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BUSINESS

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MERLE NORMAN IN MADISON

A RIVALRY IS BORN WITH JAGS, MAVS

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Madison County’s leading newspaper.

VOLUME 38 NUMBER 45

Serving Madison, Ridgeland, Canton, Flora, Northeast

Copyright © 2017 Madison County Journal

MADISON COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

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NOVEMBER 7, 2019 ** $1.00

DISTRICT 4

Banks beats Harreld in supe race By TYLER CLEVELAND Madison County Journal Karl Banks is back. Uncertified results show the former longtime Democrat supervisor defeating Republican Jim Harreld by a slim margin of 51 votes, 3,501 to 3,450. Banks had held the District 4 seat for more than 30 years before losing to Republican David Bishop in 2015 by two votes.

Bishop lost the Republican primary to Harreld in August. Both Banks and Harreld, who is of the Harreld Chevrolet family, were at the county courthouse Wednesday morning as county election officials were counting an unknown number of absentee and affidavit ballots. Those totals were not available as

Karl Banks

of press time. “It feels good to win,” Banks said. “And I have to start by thanking everyone who voted for me yesterday. It was an effort from the constituents who appreciate good governance who pushed me over the top, and I appreciate them.” Banks added that he had been very careful over the past 24 hours to be vigilant after his

last election bid was “stolen.” “If that election wasn’t stolen from me four years ago, we’d probably be further ahead as a county than we are now, because I know how to solve problems,” he said. “(In 2015) I knew that some had done something underhanded, and I pointed it out to them before they ever certified that election. Today, I made sure I was there every step of the way because I felt if they could take it away that easily without repercussions in 2015, they could pos-

sibly do it again today.” Harreld declined to comment when contacted by the Journal Wednesday morning. The District 4 Supervisor race was one of four contested local races in Madison County Tuesday. In District 5, incumbent Supervisor Paul Griffin cruised to re-election, defeating Charles “Chip” Matthews by a better than 2-to-1 margin, 4,787 votes to 2,219. See BANKS, page A6

KINGSTON FRAZIER

Wakefield faces up to 45 years for murder role By TYLER CLEVELAND Madison County Journal

The cast crew of the St. Joseph Catholic School stage production of “Junie B. Jones is NOT a Crook.” Back row from left: Mr. Madison Upendo, the St. Joe theater teacher and play’s director; Loria Williams; Ava Schuetzle; Anna Grace Starnes; Anna Veston Deer; Abigail Hardeman; Molly Moody; Turner Brown; Connor Odom; and

Addie Welshans. Second row sitting in desks from left, Anderson Nixon, Annalise Rome, Hannah Dear, Georgia Conrad, Natalia Igwebuike and Andrew Bain. Sitting on the floor, Mary Kathryn David, Madalyn Weisenberger, Iliana Ramos, Meredith Morrow and Heath Dodson. Leaning against the desk on the far left is Kim Kaiser.

St. Joe students to perform ‘Junie B. Jones’ MADISON – Junie B. Jones comes to life at St. Joseph Catholic School next week in a stage production based on the popular series of children’s books featuring the kindergarten-aged character. “Junie B. Jones is NOT a Crook,” starring St. Joe theater students, opens a three-night run at 7 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14 in the school’s Fine Arts theater. Other performances are 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Nov. 15 and 16. “I can’t think of a better familyoriented production than this to open the performing arts season at St. Joe,” said Madison Upendo, St. Joe’s the-

ater teacher who is directing the play. “This play is a lot of fun, has great humor and is the perfect family outing.” Admission to the play is $10 each with St. Joe students free; tickets can be bought at the door the night of each performance. Students from other area Catholic schools are admitted free if they wear their school shirt while attending the play. “Junie B. Jones” is the first of two stage productions students will perform this school year, including their annual spring semester musical. Other upcoming productions include the popular “Gifts of the Season”

Christmas concert next month. “Junie B. Jones is NOT a Crook” is an adaptation by Allison Gregory of the wildly popular young children’s book series by Barbara Park. The books, aimed at beginning readers, is about precocious Junie B. Jones’ adventures in kindergarten. In the stage adaptation, someone has stolen Junie B. Jones’ new furry mittens. Because someone took her new mittens, should she be allowed to keep something she finds that doesn’t belong to her? Upendo has assembled a group of talented young actors and actresses from all grades at St. Joe to tell this

light-hearted, funny story that is sure to make people fall in love with the main character as well as provide the audience with some strong laughs. Students have been rehearsing the play since shortly after the 20192020 school year began. Now, after weeks of rehearsing and learning their lines, St. Joe’s talented group of actors is ready for opening night. And so is Principal Dena Kinsey. “The ‘Junie B. Jones’ books are a great way to encourage young children to learn to read,” Kinsey said. “This stage version is bound to excite many of those same children about See PLAY, page A5

Dwan Wakefield is going to prison for his role in the murder of 6-year-old Kingston Frazier and faces up to 45 years behind bars. Wakefield, the third and final defendant in the case stemming from Dwan the 2017 kidnapping and Wakefield murder, was convicted by a jury of his peers after less than four hours of deliberation. His sentencing, which is scheduled for Dec. 16, will close the book on the final chapter of a murder case that rocked the Jackson metro. Frazier was asleep in the back seat of his mother Ebony Archie’s car when it was stolen from the parking lot of the Jackson Kroger on North Frontage Road by Byron McBride. McBride took the stolen vehicle and Frazier to Gluckstadt, to a dirt road off of Enterprise Drive, where prosecutors said he called Wakefield, who was 17 at the time, and told him about the boy. Wakefield told jurors that he told McBride, then 19, to drop Frazier off at a gas station or other public park or business. Instead, McBride shot FraSee TRIAL, page A3

VILLAGE AT MADISON

Kickoff event held for $50M development in heart of Madison By TYLER CLEVELAND Madison County Journal Dozens of civic and business leaders gathered last week to celebrate the start of construction on the Village at Madison brining a new downtown residential and commercial focus. Madison Mayor Mary Hawkins Butler welcomed guests to the ceremony, held Friday morning next to the construction site on Madison Avenue near the offices of the Madison Chamber of Commerce. “The Village at Madison is a key component of our his-

toric district, which we are working to develop into the cornerstone of our city,” Butler told the crowd to big applause. The development, which will be located adjacent to the Madison Justice Complex, will have entrances from Main Street and Crawford Street. The 18-acre district will include approximately 60,000 square feet of commercial space, with Half Shell Oyster House already committing as a tenant. The residential section will encompass 37 homes and nine townhomes. Main Street Investors, a group comprised of partners Dr. Michael Manning of Ridgeland, Lee Stafford of

OPINION

Patrick Buchanan

West Point and Mark Castleberry of Starkville, are the developers behind the project. “We are a business,” Castleberry said. “When we are choosing a location, we look at the average income and livability… and think ‘What will this community be like five or 10 years from now?’ “What we see in Madison is a city that is enjoying growth. It’s the kind of community that we want to be a part of.” The developers aren’t the only interested party with skin in the game — the city of Madison has approved a TIF, or tax increment financing, of up to $2 million for the project See VILLAGE, page A5

OPINION

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVES PAGE A4

Ligon Duncan

Officials break champagne bottles to celebrate a new $50 million development in Madison. Pictured are: Justin Suber, Madison the City Chamber of Commerce President; partner Dr. Michael Manning; Mayor Mary Hawkins Butler; partner Lee Stafford and partner Mark Castleberry.

PAGE A6

Rich Lowry

PAGE A4


www.madisoncountyjournal.com

Page A2, Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019

Photo by Elwin Williams

Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves delivers a victory speech Tuesday night after defeating Democratic opponent and current Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood.

Reeves wins state with 52%, but Hoods wins Madison By TYLER CLEVELAND Madison County Journal Turnout in Madison County soared to nearly 54 percent of all registered voters for Tuesday’s general election. At least 37,533 voters went to the poll Tuesday and 1,420

more voted by absentee ballot, according to the summary results report released late Tuesday night. That number represents an increase of 24 percent from the Aug. 27 primary runoff. Even more interesting is the how those voters voted. Madison County rejected establishment GOP gubernatorial candidate Tate Reeves, who won Tuesday’s statewide election to become Mississippi’s 65th governor with 52.2 percent of the vote. Reeves, who had served as Lt. Governor the past eight years, received nearly 50,000 more votes state wide than his Democratic opponent Jim Hood. But Hood, who has served as Attorney General for 12 years, edged Reeves in Madison by more than 600 votes, 19,452 to 18,815. It was the first time Madison County has gone blue in a gubernatorial election since 1987, when former Gov. Ray Mabus carried the county. In the primary runoff, Madison County Republican voters favored former Mississippi Supreme Court Justice Bill Waller over Reeves by a 2-to-1 margin, with Waller garnering 12,401 votes to Reeves’ 5,905. In down-ballot races Tuesday, the majority of Madison voters overwhelmingly selected Republican candidates.

GOP nominee for Lieutenant Governor Delbert Hosemann garnered nearly 7,000 more votes than his Democratic opponent Jay Hughes among Madison voters and won statewide with 60.3 percent of the vote. Likewise, 59 percent of Madison voters chose Republican Michael Watson over Democrat Johnny Dupree for Secretary of State and 57.8 percent voted for Republican Lynn Fitch over Democrat Jennifer Riley Collins for attorney general. Watson cruised to a 59-41 win over Dupree and Fitch defeated Collins 58.1 percent to 41.9. Here is how Madison County voted in the rest of the down-ballot races: State Treasurer - David McRae (R) - 23,816, Addie Lee Green (D) 14,052. Secretary of Agriculture Andy Gipson (R) - 22,907, Rickey Cole (D) - 15,366. Commissioner of Insurance - Mike Cheney (R) - 23,943, Robert Amos (D) - 14,406. Public Service Commissioner - Brent Bailey (R) 23,395, De’Keither Stamps (D) - 14,780. Transportation Commissioner - Butch Lee (R) 23,124, Willie Simmons (D) 15,146.

Aldermen approve funds for city’s first responders By DUNCAN DENT Madison County Journal

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RIDGELAND — the Mayor Board of Aldermen approved a variety of budget amendments requested by the city’s first responders. They approved a budget amendment decreasing the Court Services Fee Fund balance by $11,869.64 and increasing the Capital Machinery & Equipment fund account balance to $11,869.64 for two expenditures. The first is the unexpected replacement of an air conditioning unit in the city prosecutor’s office in the court services building in the amount of $4,993.17. The second was a DVD video burner in the PD evidence room. The item had been on loan and finally gave out. A new one is expected to cost $6,876.47. Chief John Neil said that they had been anticipating this for a while and planned built the cost of a new one into last year’s budget, but never ended up spending the money. “We have had a loaner for five years now,” Neil said. Mayor Gene McGee said (USPS 687-570)

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PRINCE D I G I T A L

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The Madison County Journal is published every Thursday by the Madison County Publishing Co., Inc., 293 Commerce Park Drive, Ridgeland, MS 39157, James E. Prince III, president. Subscriptions are: $42 per year in Madison and Hinds counties; $46 in-state; $52 out-of-state. Single copy price is $1.00. Periodicals postage paid at Ridgeland, MS. The Madison County Journal reserves the right to edit or reject any or all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Madison County Journal, P.O. Box 219, Ridgeland, MS 39158.

the items would not effect the final balance of the general fund. Neil also accepted a donation form the Madison/Rankin County District Attorney's office in the amount of $2,495 for the purchase of Input-Ace video software. Chief Neal said it allows the conversion of proprietary video files to any standard output form such as AVI or MP4 without changing pixels within images. “When we get, say, security footage from a business, it can come in any number of formats and this identifies the necessary player and lets us play it,” Neil said. The police department also received $500 form the Shadowood/Wendover homeowners association. The funds were posited into the department's donations account and no specific expense was named as of Tuesday. Fire Chief Matt Bailey asked that the board approve a donation his department received to buy new weight equipment for one of their fire stations. “It is always good to get a donation,” McGee said. In other action regarding first responders: •     The board gave Chief Neal approval to pursue a municipal lease to purchase agreement for new sets of Motorola radios. He was working on finding financing for them. •      Declared a 2011 and a 2013 Dodge Charger as surplus property to be sold for the Police Department •    Declared two 2017 and two 2018 Harley Davidson FLHTP’s to be declared surplus property so that they could be returned to Harley Davidson pursuant to their lease agreement with the company.


www.madisoncountyjournal.com

Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019, Page A3

Chain sports bar coming to Ridgeland near Costco By DUNCAN DENT Madison County Journal RIDGELAND — WalkOn’s Bistreaux and Bar is coming to the new third phase of the Renaissance under construction here. As Phase III of the Renaissance at Colony Park development chugs forward, two businesses received approval for site plan and architectural reviews to join the Costco anchor tenant. “We had a very good meeting and I think we accomplished a lot.” Mayor Gene McGee said after the meeting. The first approved building was a standalone restaurant, a Walk-On’s Bistreaux and Bar. Walk-On’s is a chain sports bar with locations in six states and cities including Hattiesburg, two in Baton Rouge, New Orleans and others. This location off Highland

Colony Parkway is one of four currently proposed for the state including locations on the coast, in Southaven and Oxford. According to their website, they currently boast sold franchise locations in 14 states including Mississippi. New Orleans Saints great Drew Brees is among the founding members and coowners of the franchise. The other building is the first announced tenant in a proposed 8,400 square foot twotenant building in the development. It is a retail building for Comcast. Mayor Gene McGee said that it would be “like an Apple store.” McGee noted both items were recommended for approval by the Architectural Review Board. Both items were unanimously approved on the consent agenda. Costco is set to open its doors next spring.

Walks-On’s Bistreaux & Bar is a franchise that originated in Louisiana that is co-owned by New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees.

Supervisors approve resort status for Gluckstadt venue By TYLER CLEVELAND Madison County Journal An event venue just south of Gluckstadt Road will likely soon be able to sell and serve alcohol after the Madison County Board of Supervisors on Monday voted to grant the venue resort status. The board voted 3-0 in the absence of District 4 Supervisor David Bishop and District 5 Supervisor Paul Griffin to approve a petition from Woodbridge Commons, LLC to have its property at 119 Enterprise Drive designated as a Qualified Resort Area. The designation will allow the venue, which has been in operation for six months and is designed to host weddings, receptions, meetings and parties to serve and sell liquor and. In some instances, resort status also allows businesses to remain open later than other normally allowed by law. Don McGraw, the attorney representing Woodbridge Commons, presented a letter of endorsement from Madison County Sheriff Randy Tucker

Trial Continued from page A1

zier four times, killing him. Wakefield drove to Gluckstadt to pick McBride up and, knowing he had murdered the six-year-old, took him home without notifying police. He was ultimately charged with accessory after the fact for car theft, kidnapping and murder. The case against the trio

and letters from three different civic groups — Leadership Madison County, the Madison County Chamber of Commerce and the Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce. The vote came after a brief discussion about the nature of the surrounding area. District 1 Supervisor Sheila Jones expressed concern about the property line for the venue, known as The Station, backing up to the Red Oaks Plantation subdivision and asked about the legality of allowing the sale of alcohol that close to a residential area. After a brief interlude, board attorney Katie Snell said the county can lawfully prohibit the sale or consumption of alcohol outside of school and church zones, but, to her knowledge, it had never done that. “Didn’t we give resort status to Lost Rabbit?” asked District 2 Supervisor Trey Baxter, who represents that part of the Gluckstadt area. “That’s residential.” He then pointed to the Town of Livingston, which also

received resort status nearly a decade ago. Ultimately, Baxter made the motion to approve and District 3 Supervisor Gerald Steen seconded it. It passed without further discussion. Woodbridge Commons is still required by law to publish its request in a periodical, then appear before the State Alcoholic Beverage Control board to get final approval. In other action, the board: • Acknowledged and accepted a management plan for the lake at Sulphur Springs Park. • Authorized to advertise for the purchase of up to 25 police pursuit package vehicles. • Approved the final plat for Bellevue Cove subdivision in the Lake Caroline neighborhood. • Approved the final plat for Yandell Farms of Sheffield subdivision within the Cedar Green neighborhood off of Yandell Road just southeast of Deerfield. • Accepted a proposal from JH&H Architects to assess the need to re-roof the E-pod and

D-pod at the new county jail, repair the roof at the old jail and replace the roof at the

Madison Annex. • Voted to send letters of support for MCEDA’s Build

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2018 and received a sentence of 15 years in prison. Wakefield, who was the starting quarterback at Ridgeland High School at the time, is the only defendant who failed to enter a guilty plea. On Oct. 31, a jury of six men and six women found him guilty on all three counts. District Attorney John Bramlett told news outlets following the verdict that he plans to seek to the maximum sentence for Wakefield, which carries 45 years behind bars.

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Page A4, Madison County Journal, October 24, 2019

Opinion & Editorials Founded 1982

“To glorify God, and enjoy Him forever.” JAMES E. PRINCE III Editor and Publisher MICHAEL SIMMONS Associate Editor and Publisher

EDITORIALS

GOP’s sweep means we’re on The new generation of Republican leaders elected Tuesday night is a sweep that will transform our state for the good of all. A solidly Republican state became even more Republican. Tate was the big win, of course, but on the down-ticket State Auditor Shad White, Commissioner of Agricultures Andy Gipson and State Treasurer-elect David McRae, especially, bring hope because of their personal convictions, policy stances and record of work. White was re-elected after a powerful four years of safeguarding taxpayer monies. Expect to see more from Gipson and McRae and the Republican leadership across the board united on many issues like better schools and better-paying jobs along with diversity and outreach in an increasingly diversified state. They have a real opportunity to make a positive impact on our state alongside leaders in Washington like U.S. Rep. Michael Guest. Tate Reeves beat the most formidable Democrat candidate in decades and was also running against the establishment media as well as Jim Barksdale’s left-wing George Soros-funded blog that functioned as Jim Hood’s PR arm. After all, Hood won Madison County with 51 percent of the vote, which isn’t that surprising given the strong teacher lobby, the large number of government employees and apathy among a large swath of voters. Frankly, some good people just never saw Hood for the fraud he is masquerading as a conservative that he’s not. He would have appointed liberals to the judiciary and other positions. Reeves never abandoned his conservative ideals to pander to teachers, hospital administrators or the construction lobby who

would have raised taxes under a Hood administration. Our new leadership will be able to demonstrate there is a place in the GOP — as there always has been — say, for example, single, black moms trying to educate their children or hard-working brown people who just want to live free of government intrusion as well. The cries and bellyaching of the “woke” crowd on Wednesday morning should not be of concern. It’s always going to be something, a new crusade, a new social justice of some sort, any way to keep folks on the plantation of dependency in a cycle of poverty. The GOP is the opposite of all of this. The “woke” are welcome and encouraged to wake up and work with this team for a better Mississippi, but we don’t expect much enthusiasm. Barksdale’s blog propagated the myth that by resisting Medicaid expansion, Mississippi is forfeiting more than $1 million a day that could help thousands of uninsured people with untreated mental illnesses and health care providers drowning in uncompensated costs. Medicaid expansion would bankrupt the state, Vicksburg mayor and former Democrat state Sen. George Flaggs has said from the start. Tuesday’s sweep of all eight statewide elected offices by Republicans puts the pressure on us as conservatives to get things done and to deliver on promises of a better Mississippi for all. Unlike Virginia and Kentucky where Dems won big Tuesday, Mississippi conservatives are united and clear on the dangers of Democrats masquerading as conservatives — because there is no such thing!

The sad tale of Argentina Cry, yet again, for Argentina. The South American nation — rich in farmland, durable institutions and an educated population — has, for nearly a century, been an economic basket case. With the results of its recent presidential election, that sad tale looks set to continue. Argentina is a useful reminder to our progressive friends that history does not go in a straight line. It moves in fits and starts, and sometimes even goes backward. Consider: At the beginning of the 20th century, Argentina was wealthy, very much so. In 1913, it was the 10th richest country in the world in terms of per capita income, richer than Canada and Australia. For many years it was wealthier even than Spain, its former colonial master. Buenos Aires, the capital, is a jewel, a testament to the monumental wealth that the Latin American nation once enjoyed. Then came decades upon decades upon decades of decline. Trouble began early last century, around the time of the Great Depression, when Argentina foolishly began a policy of “import substation” — abandoning its agrarian economy in hopes of industrializing, and importing rather than growing its own agricultural products. This kind of heavy-handed interventionism rarely works out, and the country’s rich farmlands — the engine of its prosperity — collapsed. Then when the Depression hammered industrial production too, Argentina was left with neither a booming farmland nor the industrial boom it had hoped to foster. Lose-lose, in other words. Things took a turn for the worse in 1943, when Juan Peron led a coup against the sitting government and made himself minister of labor. Mr. Peron injected the state’s heavy hand into Argentina’s economy, imposing price controls and nationalizing entire industries. Argentina was no free market at this point: It was state-controlled and corporatist, with various interest groups jockeying for influence and largesse. (Peron’s wife, Eva, she who urged Argentina not to cry to the swelling strings of Andrew Lloyd Webber, ended up a glob-

al celebrity, more famous than even the president.) Chronically high spending under Peron led to chronic inflation and debt defaults. That has been the tale of the subsequent decades. Since independence from Spain, Argentina has defaulted on its debts an astonishing eight times. Even under its most recent president, the conservative reformer Mauricio Macri, Argentina was forced to take out a loan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to the tune of $57 billion — the largest line of credit the body has ever extended to any country. Mr. Macri, for all his good intentions, proved unable to cut the Gordian knot of interest groups and state interventionism that is strangling his country’s economy. Argentina is once again in recession and inflation is ruinously high. And so last week saw a return of the Peronists and their heavy hand. “Argentines on Sunday entrusted leftists to steer the nation as it reels from a deep recession, electing as president Alberto Fernandez, a longtime political operative who toiled behind the scenes most of his career,” The New York Times reported. “His victory was masterminded by former President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, a deeply polarizing leader who opted not to try for a comeback term as president, settling instead for the No. 2 spot on the ticket.” Ms. Fernandez de Kircher is alleged to have been fabulously corrupt during her last rule: She is currently facing trial for one of 11 (count them) graft cases brought against her. Aside from personal venality, her record in office from 2007 to 2015 was troubling, to say the least. “She was criticized for distorting economic figures and building a patchwork of unsustainable subsidies that set the stage for the state’s insolvency when commodities prices dropped during her time in office,” The New York Times noted. Argentina, in other words, continues to suffer from a peculiar economic disease. Unfortunately, the new administration does not have the cure. — The Washington Times

PATRICK J. BUCHANAN

‘High crimes?’ “Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.” These are the offenses designated in the Constitution for which presidents may be impeached and removed from office. Which of these did Trump commit? According to his accusers in this city, his crime is as follows: The president imperiled our “national security” by delaying, for his own reasons, a transfer of lethal aid and Javelin missiles to Ukraine — the very weapons President Barack Obama refused to send to Ukraine, lest they widen and lengthen the war in the Donbass. Now, if Trump imperiled national security by delaying the transfer of the weapons, was not Obama guilty of a greater crime against our national security by denying the weapons to Ukraine altogether? The essence of Trump’s crime, it is said, was that he demanded a quid pro quo. He passed word to incoming President Volodymyr Zelensky that if he did not hold a press conference to announce an investigation of Joe Biden and son Hunter, he, Zelensky, would not get the arms we had promised, nor the Oval Office meeting that Zelensky requested. Again, where is the body of the crime? Did Zelensky hold the press conference Trump demanded? No. Did Zelensky announce Ukraine was investigating the Bidens? No. Did Zelensky get the Oval Office meeting? Yes. Did Zelensky get the U.S. weapons? Yes, $400 million in arms and Javelin missiles. Where then is the crime? When was it consummated? Or was this a thought crime, a bluff to get Zelensky to look into how Hunter Biden got a $50,000-a-month seat on the board of the most corrupt company in Ukraine, days after Joe Biden was in Kyiv threatening to block a $1 billion loan guarantee to the

An attempt by the deep state and its media, bureaucratic and political allies to overturn an election. regime. By the way, what was Biden doing approving a $1 billion loan guarantee to Petro Poroshenko’s regime, which was so corrupt that it ferociously fought not to fire a prosecutor whose dismissal all of Europe was demanding? Should Biden be nominated and elected, a special prosecutor would have to be appointed to investigate this smelly deal, as well as the $1 billion Hunter got for his equity fund from the Chinese after his father visited the Middle Kingdom. Given last week’s partyline vote in the House, where all but two Democrats voted to proceed with the inquiry, the impeachment of President Donald Trump seems baked in the cake. Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s designation of Adam Schiff to head the investigation tells us all we need to know about the sincerity of her pledge to make the inquiry bipartisan. Suppose Zelensky had agreed to an investigation into how Hunter Biden, with no experience in the energy industry, got his sweetheart deal. Would that be impeachable for Trump? How so? Does not the U.S. have a right to put conditions on its foreign aid and to seek guarantees that our money will not be used as graft to grifters? A few of those listening in on Trump’s phone call with Zelensky have gone public asserting that withholding the arms transfer to Kyiv imperiled our national security. But if east Ukraine rises up and secedes from Kyiv, as Kyiv itself seceded from the Russian Federation at the end of the Cold War, how does any of that endanger America’s national security? Did not George H.W. Bush himself warn, three decades ago, that a declaration of independence

by Ukraine from the Russian Federation would constitute an act of “suicidal nationalism”? And who does the Constitution charge with making the decisions as to whether military aid goes to Ukraine? The president, or some NSC staffer who sits on the Ukraine desk? Since the U.S.-backed overthrow of the pro-Russian regime in Kyiv in 2014, and Vladimir Putin’s counterseizure of Crimea and support for pro-Russian secessionists in Donetsk and Luhansk, there has been a debate in the USA over how to deal with this faraway problem. Obama decided not to send lethal aid or tank-killing Javelin missiles, lest the U.S. arms escalate a war between Russia and Ukraine that Kyiv could not win. The Republicans argued the issue at their Cleveland convention. Trump’s team won that argument, but lethal aid and Javelin missiles were eventually sent to Kyiv. Now Trump has sent even more weapons. But again, the authority to make this decision resides in the Oval Office, not in the NSC, not in the CIA, and not with those in the “deep state” who have their own settled view of what U.S. foreign policy should be. The authority lies with the elected president of the United States. This impeachment battle will almost surely reach the Senate. And in the end it will be about what it has been about since the beginning: An attempt by the deep state and its media, bureaucratic and political allies to overturn the democratic verdict of 2016 and to overthrow the elected president of the United States. The establishment’s coup attempt is now approaching end game. Patrick J. Buchanan is the author of “Nixon’s White House Wars: The Battles That Made and Broke a President and Divided America Forever.”

RICH LOWRY

‘Nationalism’ isn’t a dirty word If there’s one thing that elite opinion tends to agree about on the left and the right, it’s that nationalism is a very bad thing. If anything, this view has become even more entrenched as nationalism has demonstrated its potency in recent years, from the election of Donald Trump to Britain’s vote to leave the European Union. When President Trump first openly embraced the term “nationalist” at a 2018 campaign rally, commentators reacted in horror. Patriotism is about love, nationalism about hate, New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof opined. Trump, insisted Jennifer Rubin of The Washington Post, is “normalizing a hateful political philosophy that is contrary to our deepest-held beliefs.” As I write in my new book, “The Case for Nationalism,” this reflexive hostility to the concept is ill-informed and an attempt to deem nationalism a swearword and end all discussion on that basis. At its most basic, the scholar Azar Gat writes, nationalism is “the doctrine and ideology that a people is bound together in solidarity, fate, and common political aspirations.” Historian Anthony Smith described the national ideal as “a belief that all those who shared a common history and culture should be autonomous, united and distinct in their recognized homelands.” A key contention of nationalism is that a nation has its rights and claims. This is a thread that runs through the Declaration of Independence, the Gettysburg Address and the Atlantic Charter. A nation has the right to break off from

The left has pushed further from respect for nationalistic attitudes and even patriotic symbols. larger sovereignties in the cause of self-determination (see, for instance, 1776), and to remake its regime or foundational governing rules (see, for instance, 1789). So if a nation’s rights and interests are being trampled, loyalty to the nation, i.e., nationalism, may require treason against the government, the object of patriotic loyalty. As Michael Lind explains, “Governments should serve nations, not nations governments.” When Europe went off the rails in the early 20th century, nationalism as such didn’t cause its crash so much as social Darwinism, militarism and the cult of charismatic leadership. The aftermath of World War I added its own poison. Regardless, American nationalism — which encompasses such diverse, rightly beloved figures as Alexander Hamilton, Abraham Lincoln and Teddy Roosevelt — is not to be feared. As with so many other things about this country, it is more benign than the versions to be found in Europe and other places around the world. This is true for a number of reasons. First, we are the inheritors of an Anglo-American tradition that has profound respect for the individual and the rule of law and is a fundamental part of our national identity.

The sheet anchor of American sovereignty, the U.S. Constitution, makes it clear that authority ultimately resides with “we the people of the United States.” The Constitution also happens to be a durable mechanism of selfgovernment and itself an object of patriotic loyalty and national pride. Finally, the United States was never infected with the dream of universal empire that Europe inherited from Rome and that has lingered on in differing forms from Charlemagne to the European Union. The rise of Donald Trump has pushed the left further away from respect for nationalistic attitudes and even patriotic symbols. Democrats — and the country — would be much better served if they countered Trump’s nationalism with a version of their own. On his own side of the aisle, Trump has made Republicans more nationalistic. Still, much of the party is quietly uncomfortable with this. If Trump loses in 2020, the party’s establishment may try to snap back to its pre-Trump disposition of relative indifference to nationalism. Yet, if there’s one clear political lesson from the long history of nationalism in this country and elsewhere, it is that a party interested in moving people and selling a program should make some sort of an appeal to it — even if conventional wisdom insists it is foolish and wrong. Rich Lowry is editor of National Review, a leading conservative magazine founded by William F. Buckley.

BIBLE SELECTION Be sober, be vigilant; because your adversary the devil walks about like a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour. Resist him, steadfast in the faith, knowing that the same sufferings are experienced by your brotherhood in the world. — 1 Peter 5:8-9 NKJV


Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019, Page A5

Canton student selected to education advisory panel By DUNCAN DENT Madison County Journal A Canton High School junior has been selected to the State Superintendentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Student Advisory Council for this academic year. CHS eleventh grader Andrea Tall was selected as one of 83 students out of 150 to sit on the 2019-2020 inaugural State Superintendentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Student Advisory Council representing the Canton Public School District. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tall is excited about this distinguished honor and the opportunity to share her innovative ideas,â&#x20AC;? District Information Director Beverly Luckett said. Tall will join students from different backgrounds, school size and regions in Mississippi in sharing their opinions and offer advice about educational opportunities and policy in Mississippi with Dr. Carey Wright, state superintendent of education. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking forward to hearing directly from students on issues of importance to them,â&#x20AC;? Wright said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As our clients, we want to make sure

Village Continued from page A1

and the Madison County Board of Supervisors last month agreed to a proposed $500,000 TIF. Hawkins-Butler also announced at the event that the city had recently agreed to purchase the nearby Montgomery House, a picturesque one-story

Canton High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Andrea Tall will represent the school on the State Superintendentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Student Advisory Council. public education provides them Recycle Club. She is also an with the knowledge and skills honor roll student. The MDE inaugural State they need to be successful. The council also allows students to Superintendentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Student Adviinteract with their peers from sory Council includes students around the state and learn from in grades 11 and 12 or first year of college to serve as members one another.â&#x20AC;? Tall has a background of for a term of two school years. The councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purpose is to service in her community and in her school. She has served provide a forum for Mississipas a Girl  Scout for six years, piâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s students to offer diverse participated in the 4H Model- perspectives to Wright. The ing Squad and volunteered at selected students will act as liaisons between MDE and local animal shelters. At Canton High School she public school students from has served as an ambassador in across the state. Council meetthe â&#x20AC;&#x153;ICAN, We Canâ&#x20AC;? mentor- ings will be held twice (fall and ing program. She is a member spring) during the school year. of the Beta Club and the CHS

Gothic Revival house built in 1852. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always said that every city needs to have green space near the center of town,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is going to be ours.â&#x20AC;? Castleberry said he expects the entire buildout of the development to be complete within three years, but that the residential lots should be ready for construction by April 2020 and the Half Shell could be open as early as May or June.

City of Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce presents

       Gene F. McGee, Mayor

Colonial Heights Baptist Church 444 Northpark Drive Ridgeland, Mississippi Tuesday, December 10, 2019 7:00 a.m. ~ Breakfast Buffet 7:30 a.m. ~ Program

Play Continued from page A1

the possibilities of live theater. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Barbara Parksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; stories cen-

ter around a young, lively, spirited little girl,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait to see the spin our own students put on this production. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking forward to seeing a talented group of students bring this story to life.â&#x20AC;?

Tickets are $ 15.00 and may be purchased at the Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce 601~991~9996

Featuring Ridgeland High School Singers Gold Sponsors BankPlus  Butler Snow, LLP  BXS Insurance  Community Bank  CenterPoint Energy Entergy Mississippi  John DorsaState Farm Insurance  Keesler Federal Credit Union Neel-Schaffer, Inc.  PriorityOne Bank  Renasant Bank  Staffers, Inc. Madison County Journal  Trustmark National Bank  Waggoner Engineering, Inc.

Wells Marble & Hurst, PLLC  Wh White Construction Company  Young Wells Williams , P.A.

The Township at Colony Park a Keriotthh Coorrporation r nD Deevelop lopm meennt Please send d me

tickets ($ 15 each)

 My check is ennclosed  Invoice me  VISA  MasteerCard  Discover  AM AMEX Chamber Phone: 6011-991-9996

Fax: 601 6 -991-9997

Make Checks Payable to:

HOLIDAYS ARE BETTER WITH

Primos

primoscafe.com/holiday

Ridgel e and Chamber of Commerce P.O. Box B 194 Ridgel e and, MS 39158-0194 Company Name __ __ ________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ _____ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ _____ __ __ __ __ _________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ _____ __ __ __ __ _ Contact Person __ __ ___ ______ __ __ __ __ __ _______ __ __ __ __ __ __ ___ ___ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ _______ __ __ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ ___ __ ___ ___ ___ __ __ _ Mailing Address City Zip ______ __ __ __ __ __ _____ __ __ __ __ _ Phone __ __________ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _____ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ _____ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ _ Fax a Credit Card __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ _______ __ __ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ _____ __ __ __ __ ______ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ _CV VVS #__ ____ __ __ __ _Exxp piration Date ____ __ __ __ __ _

THANK YOU FOR YOUR VOTES AND SUPPORT!


www.madisoncountyjournal.com

Page A6, Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019

BIBLICAL PERSPECTIVES/J. Ligon Duncan III

The mediator of a better covenant

Ridgeland Mayor Gene McGee was joined by Wonder Woman, Lisa Newman, for this year’s Mayor's Fun Walk for senior adults. Newman is a personal trainer and fitness instructor. The theme this year was "Super Hero's, Super Health, Super Foods, & Super Faith."

THE LORD’S DAY Morning Worship 8:30 a.m. 11 a.m. Sunday School 9:40 a.m. Evening Worship 6 p.m. Family Night Dinner (Wed.) 5 p.m. to 6:15 (Miller Hall) Mid-Week Worship/Study (Check website) Livestream fpcjackson.org/livestream 11 a.m. 6 p.m. WLBT-TV3 10 a.m.

First Presbyterian Church of Jackson “To glorify God, and enjoy Him forever.” 1390 N. State Street Jackson, Mississippi 601.353.8316 fpcjackson.org Presbyterian Church in America (PCA)

Banks Continued from page A1

Incumbent County Tax Collector Kay Pace, a Republican, defeated Democrat Robert Earl Winn, Jr. by a 24,551 to 13,403vote margin. The other county-level race decided Tuesday was for Justice Court Judge for District 2, where incumbent Democrat Martina B. Griffin, Paul Griffin’s daughter, crushed Republican challenger Bill Featherston 5,728 votes to 1,290. Madison County voters also decided — or helped decide — several state legislative races Tuesday: • In the race for District 73 Representative, Republican Jill Ford handily defeated Democrat Gayle Walsh Massey with 74 percent of the vote.

• In the race for District 64 Representative, Democrat Shanda Yates edged incumbent Republican Bill Denny by a 5149 margin. • In the State House race in District 56, Republican Speaker of the House Philip Gunn defeated former Democratic gubernatorial candidate Vickie Slater by a margin of 64-36. • In State Senate District 25, incumbent Republican Walter Michel defeated Democrat Earl Scales by capturing 72 percent of votes. • In State Senate District 22, Democrat Joseph Thomas, Sr. defeated Republican Hayes Dent 52-48.

Please turn to Hebrews 8:113. Where do we turn when we are looking for hope but find ourselves in the midst of despair? Where do we turn when we are looking for encouragement but we find ourselves underneath discouragement?  Do we look to better circumstances?  No, that is not where we look for hope.  In fact, we do not look to our circumstances at all for our hope. Instead, the author of Hebrews encourages us to look somewhere else. In Matthew 6:33, Jesus says, “Seek ye first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things shall be added unto you.” And, in a real sense, that is what the author of Hebrews is saying here in this passage.  Specifically, he encourages us to place our hope in Jesus alone. He is telling us where we find the basis of the life of true blessedness and joy by pointing us directly to Jesus. This passage can easily be divided into two parts. First, in verses 1-5, the author of Hebrews tells us that Jesus is a better priest. Then, in verses 6-13, he tells us that Jesus is the mediator of a better covenant. I. Jesus is a Better Priest. In Hebrews 8:1-5, the author of Hebrews is saying, “All those things that I was telling you about Jesus and Melchizedek were designed to teach you this one point - Jesus is not only better than the Old Testament priesthood that descended from Levi and Aaron; He is the only true priest. The former priests were simply copies of Him.” Thus, the author of Hebrews is telling us that the Old Testament priesthood, all it was, was a copy of the true priesthood of Jesus. Just as the presence of a real person is better than the picture of their likeness, the real priesthood of Jesus is better. Therefore, the author of Hebrews is saying, “Do not look to the copy for your hope. Do not look to the Old Testament priestly ritual for your hope.  Look only to Jesus.” And that is a message for all of us.  In our discouragements and in our trials, we must not look to anything else but Jesus for our hope. The author of Hebrews is encouraging us to remember that we have a better priest in Jesus who is our great high priest. II. Jesus is the Mediator of a Better Covenant.

In Hebrews 8:6-13, the author of Hebrews encourages us to look to the covenant of which Jesus is the mediator. In verse 6, he says, “But as it is, Christ has obtained a ministry that is as much more excellent than the old as the covenant he mediates is better, since it is enacted on better promises.” In other words, he is saying, “Jesus is better not only because He is a better priest but because He is a priest of a better covenant.  Jesus is better because He mediates the ultimate covenant.” In what way is this new covenant better? First, quoting from Jeremiah 31:33, he says in verse 10, “For this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, declares the Lord: I will put my laws into their minds, and write them on their hearts.”  Now in the old covenant, when Moses came down from the mountain, the law was written on tablets of stone by the very finger of God.  But, in the new covenant, God writes His law by His Spirit on our hearts.  In other words, the author of Hebrews is explaining that the new covenant is better in the moral transformation that it works in the people of God.  Second, still in verse 10 and quoting from Jeremiah 31:33, the author says, “I will be their God, and they shall be my people.” That is a significant Old Testament theme, and it is a theme that announces the purpose of God. And what is the purpose of God for you? It is for you to be His possession and for God to be your possession.  It is for you to be His inheritance and for God to be your inheritance.  The whole purpose of God is that He would be ours and we would be His. God says to us, “I will be your God and you will be My people.” And that truth is realized by this new and better covenant. Third, in verse 11, he quotes from Jeremiah 31:34 by saying, “And they shall not teach, each one his neighbor and each one his brother, saying, ‘Know the Lord,’ for they shall all know me, from the least to the greatest.”  This is referring to our experience of communion with God.  “To know” God is the language of intimacy in the Bible.  How do you express a personal relationship with God in biblical

language? You “know” God.  That is why J.I. Packer titled his book,  Knowing God.  Packer’s study of God is called  Knowing God  because the Christian longs to have a personal experience and knowledge of the living God.  It is at the very heart of what true Christianity is about and this new covenant realizes that in a way that was never realized under the old covenant. Fourth, in verse 12, the author of Hebrews quotes from Jeremiah 31:34 by saying, “For I will be merciful toward their iniquities, and I will remember their sins no more.”  And so in actual forgiveness of sins, the new covenant is superior to the old covenant.  It is important to understand that not one sin was forgiven by the Old Testament sacrifices.  All of the sins of the people of God in all ages are forgiven only by the blood of Jesus.  As the hymn writer penned, “What can wash away my sin?  Nothing but the blood of Jesus.” That means that Abraham’s sins and Moses’ sins and Aaron’s sins and Joshua’s sins and David’s sins were not forgiven by animal sacrifices. They were forgiven by the blood of Jesus. And the author of Hebrews is also saying this new covenant has been fulfilled. On the night in which Jesus was betrayed, he took a cup and He said, “Drink of it, all of you, for this is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sin.” And so, when we are in despair, where do we look? We do not look to our current circumstances and not to better circumstances; instead, we look to a better priest and to a better covenant. That is the hope that God has given to those who are despondent and despairing. Where do we find hope in this life? The author of Hebrews tells us to look to Jesus who is the better priest of a better covenant. May God work His Word into our hearts by His Spirit so that our focus of faith would be on Jesus only.

The Rev. Dr. J. Ligon Duncan III is Chancellor and CEO of Reformed Theological Seminary. He can be reached at 601-923-1600 or by email at jhyde@rts.edu.

OBITUARIES Judith Chloe Forbes Ellison Judith Chloe Forbes Ellison, 82, met Jesus face to face on November 3rd at her home in Ridgeland. Judy was born on August 9, 1937 in Hattiesburg. She was the oldest child of Hallie Guy Forbes (Big Daddy to the grandchildren) and Florence Tresjolie Fuller Forbes (Big Mama). Judy's family moved around some during her childhood due to her father's job as a County Agent. They lived in Prentiss, MS for a while as well as Bay Springs. They eventually settled in Jackson where Judy attended elementary and junior high and then graduated from Central High School in 1955. After she graduated from high school she attended Millsaps College where she pledged Chi Omega, briefly attended Ole Miss, and then graduated from Millsaps College in 1959 with a degree in Biolo-

gy. During Judy's time at Millsaps she also worked in the pathology lab at the new medical center in Jackson. She moved with her family to Jackson in July 1976. She and Dick had a wonderful, rich and full life in the Jackson area ever since. She was very involved in Explorer's Bible Study for many years. During her time in Jackson she was a successful entrepreneur with her "Color Me Beautiful" franchise. Judy was predeceased by her parents. She is survived by her husband of 59 years (Dick) and their 3 children Richard Beirne Ellison, Jr and his wife Robbi of Ridgeland, Parker Lee Ellison and his wife Mary of Jackson, and Hayes Forbes Ellison Dale and her husband T. of Ridgeland. Judy was the proud grandmother of Parker

Lee Ellison, Jr (Bonney) of Charleston, SC, Claire Varner Ellison of Chattanooga, TN, Daniel Fuller Ellison of Denver, CO, Lauren Elizabeth Ellison of Washington, D.C., Emily Catherine Ellison of Jackson, MS, Richard Beirne Ellison III (Trey) of Ridgeland, Thomas Douglas Dale III, Hallie Elizabeth Dale, and Mary Ellison Dale all of Ridgeland. She is also survived by her loving sister Mary Vela Caston of Santa Rosa Beach, FL, and Mary Vela's children, Molly Forbes Caston Brown (Nathan) Santa Rosa Beach, FL, and Julius William Caston III(Laurel) of Ridgeland. A graveside service was held at Parkway Memorial on November 5, 2019. Memorials may be made to French Camp Academy.

Evelyn Puddister Evelyn Puddister of Madison, passed away on November 1, 2019 after a short illness. ‘Evelyn was born on January 17, 1924 in the town of Franklinton, La. to James and Eva Simmons. She was the third of four children. During her senior year in high school, a representative from the Federal Bureau of Investigation spoke to her class seeking recruits to work on the massive increase in background checks occasioned by the USA's participation in the Second World War. Evelyn volunteered. So, in 1943 at the age of 19, she took the train to Washington D.C. and accepted a position

as a Clerk/Typist in the Identification Division of the FBI. Evelyn was a Cub Scout den mother, a Brownie and Girl Scout troop leader and an officer in the Le Midi Luncheon Club at Colonial Heights Country Club. She enjoyed golf, league bowling, playing bridge, traveling and hosting her epic Christmas Open House parties. She was an active member of her church. She is preceded in death by her husband John in 2010 and her son John in 2015, as well as her brother Howard and sister Janella. She is survived by her sister Opal Simmons of Madi-

son, her son Dr. Michael (Mimi) Puddister of Natchez, son David (Laura) Puddister of Madison, daughter Ann Puddister of Madison. She is also survived by grandchildren Joanna (Justin) King, Virginia (Chris) Puddister, Jonathan Puddister, Jessica (Travis) Swisher and three great-grandchildren. A funeral Mass was celebrated at St. Richard’s Catholic Church on November 4, 2019. Memorial donations may be made to St. Richard Catholic Church, 1242 Lynwood Drive, Jackson, MS 39206.


Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019, Page A7

www.madisoncountyjournal.com

GETTING THE MESSAGE/Rev. Chris Shelton

2nd Timothy 3:16 We finished our study of the book of Colossians last week, and before moving on to another book, we will look at different subjects over the next several weeks. This week we look at the inspiration and authority of God’s Word. A non-negotiable tenant of the Christian faith is that the Scriptures are the Word of God. This means that the original source of the Bible in its original manuscripts was Almighty God. The Bible was written over 1000’s of years by over 40 authors, but the ultimate author was the Lord God. In Chapter 3, Paul is warning Timothy that there will be difficult times in the last days. By “last days” he means the time between Christ’s ascension and his return. The reason for the difficult days is that there will be imitations of the Christian faith that are not in accordance with the truth. Men, Paul says, will have an appearance of godliness but deny its power. In Chapter 4, Paul again warns Timothy that a time is coming when men will not endure sound teaching but accumulate for themselves teachers to suit their own passions, and say what they want to hear rather than the truth of Scripture. Certainly, Paul’s warnings have seen fulfilment throughout church history and are plainly manifest in our day. Many Christian churches openly deny that the Scriptures are inspired and inerrant, and many people profess Christ, yet betray him in what they believe and how they live. Paul directs Timothy to never waver from declaring the word of the Lord, regardless of how difficult it is because of imitations and dilutions of the truth there may be in or out of the church. God’s word is for God’s people, so Timothy is to provide the word of the Lord for those who would hear. The Lord Jesus delivers his people from sin so that they may dwell with him and serve him, according to his word. It is the word of God that gives joy, peace, and comfort on earth. The first thing, then, is to believe the Scriptures are the word of God. Paul says that Scripture is “breathed out by God.” This is familiar language with respect to God’s work. The Lord God “breathed” life into man when he created

him. Also, we read in Psalm 33, “By the word of the Lord were the heavens made; their starry hosts by the breath of his mouth.” Obviously, it isn’t beyond reason to conclude that the Lord, who made the heavens and earth with his word, could certainly superintend the writing of Scriptures as to direct the final product to be what he wanted to be written down. Paul says this is what God did. This doesn’t mean it isn’t mysterious. The writers of Scripture had different vocabularies, different personalities, different contexts, genres, and so on. They weren’t asleep and God moved their hands to write on the paper; nor were they simply secretaries taking dictation. Nevertheless, they produced what God intended to be written. Jesus affirmed Scripture was God’s word even to the punctuation marks (every jot and tittle). So those who deny it will have their accountability with him. Remember that when you hear men, Pilate like, scoffing at claims to truth, and then sending Jesus off to his death. Jesus rose from the dead; his word endured, and still does to this day. And men have a reckoning that will be based upon it. Setting aside then, those who oppose God’s word, what are you to do with God’s word? First, labor to see the truth of Christ throughout the pages of Scripture. The Scriptures are about God having a people his very own to dwell with him forever through the work of the Lord Jesus. When you see how the prophets wrote of Christ long before he came, it will confirm to you the word of God. Don’t just read God’s word, but dwell upon the truths you learn in it, and seek to apply it to heart and life. Since God is the author of it, we sit under the authority of his word. Seek to be encouraged by the hope Scripture gives you in Christ, despite the difficulties in this fallen world. Paul says to Christians in Romans 15; “Whatever was written in former days was written for our instruction, that through endurance and through the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope.” Blessed is the man who makes the Lord his God and loves his word.

Area Churches APOSTOLIC VIRGIN MARY APOSTOLIC 614 Virgin Mary Rd., Canton 859-9110 ASSEMBLY OF GOD TURNING POINT ASSEMBLY OF GOD 335 Cameron St., Canton 859-6158 BIBLE FELLOWSHIP BIBLE 2270 Hwy. 51, Canton 855-0660 OPEN DOOR BIBLE 157 Sharpe Rd., Madison 898-0908 FELLOWSHIP CHRISTIAN ASSEMBLY 528 Hart Rd., Canton 859-8912 CATHOLIC SACRED HEART CATHOLIC 238 E. Center St., Canton 859-3749 ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI CATHOLIC 4000 W. Tidewater Ln., Madison 856-5556 ST. JOSEPH CATHOLIC Gluckstadt, Madison 856-2054 HOLY CHILD JESUS 315 Garrett St., Canton 859-2957

CROSSROADS CHURCH OF GOD INC. Hwy. 16 E., Canton 859-2858 FIRST CHURCH OF GOD 741 Hwy. 51, Madison 856-0652 HOLY CITY CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 251 Kearney Park Rd., Flora 879-3999 PHILADELPHIA CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 244 W. North St., Canton 859-1116 ST. MARK CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 354 Old Hwy. 16, Canton 859-6577 EPISCOPAL CHAPEL OF THE CROSS EPISCOPAL 674 Mannsdale Rd., Madison 856-2593 GRACE EPISCOPAL 161 E. Peace St., Canton 859-2680 ST. COLUMB’S EPISCOPAL 550 Sunnybrook Rd. 853-0205 JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES KINGDOM HALL OF JEHOVAH WITNESSES 2780 S. Liberty St., Canton 859-8613

1529 Hwy. 43 S., Canton 859-7363 APOSTOLIC REVIVAL CENTER 301 W. Washington St. 856-2385 FIRST UNITED PENTECOSTAL Hwy. 51 N., Canton 859-2457 PARKWAY PENTECOSTAL 601 Reunion Parkway, Madison 853-2607 PRESBYTERIAN FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 202 E. Peace St., Canton 859-4738 FIRST PRESBYTERIAN 7717 Old Canton Rd., Madison 856-6625 GRACE CHAPEL PRESBYTERIAN 307 New Mannsdale Rd., Madison 856-7223 HIGHLANDS PRESBYTERIAN 1160 Highland Colony Pkwy. 853-0636 OLD MADISON PRESBYTERIAN 232 Old Yazoo City Rd., Canton 859-7142 PEAR ORCHARD PRESBYTERIAN 750 S. Pear Orchard Rd. 956-3283 SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST CANTON SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST Lutz Ave., Canton 859-7364

METHODIST OTHER

CANTON UNITED METHODIST 3808 N. Liberty St., Canton 859-6009 CHINA GROVE A.M.E. Mannsdale Rd., Madison 856-7348 FIRST UNITED METHODIST 3301 S. Liberty St., Canton 859-4621 CHRISTIAN SCIENCE FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF RIDGELAND First Church of Christ, Scientist 234 W. Jackson St., Ridgeland 731 S. Pear Orchard Rd., Suite 9 601-856-6456 Ridgeland 952-0307 FLORA METHODIST CHURCH OF CHRIST 142 Carter St., Flora 879-8642 GOSHEN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF CHRIST 1023 Pat Luckett Rd., Canton 859-4656 3479 N. Liberty St., Canton 859-2865 LAMPTON CHAPEL FGAME CHURCH OF CHRIST 715 W. Fulton St., Canton 859-6047 851 W. Fulton, Canton 859-7698 LEE’S CHAPEL A.M.E. ZION HIGHLAND COLONY CHURCH OF Hwy. 16 E., Canton 859-6005 CHRIST LONE PINE UNITED METHODIST N. Sunnybrook Rd., 856-6555 170 Lone Pine Rd., Canton MADISON CHURCH OF CHRIST MADISON UNITED METHODIST 483 Reunion Parkway, Madison 853-9558 2050 Main St., Madison 856-6058 NORTH FLORA CHURCH OF CHRIST MIDDLETON A.M.E. ZION Hwy. 49 N., Flora 879-3509 602 Way Rd., Canton 859-6551 NORTH LIBERTY CHURCH OF CHRIST PARKWAY HILLS UNITED METHODIST 523 N. Liberty St., Canton 859-2865 1468 Highland Colony Pkwy., PLEASANT GREEN CHURCH OF Madison 856-2733 CHRIST SHARON A.M.E. ZION 925 Lutz Ave., Canton 895-5515 Sharon Rd., Canton 859-6077 PLEASANT GREEN CHURCH OF SINGLETON UNITED METHODIST CHRIST 1023 Pat Luckett Rd., Canton 859-4656 925 George Washington Ave., ST. JOHNS UNITED METHODIST Canton 859-5515 SOUTH MADISON CHURCH OF CHRIST 219 N. Hargon St., Canton 859-6265 ST. MATTHEW’S UNITED METHODIST 338 Lake Harbour Dr., 856-2165 7427 Old Canton Rd., Madison 856-9581 ST. PAUL & DENNIS CHAPEL A.M.E. CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST 495 Main St., Madison 898-9610 CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER ST. PAUL A.M.E. ZION 505 S. Union St., Canton 859-1904 DAY SAINTS THE CONNECTION 703 Hwy. 17, Canton 859-3591 CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER 670 G Hwy. 51, Ridgeland WIGGINS UNITED METHODIST DAY SAINTS 1023 Pat Luckett Rd., Canton 859-4656 243 Hoy Rd., Madison 898-7751 ZION CHAPEL METHODIST CHURCH OF GOD Robinson Rd., Canton 859-5609 CHURCH OF GOD IN MISSISSIPPI, INC. PENTECOSTAL 213 John Day Rd. #A, Canton 859-9804 COBBLESTONE CHURCH OF GOD APOSTOLIC LIGHTHOUSE 444 Pebble Creek Dr., Madison 853-6910

NORTHEAST CHRISTIAN 3169 W. Tidewater Ln., Madison 856-7399 CANTON CHRISTIAN CENTER 2735 S. Liberty St., Canton 859-8324

P.O. Box 1310 11748 HWY 35 Kosciusko, MS 39090 662-289-4111

P.O. Box 71 3434 North Liberty St. Canton, MS 39046 601-859-2031

www.culpepperfuneralhome.com

THE CHURCH TRIUMPHANT 731 S. Pear Orchard Road Suite 43-Ridgeland • 601-977-0007 FAITH TABERNACLE 672 N. Liberty St., Canton 859-8972 GREATER FAITH CALVARY 551 Owens St., Canton 859-4997 GREATER REFUGE 375 Morgan Rd., Canton 859-9483 GREATER SIMS CHAPEL AMEZ 915 Lutz Ave., Canton 859-6327 KEYPOINTE CHURCH INT’L 614 Magnolia St., Madison, MS 601605-2880 LIFE WAY CENTER 271 W. Center St., Canton 859-2770 MIRACLE OF FAITH TEMPLE 3466 N. Liberty St., Canton 859-8995 NEW MOUNT ZION 432 Yandell Rd., Madison 856-9113 NEW TESTAMENT FELLOWSHIP 2009 Gateway Dr. 856-2106 OLDE TOWNE COMMUNITY CHURCH 220 W. Ridgeland Ave., Ridgeland RIDGELAND FAMILY CHURCH 803 Old Agency Rd. 856-2101 RIVER OF LIFE 7417 Old Canton Rd., Madison 922-7100 SPIRIT 731 S. Pear Orchard Rd. 957-0700 ST. PETER’S ORTHODOX 180 Saint Augustine Dr., Madison 856-3894 STILL WATER CHURCH 619 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, 601-259-5252 UNITED BELIEVERS CENTER 819 George Washington Ave., Canton 8597180 WORD OF FAITH MINISTRIES INC 228 W. North St., Canton 859-8972 Crossway Community Church 7430 Old Canton Road, Canton 605-2000 New Beginnings 211A Industrial Drive, Ridgeland 898-2727 VICTORY CHURCH 7417 Old Canton Rd, Madison 601-383-3891


www.madisoncountyjournal.com

Page A8, Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019

11/7/2019

Massage Envy Spa

Ely’s Ely’s Roger McGehee, McGehee, Jr. Jr. PLLC PLLC Restaurant & Roger Real Estate Attorney Bar

New Summit School Services

The The Bounce PPalace alace

First South Farm Farm Credit

F Franklin ranklin Eyewear

Gladden & Ingram, Ingram , PLLC

Ridgeland...Banking On Our Future THE

RIBBON CUTTINGS & GROUNDBREAKINGS

RIDGELAND CHAMBER’ S Thursday, November 7 Ribbon Cutting and Reveal The Railroad District of Ridgeland The Plaza at Old Town Crossing

The Ridgeland Chamber wishes to thank area businesses and individuals for their generous contributions to the Silent Auction. Their donations far exceeded our expectations. Thank you for your support! And, Thank you to our 2019 Sponsors DIAMOND Community Bank of Mississippi • Ergon, Inc. GOLD CenterPoint Energy • Madison County Journal PriorityOne Bank SILVER Staffers, Inc. • Trustmark National Bank Waggoner Engineering, Inc. BRONZE Haps, LLC • Luckett Land Title, Inc. • Northpark Ridgeland Tourism Commission • Southeastern Financial COPPER BancorpSouth • BankPlus • Cerami’s Italian Restaurant First Commercial Bank John Dorsa - State Farm Insurance • Renasant Bank SouthGroup Insurance Services FRIENDS iHEART MEDIA • MISS 103 • Mike Bridges and Z106 Hallelujah 95.5 • WJDX 620 AM WYAB and the Jim Thorne Show

Monday, November 11, Veterans Day Tuesday, November 12, 10:30 A.M. Ribbon Cutting Olivia’s Food Emporium, Inc. 637 Highway 51, Suite K Wednesday, November 13, 11:30 A.M. Board of Directors Meeting Chamber Office 754 S. Pear Orchard Road Thursday, November 14, 10:30 A.M. Ribbon Cutting Classic Restorations, LLC 642 Ridgewood Road

From left, Beth Henry, Mona Hagler, Terry Volz, Kelly Sellers, Mary Hannah Cooper, and Cindy Cain, all of Staffers, Inc.

Linda and Randy Keng, Southeastern Financial.

12

Friday, November 15, 10:30 A.M. Ribbon Cutting Palladian Consign & Design 637 Highway 51, Suite A Friday, November 15 - Sunday, December 15 Holly Jolly Christmas in Ridgeland! SHOP LOCAL – BUY LOCAL Pre-holiday Christmas kick-off. Watch for details of participating merchants. In partnership with Ridgeland Tourism Commission.

Saturday, November 30 SHOP LOCAL – BUY LOCAL Small Business Saturday in Ridgeland Tuesday, December 3, 10:30 A.M. Ribbon Cutting Motion Physical Therapy LLC 7048 Old Canton Road

Michael and Tammy Louvier, Jackson.

From left, Kelly Mott, Chris Maur and Karen McKie and Eric and Chapman, Mina Thorgeson and Carly McKie, Green Oak Florist and Hannah Wilkins, of Ridgeland Tourism Commission. Garden Center.

Thursday, December 5, 5 – 7:00 P.M. Christmas Holiday Business After Hours Speed Commercial Real Estate, LLC 5 Atrium Building, 805 S. Wheatley Street 12

Thursday, December 5 6 – 7:00 P.M. Christmas Tree Lighting The Plaza at Old Town Crossing

From left, Mike Nolen, Safety-Kleen; Ridgeland Officer Ray Daniels and Kristy Daniels, PriorityOne Bank; Emily and Scott Melichar, Southern Oak Landscaping and Enjoli Nolen, Luckett Land Title, Inc.

From left, Tina Lakey, Madison; Linda Bynum, Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce; Sarah and Russ Farley, Memphis, TN and Sandy Baas, Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce.

Community Bank of Mississippi staff and friends.

Photography by: Elwin Williams, Entertainment Media & Print Services.

Front row, from left: Vice President Beth Henry, Staffers, Inc.; 2019 Ridgeland Chamber President Bill Bethany, Community Bank of Mississippi; Treasurer Jon-Michael Trimm, Trustmark National Bank and Immediate Past President Karen McKie, Green Oak Florist & Garden Center. Second row, from left: Kevin Rogers, Wells Marble & Hurst, PLLC; J. Chase Bryan, Young Wells Williams, P.A.; Joel Lofton, Barnett’s Body Shop and David Broadaway, Members Exchange Credit Union.   Back row, from left: Billy Siddall, Merrill Lynch and Adam Panetta, C Spire Business Solutions. Not pictured: Ronnie Tubertini, SouthGroup Insurance Services.   Photo by Deryll Stegall, Stegall Imagery.

Chamber Staff

JACKSON STREET GALLERY Fifty-One Place, 637 Highway 51, Suite AA

Thursday, November 14, 5 – 7:00 P.M. Business After Hours Young Wells Williams P.A. 5 141 Township Avenue, Suite 300

Thursday, November 28, Thanksgiving Day David Broadaway, Members Exchange Credit Union and Cynthia Broadaway, New York Life.

CADILLAC OF JACKSON 700 Adcock Street

Saturday, December 7, 2:00 P.M. City of Ridgeland Christmas Parade “Songs of Christmas” Begins at Holmes Community College Tuesday, December 10 Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast “Make a Joyful Noise Unto the Lord!” Featuring Ridgeland High Singers Colonial Heights Baptist Church 444 Northpark Drive 7:00 A.M. – Breakfast 7:30 A.M. – Program Tickets - $15.00 each. Call the Chamber for info (601) 991-9996.

THE STUFFED BAKED POTATO FACTORY Northpark • The Eatery, 1200 E. County Line Road Photography by: Elwin Williams, Entertainment Media & Print Services.

Welcome, New Members! When considering needs for your home or office, please shop with Ridgeland Chamber members first! The Abigayle Adult Day Center The Northside Sun Lauren Benner • Tonya Donald Nathan Cantrell • Jimmye Sweat 205 Industrial Cove 246 Briarwood Drive (601) 607-7820 Jackson, MS 39236 www.abigayle.net (601) 957-1122 Caregivers www.northsidesun.com Magazine Publications • Newspapers Classic Restorations, LLC Mike Martin Olivia’s Food Emporium, Inc Olivia King 642 Ridgewood Road 637 Highway 51, Suite K (601) 906-1196 (601) 898-8333 mikeamartin02349@gmail.com oliviasfoodemporium.com Classic Car Restorations Caterers • Food - Frozen E.A.T.S. DINER Gifts & Specialty Items Ashley Bach Palladian Consign & Design 680 US Hwy. 51, Suite E Kay Fagan (769) 300-2778 637 Hwy. 51 North, Suite A www.eatsdiner.com (601) 790-9678 Restaurants palladian@comcast.net Grills of MS Consignment Shop • Furniture & Jonathan Huddleston Accessories 588 Hwy. 51 Interior Decorators & Designers (601) 790-7980 Taylor & Sons www.GrillsofMS.com Marti Rittenhouse Caterers • Specialty Foods 232 Market Street Cooking Schools/Classes Flowood, MS 39232 Guaranty Bank & Trust (601) 331-2405 Company mrittenhouse@tandsbenefits.com Bobby Little Employee Benefits & Consultants 601 Crescent Boulevard, Ste. 300 Insurance Companies (601) 707-9400 • (601) 605-7076 The Whimsy Cookie Company bobby.little@gbtonline.com Allan Carter • Pepper Carter Banks & Banking Associations 1000 Highland Colony Parkway, Kees Trees, LLC Suite 5005 Donna Kees • Terry Kees (601) 594-1575 • (601) 594-3076 247 Knight Road pepper@whimsyridgeland.com Terry, MS 39170 Bakeries (601) 874-2671 • (601) 672-3370 Zea Rotisserie & Bar https://keestreesllc.com Barbara Coultas Tree Service 1000 Highland Colony Pkwy., Motions Physical Therapy, LLC Ste. 10500 Monique Thompson (601) 790-1616 7048 Old Canton Road, Suite 1000 www.zearestaurants.com (769) 300-4143 Restaurants www.motionsphysicaltherapy.com Physical Therapy

SAVE THE DATE

Thanksgiving Blessings

MAYOR’S PRAYER BREAKFAST

FROM THE

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Board of Directors and Staff

COLONIAL HEIGHTS BAPTIST CHURCH 444 Northpark Drive Ridgeland, Mississippi

Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce

7:00 A.M. • Breakfast Buffet Opens 7:30 A.M. • Program Begins Linda Bynum Executive Director

Sandy Baas Administrative Assistant

MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of the City of Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce is to encourage an economic environment conducive to the continuing development of new and existing business.

You can contact the Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce at 754 Pear Orchard Road, Ridgeland, MS 39157, PO Box 194, Ridgeland, MS 39158-0194 ph 601.991.9996 fax 601.991.9997 email admin@ridgelandchamber.com or visit us online at www.ridgelandchamber.com

DIPLOMAT OF THE MONTH

JUNIOR DIPLOMAT OF THE MONTH

SEPTEMBER 2019 Allison DeWeese Holmes Community College

SEPT. – OCT. 2019 Amber Parks Ridgeland High School

The Ridgeland Chamber Junior Diplomats met at Ridgeland City Hall where Mayor Gene McGee shared news of exciting developments in Ridgeland. Thirty-five students representing Ridgeland High School, Madison Ridgeland Academy, Jackson Prep, Jackson Academy, St. Andrew’s Episcopal School and St. Joseph Catholic School are participating in the program. The students will be meeting throughout the year at area businesses as well as volunteering their services at upcoming Chamber and City events. Photo, from left: Junior Diplomat Co-Captains for 2019-2020, Emerson Robinson, St. Andrew’s Episcopal School; Justice Owah, George Jones, IV and Claire Richert, all from Ridgeland High.

Insuring your retirement! Free Educational Events: Nov. 19 & Dec. 10 from 5:30–6:30 pm in Ridgeland

(877) 759-5760

Advertise your business here! Call the Ridgeland Chamber of Commerce for information. 601.991.9996


Economy

November 7, 2019 Page B1

Pathways 2 Possibilities hosting Career Fair A Career Fair will be held in Central Mississippi Thursday, Nov. 7, at the Jackson Convention Center for eighth graders in Hinds, Madison, Rankin, Scott and Warren counties. P2P is an interactive, hands-on career exploration experience, designed to help 8th graders and older identified youth, ages 1624, link their passions to a paycheck. For more information, visit www.pathways2possibilities.org.

Ridgeland Tourism announces promotions

Nicolet Bell (right) purchased the Madison Merle Norman store in January. She is pictured with mother Sonja Hopper.

Madison Merle Norman store prepping for the holidays By DUNCAN DENT | Madison County Journal Nicolet Bell has been in Merle Norman stores since she was four years old. Growing up, her mother, Sonja Hopper, owned the one in Petal and later the one in Hattiesburg. Twenty-one years later she is getting into the business herself after she took over the Madison location in the Colony Crossing Shopping Center. “We are a locally-owned cosmetic studio offering a full range of products as well as jewelry and boutique clothing as well as ear

piercings,” Bell said. She purchased the store in January, which moved to Colony Crossing Shopping Center the previous April. She said she and her mom became interested because this was one of the best markets in the state. Hopper said it is exciting to see her daughter carry on the family business. “It is special,” Hopper said. “She is a natural. She has been in this store since she was four.” They are transitioning to their Christmas decorations

and out of their fall line of products. Bell said that coming up on a year in this location she has come to enjoy working with customers and offering them personalized service and connecting them to products that make them happy. “I really like getting to meet people and help them feel better about themselves. We hope people leave here confident and encouraged. I like to say we are in the encouragement business. We all know true beauty is on the inside but

that doesn’t mean it doesn't put a smile on people's faces when you help them improve how they feel about the way they look outside,” Bell said. They have four employees. To experience their personalized service and top of the line products, many of which customers are encouraged to try before they buy, visit Merle Norman at 111 Colony Crossing Suite 320 in Madison or call 601-427-5920.

The Ridgeland Tourism Commission (RTC) is pleased to announce two new staff members and two promotions within Ridgeland’s destination marketing organization. Hannah Wilkins of Ridgeland, formerly an event planner with Kendall Poole, has been selected as the Group Sales Manager to focus on meetings and conferences, reunions, weddings and the group leisure market. Wilkins was also a leadership development consultant and brings with her three years of experience in event coordination, project management and digital marketing. Karen Vance of Brandon, formerly an accountant with Heritage Properties SPC, has been named the Vice President of Finance and Administration for the operations of the RTC and the Visitors Center. Karen brings over 15 years of experience excelling in management, human resources, customer service and business operations. She replaces Shirley Williams who retired in September of 2019. Kelly Mott of Madison has been promoted to Vice President of Communications and Marketing with an emphasis in digital platforms. Mott joined Visit Ridgeland in July of 2017 with over 20 years of experience in the travel and tourism industry in central Alabama and east Tennessee. As a seasoned tourism marketing professional, Mott is responsible for strategically planning and implementing all segments of Ridgeland Tourism Commission’s digital and print communications, public relations and marketing/advertising efforts with RTC’s agency of record. Mina Thorgeson of Ridgeland has been promoted to Deputy Director and Vice President of Sales and Events. Thorgeson joined Visit Ridgeland as Director of Sales in 2010 and has successfully led the tourism efforts to establish Ridgeland as a sports and leisure destination. She has secured collegiate, professional and national events that attract attendees from around the country. As an avid cyclist herself, Thorgeson promotes the Ridgeland brand as an active lifestyle destination with events attractive to both locals and tourists. "The RTC is a creative, focused and innovative destination marketing organization established to advance the economic vitality of tourism in Ridgeland," said Chris Chapman, president/ CEO. "We are highly blessed to have this group of tourism professionals on our team and look forward to continuing outstanding work for the tourism industry in Ridgeland." It’s brand, “Ridgeland…Inside + Out” positions Ridgeland as a destination for active travelers seeking style and substance, where the integration of an outdoor lifestyle with modern, upscale design means whatever a traveler is doing, a backdrop of beauty and possibility await. For more information on Ridgeland, visit www.visitridgeland.com or on Facebook - @visitridgeland.

A ribbon-cutting ceremony was recently held for the new Stuffed Baked Potato Factory restaurant at Northpark. The Stuffed Baked Potato Factory was voted community favorite during the Taste for the Space culinary event last year, winning an opportunity to open its dream restaurant inside the Eatery. The Northpark location The Stuffed Baked Potato Factory’s first in Mississippi.

Photo by Elwin Williams


Page B2, Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019

601-853-4222

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Place your ad online onlinemadison.com/classified

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See LEGALS, page B7


Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019, Page B3

CLAIMS DOCKET From 7/21/2019 to 8/10/2019 Claim Invoice Number Amount Vendor Name DESCRIPTION Fund 001 GENERAL COUNTY FUND 4224 125.00 BATTLE TANIYA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4225 125.00 DIXON STEPHANIE A ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4226 125.00 DUNIGAN EDWARD ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4227 125.00 EPHFROM ORA W ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4228 149.00 EVANS JOHN WARING ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4229 125.00 JOHNSON MARCUS ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4230 149.00 LANCASTER LINDER (JACK) ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4231 149.00 LANCASTER WANDA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4232 125.00 MAYFIELD SHAWN ELECTION WORKER 8/05/2019 4233 125.00 MURRY EVELYN ELAINE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4234 125.00 NASH AURILA D ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4235 125.00 NASH HARRISON ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4236 125.00 OWEN CYNTHIA G ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4237 125.00 ROSELL CATINA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4238 125.00 WATSON CHRISTIAN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4239 125.00 WELLS BILLY J ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4240 125.00 WILLIS SHELIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4241 264.96 ANYA RUCKER TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 4242 263.31 ALICIA K LOUISVILLE TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 4243 979.50 LLOYD SPIVEY III TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 4244 1501.58 HAZEL CUNNINGHAM REIMBURSEMENT-ORLANDO 4245 1425.77 LINDSEY HERR REIMBURSEMENT-ORLANDO 4246 1347.84 STEVEN ROSS REIMBURSEMENT-ORLANDO 4247 165.88 JULIA R HODGES TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 4248 7950.00 SECURITY SUPPORT SERVICES HIKVISION MINI-DOME CAMERA 4250 9501.80 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 4251 11000.20 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 4252 16282.67 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 4253 125.00 HULSEY MARIE B ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4254 511.12 ALEX BREELAND TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 4255 16667.00 REGION 8 MENTAL HEALTH MEDICAL FEES - AUG 4256 36588.24 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE OF COURT PERSONNEL/STAFF 4257 5000.00 CLEARWATER GROUP, LLC CONSULTING - AUGUST 4258 12377.98 CENTRAL MS.PLANN/DEV.DIST RENT 4259 476.55 A COMPLETE FLAG SOURCE OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 4260 10.00 BEAR CREEK WATER ASSN UTILITIES 4261 44.80 CITY OF MADISON WATER DEP UTILITIES 4262 797.89 CANTON MUNICIPAL UTILITIE UTILITIES 4263 18976.50 CANTON MUNICIPAL UTILITIE UTILITIES 4264 9018.18 CANTON MUNICIPAL UTILITIE UTILITIES 4265 348.50 CRYSTAL CLEAN SWEEPING, I BUILDING AND GROUND REPAIR 4266 237.66 DIXIE SPRINGS OF JACKSON, MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 4267 170.00 MCGRAW "GOTTA GO" MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 4268 13657.00 PREWITT CONTRACT SERVICES JANITORIAL SERVICES 4269 4292.13 ROTOLO CONSULTANTS, INC LANDSCAPE MAINTENANCE 4270 30.00 SUPERIOR TIRE RECAPPERS, VEHICLE REPAIRS 4271 6227.61 TERRY SERVICE, INC. BUILDING AND GROUND REPAIR 4272 5728.47 TERRY SERVICE, INC. BUILDING AND GROUND REPAIR 4273 164.75 INTAB LLC OFFICE SUPPLIES 4274 494.81 JACKSON DATA PRODUCTS, IN OFFICE SUPPLIES 4275 182.40 AMERIFLEX BUSINESS SOLUTI FSA ADMIN FEE 4276 274.36 WAGE WORKS, INC. ADMIN FEES COBRA 4277 18.75 ADDISON HALL DESIGN LLC OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 4278 226.00 B & E COMMUNICATIONS, INC BUILDING AND GROUND REPAIR 4279 960.00 BUFKIN MECHANICAL, INC BUILDING AND GROUND REPAIR 4280 625.00 BXS INSURANCE KYRIE LUCAS 4281 450.00 DEPENDABLE PEST SERVICE, PEST CONTROL 4282 26.61 FED EX POSTAGE AND BOX RENT 4283 350.00 DANA SAFETY SUPPLY, INC. LAW ENFORCEMENT SUPPLIES 4284 250.00 GLOCK PROFESSIONAL, INC. TRAINING-SCOTT MCDONALD 4285 884.18 GRAINGER OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 4286 100.00 GRIFFIN MOTORS, INC. VEHICLE REPAIRS 4287 378.00 GULF STATES DISTRIBUTORS LAW ENFORCEMENT SUPPLIES 4288 49.90 HARTLEY EQUIPMENT COMPANY BUILDING AND GROUND REPAIR 4289 375.00 HICOMP, LLC OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 4290 52.80 HOLLYWOOD FEED, LLC OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 4291 370.80 LEXISNEXIS RISK SOLUTIONS OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 4292 53.98 MADISON COUNTY COOP OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 4293 200.00 MEA DRUG TESTING CONSORTI DRUG TESTING FEES 4294 88412.57 MISSISSIPPI CORRECTIONAL MEDICAL FEES 4295 3.95 NAPA AUTO PARTS OF CANTON VEHICLE REPAIRS 4296 305.00 OZBORN COMMUNICATIONS, LL RADIO REPAIRS 4297 338.36 PHILLIPS LUMBER & HOME CE HARDWARE SUPPLIES 4298 295.73 SCOTT PETROLEUM CORP DIESEL 4299 2019.43 SOUTHERN CONNECTION POLIC UNIFORMS/WEARING APPAREL 4300 844.37 STAPLES BUSINESS ADVANTAG OFFICE SUPPLIES 4301 9707.84 SUMMIT FOOD SERVICES LLC FEEDING PRISONERS 4302 216.00 VENABLE GLASS SERVICES, L VEHICLE REPAIRS 4303 940.00 APEX SOFTWARE MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 4304 626.20 LEXISNEXIS RISK SOLUTIONS OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 4305 291.26 TONY'S TIRE & AUTO INC VEHICLE REPAIRS 4306 2164.67 ABSOLUTE PRINT SOLUTIONS OFFICE SUPPLIES 4307 2750.00 MS STATE MEDICAL EXAMINER AUTOPSY/MORGUE FEES 4308 320.00 MISSISSIPPI SOCIETY OF CP DUES - JAY HILLIARD 4309 1216.56 OFFICE DEPOT INC OFFICE SUPPLIES 4310 985.99 CDW GOVERNMENT, INC HP LASERJET 4311 1530.39 METRIX SOLUTIONS, LLC CYLANCE ANTI-VIRUS 4312 402.44 MADCO PROPERTIES, LLC UTILITIES 4313 400.00 NELSON CAUTHEN MEDICAL FEES 4314 425.00 MISS. ASSOCIATION OF SUPE MAS - RONNY LOTT 4315 431.00 METRIX SOLUTIONS, LLC HP LASERJET (2) 4316 596.70 TEC PHONE SERVICE 4317 3589.95 U.S.NEXT, INC. SERVER HOSTING SUPPORT 4318 125.78 PITNEY BOWES OFFICE SUPPLIES 4319 3360.79 DIVERSIFIED COMPANIES, LL PROCESSING TAG RENEWALS 4320 991.00 AMERICAN SOLUTIONS FOR BU OFFICE SUPPLIES 4321 46.98 HELEN CARNEY TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 4322 132.88 AMANDA BROCK-VANLANDINGHA TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 4323 3100.00 GREENE RODDRICK OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 4324 525.00 TRESSA CARLISS OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 4325 225.00 SECURITY SUPPORT SERVICES COMMERCIAL SERVICE CALL 4326 16880.39 MADISON COUNTY SCHOOL DIS MOTOR VEHICLE LICENSES 4327 4774.00 MADISON COUNTY SCHOOL DIS MOTOR VEHICLE LICENSES 4328 364.76 MADISON COUNTY SCHOOL DIS MOTOR VEHICLE LICENSES 4329 231.60 MADISON COUNTY JOURNAL LEGAL AD 4330 1640.00 T E LEWIS D/B/A F M SOFT MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS-AUG 4331 3857.87 ELECTION SYSTEMS & SOFTWA OFFICE SUPPLIES 4332 409.99 INTERSTATE BATTERIES OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 4333 12598.50 KATIE BRYANT SNELL PLLC LEGAL FEES 4334 1909.48 ENTERGY UTILITIES 4335 132.42 ARAMARK UNIFORM & CAREER MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 4336 1072.67 MODERN MARKETING EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS 4337 280.32 KAREN ROWZEE TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 4338 123.00 KAREN S. ROWZEE TRANSCRIPTS 4339 309.00 LUIS DIAZ INTERPRETER INTERPRETER 4340 568.17 SAFEGUARD BUSINESS SYSTEM OFFICE SUPPLIES 4341 12.25 ARAMARK UNIFORM & CAREER JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 4342 50.00 SECRETARY OF STATE NOTARY-MYRTLE RAYBORN 4343 125.00 DUNIGAN EDWARD ELECTION WORKER 8/2019 4344 125.00 JOHNSON MARCUS ELECTION WORKER 8/2019 4345 125.00 LYLES ELLIOTT ELECTION WORKER 8/2019 4346 125.00 OWEN CYNTHIA G ELECTION WORKER 8/2019 4347 125.00 SIMS JAMES ELECTION WORKER 8/2019 4348 125.00 WELLS KATHY ELECTION WORKER 8/2019 4349 10.00 WILLIAMS DIANE ELECTION WORKER 8/2019 4350 125.00 WILLIS SHELIA ELECTION WORKER 8/2019 4351 3040.00 PILEUM CORPORATION OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 4352 1841.40 BOB BARKER CO INC HANDCUFFS 4353 14516.25 ABSOLUTE PRINT SOLUTIONS ELECTION DAY BALLOTS 4354 8032.50 WATKINS & EAGER, PLLC LEGAL FEES 4355 1250.00 COTHERN COMPUTER SYSTEMS AS400 PROGRAMMING SUPPORT 4356 62.43 MATTHEW BENDER & CO., INC DUES & SUBSCRIPTIONS 4357 107.90 VENTURE TECHNOLOGIES WEBSITE CREDIT CARD FEES 4358 756.35 CARD SERVICES TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 4359 814.99 AT&T MOBILITY, LLC FLEET TRACKING 4360 2341.00 MADISON COUNTY CHANCERY C MISC - OTHER REVENUE 4361 363.94 MADISON COUNTY CHANCERY C MISC - OTHER REVENUE 4362 24.75 CENTERPOINT ENERGY UTILITIES 4363 173.34 THOMAS REUTERS - WEST DUES & SUBSCRIPTIONS 4364 1551.19 MANNING TIRE CO., INC. REPAIR MOSQUITO TRUCK 4365 5028.00 ADAPCO, INC. AQUA-RESLIN 4368 357380.78 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 4369 7114.24 CARD SERVICES OFFICE SUPPLIES Fund 012 PLANNING & ZONING FUND 140 43.29 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 141 3678.50 SCOTT, SULLIVAN, STREETMA LEGAL FEES 142 26.29 AT&T MOBILITY, LLC FLEET TRACKING 143 58.02 JACKSON BLUE PRINT & SUPP OFFICE SUPPLIES 144 80.04 MADISON COUNTY JOURNAL LEGAL AD Fund 015 SELF INSURANCE FUND 74 15815.42 GUARDIAN A/F LIFE/VISION/DENTAL-CLAIMS 75 97425.70 UMR HEALTH-CLAIMS 76 163008.53 UMR HEALTH-CLAIMS 77 42241.54 UMR HEALTH-CLAIMS Fund 030 CANTEEN FUND 64 8158.04 PREMIER SUPPLY LINK, LLC JAIL SUPPLIES Fund 097 E911 COMMUNICATIONS FUND 83 1183.00 OZBORN COMMUNICATIONS, LL RADIO REPAIRS 84 24644.10 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES Fund 103 RECORDS MANAGEMENT COUNTY 2 94.68 JACKSON DATA PRODUCTS, IN OFFICE SUPPLIES Fund 104 LAW LIBRARY 20 575.00 RELX INC. DBA LEXISNEXIS LAW LIBRARY MATERIALS Fund 105 SOLID WASTE FUND 84 3279.38 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 85 1037.00 SOUTHERN TIRE RECYCLING L CONTAINER RENTAL Fund 113 SHERIFF'S ST/LOCAL DRUG SEIZ 14 3261.12 CREATIVE PRODUCT SOURCING DAREN BADGE TEE SMALL NAVY Fund 115 1/4 MILL FIRE DISTRICT FUND 136 44.69 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE

137 138 139

123.53 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES VEHICLE REPAIRS 109.95 INTERSTATE BATTERIES BLDG REPAIR SUPPLIES 970.00 TAW POWER SYSTEMS, INC. MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS Fund 150 ROAD MAINTENANCE FUND 567 94577.01 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 568 5026.85 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 569 4538.31 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 570 1170.11 LIVINGSTON M.B. CHURCH DAMAGED SIGN 571 1790.98 CANTON MUNICIPAL UTILITIE UTILITIES 572 185.00 PUCKETT RENTS OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 573 482.03 ARROW DISTRIBUTION, LLC JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 574 1439.96 CINTAS CORPORATION #210 UNIFORM RENTAL 575 200.09 CINTAS FIRST AID & SAFETY MEDICAL SUPPLIES 576 13.98 DIXIE SPRINGS OF JACKSON, OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 577 70.00 MCGRAW "GOTTA GO" OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 578 49.42 PHILLIPS LUMBER & HOME CE OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 579 33.99 QUILL CORPORATION OFFICE SUPPLIES 580 144.70 SOUTHERN HOSE & INDUSTRIA REPAIR PARTS 581 29.59 ENTERGY UTILITIES 582 746.32 DAVIS REFRIGERATION & ELE OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 583 5662.64 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE ASPHALT-JULY 584 3217.06 CAPITOL BODY SHOP INC OF REPAIR TRUCK 585 4916.50 WARREN PAVING, INC #7 WASHED AGGREGATE 586 7914.00 SCOTT PETROLEUM CORP LOW SULPHUR DIESEL 587 3350.00 JACKSON TREE SERVICE CUT AND REMOVE TREE 588 2167.20 GOODLOE CONSTRUCTION COMP FILL DIRT - JULY 589 4200.00 JACKSON TREE SERVICE CUT AND REMOVE TREE 590 300.00 MEA MEDICAL CLINIC EMPLOYMENT PHYSICAL 591 1472.24 AT&T MOBILITY, LLC FLEET TRACKING 592 27029.21 CARD SERVICES ROAD MACH & EQUIPMENT REP Fund 160 BRIDGE & CULVERT FUND 74 18845.44 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 75 3200.00 H1 SERVICES, LLC ROW ACQUISITION 76 1287.00 JEFCOAT FENCE CO.,INC FENCING 77 6000.00 SOUTHERN CONSULTANTS, INC DRAINAGE REHABILITATION 78 4750.00 SOUTHERN CONSULTANTS, INC CULVERT REPLACEMENT 79 9892.00 UTILITY CONSTRUCTORS, INC STORM DRAIN REPAIR 80 2400.00 UTILITY CONSTRUCTORS, INC REPLACE EXISTING 24" X 40 81 1409.50 G & O SUPPLY, INC. 15" ARCHED PIPE 82 7800.00 BLURTON, BANKS, & ASSOC., EXCAVATE 4 SINK HOLES 83 1764.00 G & O SUPPLY, INC. 42"14 GAUGE CULVERT 84 2150.00 JIMMIE CAROL CAIN AND LAND ROW - PURVIS ROAD Fund 170 STATE AID ROAD FUND 8 26453.26 STANTEC CONSULTING SERVIC OLD CANTON RD OVERLAY Fund 190 JUVENILE DRUG COURT 67 30.16 JOHN BARNTS TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT Fund 191 AOC-ADULT DRUG COURT 134 1121.89 JOHN BARNTS TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 135 47.17 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 136 21.30 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 137 5579.11 CARD SERVICES TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 138 26.29 AT&T MOBILITY, LLC FLEET TRACKING 139 164.64 CARD SERVICES OFFICE SUPPLIES Fund 315 2014 $15 MILLION ROAD BONDS 15 54646.50 NEEL-SCHAFFER, INC BOZEMAN/463/GLUCKSTADT Fund 316 $6M MDOT PROJECT 5 31810.20 WAGGONER ENGINEERING, INC REUNION/HIGHLAND COLONY Fund 319 2017 $8M ROAD BOND 32 24942.50 NEEL-SCHAFFER, INC REUNION PHASE II 33 45354.87 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE APSHALT Fund 320 $3.3M BOND 45 152.75 MADISON COUNTY COOP SULPHUR SPRINGS PARK 46 1050.00 NEEL-SCHAFFER, INC GLUCKSTADT WIDENING 47 97288.55 BENSON BUILDERS & PROPERT SULPHUR SPRINGS PARK Fund 321 SULPHUR SPRINGS NH GRANT 6 1206.60 G & O SUPPLY, INC. SULPHUR SPRINGS 7 677.60 GOODLOE CONSTRUCTION COMP SULPHUR SPRINGS Fund 323 $5.7M SHORT TERM 36 9385.00 LANE LINE LLC TRAFFIC STRIPING Fund 325 MDA DIP FASTENAL GRANT 7 33628.60 HEMPHILL CONSTRUCTION SPLIT CASING #2 INSTALLED Fund 327 1.6 MILLION SHORT TERM 15 9531.09 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE ASPHALT 16 25293.91 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE ASPHALT 17 139358.41 CITY OF MADISON HOY ROAD Fund 681 PAYROLL CLEARING ACCOUNT 55814.06 TOTAL NET PAY NET PAY - ALL CHECKS 177362.13 TOTAL NET PAY NET PAY - ALL CHECKS 364 381863.17 PERS/MHSPRS/SLRP/MRS/ORP STATE RETIREMENT 374 17614.44 IRS TAXTEL PAYMENT SOCIAL SECURITY (FICA) PAY 375 57746.57 IRS TAXTEL PAYMENT SOCIAL SECURITY (FICA) PAY 2,562,725.52 Total All Invoices From 7/21/2019 to 8/10/2019 Claim Invoice Number Amount Vendor Name DESCRIPTION Fund 001 GENERAL COUNTY FUND 3333 24.00 NASON GLORIA ELECTION TRAINING 6/2019 3688 280.00 AVIS STRINGER ADVANCE - ORLANDO 3689 5767.08 CARD SERVICES OFFICE SUPPLIES 3690 1299.00 LOGMEIN USA, INC. MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 3691 400.00 MJCCA SEMINARS-CHERYL HORN 3692 75.00 RALPH WARD REFUND-ROGERS PARK 3693 340946.80 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 3694 827198.65 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 3695 10119.86 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 3696 100000.00 SELF FUNDED INSURANCE ACC INSURANCE TRANSFER 3697 11081.62 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 3698 7867.81 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 3699 15460.59 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 3700 13455.32 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 3701 10359.47 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 3702 791.17 CANTON MUNICIPAL UTILITIE UTILITIES 3703 20513.35 CANTON MUNICIPAL UTILITIE UTILITIES 3704 3349.30 CANTON MUNICIPAL UTILITIE UTILITIES 3705 4888.26 CARD SERVICES TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 3706 261512.28 BANCORPSOUTH BANK SOUTH MADISON ANNEX PRIN 3707 8062.50 REGIONS BANK 2013 URBAN RENEWAL BONDS 3708 450.00 DIVERSIFIED COMPUTER SYST OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 3709 814.99 AT&T MOBILITY, LLC FLEET TRACKING 3710 11716.25 MADISON COUNTY SOIL CONSE GRANTS & SUBSIDIES 3711 3237.50 MADCO PROPERTIES, LLC RENT 3712 9166.66 REGION 8 MENTAL HEALTH GRANTS & SUBSIDIES 3713 15203.34 MADISON CTY HEALTH DEPT GRANTS & SUBSIDIES 3714 1200.00 214 KEY DRIVE, LLC RENT 3715 4518.19 MS STATE UNIV EXTENSION S GRANTS & SUBSIDIES 3716 2500.00 STRATEGIC MARKETING GROUP CONSULTING 3717 8723.35 ROBERT J YOUNG COMPANY OFFICE SUPPLIES 3718 1300.00 WARREN COUNTY GENERAL FUN DETENTION/SECURITY COSTS 3719 5150.00 RANKIN SHERIFFS JUVENILE DETENTION/SECURITY COSTS 3720 726.35 ADAPTS ELECTRONIC MONITOR DETENTION/ANKLE BRACELETS 3721 1215.58 REDWOOD TOXICOLOGY LABORA DRUG TESTING FEES 3722 650.35 OFFICE DEPOT INC OFFICE SUPPLIES 3723 3572.13 AT&T MOBILITY, LLC PHONE SERVICE 3724 235.00 U. S. POST OFFICE POSTAGE AND BOX RENT 3725 610.95 SOUTHERN TELECOMMUNICATIO PHONE SERVICE 3726 5145.86 SOUTHERN TELECOMMUNICATIO PHONE SERVICE 3727 360.99 CFS PRODUCTS, INC OFFICE SUPPLIES 3728 3589.95 U.S.NEXT, INC. SERVER HOSTING SUPPORT 3729 587.88 TEC PHONE SERVICE 3730 2717.40 VENTURE TECHNOLOGIES MONTHLY E-MAIL SUPPORT 3731 1250.00 COTHERN COMPUTER SYSTEMS AS400 PROGRAMMING SUPPORT 3732 418.52 ALEX BREELAND TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 3733 279.56 AVIS STRINGER TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 3734 4627.50 PILEUM CORPORATION OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 3735 3300.00 MS STATE MEDICAL EXAMINER AUTOPSY/MORGUE FEES 3736 250.00 ROBERTSON REMOVAL SERVICE OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 3737 135.00 CENTRAL MS REMOVAL SERVIC OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 3738 1435.58 PITNEY BOWES OFFICE SUPPLIES 3739 850.00 TRI-STATE CONSULTING SERV WEB/GIS SUPPORT 3740 102.80 BRENCORP OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 3741 486.00 TONY'S TIRE & AUTO INC VEHICLE REPAIRS 3742 111.20 ARAMARK UNIFORM & CAREER MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 3743 66.78 CARR PLUMBING SUPPLY, INC OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 3744 170.00 MCGRAW "GOTTA GO" MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 3745 1325.00 MIDSOUTH ELEVATOR, LLC MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 3746 125.00 SOLAR CONTROL OF JACKSON BUILDING AND GROUND REPAIR 3747 13657.00 PREWITT CONTRACT SERVICES JANITORIAL SERVICES 3748 318.00 SOUTHEASTERN POND MANAGEM FERTILIZATION SERVICE #5 3749 1536.21 JACKSON DATA PRODUCTS, IN OFFICE SUPPLIES 3750 781.89 JACKSON DATA PRODUCTS, IN OFFICE SUPPLIES 3751 1131.01 ELECTION SYSTEMS & SOFTWA OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 3752 900.00 INFOWARE MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 3753 230.00 MANNING TIRE CO., INC. TIRES 3754 274.36 WAGE WORKS, INC. ADMIN FEES COBRA 3755 431.11 AT&T PHONE SERVICE 3756 5576.47 BOB BARKER CO INC JAIL SUPPLIES 3757 6069.34 CANTON MUNICIPAL UTILITIE UTILITIES 3758 50.00 DEPENDABLE PEST SERVICE, PEST CONTROL 3759 363.30 LEXISNEXIS RISK SOLUTIONS OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 3760 25.00 SECRETARY OF STATE NOTARY-K WILLEY 3761 2000.00 STRATEGIC MARKETING GROUP PUBLIC RELATIONS 3762 217.00 RADFORD SHEARRILL TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 3763 810.05 ALEX BREELAND TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 3764 904.80 METRIX SOLUTIONS, LLC OFFICE 365 MONTHLY 3765 866.41 MILLETTE ADMINISTRATORS, MEDICAL FEES 3766 2193.20 C SPIRE WIRELESS PHONE SERVICE 3767 200.00 SUPREME COURT OF MISSISSI NOTICE OF APPEAL 3768 200.00 SUPREME COURT OF MISSISSI NOTICE OF APPEAL 3769 333.75 RAYBORN HARVEY, CSR #1274 TRANSCRIPTS

3770 3771 3772 3773 3774 3775 3776 3777 3778 ICE 3779 3780 3781 3782 3783 3784 3785 3786 3787 PLIES 3788 3789 3790 3791 3792 3793 3794 3795 3796 3797 3798 3799 3800 3801 3802 3803 3804 3805 3806 3807 3808 3809 3810 3811 3812 3813 3814 3815 3816 3817 3818 3819 3820 3821 3822 3823 3824 3825 3826 3827 3828 3829 3830 3831 3832 3833 3834 3835 3836 3837 3838 3839 3840 3841 3842 3843 3845 3846 3847 3848 3849 3850 3851 3852 3853 3854 3855 3856 3857 3858 3859 3860 3861 3862 3863 3864 3865 3866 3867 3868 3869 3870 3871 3872 3873 3874 3875 3876 3877 3878 3879 3880 3881 3882 3883 3884 3885 3886 3887 3888 3889 3890 3891 3892 3893 3894 3895 3896 3897 3898 3899 3900 ICE 3901 3902 3903 3904 3905 3906 3907 3908 3909 3910 3911 3912 3913 3914 3915 3916 3917 3918 3919 3920 3921 3922 3923 3924 3925 3926 3927 3928 3929 3930 3931 3932 3933 3934 3935 3936 3937 3938 3939 3940 3941 3942 3943 3944 3945

25.28 INTAB LLC OFFICE SUPPLIES 398.25 MOLLY B. EATON TRANSCRIPTS 19.20 MIRANDA M SCHOGGEN TRANSCRIPTS 48.00 KAREN S. ROWZEE TRANSCRIPTS 189.45 SAFEGUARD BUSINESS SYSTEM OFFICE SUPPLIES 49.00 WEST ACADEMIC DUES & SUBSCRIPTIONS 18567.01 ENTERGY UTILITIES 4000.00 CAPITOL BODY SHOP INC OF VEHICLE REPAIRS 150.00 DIVERSIFIED COMPUTER SYST OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERV504.00 ELKINS WHOLESALE, INC JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 441.76 GRAINGER JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 52.80 HOLLYWOOD FEED, LLC OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 90.93 MADISON COUNTY COOP OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 513.23 MID-SOUTH UNIFORM & SUPPL UNIFORMS/WEARING APPAREL 80888.29 MISSISSIPPI CORRECTIONAL MEDICAL FEES 60.00 NICK CLARK'S OFFICE PARTN OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 206.00 OZBORN COMMUNICATIONS, LL RADIO REPAIRS 2257.69 SOUTHERN CONNECTION POLIC LAW ENFORCEMENT SUP1912.30 STAPLES BUSINESS ADVANTAG OFFICE SUPPLIES 1693.84 STAPLES BUSINESS ADVANTAG OFFICE SUPPLIES 41465.85 SUMMIT FOOD SERVICES LLC FEEDING PRISONERS 15.00 SUPERIOR TIRE RECAPPERS, VEHICLE REPAIRS 698.74 TAW POWER SYSTEMS, INC. OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 313.33 AMERICAN SOLUTIONS FOR BU OFFICE SUPPLIES 47.50 FORESTRY SUPPLIERS INC OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 309.92 SOUTHERN CONNECTION POLIC OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 4104.72 ENTERGY UTILITIES 2658.40 ENTERGY UTILITIES 10.00 BEAR CREEK WATER ASSN UTILITIES 24.75 CENTERPOINT ENERGY UTILITIES 49.80 CITY OF MADISON WATER DEP UTILITIES 8066.45 TERRY SERVICE, INC. BUILDING AND GROUND REPAIR 727.89 OMEGA ELECTRIC, LLC BUILDING AND GROUND REPAIR 24.00 ALEXANDER GENEVA ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 BARRET MICHELLE ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 BROWN BARBARA A ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 BROWN CALLIE ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 BROWN HARRIS RUTH ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 CARTER DEBBIE ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 CAUTHEN AMY ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 CLEAVER KATIE ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 CULVER MICHAEL ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 DAVIS LAURA ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 DEVINE YVETTE M ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 DIXON NELLIE R ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 ESCO NETTIE P ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 FOSTER MORZELL ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 GARRISON JESSE L ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 GOOLSBY DAVID ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 HAYES FRANKIE ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 JACKSON DOROTHY ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 JONES ANNIE ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 MARTIN JR ROBERT C ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 MAXWELL DANA ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 MCCARTY MELISSA ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 MCGRUDER CLARA ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 MICHAELSEN KELLI ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 PARKER JAMES ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 POSTON RUBY ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 PRESCOTT BOB ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 ROBERTS JANET ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 ROUSER DARRYL ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 RUSSELL-REED BARBARA ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 SIMS JAMES ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 SMITH KATHLEEN ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 SMOOTS JAZSICA ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 TUCKER BETTY J ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 UPTON MEREDITH ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 VANCE SARAH M ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 WASH DOMINIQUE ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 WASH SHERROD ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 WATTS HURSTINE ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 24.00 WILLIAMS ANNIE ELECTION TRAINING 7/19/20 444.77 STUART C IRBY CO BLDG REPAIR SUPPLIES 195.00 1ST DEFENSE FIRE & SAFETY MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 51.95 MADISON COUNTY COOP OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 153.32 PHILLIPS LUMBER & HOME CE OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 1579.33 QUALITY CHEMICAL & SUPPLY JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 221.80 SCOTT PENN, INC. OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 15.00 SUPERIOR TIRE RECAPPERS, TIRES 6407.80 CIRCUIT COURT JURY ACCOUN JURY & WITNESS FEES 24.00 MORRIS KIM ELECTION TRAINING 7/29/19 24.00 MORRIS STEVE ELECTION TRAINING 7/29/19 24.00 RIGNEY MAEVE ELECTION TRAINING 7/29/19 309.00 LUIS DIAZ INTERPRETER INTERPRETER 8361.00 ANITA E WRAY COUNTY REGISTRAR 17.40 KELLY BRENTZ TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 104.40 DANA GORDON TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 36.75 ARAMARK UNIFORM & CAREER JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 299.00 SKILLPATH DUES & SUBSCRIPTIONS 47.59 NORMAN CANNADY TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 2876.66 AT&T MOBILITY, LLC PHONE SERVICE 337.00 THOMAS REUTERS - WEST DUES & SUBSCRIPTIONS 2096.64 SOUTHERN TELECOMMUNICATIO PHONE SERVICE 46104.50 MCEDA MCEDA SUBSIDIES 2089.46 DELTACOM, INC. INTERNET SERVICE 236.85 COMCAST CABLE PUBLIC INTERNET SERVICE 125.00 BRANCH NICKIE OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 1187.80 SHRED-IT USA - NEW YORK OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 54.90 STAMPS-A-MILLION OFFICE SUPPLIES 2732.43 CENTRAL MISSISIPPI COURT OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 89.95 INTERSTATE BATTERIES OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 153.00 LISHA S EDWARDS TRANSCRIPTS 160.00 PWTINT, LLC VEHICLE REPAIRS 1319.55 OFFICE DEPOT INC OFFICE SUPPLIES 1825.00 BXS INSURANCE BRITTANY HOLLINS 4126.56 ELKINS WHOLESALE, INC SOUR/SOFTNER 1800.00 GULF STATES DISTRIBUTORS NS-A 0-50 SPPEDWEEL TQ 19 1980.00 SOUND & COMMUNICATIONS CIRCUIT CT-ACOUSTICAL 1200.00 SOUTHEASTERN POND MANAGEM SULPHUR SPRINGS 24.00 AGIN BILL ELECTION TRAINING 7/31/19 24.00 BIERNAT AMY ELECTION TRAINING 7/31/19 24.00 CLAY CONNIE ELECTION TRAINING 7/31/19 24.00 HAYES FRANKIE ELECTION TRAINING 7/31/19 24.00 RILEY MARY ELECTION TRAINING 7/31/19 24.00 WRIGHT EDWARD ELECTION TRAINING 7/31/19 4400.00 TRI-STATE CONSULTING SERV SET BOUND MAP BOOKS 4993.00 ADAPCO, INC. AQUA-RESLIN 4906.40 TONY'S TIRE & AUTO INC 265/60/17 BFG ADVANT TIRES 297.00 SMARTDRAW SOFTWARE, LLC SOFTWARE/LICENSES 259.84 KAY PACE TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 3825.00 DELTA COMPUTER SYSTEMS, I MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 485.00 TAW POWER SYSTEMS, INC. MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS 223.88 ENTERGY UTILITIES 123.09 ENTERGY UTILITIES 25.94 ENTERGY UTILITIES 10600.98 DICKERSON PETROLEUM, INC GASOLINE 990.00 TOWERCOM SOUTH, LLC TOWER RENT 2123.43 TONY'S TIRE & AUTO INC VEHICLE REPAIRS 125.00 ROBERTSON REMOVAL SERVICE OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERV1557.30 THE CLARION LEDGER REUNION PKWY II 36924.90 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 450.00 ALABAMA NENA GULF COAST 9 SEMINARS-JENNIFER KNIGHT 4796.06 CAROUSEL INDUSTRIES OF NO AVAYA SUPPORT - CHANCERY 450.00 MCGRAW JR DON LEGAL FEES 295.00 MISSISSIPPI SOCIETY OF CP SEMINAR-JAY HILLIARD 31819.64 RANKIN CO BOARD OF SUPERV VICTIM ASST COORDINATOR 360.00 THE GOZA LAW FIRM, PLLC LEGAL FEES 337387.34 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 125.00 ADAMS CARRIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 ADAMS CLARA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 ADAMS FREDDIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 ADAMS SALLIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 AGIN BILL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 ALEXANDER GENEVA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 ALMAN LYNDA M ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 ANDERSON ARTHUR ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 ANDERSON DELORISE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 ANTHONY CURTISTINE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 ARCHIE VEDA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 BAKER GLENNETTA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 BARNES EVELYN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BARNES MARILYN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BARNES VANICE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 135.00 BARRET MICHELLE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BATES SHARON STEED ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BATTLE WILLIE STEEN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 135.00 BERGANSKY DEBBIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BERRY BEATRICE LANGSTON ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BETTIS WILLIAM HENRY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BIERNAT AMY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BILBREW MARLENE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BILBREW MARY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 157.76 BILBREW ROBERT A ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BLACK BOBBIE J ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BLACK CLARENCE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BLACKMON DOROTHY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BOLDEN ANGELIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BOLDEN RANDALL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BOOKER JANNIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 160.08 BOWERING NANCY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BRAGGS JIMMIE LEE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BRAGGS LINDA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BRATTON NORA J ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 BRENT FREDRICA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019

See CLAIMS, page 4


Page B4, Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019

Claims Continued from page B3 3946 3947 3948 3949 3950 3951 3952 3953 3954 3955 3956 3957 3958 3959 3960 3961 3962 3963 3964 3965 3966 3967 3968 3969 3970 3971 3972 3973 3974 3975 3976 3977 3978 3979 3980 3981 3982 3983 3984 3985 3986 3987 3988 3989 3990 3991 3992 3993 3994 3995 3996 3997 3998 3999 4000 4001 4002 4003 4004 4005 4006 4007 4008 4009 4010 4011 4012 4013 4014 4015 4016 4017 4018 4019 4020 4021 4022 4023 4024 4025 4026 4027 4028 4029 4030 4031 4032 4033 4034 4035 4036 4037 4039 4040 4041 4042 4043 4044 4045 4046 4047 4048 4049 4050 4051 4052 4053 4054 4055 4056 4057 4058 4059 4060 4061 4062 4063 4064 4065 4066 4067 4068 4069 4070 4071 4072 4073 4074 4075 4076 4077 4078 4079 4080 4081 4082 4083 4084 4085 4086 4087 4088 4089 4090 4091 4092 4093 4094 4095 4096 4097 4098 4099 4100 4101 4102 4103 4104 4105 4106 4107 4108 4109 4110 4111 4112 4113 4114 4115 4116 4117 4118 4119 4120

125.00 BROOKS MARGIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BROOKS SCHLETHA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 135.00 BROWN BARBARA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 BROWN BARBARA A ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BROWN CALLIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 135.00 BROWN DOROTHY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 146.02 BROWN HARRIS RUTH ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BROWN LINDA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BROWN ROY LEE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BULLOCK CLYDE MARK ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BULLOCK JANET ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BURCHFIELD DOROTHY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 BURRELL JR HERMAN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 CAPPLEMAN BRUCE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 CARTER DEBBIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 CARTER ONELL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 153.70 CAUTHEN AMY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 142.54 CAUTHEN DANIEL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 CHRISTOPHER SONJA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 CLAY CONNIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 CLEAVER KATIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 COOK ALICE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 COON RALPH M ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 COX DOROTHY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 155.44 CULVER MICHAEL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 CUMMINGHAM EMMARYN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DAVENPORT MATTIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DAVIS HELEN T ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 150.80 DAVIS JIMMIE L ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 135.00 DAVIS LAURA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DAVIS PATRICIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DAVIS ROZELLA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DAVIS TOMMIE L ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DAWSON BRUCE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DEAVOURS MARGARET ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DEER PAM ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DENTON SHERRY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DEVINE YVETTE M ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DIDLAKE MILLIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DILLARD MELBA W ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 161.47 DIXON NELLIE R ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DIXON, JR JIM A ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 DUVALL RITA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 EDWARDS RUBY L ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 EDWARDS VERNELL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 ELLIOTT LESLIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 156.02 ESCO NETTIE P ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 EVANS CAROLYN L ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 FAULKNER BECKY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 FAULKNER TOMMY S ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 156.60 FLEMING VIOLET J ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 149.64 FORT DOROTHY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 150.22 FOSTER MORZELL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 135.00 FRANCIS JANICE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 FUHRER MARILYNN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GARDNER JACK ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 163.56 GARDNER JUDY D ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GARNER CANDACE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 146.60 GARNER HOWELL C ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GARRETT COLEMAN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GARRETT JOANNE T ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GARRISON JESSE L ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GIBSON LEILA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GIBSON PAMELA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 191.98 GLASCOE MARK ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GLASCOE PATRICIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 151.96 GODWIN JEAN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 GODWIN LORI V ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GODWIN PHILLIPS ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GOOLSBY DAVID ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 156.60 GRANDERSON MONICA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GREER JAMES LARRY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 GROSS BARBARA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HALFORD FRANK ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HAMBRICK MATTIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 159.85 HAMMETT POLLY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HANEY LYNN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 174.00 HARDACRE JASON W. ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HARDACRE JOHNNY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HARDACRE RITA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HARDY JOHN T ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HART CORINE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HAWKINS PEARLY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 158.78 HAYES FRANKIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HOLIDAY MARY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 HOLMES BOBBIE JEAN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HOLMES SANDRA J ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HORNE RICHARD C ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HUGHES JANET ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HUGHES JOHNNY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 168.20 HUGHES PATRICIA H. ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 HUGHES WILLIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 JACKSON DOROTHY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 JACKSON EVELYN J ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 JACKSON MARILYNN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 135.00 JACKSON SHARON ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 JENKINS PATRICIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 JOHNSON MARGARET ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 JOHNSON MARY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 159.50 JOHNSON NORMA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 JOHNSON PHILLIP ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 JOHNSON ROBERTA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 JOHNSON STELLA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 JONES ANNIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 JONES EMMA B ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 JONES WILLIAM ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 JORDAN MATTIE W ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 KELLY CARRIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 KENNEY JOHN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 162.40 KRAKOS PATRICIA M ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 KRAKOS RODDY L ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LEE DARLENE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LEE JAIRUS ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LEWIS OLIN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LEWIS SHIRLEY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LIDDELL JOYCE N ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LIGHTNER-CULLINS EVELYN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LITTLE AMANDA DIANE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LOVING SHELLEY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 LUCKETT DORIS ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LUCKETT JAMES T ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LUCKETT JANICE M ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LUCKETT LA'DREVIUS ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LUCKETT LOVIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LUCKETT PATRICIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 LUSTER HELEN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 MANNEY RUTH ANN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MARSHALL JORDAN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MARSHALL MORGAN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 158.92 MARTIN JR ROBERT C ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MATLOCK EIRDELL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 MAXWELL DANA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MAYFIELD FREDRICK ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MAYFIELD GALONDA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 174.00 MAYFIELD SHAWN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MCCULLAR CALVIN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 MCGEE CALLIE D ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 153.12 MCGRUDER CLARA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MCHARRIS JACQUELINE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MCWILLIAMS HOLLY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 135.00 MILLER FELICIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MITCHELL GLORIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 135.00 MITCHELL MELISSA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MOORE CHERYL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MORRIS KIM ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MORRIS STEVE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 135.00 MORRIS SU ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 MURPHY LUELLA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 NASH CHARLES C. ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 NASON GLORIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 NEWMAN CLARA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 NICHOLS ANNIE PEARL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 NICHOLS BETTYE J ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 NICHOLSON LINDA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 OUSLEY EULA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 OUSLEY SHIRLEY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PAGE BOBBIE N ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PARETTI WILLIAM ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PARKER BARBARA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PARKER JAMES ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PARKER JAMURIEL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 PATTERSON MICHELLE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PAYTON LORIECE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PEARSON DOROTHY W ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 155.44 PHEAL PATRICIA ANN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PHILLIPS MARSHAU ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PHILLIPS TAMARA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PHILLIPS TAMMIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PIERCE GAYLE L ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 POORE JEAN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 PORTER CLARENCE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 145.00 POSTON RUBY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 POWELL BOB ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 125.00 POWELL SYBIL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019

4121 135.00 PRESCOTT BOB ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4122 157.76 PRICE ANN C ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4123 125.00 PRICE BILL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4124 125.00 PURVIS DIANE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4125 125.00 RANSBURG ANNETTE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4126 125.00 RANSBURG ANNIE R ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4127 125.00 READIRS ARNITA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4128 125.00 READIRS MONEEKEA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4129 125.00 REED CHANNIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4130 158.34 RICE CHARLIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4131 125.00 RICE DENISE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4132 125.00 RICHARDSON IRA M ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4133 125.00 RICHARDSON MARGARET ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4134 125.00 RIGNEY MAEVE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4135 125.00 RILEY MARY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4136 125.00 ROBERTS PATRICIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4137 125.00 ROBINSON BETTY W ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4138 125.00 ROBINSON CARRA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4139 125.00 ROBINSON CHARLIE M ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4140 151.38 ROBINSON FREDERICK ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4141 135.00 ROSS-CLARK JO ANN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4142 197.20 ROUSER DARRYL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4143 125.00 RUFFIN GAIL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4144 125.00 RUNNELS LAURIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4145 125.00 SADDLER LEAR PEARL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4146 125.00 SALMI ALLEN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4147 125.00 SANDEFUR LISA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4148 125.00 SANDERS HELEN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4149 125.00 SANFORD GLENN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4150 151.96 SEALS JANICE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4151 125.00 SEALS JARED ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4152 125.00 SEALS JASLYN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4153 125.00 SHELBY ALMEDA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4154 125.00 SHOULDERS CHARLENE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4155 125.00 SIMES BETTY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4156 125.00 SIMMONS DARLENE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4157 145.00 SIMS JAMES ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4158 125.00 SIMS MAGGIE M ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4159 145.00 SMITH BEVERLY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4160 153.12 SMITH KATHLEEN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4161 125.00 SMITH MOLLIE LEFLORE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4162 125.00 SMITH SHARONICA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4163 125.00 SMOOTS JANESIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4164 145.00 SMOOTS JAZSICA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4165 125.00 SPEAKS TERESA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4166 135.00 SPRAYBERRY LINDA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4167 125.00 STOKES MARY H ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4168 125.00 STRAUGHTER TACHANDA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4169 125.00 STRICKLAND EMMA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4170 125.00 STUBBS JIMMIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4171 161.82 SUTHERLAND DORIS ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4172 125.00 SWINDLE BILLY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4173 24.00 TERRY ADRIANE ELECTION TRAINING 6/2019 4174 125.00 TERRY ADRIANE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4175 125.00 THOMAS ELIZABETH E ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4176 125.00 THOMAS IDA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4177 125.00 THOMAS JANET ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4178 125.00 THOMAS MICHAEL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4179 125.00 THOMAS SYLVIA M ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4180 125.00 THOMPSON ERMA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4181 125.00 THOMPSON VICKIE RENA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4182 156.60 THURMON MINNIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4183 125.00 TRAVIS MATTEAL ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4184 151.96 TUCKER BETTY J ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4185 125.00 UNDERWOOD MARY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4186 125.00 UPTON MEREDITH ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4187 125.00 VAN BUREN JACQUELINE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4188 125.00 VANBUREN CHRISTINE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4189 125.00 VANBUREN EARNEST ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4190 125.00 VANBUREN KIMBERLY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4191 125.00 VANBUREN TANESHA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4192 145.00 VANCE SARAH M ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4193 125.00 VEAL MARIANNE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4194 135.00 WALES LAFAYETTE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4195 125.00 WALKER CARLEY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4196 145.00 WALKER CHRIS ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4197 125.00 WALKER MARCIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4198 125.00 WARD EVANGELINE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4199 125.00 WARD RALPH ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4200 125.00 WASH DOMINIQUE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4201 125.00 WASH SHERROD ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4202 125.00 WASHINGTON ELIZABETH ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4203 145.00 WASHINGTON FRANCES ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4204 125.00 WASHINGTON JACOB ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4205 159.50 WASHINGTON JOHNNY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4206 125.00 WASHINGTON VERONICA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4207 125.00 WATKINS JOANN ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4208 135.00 WATTS HURSTINE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4209 125.00 WEBB DEBRA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4210 125.00 WELLS RONNIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4211 125.00 WHITE GARY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4212 125.00 WHITEHEAD TUWAINE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4213 145.00 WHITTEN GERALDINE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4214 145.00 WILLIAMS ANNIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4215 125.00 WILLIAMS DIANE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4216 125.00 WINTERS ALMARIE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4217 125.00 WOLFE LISA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4218 135.00 WREN CLAUDIA ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4219 125.00 WRIGHT CREEKMORE ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4220 125.00 WRIGHT EDWARD ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4221 125.00 WRIGHT PAM ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4222 145.00 ZOLLICOFFER BETTY ELECTION WORKER 8/06/2019 4366 1640652.88 MADISON COUNTY OPERATING BANK TRANSFER-BILL PAY ACC Fund 012 PLANNING & ZONING FUND 130 28702.70 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 131 46.63 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 132 48.96 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 133 42.26 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 134 26.29 AT&T MOBILITY, LLC FLEET TRACKING 135 9825.00 NOBLE JOHN REVIEWS 136 7245.00 SILLS CHARLES INSPECTIONS 137 53.71 ROBERT J YOUNG COMPANY OFFICE SUPPLIES 138 62.78 SOUTHERN TELECOMMUNICATIO PHONE SERVICE 139 101.84 C SPIRE WIRELESS PHONE SERVICE Fund 015 SELF INSURANCE FUND 71 94072.67 UMR HEALTH-CLAIMS 72 26614.98 UMR HEALTH-CLAIMS 73 80743.65 UMR HEALTH-CLAIMS Fund 030 CANTEEN FUND 59 1053.68 BOB BARKER CO INC JAIL SUPPLIES 60 684.54 GRAINGER JAIL SUPPLIES 61 28318.53 PREMIER SUPPLY LINK, LLC JAIL SUPPLIES 62 3505.00 BOB BARKER CO INC GREEN MATTRESS 63 2699.00 CHARM-TEX, INC. EZ BUNK BLUE Fund 031 JAIL PHONE CARDS 14 4463.60 SECURUS TECHNOLOGIES, INC 20 DOLLAR PHONE CARDS Fund 095 LIBRARY FUND 10 28891.72 MADISON COUNTY LIBRARY GRANTS & SUBSIDIES Fund 097 E911 COMMUNICATIONS FUND 76 26298.25 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 77 2929.15 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 78 1200.00 C SPIRE FIBER PHONE SERVICE 79 40431.00 MOTOROLA INC SUBSCRIBER PROGRAMMING 80 16487.34 AT&T PHONE SERVICE 81 330.00 TOWERCOM SOUTH, LLC TOWER RENT 82 25248.83 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES Fund 103 RECORDS MANAGEMENT COUNTY 1 190.22 JACKSON DATA PRODUCTS, IN OFFICE SUPPLIES Fund 104 LAW LIBRARY 19 250.60 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES Fund 105 SOLID WASTE FUND 77 2392.90 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 78 2889.44 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 79 500.00 EDWARD C. JOHNSON RENT 80 19541.02 REPUBLIC SERVICES, INC LANDFILL CHARGES 81 150.00 HEADWATERS, INC SOLID WASTE PLAN - MDEQ 82 2643.50 SOUTHERN TIRE RECYCLING L RECYCLING 83 10328.91 REPUBLIC SERVICES, INC LANDFILL CHARGES Fund 113 SHERIFF'S ST/LOCAL DRUG SEIZ 13 2830.00 MADISON CO. SHERIFF'S NAR OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE Fund 115 1/4 MILL FIRE DISTRICT FUND 121 11372.21 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 122 105.26 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 123 103.71 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 124 132.32 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 125 99.78 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 126 61.20 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES DIESEL 127 6207.43 MISSISSIPPI DEVELOPMENT A WEISENBERGER CAP LOAN PRIN 128 6133.64 MISSISSIPPI DEVELOPMENT A FARMHAVEN CAP LOAN PRIN 129 3678.61 MISSISSIPPI DEVELOPMENT A VALLEY VIEW CAP LOAN PRIN 130 3794.12 MISSISSIPPI DEVELOPMENT A GLUCKSTADT #3 CAP LOAN 131 50.92 C SPIRE WIRELESS PHONE SERVICE 132 769.00 SUNBELT FIRE APPARATUS IN VEHICLE REPAIRS 133 1755.00 SUNBELT FIRE APPARATUS IN PUMP TEST FIRE TRUCKS 134 390.00 SUNBELT FIRE APPARATUS IN PUMP TEST FIRE TRUCKS 135 330.00 TOWERCOM SOUTH, LLC TOWER RENT Fund 116 SOUTH MADISON FIRE DIST FUND 8 6440.36 SOUTH MADISON CO FIRE DEP GRANTS & SUBSIDIES Fund 117 VALLEY VIEW FIRE DISTRICT 7 459.15 VALLEY VIEW FIRE STATION GRANTS & SUBSIDIES Fund 118 KEARNEY PARK FIRE PROTECTION D 8 248.68 KEARNEY PARK FIRE PROTECT GRANTS & SUBSIDIES

Fund 119 FARMHAVEN FIRE DISTRICT FUND 731.14 FARMHAVEN VOLUNTEER FIRE GRANTS & SUBSIDIES Fund 120 SOUTHWEST MADISON FIRE DIST 8 843.80 SOUTHWEST MADISON FIRE DI GRANTS & SUBSIDIES Fund 121 CAMDEN FIRE DIST FUND 8 200.66 CAMDEN VOLUNTEER FIRE DEP GRANTS & SUBSIDIES Fund 137 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND 10 12079.59 MCEDA GRANTS & SUBSIDIES Fund 150 ROAD MAINTENANCE FUND 522 28788.38 CARD SERVICES REPAIR PARTS 523 103455.74 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 524 5052.53 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 525 3575.18 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 526 4748.47 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 527 2863.27 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 528 4369.23 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 529 545.06 CARD SERVICES TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 530 26271.96 HANCOCK BANK LEASING DEPT HEAVY EQUIP PRIN 531 1472.24 AT&T MOBILITY, LLC FLEET TRACKING 532 6487.28 REPUBLIC SERVICES, INC LANDFILL CHARGES 533 253.18 ROBERT J YOUNG COMPANY OFFICE SUPPLIES 534 1237.24 SOUTHERN TELECOMMUNICATIO PHONE SERVICE 535 5071.34 TOWN OF FLORA COX FERRY ROAD 536 1625.40 ALLEN ENGINEERING & SCIEN STORMWATER IMPLEMENTATION 537 2650.00 LEWIS ELECTRIC, INC GLUCKSTADT & I-55 538 1278.63 CANTON MUNICIPAL UTILITIE UTILITIES 539 70.00 MCGRAW "GOTTA GO" OTHER CONTRACTUAL SERVICE 540 170.98 FIRE EQUIPMENT SERVICE, L VEHICLE REPAIRS 541 788.21 C SPIRE WIRELESS PHONE SERVICE 542 640.14 STANTEC CONSULTING SERVIC KING RANCH ROAD 543 161.99 CANTON MUNICIPAL UTILITIE UTILITIES 544 87.40 ARAMARK UNIFORM & CAREER JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 545 140.00 B&D DISTRIBUTION, LLC REPAIR PARTS 546 2270.43 CINTAS CORPORATION #210 UNIFORMS/WEARING APPAREL 547 64.63 CINTAS FIRST AID & SAFETY MEDICAL SUPPLIES 548 2112.57 ENTERGY UTILITIES 549 148.37 ENTERGY UTILITIES 550 441.65 FLEETPRIDE REPAIR PARTS 551 180.00 LANKS AUTO GLASS REPAIR PARTS 552 61.42 PHILLIPS LUMBER & HOME CE OTHER SUPPLIES/MATERIALS 553 724.40 PUCKETT MACHINERY ROAD MACH & EQUIPMENT REP 554 6116.47 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE ASPHALT 555 9044.66 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE ASPHALT 556 12710.31 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE ASPHALT 557 18221.00 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC COLD MIX ASPHALT 558 175.00 BXS INSURANCE TIMOTHY BRYAN 559 10032.60 ERGON ASPHALT & EMULSIONS CRS-2 LIQUID ASPHALT 560 1170.40 GOODLOE CONSTRUCTION COMP FILL DIRT - JUNE PO 561 8732.07 HAMMETT GRAVEL CO. CLAY GRAVEL 562 2198.00 GOODLOE CONSTRUCTION COMP FILL DIRT 563 330.00 TOWERCOM SOUTH, LLC TOWER RENT 564 3122.94 REPUBLIC SERVICES, INC LANDFILL CHARGES 565 542.08 SOUTHERN HOSE & INDUSTRIA REPAIR PARTS 566 231891.37 CITY OF MADISON CALUMET DRIVE Fund 160 BRIDGE & CULVERT FUND 67 19403.34 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 68 5260.00 MENDROP ENGINEERING RESOU YANDELL RD/WESTFALEN DRIV 69 4482.00 KEY, LLC FURNISH AND INSTALL H PILE 70 11230.00 UTILITY CONSTRUCTORS, INC EXCAVATE PIPE JOINT 71 5800.00 BLURTON, BANKS, & ASSOC., GROUT INLET BOX 72 1696.25 G & O SUPPLY, INC. 36" ALUMINIZED PIPE 73 17200.00 ATWOOD FENCE CO., INC INSTALL GUARD RAIL Fund 190 JUVENILE DRUG COURT 63 19022.85 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 64 101.50 STEVEN ROSS TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 65 80.28 AMY NISBETT TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 66 78.89 C SPIRE WIRELESS PHONE SERVICE Fund 191 AOC-ADULT DRUG COURT 124 358.20 CARD SERVICES OFFICE SUPPLIES 125 11113.89 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 126 25.05 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 127 26.51 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 128 30.04 FLEETCOR TECHNOLOGIES GASOLINE 129 26.29 AT&T MOBILITY, LLC FLEET TRACKING 130 36.83 ROBERT J YOUNG COMPANY OFFICE SUPPLIES 131 200.52 C SPIRE WIRELESS PHONE SERVICE 132 698.97 JESSICA CARR CULPEPPER TRAVEL REIMBURSEMENT 133 1576.93 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES Fund 194 SAMHSA GRANT 1 1822.97 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES Fund 226 GENERAL COUNTY I & S FUND 27 128825.00 TRUSTMARK NAT'L BANK ATT: 2015 GO RD & BRDG RFNDG 28 115425.00 TRUSTMARK NAT'L BANK ATT: 2016 GO RD & BRDG RFNDG Fund 304 FIRE STATION CONSTRUCTION 22 157628.90 RICHARD WOMACK CONSTRUCTI SOUTHWEST MADISON FIRE ST Fund 315 2014 $15 MILLION ROAD BONDS 14 45100.79 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE APSHALT Fund 316 $6M MDOT PROJECT 4 58531.99 WAGGONER ENGINEERING, INC REUNION/HIGHLAND COLONY Fund 319 2017 $8M ROAD BOND 29 37161.47 STANTEC CONSULTING SERVIC REUNION PHASE III 30 10367.98 NEEL-SCHAFFER, INC REUNION PHASE II 31 42177.86 STANTEC CONSULTING SERVIC REUNION PHASE III Fund 320 $3.3M BOND 41 38407.55 BENSON BUILDERS & PROPERT SULPHUR SPRINGS PARK 42 47646.77 NEEL-SCHAFFER, INC GLUCKSTADT WIDENING 43 1968.00 GOODLOE CONSTRUCTION COMP SULPHUR SPRINGS PARK 44 2000.00 GOODLOE CONSTRUCTION COMP SULPHUR SPRINGS PARK Fund 322 2019 CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND 19 22006.40 WALTERS CONSTRUCTION COMP DEERFIELD DRIVE 20 149876.10 CITY OF MADISON NORTHBAY SUBDIVISION Fund 323 $5.7M SHORT TERM 35 1006580.01 CITY OF MADISON NORTHBAY SUBDIVISION Fund 327 1.6 MILLION SHORT TERM 2 34748.00 ADCAMP INC ROAD BASE REPAIRS 3 149198.30 ADCAMP INC MILLING 4 344250.00 ADCAMP INC ASPHALT MILLING 5 61184.04 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE ASPHALT 6 42292.08 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE ASPHALT 7 19379.59 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE ASPHALT 8 8448.41 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE ASPHALT 9 8767.65 APAC-MISSISSIPPI INC SURFACE ASPHALT 10 9087.50 KATIE BRYANT SNELL PLLC BOND ISSUE COSTS 11 8000.00 GOVERNMENT CONSULTANTS, I BOND ISSUE COSTS 12 17912.50 BUTLER SNOW BOND ISSUE COSTS 14 348316.18 CITY OF MADISON HOY ROAD Fund 655 STATE COURT EDUCATION FUND 10 75851.25 STATE TREASURER/DEPT. OF JUSTICE COURT FINES Fund 664 INTERLOCK DEVICE FEE 10 2310.00 MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF DUI OFFENSE Fund 672 RECORDS MANAGEMENT PROGRAM 10 785.50 DEPARTMENT OF ARCHIVES & JUSTICE COURT FINES Fund 675 WIRELESS COMMUNICATION-MHP 10 4335.00 MISSISSIPPI DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE COURT FINES-MHP Fund 681 PAYROLL CLEARING ACCOUNT 169425.84 TOTAL NET PAY NET PAY - ALL CHECKS 482292.34 TOTAL NET PAY NET PAY - ALL CHECKS 61234.43 TOTAL NET PAY NET PAY - ALL CHECKS 21935.16 TOTAL NET PAY NET PAY - ALL CHECKS 167867.06 TOTAL NET PAY NET PAY - ALL CHECKS 337 299245.02 SELF FUNDED INSURANCE ACC COUNTY HEALTH INSURANCE 338 5033.40 FLEXIBLE SPENDING PLAN FLEX SPENDING PAYABLE 342 53779.95 IRS TAXTEL PAYMENT SOCIAL SECURITY (FICA) PAY 343 163445.07 IRS TAXTEL PAYMENT SOCIAL SECURITY (FICA) PAY 344 19569.16 IRS TAXTEL PAYMENT SOCIAL SECURITY (FICA) PAY 345 220.00 JACKSON AREA FEDERAL CRED JACKSON CREDIT UNION 346 6046.00 DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SER. CHILD SUPPORT 347 282.04 CUYAHOGA COUNTY CSEA VIDAL FLEMING 348 314.42 WISCONSIN SCTF TOMMIE HEARON 349 44558.00 MS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE STATE WITHHOLDING TAX 350 13513.34 MS DEFERRED COMPENSATION STATE DEFERRED COMP 351 700.00 MARVELINE BACON CORNELIUS BACON 352 280.00 REEVES, JOHN R JAMES RANSBURG 353 183.00 KIMBERLY CARSON RAMONDO SANDERS 354 1716.86 MENDELSON LAW FIRM ANGELA TRAMBLE 355 823.91 SIMPSON LAW FIRM JEFFREY HODGINS 356 500.21 U.S. DEPT OF EDUCATION AW KYRIE LUCAS 357 495.60 HENLEY, LOTTERHOS & HENLE LEEANNA MASSEY 358 529.16 FAMILY CHOICE FINANCIAL I PATRICK WHITE 359 1658.00 JAMES L. HENLEY WESLEY HOLLINS 360 5967.54 HAROLD J BARKLEY JR ELTON FLAX JR 361 7926.24 AFLAC AFLAC PAYABLE 362 1136.34 COLONIAL LIFE & ACC. INS. COLONIAL PAYABLE 363 2838.46 ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE OF LINDSAY JOHNSON 372 8406.85 IRS TAXTEL PAYMENT SOCIAL SECURITY (FICA) PAY 373 53168.78 IRS TAXTEL PAYMENT SOCIAL SECURITY (FICA) PAY Fund 690 HOLMES COMMUNITY COLLEGE-MAINT 10 31576.76 HOLMES COMMUNITY COLLEGE GRANTS & SUBSIDIES Fund 691 HOLMES COMMUNITY COLLEGE-E $ I 10 39466.48 HOLMES COMMUNITY COLLEGE GRANTS & SUBSIDIES Fund 697 CHANCERY CLERK EMPLOYEES 12 53510.55 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES Fund 698 CIRCUIT CLERK EMPLOYEES 10 34736.19 PAYROLL CLEARING FUND GROSS WAGES 8

10,063,449.72 Total All Invoices


Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019, Page B5

WHAT’S DOING

Madison Central High School Executive SGA Officers for the 2019-2020 school year are pictured. Left to right are Emma Grace Trammell (treasurer), Allie Grace Bell (secretary), Brooks Stewart and Allison Hill (co-presidents) and Anna Cate Strong (vice president).

Mistletoe Marketplace | Nov. 6-9 Mistletoe Marketplace is a holiday tradition, presented by The Junior League of Jackson. The Junior League of Jackson is an organization of women committed to promoting voluntarism, developing the potential of women and improving communities through the effective action and leadership of trained volunteers. Go to: mistletoemarketplace.com

Natural Showcase Nov. 23 at Thalia

Madison Central High School Senior SGA officers and representatives for the 2019-2020 school year are pictured. Front row left to right are Miller Widemire (vice president), Meghan Thrash (secretary), Jordan Williams (president) and Mary Morgan Williams (treasurer). Back row left to right are representatives Anna Johnston, Kamal Kota, Logan Landis, Emilee Collins and not pictured Justin Storm.

The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra present Natural Showcase Nov. 23 at Thalia Mara Hall 7:29 p.m. Treat the eyes as well as the ears to an engaging adventure, as Westwater Arts evocative panoramas of the American West are choreographed to the symphonic splendor of Bach, Elgar, Copland, and more. Benjamin Britten’s “Sea Interludes” from “Peter Grimes” and Missy Mazzoli’s “River Rouge Transfiguration” enhance the nature theme. Featuring Westwater Arts’ guest photographer and multimedia artist, Nicholas Bardonnay. Cash bar in the lobby prior to the concert and at intermission. Pre-concert lecture by Dr. Timothy Coker on the mezzanine level, 6:457:15pm.

Cultivation Food Hall Saturday 6 PM – 9 PM The District at Eastover 1200 Eastover Drive, Suite 125, Jackson, Mississippi 39211 Join Cultivation Food Hall for LIVE MUSIC on Saturday evenings. Each Saturday, the food hall will host a local artist or group for your listening pleasure.

Organ Concert | Nathan Laube First Presbyterian Church of Jackson, 1390 N State ST Friday, Nov. 15 ~ 7 p.m.

World-class organist at First Presbyterian Jackson

Madison Central High School Junior SGA officers and representatives for the 2019-2020 school year are pictured. Front row left to right are Phillip Wright (treasurer), Anna Kay Bumgarner (secretary), Mary Addison Gregory (president) and Will Scoggins (vice president). Back row left to right are representatives Rob Embry, Connor Chisolm, Robert Tickner, Taylor Boyt, Kellen Fairburn and not pictured Haley Cote.

Madison Central High School Sophomore SGA officers and representatives for the 20192020 school year are pictured. Front row left to right are Annabelle Zuluaga (vice president), Sneha Cherukuri (president), Deanna Wilbourn (secretary) and Orlandria Johnson (treasurer). Back row left to right are representatives JT Evans, Seth Castilla, Benjamin Joshua, Victor Hollins, Megan Staehling and Camille Boles

Nathan Laube will be featured in a concert at The First Presbyterian of Jackson on Friday, Nov. 15 at 7 p.m. In his early 30s, Laube has already played at all of the major symphony halls in the U.S. that have pipe organs as well as iconic churches and halls in Europe, including Notre Dame, Paris; St. Paul’s Cathedral, London; the Berlin Cathedral, York Minster,

Canterbury, Exeter, Ely, Hereford and Truro cathedrals as well. He is the Associate Professor of Organ at Eastman School of Music and International. Consultant in Organ Studies at the Royal Birmingham Conservatorie, Nathan appeared this summer at a number of the festival summer concert series in cities such as Stuttgart, Naum-

burg, Dresden, Orleans, Bordeaux and Goteborg. Jointly sponsored by the American Guild of Organist, Jackson Chapter, Nathan’s organ concert will be in the First Presbyterian sanctuary located on North State Street at Belhaven Street. Admission is free and the public is cordially invited to hear this world-class organist.


Sports

November 7, 2019 Page B6

Photo by Chris Todd

Madison Central's Javarius Jordan (6) runs against Germantown on Nov. 1, at Germantown High School in Gluckstadt.

A RIVALRY IS BORN Madison Central tops Germantown in first-ever meeting By TYLER CLEVELAND | Madison County Journal Madison Central was a heavy favorite headed into the first-ever meeting against Germantown High last week, but Anthony Hart knew better than to let his 6th-ranked Jaguars underestimate their new cross-town rival. That mentality paid off Thursday, as the Jags rallied from a second-half deficit to escape Gluckstadt with a 31-23 win. “We talked about it all week,” Hart said. “I thought we were going to be in for a fight, and we were.” Madison Central’s splendid quarterback Jimmy Holiday put the Jags on top early with the first of his four rushing touchdowns in the first quarter. After leading the Jags 44 yards, the junior capped the opening drive himself with a 34-yard scamper to the end zone. After exchanging a couple of possessions, the Jags extended their lead to 10-0 on a 36yard field goal from Luke Bridges. It looked to all the world like Madison Central would keep pulling away, but the Mavericks had other ideas. Germantown responded on the ensuing possession following a big kick return near midfield. Maverick quarterback Colton Gardner connected with Dequante Peoples for a 43-yard touchdown pass that cut the Jags’

lead to 10-7. Madison Central came right back with its third score of the night - a 53-yard drive capped by Holiday’s second rushing touchdown from 29 yards out - that put the Jags ahead 16-7 after a missed extra point. Madison Central’s Creek Robertson picked off Gardner on Germantown’s next possession, and it looked like Big Blue was going to score again before the half. But the Germantown defense stood tall and forced a turnover on downs at their own 38-yard line. With less than a minute left in the half, Gardner found an open receiver and got the Mavericks back into field goal range. Dylan Wasson hit a 47-yarder and cut Madison Central’s halftime lead to 16-10. “We knew they were going to play hard against us because it’s a rivalry game and it’s important to them,” Hart said. “They played us exactly like we thought they would.” The Jaguar defense got a big stop on fourth down at their own 20-yard line on the opening possession of the second half, but Germantown defensive back Quavius Thompson picked off an errant pass from Holiday and returned it 60 yards for a touchdown. Wasson’s extra point gave the Maverick the 17-16 lead with five minutes to go in

the third quarter. That’s when the Jags woke up. First, Holiday took off on a quarterback draw, juked a couple of defenders and reversed field for a 49-yard touchdown run to regain the lead 23-17. Then, after a quick 3-and-out by Germantown, it was Javarius Jordan who cashed in on a short field with a 5-yard touchdown run to extend the lead to 30-17. Holiday’s final rushing touchdown came with two minutes to go in the game from five yards out and made it 36-17 after another missed extra point attempt. “I felt like a different team came off the sideline after that pick-six,” Hart said. “That kind of set off the alarm bells and we snapped out of it and finished the game like we were supposed to.” Germantown’s final touchdown - a 26yard pass from Gardner to Dequante Peoples - came with under a minute to go. Holiday finished with 87 yards through the air and carried the ball 16 times for 174 yards. Jordan added 123 rushing yards on 17 carries. The Jags rushed for 370 total yards as a team. Germantown ran for just 25 yards on 15 carries. Gardner completed 15 of 28 passes

for 233 yards with two touchdowns and two interceptions. With the win, the Jaguars (8-2) moved to 4-2 in Region 2 play and into a tie for third place with Warren Central. The Jaguars own the tie-breaker thanks to a 28-7, head-to-head win over the Vikings back on Oct. 10. They cannot improve their playoff seeding with a win in the regular season finale against Greenville, but a loss - combined with a Warren Central win over No. 4 South Panola would mean a first-round date on the road at No. 7 Oxford (9-1). And Hart is convinced the Jaguars will have their hands full this week with the Yellowjackets (3-7). “They’ve got a receiver who is as good as anyone we’ve faced all season,” Hart said, referring to Greenville senior Rufino Griffin. “He’s the first thing we’ve got to contend with as far as their offense goes. Their quarterback throws the ball well too, and they’ve scored a lot of points this year.” Germantown (4-6, 1-5 in 2-6A) will wrap up the regular season Friday in Jackson with a tilt against Murrah (1-9) at Hughes Field.

Patriots survive finale, eye upcoming playoffs By MARK ALEXANDER Madison County Journal

Photo by Lonnie Kees

MRA defenders swarm an Oak Forest ball carrier.

AMITE, La. – MRA scored a pair of early touchdowns here Friday night and, at the time, looked as if it would cruise to yet another lopsided victory. Au contraire. Little did the Patriots know, they would also need one more score, plus a goal line stand, a little good fortune, and another late stop to escape with a hardearned, physically-demanding 21-7 victory over homestanding Oak Forest in their regular season finale. “Obviously, looking back at it, those first two scores were huge,” MRA head coach Herbert Davis said. MRA concluded the regular season 10-2 overall, 5-0 in conference play with its fifth consecutive win. The Patriots

earned a first-round playoff bye, meaning they will be off this upcoming week prior to hosting the Parklane-Oak Forest quarterfinal winner at Patriot Field in two weeks. Oak Forest, winners of five straight coming in, dropped to 7-4, 2-3. Davis now has 59 wins in this his sixth year at MRA. His team is 22-3 overall the past two seasons – 22-2 in the regular season – and undefeated at home during that time period. He hopes to get win No. 60 in two weeks, and win No. 61 the following week in the MSAIS Class 6A championship game at Mississippi College’s Robinson-Hale Stadium. Davis knows it won’t come easy, however. Oak Forest is the likely opponent, although Parklane has narrowly lost to No. 2 seed Jackson Prep (31-28 2OT) and No. 3 seed Jackson

Academy (15-14) in recent weeks. The Yellowjackets defeated Parklane 41-22 during the regular season, and will host the quarterfinal playoff game here where plenty of good Cajun home cooking is served. An MRA win would put the Patriots in the title game opposite the winner of the other semifinal pitting Jackson Academy vs. seven-time reigning champion Jackson Prep. Both of those teams are also off this week as PCS has been banned from postseason play (in football) for failing to play its final three junior high games. Like two of the most famous dishes in this part of the country – gumbo and jambalaya – Friday’s game included a little bit of everything, especially for a game that saw only 28 combined points on the scoreboard See MRA, page 8


Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019, Page B7

Photo by Fran Twiner

Tri-County Academy has been dominant on the field all season.

After first-round bye, Rebels welcome Brookhaven By TYLER CLEVELAND Madison County Journal Tri-County Academy is a team that seems to have improved with each passing week. Now it’s time to see if they can finish. The Rebels (8-2) went 3-0 in District play to earn a firstround bye, giving them two full weeks to game plan for their second-round game against Brookhaven Academy, set for this Friday in Flora. The winner will face the Natchez Cathedral-Wayne Academy winner in the state semifinals next week, but as

Legals Continued from page B2

first-year TCA coach Phillip Wasson explained, that’s the furthest thing from his Rebels’ minds. “We’ve done a good job to this point of not looking too far ahead and taking it one game at a time,” Wasson said. “But getting the bye in the first round was huge because it has given us more time to prepare and get some guys that were banged up healthy.” And that’s a good thing, because Brookhaven Academy (7-4) is another team on the rise. The Cougars bounced back from a three-game skid in September and finished the season with two convincing wins,

beating Hillcrest Christian 4114 and River Oaks (La.) 10-3, both on the road. They dispatched Kirk Academy 27-0 in the first round of the playoffs last week. Wasson made the 70-mile drive to scout the Cougars, and he came away impressed, especially with Brookhaven quarterback Tyler Fortenberry. “They are well-coached and they have a lot of talented players,” Wasson said. “Their quarterback is a big kid who can really sling it. He can make all the throws and he can run the ball.” Wasson watched as Fortenberry threw a 62-yard touch-

down pass on the first play of the game against Kirk, then ran for an 11-yard touchdown and connected with Collin Waldrop for an 8-yard score to put the Cougars ahead 21-0 before sitting out the entire second half. Brookhaven coach Ron Rushing - no stranger to MAIS playoff football after winning a state championship at Natchez Cathedral - said he hopes Fortenberry can continue to be effective and lead the Cougars on a deep playoff run. “Tyler’s one of our really good young players,” Rushing said. “He’s 6-foot-5 and 192 pounds with a big-time arm. He’s gotten better with each

game. We’ve been trying to be more balanced and not throw it 40 or 50 times a game, but he’s definitely a nice weapon to have.” Wasson said Tri-County’s ability to contain Brookhaven’s rangy quarterback will likely dictate whether or not his Rebels will advance to the state semifinals. “He’s going to make plays and we know that,” he said. “We just need to minimize the damage and avoid giving up the long touchdowns.” The Rebels will counter with the same balanced offense that has helped them put up an average of 34.9 points a game.

Senior quarterback Cade Shepherd, who is looking to cap his high school career with a state title, has both thrown and run for over 1,000 yards this season and accounted for 22 touchdowns. Wasson said he feels like his offense will put up some yards, but they have to avoid the costly turnovers that hurt them in their two regular-season losses to Riverfield Academy and Hartfield Academy. “At this point, every team is good,” Wasson said. “It’s about which team can control the ball, tackle and avoid turnovers.” Kickoff is set for 7 p.m. in Flora.


Page B8, Madison County Journal, November 7, 2019

Prep Roundup: Titans fall to Holmes County Central By TYLER CLEVELAND Madison County Journal Ridgeland will have to start any potential playoff run on the road following a 50-20 loss to Holmes County Central last week. After racing to a 4-0 start to open Region 2-5A play, the Titans (7-3, 4-2 in 2-5A) have now lost two league games in a row. Coach David White’s bunch is still guaranteed a playoff spot. If they defeat Provine (92, 4-2 in 2-5A) on Senior Night this weekend, they’ll be the three-seed and face the No. 2 team from Region 1, which will either be Lafayette (8-2) or Lake Cormorant (6-4). A loss to Provine would mean a firstround trip to face the defending 5A champs, West Point (10-1). Against Holmes County (83, 5-1 in 2-5A), Ridgeland was dogged early by an 18-7 firstquarter deficit that dragged into the half. They could not keep pace with the Jaguars, who put the game away by pouring on 26 more points in the third quarter. Ridgeland returned a kickoff for a touchdown but it proved to be entirely too little too late with a missed PAT to boot. The Titans had 323 total yards Friday evening, including 195 through the air. Junior Richard Mays led the offense in receiving yards with six receptions for 80 yards and a touchdown. Donovan Ball led the rush-

MRA Continued from page B6

at the end of a very chilly early November evening. There was, among other things, a two touchdown advantage by the visiting team in the first quarter, with one of those touchdowns coming on a zig-zagging, multi-tackle breaking 18-yard run by MRA quarterback Philip Short – bad wheel and all; a scare from that same quarterback late in the second quarter when he took a

playoffs. JA lost to their rivals in the Brickyard earlier this season in a tough but decisive 2817 struggle.

ing game with two carries for 55 yards. Markell Young added 43 yards on 10 carries. Quarterback Zy McDonald kept it 11 times for 28 yards. McDonald completed 19 of 39 passes for one touchdown and one interception. The Titans will cap the regular season Friday night against Provine Raleigh 28, Velma Jackson 21 Velma Jackson will open the playoffs at home against Morton thanks to a tie-breaker. The Falcons (6-4, 4-1 in 63A) dropped their regular-season finale to Raleigh 28-21 last Friday night, which set up a three-way tie for first place with the Lions (5-5, 4-1) and Yazoo County (9-2, 4-1). While Velma Jackson still gets to claim a share of the region title, they will technically be a two-seed in the playoffs thanks to point differential in their two games against their co-champs. Their reward is a home game to start the playoffs against Morton (4-7), the threeseed out of Region 5. The Panthers are coming off of a 47-16 loss on the road against 2A foe Pelahatchie (92). Against Raleigh, Velma had a halftime lead of 14-6 but could not hang on. The loss snapped a six-game winning streak for Velma. Provine 19, Canton 0 Canton will miss the play-

shot to the head while sliding into the turf, and had to leave the game momentarily; a nifty fake punt by the home team resulting in a first down in the fourth quarter; a potentially game-altering overthrow of an open receiver by Oak Forest quarterback John Henry White, who was on the wrong end of several of the many hard hits doled out; a lead-preserving goal line stand by the Patriots’ salty defense early in the third quarter; an MRA player, Stone Blanton, departing with a possible broken rib; and more penalty flags than anyone cares to remember, with the majority of

Ridgeland head coach David White is prepping his team for the playoffs. offs for the sixth time in seven Jackson Prep following Friday years following Friday night’s night’s 15-14 nail-biting win 19-0 shutout by Provine. over Parklane Academy in Having already lost to McComb. Ridgeland, beating the Rams The win set up a showdown (9-2) was the Tigers’ only shot with Prep on Nov. 15. at sneaking into the playoffs as The Raiders (7-4, 3-2 in Disthe four-seed in Region 2-5A. trict 6A) won the defensive But the Tigers’ never could struggle over the Pioneers (6-5) get into any kind of rhythm on by overcoming a 6-0 halftime offense, thanks in part to four deficit. turnovers. Provine linebacker Marcus Harris set the tone Jaquavous White picked off for JA in the second half with a Jacobian Morgan twice and 12-yard rushing touchdown Canton lost the ball twice on with ten minutes left in the third fumbles. quarter. Coach Calvin Bolton and Harris had 169 total yards the Tigers can still close out the on the evening. season on a high note when The Raider offense would they host Cleveland Central on not find the end zone again but Senior Night this weekend. their defense kept shutting down all Pioneer attempts to Jackson Academy 15, get downfield. Parklane 14 Next week they travel to Jackson Academy will open Jackson Prep for a rematch for playoff play against arch-rival the first game of the MAIS

those going against the visitors from Mississippi. MRA finished with 344 yards total offense – 146 rushing, 198 passing. Oak Forest, meanwhile, had 197 total yards, with 134 of those coming in the second half after being limited to only 63 yards in the first half. The ground-and-pound Yellowjackets had zero passing yards as White went 0-for-15 through the air. The Yellowjackets managed only seven points on this night, however, with those coming courtesy of a 1-yard touchdown run by White late in the third quarter a few minutes after

Willie Latham had given MRA a 21-0 lead on a 1-yard scoring run of his own. Gold-cladded Oak Forest had a few more prime scoring opportunities but was denied each time by Danny White’s defense. “It’s always tough to play here,” said MRA receiver Russ Sceroler, who had five catches for 103 yards, including a 51yard touchdown late in the first quarter. “We had some calls go against us, but we played hard, and we played physical. We matched their physicality and were able to come out on top.” MRA did so without leading

North Delta 24, Canton Academy 17 Canton Academy’s (2-9,1-2) season came to an end last Friday with a 24-17 first-round playoff loss to 8-3 North Delta in Batesville. The Panthers struggled in their second season at MAIS 4A. This was head coach David Blount’s first year back at the helm. Blount was coming off several years of success at cross-county rival Tr-County. St. Joseph 33, Riverside 0 St. Joe (3-7,1-3) starts the MHSAA 2A playoffs at Northside after they capped the regular season with a district shutout win over Riverside. Friday night’s bout with the Bulldogs (2-9,0-4) snapped a four-game losing streak and earned them a playoff berth. The Bruins got on the board early and kept the pressure on through four quarters of play. They went into the half up 19-0 and put another 14 in the second half for good measure. Reed Fry had a standout evening scoring a pick-six for the Bruins early in the fourth quarter. The Bruins are in for a tough road ahead if they want to advance in the playoffs. Northside sits undefeated this season. They have allowed only 20 points all season in three games and have let no sin-

rusher A.J. Hasley, who suffered a season-ending ankle injury in last week’s win over PCS. That now leaves Davis without his top four projected running backs entering the season. Josh Tucker, the leading returning rusher from a year ago, opted to transfer to St. Andrew’s. In addition, Starkville Academy transfer Tyler Latham and Rayf Vinson both sustained season-ending knee injuries. Latham was injured early in the fourth game of this season, Vinson the seventh. Despite their absence, MRA posted its third-highest total on

gle opponent score double digits. Crystal Springs 40, St. Andrew’s 0 St.Andrew’s (2-9,1-4) season concluded last Friday with a thorough 40-0 beating at the hands of Crystal Springs in Ridgeland. The saints only mustered 104 yards of total offense, 99 of which were rushing. Senior QB Lleyton Carr finished his career with the Saints leading the rushing game with 20 carries for 54 yards. Carr completed zero passes on three attempts with on interception. The season ends on a fourgame losing streak. Their last win of the season came in October in a 29-22 home conference win against McLaurin (2-9,0-5) who finished their season last Friday at home down 44-7 to Yazoo City. St. Andrew’s other win came in week two at Newton. The Saints won 27-20. Newton would not win a game all season. Jackson Prep 49, Presbyterian Christian 20 Prep (9-2,4-1) goes into the playoffs with the momentum of two straight wins after rolling 5-6 Presbyterian Christian 4920 to end the regular season. Prep led 7-6 at the end of the first quarter and would maintain and widen that gap through the night. They rolled to 49-6 in the third quarter. It was senior night.

the ground this season. The Patriots rushed for a seasonhigh 193 yards in a win over Hartfield, and 177 in a win over Jackson Academy. MRA utilized seven different backs, including Sam Polles who gained 13 yards on his first carry of the season. MRA started the season with five straight wins, then dropped back-to-back road games at Philadelphia (ranked No. 1 in Class 2A) and Briarcest Christian (ranked among the top 10 teams in Tennessee) before winning the last five.

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