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M A D I S O N M S AA B DA TI ES LOL N I

S A B A T PORTFOLIO E L L I DESIGN RESEARCH


M A D I S O N S A B A T E L L I M A RESEARCH D I SPORTFOLIO O N DESIGN S A B A T TABLE E L LOFI CONTENTS DESIGN RESEARCH PORTFOLIO BACKGROUND Introduction Writing to Design 1. DEFINING THE LANDSCAPE Thesis Spaces as Sponsors 2. IDENITFYING CONNECTIONS Graduate Explorations in LocativeWork Media 3. OBSERVING WRITING IN USE Sketchbook Ethnography Professional Work 4. TESTING WRITING METHODS Material Palette Haikus 5. DESIGNING WITH OTHERS Codesign Community in Restrooms


My name is Madison Sabatelli

INTRODUCTION

I received my BFA in Interior Design from Miami University in 2015 and gained significant professional experience in interior design practice while working at Elevar Design Group in Cincinnati, Ohio. Working as a designer provided me with experience designing commercial, educational, medical, and institutional projects. Collaborating in multidisciplinary teams of varying sizes, I was exposed to a wide range of design practices, methodologies, and identities. My accredited education and professional practice experience qualified me to complete the NCIDQ examination in 2018. My certification number is 33645. I am currently an MFA Candidate in the Design Department at The Ohio State University, with a focus on design research and development. I expect to complete my courses in Summer, 2020. My graduate studies have served as an extension of the foundation I have built in the field of interior design to reflect my interests in incorporating a range of multimodal skills used for spatial thinking, including sketches, models, and words. Specifically, my MFA thesis employs an ethnographic approach to explore ways in which writing can be used in the design process and aims to provide insight on alternative methods for meaning-making that extends beyond preliminary images. In this way, using my own experiences as a student and my practical knowledge of design, I have demonstrated and expanded my continued interest in pedagogical approaches within the field.


My design practice and pedagogical research has been implemented through 30 hours of teaching-related duties each week while a graduate student. Within OSU’s Department of Design, I work as a Graduate Teaching Assistant for foundational design courses. As a GTA, I assist in preparing course materials, meet with students to discuss their design ideas, and evaluate student work. Additionally, I work as a consultant at the university’s Writing Center. In this position I meet one-on-one with students to assist in improving their writing skills while also leading workshops and informational lectures. In both of these roles, I aim to empower students to communicate their ideas effectively - whether it be through words or visuals. Because these students represent a range of nationalities, cultures, skills, and disciplinary backgrounds, I listen to each individual I work with carefully to truly understand how to best assist in their learning.


THESIS

This ethnographic study serves to investigate how design students utilize writing alongside drawing to effectively communicate design concepts. This study will include classroom observations, informal and formal interviews (with recording), and accumulation of students’ process work (notes, sketches, models, and their forms of documentation used to inform a final design). Data will be gathered from sections of underclassmen and upperclassmen interdisciplinary courses offered at the Department of Design at The Ohio State University, which includes majors in Industrial Design, Interior Design, and Visual Communication Design. Examples from a range of students in the beginning of their design education to those nearing its completion serve to create a comprehensive corpus referencing the many ways in which writing is used to conceptualize design concepts. Furthermore, the interdisciplinary nature of these courses aims to position this study to look at how writing is used across disciplinary lines. This research will explore the following questions: What is the nature of writing within the discipline of design? How do design students use writing in their process work to communicate design concepts? Do different types of writing facilitate different design activities? Do underclassmen and upperclassmen design students employ different writing practices? Does the writing of design students evolve or change as they progress from their first to fourth years?


GRADUATE WORK


SKETCHBOOK ETHNOGRAPHY Sketchbook Typologies Content included: included: Content Class notesa short survey was disseminated - Class notes For this project, Questions - Questions amongst graduate students to understand current Ideas/concepts written -- Ideas/concepts feelings about writing.-- written This served to inform an - Ideas/concepts Ideas/concepts -- sketches sketches ethnography of the participants’ sketchbooks and Lists -- Lists documentation of the design process to understand Diagrams -- Diagrams

The “Mapper” The “Mapper” ---

Heavy on on diagramming diagramming Heavy (note that that “class “class notes” notes” (note were all all Liz’s Liz’s diagrams) diagrams) were Ideas expressed expressed as as space space Ideas on the page on the page

how writing is already being used. Writing styles were coded, catalogued, and typogriphied.

SKETCHBOOK ETHNOGRAPHY

Sketchbook Typologies Content included: - Class notes - Questions - Ideas/concepts - written - Ideas/concepts - sketches - Lists - Diagrams

TheThe “Question The Master” “Question Master” “Mapper” “Mapper” Content driven by by questions questions -- The Content driven --

Did not not seem seem to to have have direct direct Did - Heavy diagramming class notes,on but rather class notes, but rather (note that “class notes” follow-up thoughts follow-up thoughts were all Liz’s diagrams) - Ideas expressed as space on the page

The “QuestionThe Master” “Question Master” -

Content driven by questions Did not seem to have direct class notes, but rather follow-up thoughts


The “Jot”

The “Jot” -

The “List-Maker”

Brief bits of information organized by “-” Well-versed in all content areas Utilizes sketchbook to make sense of something

The “List-Maker” -

Mostly organized notes as lists separated by horizontal lines Sees ideas as tasks

The above typologies represent a range of personified writing styles based on the types of writing content utilized as well as the general organization and direction of the books. Along with the survey each student answered, this study positions writing as an important step in designing visual works. While most designers demonstrate more confidence with drawing, the untamed nature of the sketchbook may be a good place to start when encouraging writing practies for those who consider themselves to be more adept in visual communication


responses the it was important to ensure anonymity. In In to our pursuit of same anonymity forquestion our participants, weas the boxes: “ writing utensil, restroom and space, sticky notes. They submitted their fact, “as privacy is essential in the dimension of public equipped each restroom in our study with the use of a identity andnotes self-presentation” it would be essential to box. closed cardboard slot (for(large submitting andUS responses on sticky into[1],the provided Thesebox with a in community fostered university) preserve anonymity if we were to entice any of the restroom containing responses) the prompt (“How is community visitors to share responses to the probe. 
 (large US university) public restrooms?”) a boxes were placed in theirpublic restrooms on fostered the inlarge restrooms?” hung outside sem writing Four utensil, and posters sticky notes. Theywere submitted their COMMUNITY university campus March 2019, which manifested includedresponses (H. Hall) This in sensitivity and striving for playfulness on sticky notes into the provided box. These restrooms in were (P.placed Hall). utensils were provid clearly in our recruitment efforts, as seen below in the boxes in publicWriting restrooms on the large RESTROOMS and semi-publicIN restrooms distributed flyer (Figurein 1). (P. Hall), an underclassmen university campus in March 2019, which included (H. Hall) andfor semi-public in (P. Hall), an underclassmen the posters therestrooms participants’ responses. residence hall. In both buildings, submission boxes (Figure residence hall. In both buildings, submission boxes (Figure Anonymous submssions were collected in private poling Hall Boxes - results 2) wereHayes left in a men and women’s restroom on two 2) were left a men and women’s restroom on two boxes placed in men’sin and women’s restrooms in Hayes Hall separate floors. Boxes in (H. Hall) remained in restrooms A participant-led, research-based approach was utilized for a group project, submissions were collected in private for Anonymous over a week’s length, while boxes in (P. Hall) weresubmission boxes and via (Design Department). which involved invitingBoxes restroom users informHall) the concept and qualities ofin removed graffitifrom walls restrooms in within an academic building and a residence hall on separate floors. in to(H. remained restrooms the at public restrooms a few days. community in shared restroom. statingattempted this question OSU’s campus. Responses were categorized into themes shown in the table gathering responses, ourByteam to rather ambiguously in for After over a week’s length, while boxes in (P. Hall) were both a private and shared answer format, we were better able to gauge the and graphs to the right. categorize the responses. The themes that emerged “temperature” of this and understand several key themes around community, provided anunderstanding the population’s approach to within a few days. removed theif community public restrooms Figure 1. Focus Group Flyer including from safety, aesthetics, social behaviors, accessibility, and sexuality. answering the question, exists (positively or Rodden, et al. [3]. Due to the sensitive nature of the

negatively), and other aspects of bathroom culture we were The location of our probes included several public interested in learning about, including safety, restrooms on a large USaesthetics, university. It was decided that an and sexuality. appropriate question should communicate the definition of space in relation to the campus community since public The key categories presented to the right largely tended to restrooms represent a “bubble universe” running parallel to be those related to “not community” andthe “explicit content. ” the reality of university campus at large, [6]. We decided on the question to pose for participants to answer: “How is community fostered in (large US university) In addition to the polling boxes, public walls” were restrooms?” This“graffiti question holds a clear presupposition that restrooms do indeedinfoster community. We anticipated that hung near men’s and women’s bathrooms Paterson Hall this chosen phrasingmode we could (undergraduate dorm) towith provide a comparative and prompt strong reactions location of gathering responses. The themes that emerged from this postulation tended to be more community oriented in the way that they were driven by the shared space of a group of users who lived relatively close to one another

Survey/Comment Submission Boxes

Figure 2. Comment box in residence hall.

Paterson Hall Graffiti Wall - results Cleanliness

Courtesy

Shower water

Slights off

Hair

Keep tighty

Pee on seats Food in sink Shower curtain clean Menstrual Blood

Figure 2. Comment box in residence hall.

Vomit

Turn off shower

Mock the question (Meme drawn) Question expected outcome

Bonding over bathroom functionality

Comments on others

Complain about cleanliness/floodin g/authority

Funny

Sarcastic

Non-malicious

Share knowledge about what is broken/flooded Bond over noise complaint

Figure 3. Graffiti wall in residence hall. “HOW IS COMMUNITY FOSTERED IN OSU’S PUBLIC RESTROOMS?” These graffiti walls encouraged an interaction of co that could build on each other and respond to eac


Focus Group - results Focus Group - results ●

Researchers 7 theme categories: ○

Environmental Qualities/Comments

○ Social Behaviors/Norms Researchers 7 theme categories: ○ Suggestions ○ Community Environmental Qualities/Comments

Focus group 7 theme categories: ○

Improvements

No Homo Focus group 7 theme categories: ○ BM ○ Improvements ○

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

Explicit Content Social Behaviors/Norms Graffiti Community Suggestions Not Community Explicit Content Other Graffiti

Not Community

Exchanges No Homo Rando BM Germs Exchanges A category between BM & Rando Exchanges Germs

Other

A category between BM &

○ ○ ○ ○ ○ ○

Exchanges

Following the ocus group convened to categorize and provide participants’ interpretation of the comments received in order to follow our participant-led approach. some of theconvened categoriestofrom the focus group differed from the Following While the ocus group categorize and provide participants’ ones our teamof had invented, many weretosimilar contained interpretation theoriginally comments received in order followand ourboth participant-led aapproach. total of seven Whiletypologies. some of the categories from the focus group differed from the ones our team had originally invented, many were similar and both contained a total of seven typologies.

While the results of this study were inconclusive in regards to the question of “How is community fostered in OSU’s public restrooms?” we were able to uncover and present some important findings on restroom culture in general. While there bewere a sense of “community” in the more of the the context of the While the results of may this not study inconclusive in regards to theaccepted questionsense of “How is term, community fostered in restroom provides a microscopic vision for how we share spaces and the various modes of engaging with others OSU’s public restrooms?” we were able to uncover and present some important findings on restroom culture in in them. While In these more private, we apply our implicit about theofcommunity wecontext wish toof have. general. there may not beshared a sensespaces of “community” in the morebeliefs accepted sense the term, the the restroom provides a microscopic vision for how we share spaces and the various modes of engaging with others in them. In these more private, shared spaces we apply our implicit beliefs about the community we wish to have.


CODESIGN

Our team of students and codesigners assembled a list of communication issues existing within the Westminster Thurber campus. In order to visualize and enact change, these issues were prioritized among both independent living residents (those living on their own in apartments) and those living with assistance (residents in assisted living and healthcare with more limited mobility).

Working List of Priorities Independent

Living with Assistance

No.1

Hearing

No.1

Campus TV

No.2

Campus TV

No.2

Smart Tech

No.3

Digital Calendar No.3

Hearing

No.4

Smart Tech

Digital Calendar

No.4

This was a collaborative project between graduate students and senior codesigners at Westminster Thurber Retirement Community focusing on technology and the aging population.


Auditorium Resident’s Room

Future Chatterbox Calendar

Future TV Channel / Live Streaming

Future Education for Residents

Future Hearing Technology

The ideas Our team that engaged we envisioned our codesigners with the in codesigners a number ofserve reflective, as guiding creative, principles and discursive for future activities imagining to start of thea conversationThurber Westminster around Community. the theme ofThese communication. ideas were presented Each of our asconversations ideals and values andtocreations strive forresulted in orderin toaimprove deeper understanding ofamong communication not only allthe residents uniqueand communication staff. Additionally, challenges it aims at to Westminster raise awareness Thurber, about but issues also issues olderpresent adults for most face and older to start adults. a larger conversation in encouraging new innovations to be resident-led.


PROFESSIONAL WORK


INTERIORS

Material selection, casework design, construction documents, and furniture coordination for Cincinnati Financial Corporation (above).


Designs and construction documents for Kroger Marketplace (above).


INTERIORS

Construction documentation for West Clermont High School (above - left). Material selection and coordination, construction documents, and furniture coordination for Mercy HealthPlex - West Clermont (above - right).


Material selection and coordination, construction documents, branding, and furniture coordination for Mercy HealthPlex - West Clermont and Mercy Health Family Medical - West Clermont (above).


CINCINNATI MOVABILITY STUDY FEASIBILITY CINCINNATI STUDIES MOVABILITY STUDY

A Movability Study was conducted as part of this Feasibility Study to develop a scale for each space’s “movability” or ease of relocation, depending on a number of factors, including the space’s location within the building, its adjacencies, use of specialized interior finishes, and other factors. A Movability Study was conducted as part of this Feasibility StudyUS toMarshall’s develop a scale for each space’s “movability” or ease of relocation, depending on a number of factors, including USDC USDC USDC Sattelite COA the space’s locationCourtroom within the109 building, its adjacencies, use ofCommand specializedCenter interior finishes, and other factors. Clerk’s Office & GSA Office Auxiliary Space Staff Attorneys Courtroom 117 Office USDC USDC US Marshall’s USDC Sattelite COA Clerk’s Office Courtroom 109 & Command Center GSA Office Auxiliary Space Staff Attorneys Courtroom 117 Office USDC Chambers

USDC Arbitration

USDC Chambers

USDC Arbitration

Probation Probation 1st Floor US Tax Courts Pretrial

1st Floor

US Tax Courts

Vacant

Vacant Vacant

COA Staff Attorneys Office

USDC Chambers

2nd Floor

USDC Chambers

COA Staff Attorneys Office COA Circuit Mediators

Vacant

2nd Floor

COA Circuit Mediators

Pretrial COA Facilities 1360 SF Vacant 1360 SF Vacant

COA Facilities

Vacant Vacant

COA HR COA HR

USDC Probation Pretrial IT USDC Probation Pretrial IT

3rd Floor 3rd Floor

COA US Marshall’s Office Office Vacant

USDC Jury Assembly

COA US Marshall’s Office Office Vacant

USDC Jury Assembly

Vacant

Vacant

Vacant USDC Jury Room Vacant

Storage

Vacant

Vacant

Vacant USDC Jury Room Vacant

Storage

9th Floor

9th Floor

Not movable

Vacant/Should be moved

Not movable

Vacant/Should be moved

Vacant Vacant


CINCINNATI CIRCULATION DIAGRAMS

Circulation Key Public Judges (USBC)

Circulation Diagrams were devised to demonstrate the secure paths required for judges and the paths to be utilized by the public and courthouse employees.

From Peck Parking Garage

7254 SF Probation

Vacant

Two (2) 1800 SF USBC Courtroom

Elevator Shaft 4267 SF Staff Attorneys

Basement

5731 SF USDC Clerks

Elevator Shaft

6297 SF Staff Attorneys

2nd Floor

1st Floor

8104 SF Associated Space, Jury Facilities, & Clerk Storage

13924 SF USBC Chambers and Clerks

2829 SF USDC Clerks

Third Floor

This was a comprehensive study to determine viable spaces to house the United States Bankruptcy Courts in Columbus and Cincinnati. I worked with my team and the General Services Administration (GSA) to conduct charettes involving the USBC Judges and Clerks to determine viable options for tenant organization, and provide supporting graphics and summaries illustrating considerations for egress, security, and the unique spatial needs of the Judiciary. Documentation included a Movability Study to develop a scale for each space’s ease of relocation, a comprehensive photo catalogue of the building, circulation diagrams to demonstrate the secure paths required for judges, building code analysis, and information on the consideration of the building’s historical status.


M A D I S O N S A B A T E L L I DESIGN RESEARCH PORTFOLIO

Profile for Madison Sabatelli

Teaching Portfolio - My Work  

Teaching Portfolio - My Work  

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