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HOME Field Guide Spokane / Coeur d’Alene

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How to Grow a Green Lawn

PREMIERE ISSUE

Tips to grow a great lawn

Vinter Review:

Barili Cellars Goes Double Barrel

Cooking: Better than

Restaurant Alfredo Sauce

Planting Tips From Northwest Seed and Pet

homefieldguide.com / MAY/JUNE 2011


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CONTENTS MAY/JUNE 2011 F E AT U R E

SPOKANE IS GETTING FRESH.

4 Grow Your Best Lawn Garden 6 Home Field Guide’s Planting Guide 7 Earth Box

The vibrant, bustling Spokane Public Market is opening soon. So get ready to come face-toface with locally-sourced food you’ll love, and the people who grow it. Our vendors are selected for their ability to provide fresh, nutritious, unique and innovative items, including:

Home Imporvement 8 Time to go Tankless

Locally Made 10 Man Pans

Cooking

➸ Meat and poultry ➸ Seafood ➸ Produce ➸ Flowers ➸ Desserts and baked goods ➸ Fine wine ➸ Art ➸ And more

11 Better than Restaurant Alfredo Sauce

Vintner Review 12 Barili Cellars

There is more... online! Make sure to visit us online at homefieldguide.com for more great articles and resources to make your home the best it can be.

OPEN ING SOON

Downtown at 32 W. 2nd Avenue (between Division & Browne) homefieldguide.com - MAY/JUNE 2011 - 1


From the Publisher:

HOME Field Guide Spokane / Coeur d’Alene

You Don’t Have to Move to Have a Better Home

May/June 2011 - Vol. 1 - Issue 1

Editor and Publisher Mike Allen mike@homefieldguide.com Design Coeur Creative Group, LLC Shawn Kellner shawnk@coeurcreative.com www.coeurcreative.com Sales Mike Allen mike@homefieldguide.com

HOME Field Guide Thanks for checking out the first edition of the Home Field Guide. Like a lot of people, I grew up in a world of consumerism and a lot of the home skills our grandparents had such as gardening, canning, do it yourself projects and cooking are largely being lost. The objective is to provide readers with information, ideas and resources to get the most out of their home life.

The Home Field Guide will always try to use local and regional business as resources whenever possible. In the Spokane/CDA area, small businesses make up such a large portion of our economy it’s important to support them whenever possible.   I love the modern technology that makes home life and home entertainment better. A blend of old and new makes for a great home life experience. Our first edition focuses on the Yard and Garden. Hopefully by the time you read this our cold spring will be over and the information contained in this issue will help you have a great outdoor season. I’m always looking for new ideas or insights to share. Please feel free to email me mike@homefieldguide.com. Thanks,

Michael Allen

2 - Home Field Guide - Spokane/Coeur d’Alene

Copyright 2011 Spokane/CDA Home Field Guide All rights reserved. Product information is obtained from interviews, from manufactures data and/or their representatives. All information is deemed to be accurate at press time. Published monthly Spokane/CDA Home Field Guide PO Box 8273 Spokane, WA 99203 Phone (509) 280 2516 The Spokane/CDA Home Field Guide an independently owned and operated business of Madkat Marketing.

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Senior Grads Class of 2012 By Appointment Only 509.294.4078 Spokane/Cd’A 208.443.4088 Priest Lake

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5/17/11 2011 6:04:27 PM homefieldguide.com - MAY/JUNE - 3


F E AT U R E

Grow Your Best Lawn Get It Some Air Aeration—Also known as ‘punching’ your lawn removes small cores from the grass/soil. Aeration should be done in early spring or late fall. This is a key factor to your lawn’s success. It relieves compaction, promotes air exchange and allows for better water penetration. Power Rake—Thatching or power raking should be used when you have significant matting of your grass. Otherwise stick to aeration. Thatching might expose soil to weeds and other disease. When to Fertilize Here in the Northwest we live in what is considered a cold season for grass growing. Generally that means we have hot summers and very cold winters. Cold season grasses tend to do best during spring and fall and struggle during summer and in fact can go dormant. To maximize your lawn’s potential, try the following fertilizing schedule: February through March—Yes it is still very rainy and can snow during this time, but the first application of the season helps put nutrients into the soil April through May—By mid May your grass should be starting to really emerge. Now is the time for an application of fertilizer and weed control. July and August—Depending on our summer, many lawns go dormant during this time, but it is still a good idea to apply a weed and pest control. September—Your third application of the year is focused on feeding the yard as it goes into yet another growth stage.

Late October through Early November—The last application of the year focuses on getting your lawn ready for winter. What do the Fertilizer numbers mean? When you look at a fertilizer bag you will see a series of three numbers below the logo or label. They represent the fol-

lowing elements in the following order: Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium. Nitrogen is the most important ingredient in the bag for your lawn. It prompts your grass to grow and to thicken and thwart weeds. It also gives your lawn that green color we love so much. Phosphorus is added to aid in strong root growth and to establish the lawn. It should be noted that in the spring of 2011 the Washington State Legislature passed a law banning the use of phosphorus in lawn fertilizer in established lawns. This will be effective beginning 2013, but

Fertilizer Chart Jan

Feb Mar Fertilize 15-15-10

Apr May Fertilize & Weed Control 16-5-3

4 - Home Field Guide - Spokane/Coeur d’Alene

Jun

July Aug Weed & Pest Control (if needed)

it appears that if you are starting a lawn or have a damaged lawn you will still be able to use a fertilizer with phosphorus for a period of time. Potassium is used to promote your lawn’s ability to fight disease, drought and cold weather. The Spreaders Broadcast Spreaders are probably the best. These are the walk behind models that send fertilizer pellets out in a random pattern out in front of the unit. It should be noted that you want to be careful not to get pellets in flower beds or on concrete. The Drop Spreader is a similar walkbehind model, but instead drops the fertilizer pellets straight down. The issue with drop spreaders is that they have a tendency to leave streaks if the drop slot gets plugged or drops too many in one area. Hand-Held Broadcast Spreaders probably make sense for most of the homes in our area. It sends a random pattern of fertilizer pellets out in front of the unit and requires little to no storage space. On a side note, these units are also good for spreading de-icer in winter and can be used to overseed your lawn. The Seeds Kentucky Blue Grass is probably the winner in our area. It’s fine texture and ability to grow quickly makes it a good choice. Varieties include Adelphi, Award, Baron, Midnight, NU Destiny and Touchdown.

Sept Fertilize

Oct Nov Fertilize

28-8-15

15-5-20

Dec


Fine-leaf Fescue is probably the best for shady zones in your lawn. It’s drought resistant and does well in shade, but is not meant for high traffic areas. Overseeding Your Lawn After about five years, grass plants start to slow down their growth rates and thin spots are the result. By overseeding you keep your grass thick and weed and disease resistant. The best time to overseed is in the spring and fall. Watering In general, deep and infrequent watering supports a healthy root system. It is recommended that you apply one inch of water per week and the best time to do it is from 5am to 10am. Again, that is a rule of thumb. You might need more or less water depending upon soil drainage and weather. If you start to see moss or fungus you’re overwatering. When to Mow The best time to mow is when you have a cold beer in the fridge. As far as length, the grass should be over four inches and for the grasses that do well in our area, Kentucky Blue Grass and Fescue, should be cut to a height of 3 to 3.5 inches. Other Ways to Have a Great Lawn If this seems like a lot of work, there are other options. In doing my research for this article I also talked to Doug Warner of Senske Lawn and Tree Care who offer full-service applications and a great product line, including organic options to keep your yard green and lush. I also talked to Scott Williams of Perfect Gardeners who offer similar products but ship your fertilizer to your door at the time you need to apply it.

Spokane’s Local Garden Store Supplying Spokane Gardeners With Quality Products Since 1944 2422 E. Sprague Ave. 534-069

7302 N. Division St. 484-7387

Count on De Leon Foods for authentic Mexican grocery items and food made from our traditional family recipes. With a full-service deli, bakery, and tortilla factory, we have every Mexican food you’ll need for the perfect meal. Visit Us: www.deleonfoods.net 102 East Francis, Spokane, Washington 99208 | 509-483-3033 homefieldguide.com - MAY/JUNE 2011 - 5 deLeon-_333-ad-aprMay-2011.indd 1

5/17/11 6:19:22 PM


HOME

Field Guide’s

Planting Guide

T

ake the mystery out of when to plant your garden. Tear out this guide and know when to plant your favorite garden plants. For more gardening tips, visit our web site www.homefieldguide.com or stop by Northwest Seed & Pet.

When to plant

Ready to use

Yld Per 100 ft.*

Asparagus

March-April

2nd Spring

400+ Spears

Beans, Bush

May and June

50-70 days

80 lbs.

Beans, Pole

May and June

70-90 days

150 lbs.

Beans, Lima

May and June

90-130 days

12 lbs.

Beets, Table

March - July

45-60 days

100 lbs.

Broccoli*

March and August

70-120 days

75 lbs.

Brussel Sprouts*

April - June

90-120 days

60 lbs.

Cabbage, Early*

February - April

90-110 days

60 heads

Cabbage, Late*

May and June

110-120 days

60 heads

Carrots

March - July

65-90 days

100 lbs.

Cauliflower*

March - June

60-80 days

60 heads

Celery*

April - July

120-150 days

100 heads

Chicory(Radicchio)

March - May, Sept.

90-120 days

75 heads

Corn, Sweet

May - June

60-100 days

96 ears

Corn, Popcorn

May - June

85-105 days

10-15 lbs.

Cress

March - May, Sept.

45-60 days

35 lbs.

Cucumber

May - July

50-75 days

120 lbs.

Egg Plant

May - June

80-100 days

50 lbs.

Endive

May and June

90-100 days

60 lbs.

Herbs, Annual

March and April

125-150 days

varies

Herbs, Perennial

April - June

Next Season

varies

Kale

March - April, Aug.

55-60 days

75 lbs.

Kohl rabi

March - May

50-70 days

50 lbs.

Leek

May - June

120-150 days

150 stalks

Lettuce, Leaf

March-September

40-70 days

50 lbs.

Lettuce, Head

March - August

70-90 days

75 heads

Muskmelon*

May-June

90-150 days

50-100 lbs.

Watermelon*

May and June

85-120 days

50-100 lbs.

Mustard

March - May, Sept.

40-70 days

100 lbs.

Okra*

April - May

50-70 days

300+ pods

Onion, Seed

April - May

90-120 days

100 lbs.

Onion, Sets

April - May

50-70 days

100 lbs.

Parsley

March - May, Sept.

65-90 days

30 lbs.

Parsnip

April - June

95-110 days

75 lbs.

Peas. Bush (Dwarf)

March - June, Sept.

60-75 days

20 lbs.

Peas, Tall (Pole)

March - June, Sept.

70-90 days

30 lbs.

Pepper

May - June

75-85 days

50 lbs.

Potatoes, Irish

March - June

90-150 days

150-175 lbs.

Pumpkin

May - June

90-120 days

300 lbs.

Radish

March, September

20-75 days

200+ roots

Rhubarb

March - June

3rd Year

150 lbs.

Rutabaga

May and June

90-120 days

150 lbs.

Salsify

March - May

120-150 days

100 lbs.

Spinach

March - May, Sept.

45-60 days

40 lbs.

Squash, Bush Summer May - June

55-70 days

200 lbs.

Squash, Winter

May - July

90-125 days

200 lbs.

Swiss Chard

March - July

45-60 days

40 lbs.

Tomato

May - June

70-100 days

150 lbs.

Turnip

March - August

45-90 days

40 lbs.

Planting Information provided by Northwest Seed & Pet. 6 - Home Field Guide - Spokane/Coeur d’Alene


GARDEN

Earth Box Price Range: $45 to $65 depending on whether you buy fertilizer. Hint: Buy the fertilizer. Rating:

Can be a little cumbersome to set up the first time.

Where to find in Spokane/CDA: Northwest Seed and Pet on Division and on Sprague or Amazon online.

If you plant tomatoes, make sure you get supporting latus. Trust us, you’ll need it.

I

ran across the Earth Box last year while at Northwest Seed and Pet on East Sprague. I was intrigued by the system, but I wasn’t to sure about purchasing one because of the price. In the store they were growing tomatoes like crazy in an Earth Box. It was early May! I was impressed. After talking with Bob Mauk the owner I was persuaded to try them and actually bought two. It turned out to be a great investment.

My wife and I have tried to grow toms a number of times in our backyard to varying levels of success. Mainly, not much success. Last year we planted Beefsteak and Roma toms in one box and basil and jalapenos in the other. We were pleased. The toms were fantastic and produced some of the best beefsteaks I’ve ever had. The real surprise was the basil and jalapenos. At harvest we were able to make enough pesto to get through winter, in fact we just finished it

last weekend, and the stalk on the jalapeno plant was thick and healthy. It was a good producer too. I recommend the Earth Box to those who want to garden, yet are impeded by space, low light levels in yard or deck, are not diligent waterers or lack a green thumb.

homefieldguide.com - MAY/JUNE 2011 - 7


HOME IMPROVEMENT

Time to go Tankless? A

ny of us who have lived in older homes or have simply lived in our current home long enough have had the experience of a failed hot water tank.  Wet, heavy and messy are the words that describe the clean up. In recent years tankless hot water systems have come down in price and increased their reliability.   So how does it work?  Where your traditional water tank heats and keeps a supply of hot water available at any time whether you need it or not, the tankless system heats only what you need when you need it.  Most new shower heads are rated at 2.5 gallons of water per minute. With most tankless systems rated at 4 gallons per minute, you can take a shower all day and never run out of hot water. Tankless water heaters use high power burners to quickly heat water as it runs through the heat exchanger.  Recent studies have shown that these types of systems are between 22% and 30% more efficient than the traditional tank system. Another big difference is the space that it takes up.  Rather than taking up a quarter of a room for the tank and vent, the tankless mounts to your wall freeing up more storage space in the basement. So what are the drawbacks? Price- On average, tankless systems are still more expensive than the traditional tank ($2,000 v. $800). Retro Fitting- Be aware that these systems require a bigger gas feed into the house and may require some remodeling. Jet Tubs or Soaker Tubs- On average a jetted tub fills at 15 to 20 gallons per minute. Most tankless systems produce at 4 to 8 gallons per minute. Thus, your tub may never get warm. Build up- Regardless of the mineral content of your water, you should plan on annual maintenance. Make sure you pay a few extra dollars for the bypass. 8 - Home Field Guide - Spokane/Coeur d’Alene

If you’re interested in going tankless make sure you check with Avista for any rebates that might be available to you. http://www.avistautilities.com/savings/rebates/Pages/WashingtonandIdahoCustomerRebates.aspx


homefieldguide.com - MAY/JUNE 2011 - 9


LOCALLY MADE

Man Pans Facts: Made in Spokane, WA Characteristics: Lightweight, good release qualities, uses less energy to cook with. Recommend for: Everyone who like to cook, but especially for people who like to cook and need a pan that is manageable to lift and maneuver.

C

ooking at home has come a long way since I was a kid. The variety of foods made at home, at least in my home, was limited to casseroles, hamburgers, soups, spaghetti and meatloaf. Then repeat. The cookware was just as limiting. Iron Skillet, Check, Pot, Check. Cookware complete. Today we’re evolving into a “foodie” culture that appreciates good meals at home and is willing to take the time to learn how to make them and purchase the equipment needed to do it right. Introducing Man Pans, a local manufacturer that is helping deliver our community and the world a quality eco friendly cookware set. Man Pans is a performance cookware set unlike anything else on the market currently. It’s lightweight, uses less energy to cook, is produced in the USA and has good release quality without using Teflon. I took the Man Pan for a test drive on a New York Steak on a recent Saturday night. First lesson, it really takes less heat. Traditional pans I’ve cooked with have thick bottom plates that take longer to heat up. The thicker bottom is supposed to allow you to cook more evenly. With the Man Pan I found it evenly seared and very fast! I needed to turn down the burner temperature to about half of normal. I quickly seared the other side then put the pan and steak in the oven to finish.

This night I made a mushroom red wine sauce to go with the steak. I popped out the pan, put the streak aside to rest and went to work scraping the brown bits off the bottom of the pan for the sauce. The metal spatula was able to remove the bits very easily and left no scratches or abrasions. All and all it was a great cooking experience. The Man Pan has been in our home for a month now and has become the most used pan. Its ability to clean easy, cook well and lift freely has been very attractive to our family, especially our youngest daughter who announced “I love this pan!”

10 - Home Field Guide - Spokane/Coeur d’Alene

Visit homefieldguide.com to learn more about and how to get a man pan.


COOKING

Better than Restaurant Alfredo Sauce A

t HFG, we are always seeking out recipes that make cooking at home fun and delicious. This is one of those recipes. Make it for your family or special someone this weekend. They will think you’re a true Chef! Seriously, it is easy and just as good as you will find in your favorite italian restaurant. Toss in some shrimp or grilled chicken if you want and don’t forget the Pinot Grigio or other favorite white wine. Special thanks to Erin Marie and allrecipies.com. If you have a great recipe you’d like us to try, send it to us at mike@homefieldguide.com. If you try this one, let us know what you think.

Ingredients: 1 pound dry fettuccini pasta 2/3 cup butter 1 cup heavy cream salt and pepper to taste 1    dash garlic salt 1/2 cup grated Romano cheese 1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Directions: 1. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add fettuccini and cook for 8 to 10 minutes or until al dente; drain. 2. In a large saucepan, melt butter into cream over low heat. Add salt, pepper and garlic salt. Stir in cheese over medium heat until melted; this will thicken the sauce. 3. Add pasta to sauce. Use enough of the pasta so that all of the sauce is used and the pasta is thoroughly coated. Serve immediately Be sure to frequently stir to prevent burning the sauce.

homefieldguide.com - MAY/JUNE 2011 - 11


Vintner Review

Barili Cellars Current varietals include: Viognier Chardonnay Double Barrel Red (red blend of 60% Syrah and 40% Cabernet Sauvignon) Cabernet Sauvignon

B

arili Cellars is a Spokane-based boutique winery located at 608 W. Second Ave. in the Davenport Arts District owned by Steve & Dana Trabun and Russ & Marlene Feist. They like to say that Barili is a hobby gone wild. They met through a mutual interest—home winemaking. By 2004, they were making wine together, sharing ideas and watching the wine volumes grow. Finally, They decided to take a leap of faith and open a commercial winery. They received a great opportunity to locate in a building owned by Steve Salvatori and known as the Spokane Entrepreneurial Center that included many small startups. The Barili tasting room opened for business in April 2009 with three wines: a Viognier, a Chardonnay, and a red blend—the Double Barrel Red. They sold out of the 150 cases of our initial vintages by the Fourth of July that year. Today, we’ve increased our production to about 450 cases. Barili is open for the First Friday art walk every month and for special wine tasting weekends— Spring Barrel Tasting, the Holiday Wine Fest and ValenWine.

Wine Maker’s Notes We produce wine that we like to drink. We prefer to showcase the fruit in every bottle. We carefully select the vineyards and the grapes that go into our wine and carefully determine when it’s time to harvest. We look for that perfect balance of sweetness and acidity in the grapes to get the characteristics we’re looking for. Then, we baby that wine until it’s time to bottle and share. It’s a labor-intensive process, but we think our customers taste the care we put into our wines.

12 - Home Field Guide - Spokane/Coeur d’Alene

Featured Wine The Featured Wine is the 2009 Double Barrel Red, a yummy blend of 60% Syrah and 40% Cabernet Sauvignon from the Red Mountain AVA. This wine is back by popular demand. Perhaps you’ll notice the beautiful ruby velvet color first. Then, it just gets better. The sense hints of dark cherry, black currant, and a bit of toffee, finishing with those soft tannins. And at $18 a bottle, it’s a good deal!


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Spokane/Coeur d' Alene Home Field Guide