................................................................................8 ENSEMBLE VICE-PRESIDENTS ............................................................................................8 DRUM MAJORS .............................................................................................................9 FIELD COMMANDER ........................................................................................................9 SECTION LEADERS ..........................................................................................................9 SECRETARY ...................................................................................................................9 QUARTERMASTER ....................................................................................................10 LIBRARIAN ...............................................................................................................10 HISTORIAN...............................................................................................................10 HARRISON HIGH SCHOOL ENSEMBLES AND BASIC REQUIREMENTS .......................................10 SCHEDULE AND TIME COMMITMENT .................................................................................10 PERFORMANCE DRESS CODE ...........................................................................................11 CONCERT BAND COURSE DESCRIPTION ..............................................................................11 WIND ENSEMBLE COURSE DESCRIPTION ............................................................................11 ORCHESTRA COURSE DESCRIPTION ...................................................................................11 MARCHING BAND PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS ..............................................................12 ATTENDANCE ..............................................................................................................12 WEATHER ..................................................................................................................12 “FALLING-IN”..............................................................................................................13 HEALTH ISSUES ............................................................................................................13 BAND CAMP ...............................................................................................................13 ATTENDANCE .......................................................................................................................13 OVERVIEW .................................................................................................................13 PERFORMANCE ATTENDANCE POLICY ................................................................................14 EVSC CO-CURRICULAR POLICY ........................................................................................14 ONLINE EXCUSED-ABSENCE REQUEST FORM .......................................................................15 ATTITUDE ............................................................................................................................15 ORGANIZATIONAL GUIDELINES (POLICIES AND PROCEDURES) ...............................................16 BASIC EXPECTATIONS ....................................................................................................16

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REHEARSAL RESPONSIBILITIES .........................................................................................16 REHEARSAL ROOM RULES ..............................................................................................17 THE BAND BLOCK AND THIRD QUARTER BREAK ...................................................................17 TRANSPORTATION/BUS TRIP GUIDELINES ..........................................................................18 CONCERT PROTOCOL.....................................................................................................19 SCHOOL-OWNED INSTRUMENT AND EQUIPMENT POLICY .......................................................19 MUSIC AND MUSIC FOLDERS ..........................................................................................20 PRIVATE LESSONS.........................................................................................................20 CHAPERONE TRIP RESPONSIBILITIES ..................................................................................20 CHAIR PLACEMENT AND CHALLENGES................................................................................21 PROCEDURES FOR SEAT PLACEMENT CHALLENGES: 21 MARCHING BAND UNIFORM RULES AND REGULATIONS.........................................................21 AWARDS..............................................................................................................................22 LETTERS .....................................................................................................................22 GENERAL AWARDS .......................................................................................................22 MUSICIANSHIP AWARDS ................................................................................................23 STUDENT OF EXCELLENCE 23 OUTSTANDING ACHIEVER 23 FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITIES ...............................................................................................24 OVERVIEW .................................................................................................................24 BASIC BREAKDOWN OF FEES ...........................................................................................24 SAMPLE BAND STUDENT BREAKDOWN 25 SAMPLE ORCHESTRA STUDENT BREAKDOWN 25 PROCEDURE FOR MAKING PAYMENTS ...............................................................................26 FUNDRAISERS ..............................................................................................................26 GRADING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES..................................................................................26 OVERVIEW .................................................................................................................26 GRADE COMPONENTS ...................................................................................................27 DAILY PARTICIPATION 27 OUTSIDE PARTICIPATION 28 ACADEMIC WORK 28 SYLLABI .....................................................................................................................28 MAKE-UP ACTIVITIES ....................................................................................................29 RUBRICS AND SELF-ASSESSMENT .....................................................................................29

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PRELIMINARIES

THE PURPOSE OF THIS SOURCE/REFERENCE NOTEBOOK The purpose of this Source/Reference Notebook is:  To familiarize students and parents with the activities and responsibilities involved in participating in the Harrison High School Instrumental Music Program.  To provide an information base upon which students can draw throughout their years of involvement in any facet of our program.  To provide a structure through which students can organize their work and knowledge in such a way that it is readily available and easily accessible whenever they may need it.  To create a portfolio of work for each student to document their progress throughout their experiences in any facet of our program.  To serve as a tool for student growth and learning. This document is meant to become more than simply a list of rules and policies which quickly finds its way to the rear of your music folder for safe keeping. Rather, it is meant to be a source of information, and a reference point to which you can refer throughout your time in the music department. As such it is designed to be added to and updated throughout your involvement in the department. You will notice that the notebook is broken into sections. Each of these is a unit in and of itself. For instance, all of the rules and policies are grouped into one section. You will also notice that this notebook is three-hole punched. You are to place it into a binder clearly labeled as your "Music Source/Reference Notebook," which will contain the following sections:  Handbook  Unit Study Compositions  Extension Activities It is your responsibility to maintain your notebook and to keep track of any and all work you do in your music class. Everything you do is to be kept in the binder under the appropriate heading. Notebooks will be checked at least once a grading period. It is your responsibility to ensure that all work you are requesting a grade for be found, completed, in your Source/Reference Notebook. Failure to maintain this record of your work will result in a lowering of the notebook percentage of your grade.

If you don’t know where you’re going, when you get there, you’ll be lost. - Yogi Berra

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WELCOME TO THE HARRISON HIGH SCHOOL INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC PROGRAM Welcome to another year of Instrumental Music at Harrison High School. As we enter the 20092010 school year we should be proud of the great accomplishments and tradition of excellence we have established during the preceding years. With this in mind, I have established the following as our 2009-20010 program goals: Continue our growing commitment to, and achievement of, excellence in the area of marching band performance with a Gold [Superior] rating at ISSMA District Marching Band Contest. Achieve an ISSMA All-School Music Award by receiving Gold awards at District Marching Band, Solo/Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, Concert Band, and Concert Orchestra Contests. Increase efforts to recruit new members by:  Beginning correspondence with incoming 8th grade students at the earliest part of the year.  Visiting both middle schools with both a wind and string ensemble.  Helping increase initial middle-school enrollment by assisting with their recruiting efforts, and by visiting elementary schools and increasing awareness and excitement about music.  Decrease the number of unexcused absences from required events.  Increase respect for our facilities by: maintaining organized, clean locker room facilities; decreasing the amount of lost or misplaced music; eliminating the chewing of gum in rehearsals; eliminating the brining of food and/or beverages into the rehearsal room or locker room.

A NOTE FOR PARENTS Students are responsible for seeing that their parents receive any and all pertinent information whether it is written or verbal. Parents should occasionally ask their children for information about the instrumental music program. Booster club meetings are generally held on the second Tuesday of each month unless otherwise announced. Booster meetings are held in the Instrumental Music Rehearsal Room at 7:00 PM. DISCLAIMER Should any circumstance arise that is not covered in this handbook, the decision of the Instrumental Music Teacher will be final. The Instrumental Music Teacher reserves the right to depart from the rules should extraordinary circumstances require this. The Instrumental Music Teacher will be solely responsible for making this determination and his decisions will be final.

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PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE

PURPOSE The Harrison Instrumental Music Program is a comprehensive music program that reflects selfdiscipline, maturity, pride, positive attitude, and responsibility. This organization provides performance and growth opportunities for its members and strives for high standards and ideals for the school and community. ORGANIZATION

Instrumental Music Teacher Instrumental Music Booster President Booster Committee Chairs

Allison Field, Percussion Specialist Jordan Fink, Percussion Assistant

Daryl Repuelo, Guard Specialist

Karen Renner, String Specialist

Specialized Marching Staff

Kayla McCarty, Guard Assistant

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC STAFF The Harrison Instrumental Music Boosters and the Evansville Vanderburgh School Corporation both hire supplemental staff for the instrumental music program. The EVSC provides limited funds for a String Specialist and Assistant Marching Band Director, and the Boosters hire numerous supplemental marching band staff members in addition to providing additional financial support for increased String Specialist time. These individuals report to the Instrumental Music Teacher and should, at all times, be afforded the respect of any Harrison teacher. INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC BOOSTERS EXECUTIVE BOARD These are an especially dedicated group of parents who have chosen to take an organizational and leadership role in the support of the program. These individuals are essential members of the program, and work tirelessly behind the scenes to make sure all of our activities run smoothly and put our children first. Speak to them about how you can get involved with supporting our program – there are numerous ways, big and small, that you can get involved. "The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do." - Walter Begehot

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INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC LEADERSHIP TEAM The Teacher/Director in conjunction with other staff selects student officers based on attitude, leadership skills and participation and performance in ensembles, camp, and leadership workshops. Students also participate in a tryout process including peer leadership, marching and playing competencies. Students selected serve as members of the Leadership Team including Elected Student Representatives, Drum Majors, Section Leaders, and Rank Leaders.

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC BOOSTERS Parents of students in the instrumental music program are automatically members of the Instrumental Music Boosters. It is considered a parent support group for the activities of the program including alumni and interested parents.

COMMUNICATION

STAYING INFORMED There are several ways you can stay informed of happenings within the program.  Our website is frequently updated with a great deal of information – harrisoninstrumentalmusic.org.  We maintain an e-newsletter for which you can register on our website. Periodic emails are sent with pertinent information and are also archived on the website – click eNewsletters at the very top of any page.  Attend Instrumental Music Booster meetings.  Contact the Instrumental Music Teacher or a Booster Officer. CONTACTING THE INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC TEACHER For future reference, please observe the following courtesies when it is necessary to contact Mr. Gumula:  During typical school hours please call the instrumental music office at 474-4123 option 2 and leave a message. These phone messages are delivered both to the office phone and Mr. Gumula’s email and will be received wherever email can be accessed.  After school hours, or in the case of an emergency, feel free to call Mr. Gumula’s personal cell phone at 760-4693.  The best way to contact Mr. Gumula is via email to bill.gumula@evsc.k12.in.us. Please do not call Mr. Gumula’s home phone. Given the large amount of time he dedicates to the program, and the fact that his son is still little, he likes to devote as much of his home time to his family as possible. Your consideration and understanding are appreciated.

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INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC STUDENT LEADERSHIP TEAM We can only continue to build on the successes of the past if we have outstanding student leadership. Section leaders are selected based on musical accomplishment, service, dedication and loyalty. These appointments are made by directors and staff and are not a popularity contest. Student leaders are expected to be the first students to arrive and the last to leave. Good leaders look for jobs that need doing. They don't wait to be asked. Good leaders know that respect comes from peers only when it is earned. Therefore, the leadership team should strive to always set an example by their behavior. It is an obligation of the leadership team to keep directors and staff informed about any situation that might hinder the progress of the program. Members of the leadership team never ask a member of their section to do anything they are not prepared to do. You should be the first to rehearsal, the first on line, the first to have music memorized...in short, you should be first at everything. The man at the top of the mountain did not fall there. Leaders must set the right example every day. Immaturity will often encourage us not to push ourselves to achieve our personal best until the week of a major performance. Unfortunately, that is too late. Success is built a piece at a time, every day. Lead your sections this way. Students who wish to have leadership roles should act and set their goals accordingly. Remember, directors and staff are watching for future Harrison Instrumental Music leaders throughout the year. The following guidelines will be followed in the selection of officers: ENSEMBLE PRESIDENT This individual’s role as the leader of the student leadership council will be instrumental in implementing all band related functions i.e. council meetings, delegating responsibilities, discipline and maintaining excellence throughout the band program. This person’s primary functions are: (1) the initiator of broad programs of action to cope with the bands main problems. (2) Responsible for enforcing all band’s standards and holding each member of band council to their individual responsibilities. (3) Acting Liaison between students and director/staff. ENSEMBLE VICE-PRESIDENTS These individual’s (one per grade level) roles are to assist with the implementation of the presidents programs. Other functions are (1) Develop ways of building teamwork and pride amongst responsible grade level. (2) Liaison between grade level and Band President. (3) Communicating standards and information to responsible grade level.

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DRUM MAJORS The Drum Major(s) will be chosen by audition on material selected by the director. The number of Drum Majors will be decided by the director at the time of the audition. Uniforms are also selected by the director. The basic duties of the Drum Major(s) include: (1) Attending all band functions. (2) Responsible to the director for the conduct and actions of the band at all times, and for the execution of all band duties assigned. (3) Take charge of the band in all types of situations. (4) Assist the director in maintaining discipline and order. (5) Assist the director with marching drills, inspection, planning, and special activities. (6) Promotes band standards and pride. (7) Attends all band council meetings. (8) Coordinates and supervises section leaders and is responsible for their effectiveness and actions. (9) Insures that all rehearsals begin on time. (10) Insures that at the end of an evening rehearsal the facility is locked up and clean. FIELD COMMANDER This individual is selected by the director and (1) Maintains discipline on the field during rehearsals. (2) Ensures that rehearsals start on time and everyone helps at the end of rehearsals. (3) Maintains order in the stands during football games. (4) Needs to be able to conduct the entire show in case of an injury or an illness to the drum major. (5) Needs to be able to conduct trash music in the stands. (6) Assists in making sure that our instructional staff is thanked and appreciated. SECTION LEADERS The basic duties of Section Leaders include: (1) Conduct memorization and playing checks on music. (2) Responsible for maintaining discipline and pride within the section. (3) Must call and conduct section rehearsals on a regular basis. (4) Must play a Solo or Ensemble at Solo and Ensemble Contest and must organize solos and ensembles within the section. (5) Assists the director with inspection and marching drills as needed. (6) Attends all Meetings as required. (7) In charge of recruitment for section. (8) Takes private lessons! (9) Ensures that the section’s locker area is clean and organized. SECRETARY The basic duties of the Secretary include: (1) Handles all band correspondence. (2) Responsible for all clerical work related to band. (3) Keeps office duties and writes the schedule on the white information board on a weekly basis. (4) May appoint assistants to help with certain minor duties. (5) Attends all meetings, takes notes and takes attendance at all rehearsals. (6) Assist drum major with Staff books and drill charts. (7) Responsible for all drill in the fall.

"I'm a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work... the more I have of it." - Thomas Jefferson

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QUARTERMASTER The basic duties of the quartermaster(s) include: (1) Loading all needed equipment for performances. (2) Keeping inventory of all school-owned instruments. (3) Organizing the loading and unloading of the busses and equipment trucks on all trips and events. The Guard quartermasters are in charge of all inventory relating to color guard and will make sure that the guard box is at all rehearsals and performances. Percussion quartermaster is in charge of all percussion inventories. There should be record of all equipment and mallets. This individual is also in charge of making sure that the equipment is to and from rehearsal efficiently and safely. LIBRARIAN (1) This individual is in charge of everything in our music library. (2) Has a system for collecting and distributing all music. (3) Maintains the computer database for all our music. (4) Has a form and a system in place for any music that may be borrowed and a record of who has that music. (5) In charge of collecting all music at the end of the year. (6) Makes sure that the parts to whatever piece we are about to pass out and the correct amount of copies are ready for distribution. HISTORIAN (1) Keeps an up-to-date scrapbook of all band events, including pictures, and other information. (2) Responsible for advertising band events, including pictures and others information. (3) Responsible for planning and assisting with the slide show. Collecting pictures and video tapes for awards banquet.

HARRISON HIGH SCHOOL ENSEMBLES AND BASIC REQUIREMENTS

SCHEDULE AND TIME COMMITMENT Our courses operate under the EVSC Co-Curricular Policy adopted by the Board of School Trustees. Students will be responsible for attending and participating in class each day, prepared and on-time. After-school rehearsals will be held two days each week during marching season, and once each week during concert season, and are a required part of the course. Sectionals will be held bi-weekly during concert season, and their schedule will be determined by the students and the teacher. Failure to attend either sectionals or rehearsals without a valid excuse will result in a lowering of the course grade. In addition, performances occur frequently throughout the year, with some counting as quiz-type grades, and others counting as test grades. Failure to attend a performance will result in a lowering of the grade in proportion to the type of grade being assigned to the performance. "The key to successful leadership today is influence, not authority.� - Kenneth Hartley Blanchard

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PERFORMANCE DRESS CODE Marching Band Dress: Band uniform worn in prescribed manner [see marching band uniform procedure], with show shirt under the jacket. Concert Dress: Tuxes for men, approved dress for women. Pep Band Dress: Jeans or khaki pants and sneakers, official pep-band shirt must be purchased through the Instrumental Music Boosters CONCERT BAND COURSE DESCRIPTION This band course is open to any student with at least one year of musical training or the equivalent to be determined by the teacher and is designed for the students to continue to develop fundamental techniques of tone, intonation, precision, balance, and phrasing, and is centered on frequent concerts, performances, and after-school rehearsals that allow students to gain confidence and experience in their own playing through performance. WIND ENSEMBLE COURSE DESCRIPTION This band course is open to any student with at least one year of musical training or the equivalent to be determined by the teacher who successfully completes the entrance audition held during the second semester. This course is the most advanced ensemble centered on frequent concerts, performances, and after school rehearsals that allow students to gain confidence in their playing through performance and is designed for the students to continue to develop fundamental techniques of tone, intonation, precision, balance, and phrasing. ORCHESTRA COURSE DESCRIPTION This course is open to any student with at least one year of string training or the equivalent to be determined by the teacher and is designed for the students to continue to develop fundamental techniques of tone, intonation, precision, balance, and phrasing, and is centered on frequent concerts, performances, and after-school rehearsals that allow students to gain confidence and experience in their own playing through performance.

"Leaders come in many forms, with many styles and diverse qualities. There are quiet leaders and leaders one can hear in the next county. Some find strength in eloquence, some in judgment, some in courage." - John W(illiam) Gardner

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MARCHING BAND PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS Any student enrolled in any of the band courses or flag corps course is automatically considered a member of the marching band. Marching band is considered a co-curricular activity that involves participation in a class during and after the regular school day. Both have a direct influence on the student's grade. There are many different levels of experience among the members of the marching band and students are to strive to perform at the best of their ability, showing a good effort and attitude. The following performance requirements/skills are to be demonstrated on a regular basis:  Regular attendance with minimal excused absences (no unexcused absences)  Sincere effort and attitude at rehearsals  Horn carriage, faces, mark time, and body carriage  Rhythmic foundation and timing  Marching style - forward/back marching, platform, "roll" feet, toes up, etc.  Flanks and horn slides  Music performance ATTENDANCE Attendance is essential for success. Attendance is taken in the fundamental block at the beginning of rehearsal at 3:15 PM. After school activities including homework, clubs, help/study sessions, appointments, transportation, etc. are to be completed such that the student is in formation and ready at 3:15 PM whenever possible. Students are expected to be responsible in notifying the director and staff if they expect to be late or absent. Plan to arrive well in advance of the beginning of rehearsal...don't try to squeak in at the last second. We have a limited amount of rehearsal time and it is essential that we make efficient use of the time we have. This can only happen when every band member is present and working to improve. The band member that misses rehearsal cannot improve, and the other band members around them have a less effective rehearsal due to the absence. We all depend on each other to "carry our fair share of the load" in order for us to achieve the level of proficiency for which this band has become noted. WEATHER Rehearsals are never canceled due to inclement weather. We will not usually rehearse outdoors in the rain, unless it is just drizzle or intermittent light rain. In the event of steady rain, we will rehearse indoors and go out at the first opportunity. Students should dress for the weather. Not having the proper attire is no reason for having a poor rehearsal. Students should wear comfortable shoes (preferably low-topped tennis shoes) and socks for rehearsals. This is important in that the style of marching step we use requires that the foot and ankle be permitted to move freely. Shorts are the appropriate attire for rehearsals – once the weather is too cool for shorts, you should wear something that gives freedom of movement in the lower body, like sweatpants. Constricting clothing, such as jeans, will limit your ability to function effectively in the visual part of the program.

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“FALLING-IN” When the Warrior Command "falls in" to march to or from any location, there is to be absolutely no talking. When we march in formation, we are observed by the public and by other bands, and our tradition of success demands that you exhibit the highest level of personal and ensemble discipline at all times. You are "performing" whenever you are in public, whether you are getting off the bus, marching to the stadium, or on break. Do not embarrass yourself and your friends by acting in an immature manner. HEALTH ISSUES It is critical that each member take personal responsibility for their own well-being in order to be successful in rehearsal and performance. Perhaps the most critical issue is hydration. If you wait until you are thirsty, you are probably already well on your way to a dehydration problem. Students should have had a minimum of 32 ounces of water before starting a rehearsal or performance day, and should drink adequately during the rehearsal or performance day at every opportunity, whether or not they feel thirsty at the time. Adequate water breaks will be taken. Please avoid soft drinks before and during rehearsal or performance days. Of almost equal importance is protection from the sun. All students should wear sunscreen, even on cloudy days, and reapply as needed. Students particularly susceptible to the sun should have light weight “cover-up” clothes to put on should they start to sunburn. Light colored clothes, sunglasses and a cap will make you more comfortable and able to be successful when the sun is strong. BAND CAMP Attendance at band camp is required for all high school band members wishing to be in the marching band. The show cannot be taught with individuals missing due to the complexity of marching drills currently being used on the field. Students that don't come to camp never learn the show to the degree of those that worked on the show and marching fundamentals at camp. Students missing band camp will be placed on an alternate status with the marching band.

ATTENDANCE

OVERVIEW The instrumental music program schedule is provided in full at the start of the school year to avoid conflicts. Regularly scheduled doctor, dentist, eye doctor, and orthodontist appointments should be scheduled to NOT conflict with performances and rehearsals. Requests for a prearranged absence from a rehearsal or performance MUST be submitted to the Teacher/Director in writing on the Excused-Absence Request Form available in the instrumental music office or online. This form is to be submitted at least seven days prior to a rehearsal or performance. Excused absences will be determined based on the EVSC Co-Curricular Policy. To be considered an excused absence, documentation is needed upon return for emergency doctor visits and

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absences for illness. Please contact the instrumental music office if there is going to be an absence from rehearsal or performance in the event of an emergency. Excused absences from rehearsals or performances will involve make up work as in any other academic class and will affect grades. Make-ups should be completed five school days after absence occurs to receive credit. Excessive excused absences may result in loss of performance privileges in all performance groups. Students who are absent from Thursday marching band practices are not to march the Friday and or Saturday performance(s) unless prior arrangements have been made at the Teacher/Director’s discretion. Unexcused absences will not be tolerated, and students are not allowed to make up unexcused absences. PERFORMANCE ATTENDANCE POLICY Any student who does not attend at least one, complete required rehearsal during the week leading up to a performance, or who has an absence for which no notice was given, will not be allowed to attend, nor perform during the performance(s) for the week in question. This includes riding the bus to the performance and participating in any way during the performance. A grade of "zero" will be entered for the performance, as well as for the missed rehearsals. This grade may not be appealed, nor may it be made up for credit. Students who arrive for a performance in violation of the policy will be asked to return home. EVSC CO-CURRICULAR POLICY This is EVSC School Board Policy. Co-Curricular activities usually occur outside the regular school hours or during the E.C.A. period on school time. They are the direct outgrowth of and, in part, an objective of a particular curricular offering. Enrollment in (or satisfactory completion of) a designated curricular offering is a prerequisite for participation in co-curricular activities and the activity is essentially a class project or an extension of curricular expectations. When the quality of class projects is dependent upon individual attitudes, responsibilities and classroom preparation, such factors are relevant to individual student evaluation. Co-curricular activities shall be scheduled well in advance of the rehearsal or performance. Students shall be provided a copy of the schedule of known activities at the beginning of the year or semester. Any additional activities will be shared with the students at the earliest possible date. Since rehearsals and performances are an extension of and vital to the regular school program, participation in all scheduled rehearsals and performances is required. Valid excuses for absence are: (1) An illness that would confine a student to his home (2) A death in the family (3) An Evansville school-sponsored activity which requires the students to participate in an event scheduled previously to the announcement of the rehearsal or performance (4) A religious holiday Valid excuses 1) illness, and 2) death in the family, will require a verifying written notice signed by member and guardian to be submitted upon return of the student. All other reasons for absence will be submitted at least seven days prior to the absence. The reason for absence will

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include date of absence, reason for absence, student signature, and parent/guardian signature, and will be submitted to the teacher. Absences for any reason other than those listed above will be reviewed by a designated student committee. Students may appeal a decision to the teacher and ultimately to the principal. ONLINE EXCUSED-ABSENCE REQUEST FORM While paper Excused-Absence Request Forms are always available in the Instrumental Music Rehearsal Room, the preferred method for receiving absence information is via the online version of this form. You can always access this form directly by visiting http://absence.harrisoninstrumentalmusic.org.

ATTITUDE Those who have a positive attitude, regardless of their individual skills, will always have a place in the Harrison Instrumental Music Program. Regardless of your ability, if your attitude is not positive, if you are not doing your personal best to make the group successful, you should not be a part of this program. Those who have pride in themselves will generally project a positive attitude. Characteristics of a positive attitude include a generally cheerful outlook toward rehearsals and performances, cooperation in the preparation and maintenance of equipment and facilities, and an eagerness to do what is necessary to be successful. In short, the ideal band member is someone who is always willing to give their best for the good of the organization. Performances, contests, festivals, and other adjudicated activities are important features of the Harrison Instrumental Music Program. Through these activities we obtain valuable feedback about our progress as individuals and as a program. Although we never "live or die" by any one judge's or any panel's opinion of our performance, it is important that we learn the value of giving maximum effort and standing by the results as our best possible effort that day. Competitive performances are packed with emotion. Because of the time, work and discipline required to produce award-winning performances, we develop great camaraderie within the program. We share hardship, discomfort, tedium ad nauseam, fatigue, oppressive heat, chilling cold, long bus rides, disappointment, tears, success and joy. Along with these emotions go high levels of tension, which often causes students to react immaturely. We learn to avoid these normal pitfalls and channel our energy and attention toward the goal of performance excellence and the ultimate success that will follow. All members of the Harrison Instrumental Music Program stand with silent pride as scores are announced and graciously accept the results, regardless of outcome. We show our appreciation and respect for those who have earned the right to score ahead of us and gracefully accept our own successes. Many of our competitors will not understand that we are able to congratulate those who are ahead of us and appreciate their performance. Those are the people that will not ever know the true reason for participating in competition, but will mistakenly equate winning with coming in first. We will come in first when we deserve to based on our performance. Until then, we know "winning" is the state of every individual having endured the hardships, taken the chance of competing, and done their personal best in the pursuit of excellence.

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The band's image is based on each individual. Our public reputation is based on our appearance, our actions, and our projection of pride and organization. It is the responsibility of each member to insure that we present the best possible image at all times.

ORGANIZATIONAL GUIDELINES (POLICIES AND PROCEDURES) The instrumental music program will be conducted in a way that encourages all students to achieve individual and group goals. Each member is important to the organization and should be willing to cooperate with others and improve through regular practice. He/she must have a sense of purpose toward a common goal and be willing to work hard to accomplish individual and ensemble goals. The program will be as good as YOU want it to be. BASIC EXPECTATIONS Some basic expectations include:  Be regular and prompt in attendance and account for all absences.  Be responsible for your actions at school and in the community.  Make a sincere effort to improve and contribute your best to the program.  Have proper respect for those in authority.  Follow classroom and rehearsal procedures, school regulations, and instructions.  Have a cooperative attitude towards others in the program and material presented.  Respect the Harrison Instrumental Music facility and equipment.  Observe the Instrumental Rehearsal Room Rules. REHEARSAL RESPONSIBILITIES The following responsibilities are established for students attending any rehearsal:  Prepare your part through outside practice.  Arrive on-time and set about getting ready immediately.  Warm-up properly.  Don't talk except to ask the person next to you, in a whisper, about the music.  Assume attention when the director or speaker is on the podium and/or addressing the group. Rehearsals are essential and your effort and attitude must be serious and focused.  Stay focused and give your best throughout the entire rehearsal.  At the end of rehearsal there will be closing comments and/or announcements after which the students will be dismissed. Students are not to put instruments away until after they have been dismissed.  Minor problems should not be addressed to the director on the podium so as to interrupt a rehearsal. Mechanical problems may be corrected by the Teacher/Director when available.  If you become sick, it is proper to get up and leave the room or rehearsal without obtaining permission.  When the baton stops, silence begins.

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REHEARSAL ROOM RULES We are blessed to have a terrific rehearsal facility, good quality, well-maintained equipment, and an outstanding custodian who takes great pride in keeping our facilities looking their best. The rehearsal room is primarily a place for work. The striving to make good music is enjoyable work nevertheless. When you enter the room your purpose for being there should be reflected in your behavior. Our ensembles function as school units, and in many ways we are like a big family. Each student should quickly and efficiently go about preparing to begin the planned activity on time. Any kind of horseplay, foolishness, or immature rowdy behavior is strictly out of place because it is contrary to our purpose, and will not be tolerated. In order to maintain our quality facilities, the following rules must be followed:  Food, drinks, candy, and gum are not allowed in the rehearsal room at any time.  Music stands are to be replaced on the racks at the conclusion of every rehearsal.  Trash is to be placed in the appropriate receptacles.  Instruments and equipment are to be stored in the proper storage area on the proper shelves.  Please don’t use the storage room as your personal locker. (ie: no books or clothes are to be kept in there.)  All music is to be stored in your assigned folio slot only. Do not store music in your instrument locker, or leave it elsewhere in the rehearsal room.  Play your instruments only or those that are issued to you.  School-owned instruments are to be inspected, kept clean, and in working order.  Any damage done to instruments is to be reported to the Teacher/Director immediately. Damage due to negligence will be assessed to that student.  Non-percussionist students are not to play on percussion instruments before or after rehearsal unless permission is given.  After every event, the room must be clean and everything must be put in its place before we leave for the field, or bus, or before we go home. THE BAND BLOCK AND THIRD QUARTER BREAK The following procedures and policies have been established to ensure that the preparation period before marching performances, time spent in the stands during performances, and teardown period following performances is smooth, organized and frustration free. It is expected that the Leadership Team assist in the enforcement of these policies.  Upon arriving at the performance venue, students are to remain quietly on their bus until given further instructions.  At home football games students will create a single file line on the sidewalk staying to the side farthest from the busses to allow pedestrians to pass.  When the Warrior Command "falls in" to march to or from any location, there is to be absolutely no talking. When we march in formation, we are observed by the public and by other bands, and our tradition of success demands that you exhibit the highest level of personal and ensemble discipline at all times. You are "performing" whenever you are in public, whether you are getting off the bus, marching to the stadium, or on break. Do not embarrass yourself and your friends by acting in an immature manner.  Upon arrival at the staging area students are to immediately set about assembling their instruments and dressing in their uniform if instructed to do so. As soon as the student

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is ready they are to proceed to the warm-up block, fall in, remain quiet, refrain from playing their instrument, and listen for instructions. During football games, students are expected to be in the band block and in their sections. The band block section of the stadium is only for band members, directors, instructors, and band parents. You must sit in the designated area and in your sections. When drum majors give the signal for horns up, students must be alert and watch the drum major for starts and stops. When dismissed from the stands you are to leave in an orderly fashion by row beginning with the front of the ensemble and proceeding to the rear. Remain standing and in your place until it is time for your row to depart. When you change out of the uniform it is your responsibility to hang the uniform correctly in the garment bag. Food, candy, and drinks are not allowed in the stands. Students are not allowed to “noodle” on instruments in the stands, staging area, or warm-up area unless specific instructions to do so are given.

Third quarter break is a privilege and not a right. Third quarter is the only time that members take a break, eat, and drink. Students should be in groups of two or more during third quarter break and return to their seats by the end of the third quarter. If you are late returning to the stands at a football game you will lose the privilege of leaving the stands during other games. Students are to remain in the uniform at all times and are not to be seen in public in an incomplete uniform. When you get off the bus you are to be in complete uniform or completely changed. TRANSPORTATION/BUS TRIP GUIDELINES To insure safety, students are expected to ride on the bus whenever provided. If a student must leave after a performance, the student must be released to the parents only. Such arrangements must be made in writing at least two days prior to the performance. This policy is for the student’s protection and provided to insure that students do not leave with unauthorized persons. The following policies are in effect for all bus trips:  No sudden yells or screams to distract bus drivers.  Listen to and follow directions given by chaperones and staff members.  When attendance is called, you must remain silent and attentive.  Students are not allowed to change buses during a trip unless assigned by directors or sponsors.  Use earphones when listening to music. Music is not to be played out loud for the whole bus.  Unruly students may be asked to sit in designated seats and may be changed to another bus if problems persist.  Follow bus rules given by the bus drivers.  Keep arms and hands inside bus and refrain from throwing anything out of the windows.  Students are to remain in seats when the bus is in motion.

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When arriving at destination, students are to remain quiet while drivers park the buses and until the director or a staff member dismisses the bus.

CONCERT PROTOCOL The following responsibilities are established for anyone attending a performance:  Arrive early and find a seat. If you may need to leave the performance hall for any reason during the performance, take a seat closest to the exit to minimize disruptions.  As the stage lights grow brighter, or the hall lights grow dimmer, talking should end except for emergencies or last minute instructions, which should not be louder than your softest whisper.  As the conductor enters the stage, it is tradition to applaud continuously until he/she has recognized the ensemble by having them stand, and turned to address them by standing at the side of the podium.  Once the conductor is on stage it is common courtesy to refrain from all talking, coughing, candy-wrapper crinkling, etc. Anything that may make any noise whatsoever and disrupt the performance should not occur.  Following a complete piece of music (a multi-movement piece only receives applause after the final movement) it is customary to show you appreciation, satisfaction, or to recognize the performers for the hard work by applauding. Typically, this applause continues until the conductor has left the stage, and in the case of an absolutely terrific performance, to continue clapping until he/she returns to the stage to recognize the performers again.  During the performance of a piece of music, entering the performance hall is strictly prohibited. Help us enforce this rule of common courtesy by not arguing with the ushers who will ask you not to enter. Similarly, except in absolute emergencies, refrain from leaving the hall except during the breaks between pieces.  In the event your young child becomes upset for any reason, please remove them immediately from the performance hall. The singularly most distracting thing to a performer on stage is a screaming, crying, or otherwise upset child.

SCHOOL-OWNED INSTRUMENT AND EQUIPMENT POLICY The EVSC maintains a collection of instruments for student use if purchase of an instrument is not possible. All students using a school instrument will be charged an $18 fee per semester for routine maintenance and repairs on that instrument. In addition, the student renting the instrument and their parents/guardians must sign a contract accepting responsibility for the instrument. While the instrument is in their custody , students/parents/guardians agree to the following:  The instrument must be properly taken care of, this includes regularly cleaning brass instruments and swabbing woodwinds. Students must always keep the instrument in its case when not in use.  To find a secure place to store the instrument during the school day.  To treat the instrument with the same respect with which they would treat the instrument if they owned it.

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The instrument must be checked back in at the conclusion of the semester in the same condition it was in at the start of the semester. Any damage or problems with instruments must be reported to the teacher immediately.

Students and parents/guardians are fully responsible for the instrument while it is signed out to the student, and the teacher upon signing the instrument out will stress proper care of the instrument. Parents/Guardians should reinforce these concepts with their child in order to prevent the costs associated with damage or neglect.

MUSIC AND MUSIC FOLDERS Each student will be assigned a music folder containing numbered music as well as other resource books. Students will be responsible for maintaining this folder and its contents in good condition, and for turning in a complete folder at the conclusion of each semester. Failure to turn in a folder containing all of its original contents may result in having a fee assessed equal to the cost of replacing any and all missing parts. PRIVATE LESSONS Private lessons are encouraged for all students enrolled in music courses, as they are the quickest, most efficient way of increasing one's musical ability. Beginning around the third week of school sign-ups for private lessons will be conducted in all music courses. Students are encouraged to take advantage of this facet of the program as it not only helps them become a better musician, but helps the music department grow and develop. CHAPERONE TRIP RESPONSIBILITIES The following rules and responsibilities have been established for chaperons who accompany students on trips:  All chaperones must be at least 21 years of age and have a completed criminal background check on file with the EVSC.  Chaperones follow the same rules as the students, no exceptions.  The Teacher/Director is the final authority while on the trip, problems should always be referred to him, don't try to handle situations by yourself.  Chaperones must present the proper, professional image to students, therefore, proper behavior must be maintained at all times.  Chaperones are responsible for the well being of the students while on the trip, make sure that you watch out for them and keep them safe. Always remain alert to danger and situations that the students should not be in.  Maintain a professional relationship with all students; you are like a teacher, not a parent. Touching is strongly cautioned against.  Chaperones are responsible for knowing, understanding, and following the schools policies on drugs and alcohol, sexual harassment, and conduct.  Make sure that you always follow any rules the Teacher/Director has established for the students, you serve as a role model, and if you don't follow the rules, they won't either.

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CHAIR PLACEMENT AND CHALLENGES At the beginning of each term, students enrolled in an instrumental music course are placed in an initial chair order based upon audition results. Following this initial placement, students then have the opportunity to improve on their chair placement through the challenge system. This system operates under the following guidelines:  Students may challenge up one chair at a time, only.  Students may only challenge within his or her own ensemble.  Students must wait at least 5 school days to re-challenge after losing a challenge.  Failure to appear at a challenge will result in the forfeiture of that challenge.  Challenges tainted by ill will or negative feelings will be canceled or forfeited at the director’s discretion.  All challenges must be concluded two weeks prior to any concert. PROCEDURES FOR SEAT PLACEMENT CHALLENGES: Making the challenge:  The person wishing to challenge must first notify the person that they wish to challenge of their intent to do so.  Once this challenge has been placed, both the challenger and the “challengee” must go to the director together. At this point the director will assign the music and schedule a date and time for the challenge On the day of the challenge:  The challenge itself will be “blind” in that the director listening to the challenge will not be able to see the players. To preserve the anonymity of the challenge neither student may talk when he or she is in the performance room.  Prior to playing the challenge, the students will determine who will play first (“#1”) and who will play second (“#2”).  When it is your turn to play you may enter the room and perform the music. Remember, you must not say anything while you are in the room!  The person who performs the music with the highest level of excellence will be declared the winner of the challenge and will then either assume or retain the higher chair.

MARCHING BAND UNIFORM RULES AND REGULATIONS You must wear your entire uniform to perform. Prior to each performance, the student leaders will perform a dress inspection. Neatness and correctness of appearance will be assessed. This will include band T-Shirt underneath the jacket, cleanliness of gloves, shoes, and instruments. Students that do not pass inspection must correct all violations in order to perform.  

All band members must remain in full uniform with jacket and shakos on unless told otherwise by a director or Drum Major. No jewelry is to be worn especially earrings. This applies to males and females. If earrings are not removed the student must either cover them with a Band-Aid or not perform.

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Hair that is long enough must be worn up inside the shako. This applies to both males and females. When loading the trailer and bus at all events each individual student is responsible for ensuring that all uniform parts are in the garment bag, and for placing their garment bag in their assigned slot on the trailer. At school, change into uniform in the restrooms only. Do not change in practice rooms or storage rooms. At performances the only space available for changing will be the bus and/or trailer. Plan accordingly. After each use the uniform must be hung neatly on the correct hanger, with creases aligned according to the demonstration made to all students prior to the first use of the uniforms each year.

AWARDS

LETTERS Letters are earned by students earning points in various categories. Payment of fees and participation in fundraisers are required for earning a letter in band, orchestra, or color guard. Students can then earn the minimum points necessary through varying musical activities such as auditioning for and participating in outside ensembles, participation in solo/ensemble contest, perfect attendance, and many other activities. Points are tallied annually on a tally sheet and accumulate from year to year. For specifics please request a letter point tally sheet from the instrumental music office. GENERAL AWARDS Each year the instrumental music program awards the following awards at its banquet held at the end of the year. Director’s Award This award is given annually to the student(s) who has/have shown the characteristics of dedication, respect, loyalty, and a commitment to excellence and high expectations. Most Improved This award is presented to the most improved students in each ensemble. Dedication Award This award is presented to the student(s) in each ensemble who have shown remarkable dedication to the instrumental music program. Spirit Award Awarded to the student(s) in each ensemble who have shown the greatest amount of spirit through a positive attitude, willingness to help others, and unfaltering ability to always lift our spirits and force us to look on the bright side of every situation.

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“Warrior” Award This award is chosen by the students and presented to the one band and one orchestra student who best exemplifies outstanding musical ability, commitment to the program, outside participation, and general character

MUSICIANSHIP AWARDS Starting in the 2009-2010 school year, one additional category of awards will be distributed. These are Musicianship Awards, and will be signified by a special pin to be worn on the letter [or elsewhere], and special recognition in performance programs. Only those achieving Student of Excellence level will be awarded the pin. STUDENT OF EXCELLENCE      

12 Major Scales – This student will know all twelve of the scales in more than one form [i.e. two octave up and down with arpeggio and thirds] 12 Minor Scales – This students will know the scales in all forms [natural, harmonic, and melodic] Private Lessons – This students will be taking regular weekly private lessons Chair – This student will occupy a top of the ensemble leading sectionals and assisting others Leadership – This student will tend to be a leader in all ensembles which they are a part. Solo Repertoire – This student will be performing advanced solo repertoire with piano and in small chamber ensembles. In addition, this student will participate in ISSMA State Solo/Ensemble Contest receiving a Gold rating. Outside Ensemble Membership – This student tends toward membership of outside ensembles such as EVSC Honors, EPYO, Summer and Harrison Musicals, All-State Ensembles, and others. School Academics – This student tends toward being at the top of their class academically. This student has a voracious appetite for knowledge of all kinds and loves academic challenge.

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVER    

12 Major Scales – This student will know at least 9 of the scales in more than one form [i.e. two octave up and down with arpeggio and thirds] 12 Minor Scales – This students will know at least 9 of the scales in all forms [natural, harmonic, and melodic] Private Lessons – This students will be taking regular weekly private lessons Chair – Although this student may occupy a mid chair of the ensemble, they are consistently driving toward the top by assisting the section leader for productive rehearsals and challenging for a top chair regularly. Leadership – This student will be developing leadership as they watch other leaders in the group and as coached by the teacher.

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Solo Repertoire – This student will be working on intermediate to advanced solo repertoire with piano and in small chamber ensembles. In addition, this student will participate in ISSMA District Solo/Ensemble Contest receiving a Gold rating in any division. Outside Ensemble Membership – This student tends to be actively auditioning to be a member of outside ensembles. School Academics – This student does well in other academic classes. Although there may be a subject area which the student is working on to raise a grade, generally grades are very good.

FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITIES

OVERVIEW Although every effort is made to make instrumental music as inexpensive as possible, many costs do arise throughout the year. Most of these fees will arise as a result of marching band for band students and trips for orchestra students. Families are expected to help underwrite these costs by paying their $275 band fee or $60 orchestra fee to the instrumental music boosters. Students will also be expected to help in fundraising activities designed to help supplement our annual budget. All money raised and paid goes directly towards each student’s educational experience. No student will be denied an opportunity to participate in music because of financial reasons. We recognize that there may be difficulty for some and we are always willing to work out a special payment schedule or other mutually agreeable arrangement with you if necessary. Please feel comfortable in contacting the instrumental music office or music booster treasurer to make payment arrangements, which will always be kept confidential. Until all fees are paid, no "extra" purchases may be made through the instrumental music program, i.e. videos or recordings made at performances, etc. Please, if there is any difficulty making payment, for any reason, contact the Music Office regarding a payment plan or another mutually beneficial option. BASIC BREAKDOWN OF FEES All students are assessed a fee paid to the Harrison Instrumental Music Boosters to cover expenses incurred on the student’s behalf throughout the course of the school year. For the 2005-2006 school year this fee stands at $275 for band students, and $60 for orchestra students. Below is a breakdown of expenditures per student based upon the figures budgeted by the booster organization. It is the intent of the Harrison Instrumental Music Program and Boosters that no student will be denied participation in the program because of an inability to meet the financial requirements of the program. A family who is unable to make the payments must address this to the Instrumental Music Teacher in writing. All such conversations/documents will be held in confidence. The Instrumental Music Teacher in conjunction with the booster Treasurer and

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President will make every effort to work with the family to restructure the payment and to arrange for participation in additional fund-raising activities in lieu of the payment.

SAMPLE BAND STUDENT BREAKDOWN For the budget year 2005-2006, the Harrison Instrumental Music Boosters are projecting to expend on each band student the amount of $428.37 on marching band related expenses alone. A basic, per student breakdown is as follows: $0.84 Camp Expense Gatorade, etc. $200.00 Instructors Additional staff hired in addition to the Instr. Music Teacher $50.00 Transportation Busses to and from football games and competitions $6.67 Contest Entry Fees Entry into ISSMA and other contests $30.00 Show Design Cost of music arranging, drill writing, and choreography $16.67 Equipment Maint. Maintenance of marching-related equipment and accessories $0.42 Medical Equipment Replacement of expended medical kit supplies – i.e. ice packs $5.00 Scissor Lift Delivery and recovery fee for scissor lift rental $0.67 Season End Celebration Our traditional balloon release season ending send-off $1.00 Senior Night Photos Cost of pictures provided to all senior families at no cost $4.17 Shoes and Gloves Replacement of worn-out gloves and shoes $8.75 Show Shirt Provided to all members and required at all performances $12.50 Trailer Upkeep Basic mechanical and safety upkeep $16.67 Trailer Insurance Required insurance on cargo and collision $25.00 Truck Rental Cab rental for towing the trailer to performances $16.67 Uniform Cleaning Periodic, professional, routine cleanings on all uniforms $33.34 Visual Expenses Color guard flags, uniforms, and other visual items $428.37

TOTAL

% covered by fee:

64%

SAMPLE ORCHESTRA STUDENT BREAKDOWN For the budget year 2005-2006, the Harrison Instrumental Music Boosters are projecting to expend on each orchestra student the amount of $87.14 on orchestra related expenses alone. A basic, per student breakdown is as follows:

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$28.57 Transportation $10.00 Contest Entry Fees $5.71 Equipment Purchase strings, mutes‌ $14.29 Music $28.57 String Specialist rendered

Busses to and from all off-site performances Entry into ISSMA and U of I contests/festivals Purchase of string related equipment such as

$87.14

% covered by fee:

TOTAL

Purchase of new music for use throughout the year Supplemental salary to cover additional services 69%

The above breakdowns do not include common expenses such as postage and office supplies as well as capital project contributions. You can easily see that the amount expended per child is in excess of the fee assessed in both cases. This demonstrates two important points: 1) It is of extreme important that all students pay their fee, and 2) It is of extreme importance that all students participate in fundraisers to help cover the amount expended on them not covered in the fee assessed.

PROCEDURE FOR MAKING PAYMENTS Students wishing to make any form of payment on their music account should complete a deposit envelope, insert their check/money, and seal the envelope. This should then be placed, completed, in the locked mailbox outside the instrumental music office. FUNDRAISERS Throughout the year the Instrumental Music Program will conduct several fundraisers aimed at raising funds both for normal program operation and for specific needs identified by the teachers and/or students. It is not required for students to participate in fundraising activities, although it is strongly encouraged.

GRADING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

OVERVIEW The grading policy of the Harrison High School Instrumental Music Department can best be summed up by the words high expectations and quality. The Harrison faculty and I expect a lot from our students; we also expect that the work our students do is quality work. As many of our music courses are performance based, rehearsals and performances outside of the normal class period must be a requirement as part of the academic grade. It is my expectation that students attend all scheduled outside rehearsals and performances. If the student cannot attend an excuse must be filed based upon the department rules for acceptable excuses found in the section entitled Attendance on page 13 of this notebook. I furthermore expect that students arrive on time, remain for the entire duration of the event, have all equipment necessary for active participation in the event, and behave in a proper manner. Having met all of these expectations a student will be assigned the total number of points to be awarded for the

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particular event. Failure to meet one or more of these expectations will result in a lowering of the student’s grade. Throughout the year students will be expected to do academic type work. This work will almost always be assigned at the onset of each grading period, and specific due dates will accompany the assignment. Work is to be completed in full by the due date if full points are to be awarded. Work will then be evaluated by the teacher for quality. Work that in any way does not meet the high standard of quality sought by the teacher will be returned to the student with specific suggestions for improvement. These improvements are to be made by the conclusion of the quarter, and if made within this time frame the assignment will be accepted for full credit. It is my belief as a music teacher that all students can do high quality work; for this reason I will not accept anything less from any student. Based upon the system outlined here, all students who work diligently can receive nothing but the highest grade. It is important to note that in a performance based course the performance counts as the penultimate test grade for any given performance cycle. The final performance demonstrates all of the skills developed and knowledge gained during the rehearsals that preceded it. Thus all cumulative performances such the Winter and Spring Concerts and ISSMA events work much the same as a final exam in any other course although individual performances may or may not be utilized in determining the final exam grade. Failure to attend a cumulative performance will result in the student receiving the letter grade F for a major test grade, thus bringing down their semester grade. Only the severest of excuses will be accepted for missing a final exam performance. Grades in instrumental music courses are calculated by first determining the total number of points available in any given grading period. This then becomes the total number of points students can earn. As the period moves forward the student keeps track of all points earned on their syllabus including points for rehearsals, performances, academic work, and anything additional they might do. The final grade is computed by dividing the total number of points earned by the total number of points possible. For example, if one were to add the total points possible for a quarter they may arrive at perhaps 500 points. If John Doe then earns 500 points he would divide 500 into 500 and come up with one, for a grade of 100%. If he were to earn less than 500 points he would divide the number earned by 500 coming up with a number of less than one. By taking the first two numbers after the decimal point John arrives at his grade. By using this system different assignments are weighted simply by assigning them a greater number of points than others. For instance, rehearsals are typically worth 25 points while performances are typically worth 100 points or more. All points for giving quarter are spelled out on the student’s syllabus, as is the formula for computing the student’s grade.

GRADE COMPONENTS DAILY PARTICIPATION The daily participation grade is arrived at by adding the total number of days the student was present in class during the quarter and multiplying that number by five. This then gives the student their daily participation points, which is then divided by the total number of possible

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daily participation points. This number is then the student’s daily participation grade. This grade accounts for 10% of the grading period grade. Students earn their daily participation points by:  Arriving on time for class  Being ready at the appropriate time  Having all necessary materials and equipment  Behaving in an appropriate manner  Remaining for the entire duration of the class period Failure to meet one or more of these requirements will result in a lowering of the daily participation grade for that day.

OUTSIDE PARTICIPATION The outside participation grade is arrived at in the manner described above by dividing the total outside participation points earned by the total number of participation points possible. These points are earned in much the same way as daily participation points, and account for 45% of the total quarter grade. These points are earned for attendance at after school rehearsals, sectionals, basketball and football games, major performances, and other outside activities which may be required. Again, these activities are weighted based upon importance by assigning more points to those activities which are deemed more important. Students determine their outside participation grade by dividing the total number of points earned by the total number of points possible.

ACADEMIC WORK This work may be a part of a Unit Study Composition or other work assigned by the teacher. This category also contains playing quizzes which will be given frequently throughout the school year. Again, the number of points assigned to each task is based upon the degree of difficulty of that task or of its importance as determined by the teacher. Students arrive at this grade by dividing the total number of points earned by the total number of points possible. This grade then accounts for the final 45% of their quarter grade. A reminder, points for a task are only counted once that task has been accepted as quality work. If a student has work returned for improvements this work must be returned to the teacher, with improvements, by the end of the quarter if the points are to count. SYLLABI Each grading period every student will receive a syllabus which will outline in full all the requirements for that quarter. The syllabus will be divided into daily participation points, outside participation points, and academic work. Under each heading all required work will be listed including a number of points possible for that assignment. When students report for after-school functions, it is their responsibility to sign-in in the master attendance binder when they arrive. This record will be the final accounting of who is present

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at any given function. Much like signing-in at work, those who do not record their presence will not be rewarded for their work that day – i.e. they will not receive their points for that activity. MAKE-UP ACTIVITIES Make-up activities can be done for any assignment for which a student has turned in a valid excuse based upon the acceptable excuse policy noted elsewhere in this notebook. Depending upon the work being made-up, the teacher will assign different make-up activities. These may range from individual practice after school to written papers and other activities. Students should request a specific make-up assignment at the time they are turning in their excuse. RUBRICS AND SELF-ASSESSMENT Throughout the course of the year students will be asked to complete rubrics and selfassessments as part of their grade. A rubric is a means of evaluating different criteria that are often difficult to assess. For instance, tone quality. In a rubric, students would earn points based upon how closely their tone quality matches the descriptions of tone quality given in the rubric. For instance, level three of the rubric might read "stuffy nasal tone quality." If the students tone quality could best be described as stuffy and nasal then they would receive three points. Typically, the higher the number the more desired the description. Self-assessments will be given throughout the year to give students a chance to think about their own work and their own potential. These assessments will count just as if they were done by the teacher and will be used for performance assessment as well as academic assessment.

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Evansville Harrison Instrumental Music Handbook  

Policies and procedures relating to student participation in the Harrison Instrumental Music Program.

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