Page 1

ACADEMIC PORTFOLIO PART 1

M

A

MADIHAH AZHAR S1443232


REFLECTIVE STATEMENT

I am a person , before my design. The last four years have brought me to an unusual journey to breathe in and out numerous architectural knowledge. Never that I had a same day similar as the day before. Everyday, it is a vow for me to keep improving and have a will to learn anything big or small. My original perception about space and design was not always right or true, but throughout extensive academic and constructive conversations with people in ESALA, I began to identify specific constrains and boundaries on both technical and creative possibilities in designing a space. The most treasured aspect gained during the years I receive the education is the ability to master the techniques and skills that apply to design practice in which readily evaluate the thought processes and arguments of my design decisions. The diligent delegations of exercises provided by the school in various form of tasks and expectations encourage me to always discover a better way to communicate design into people. Both academic and professional experiences are similarly valuable, for the integration enables a thorough recognition and appreciation of what is meaningful architecture and what architecture actually serves the society. Getting into the workplace has also widen my world view and my values towards the role of architecture; of which I believe an architect is dutiful in providing and accommodating the best for all people and mankind, within his own capacity. I take a great interest in housing design since my first year, and I am keen to apply and develop new methods to get together with the people in housing design industry to listen more of what people cherish than to randomly provide units to strangers they never meet. Communication, as taught in the academic environment, can be reapplied more actively in the industry as design process instead of design proposals. It is my virtue to ambitiously follow on my passion in architecture, as a purposeful architect that attend the real needs.


CONTENT

1 2 3 4

AD

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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

ART DESIGN

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17

TE

TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENT

AT

ARCHITECTURAL THEORY

AP

ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE

D

ARCHITECTURAL DISSERTATION

ES

ELECTIVES

P

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO

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29

38

46

52

63

70

82

AH

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

41 59 75 94

90

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99 108 110 121

132


CRITERIA MAPPING ARB | RIBA GENERAL CRITERIA GUIDELINES

GC 1 Ability to create architectural designs that satisfy both aesthetic and technical requirements. GC 2 Adequate knowledge of the histories and theories of architecture and the related arts, technologies and human sciences. GC 3 Knowledge of the fine arts as an influence on the quality of architectural design. GC 4 Adequate knowledge of urban design, planning and the skills involved in the planning process. GC 5 Understanding of the relationship between people and buildings, and between buildings and their environment, and the need to relate buildings and the spaces between them to human needs and scale. GC 6 Understanding of the profession of architecture and the role of the architect in society, in particular in preparing briefs that take account of social factors.

ARB | RIBA GENERAL CRITERIA GUIDELINES

GA 1 Ability to generate design proposals using understanding of a body of knowledge, some at the current boundaries of professional practice and the academic discipline of architecture. GA 2 Ability to apply a range of communication methods and media to present design proposals clearly and effectively. GA 3 Understanding of the alternative materials, processes and techniques that apply to architectural design and building construction.

GA 4 Ability to evaluate evidence, arguments and assumptions in order to make and present sound judgments within a structured discourse relating to architectural culture, theGC 7 ory and design. Understanding of the methods of investigation and preparation of the brief for a design project. GA 5 Knowledge of the context of the architect and the conGC 8 Understanding of the structural design, constructional and struction industry, and the professional qualities needed for decision making in complex and unpredictable circumengineering problems associated with building design. stances. GC 9 Adequate knowledge of physical problems and technolo- GA 6 Ability to identify individual learning needs and undergies and the function of buildings so as to provide them with internal conditions of comfort and protection against stand the personal responsibility required for further professional education. the climate.

GC

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Initially attained Further attained Partially attained Fully attained

GC 10 The necessary design skills to meet building users’ requirements within the constraints imposed by cost factors and building regulations.

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SELF PROGRESS

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES SPA

VIS

LOG

INT

Initially gained Further gained Partially gained Fully gained

SPATIAL Greater awareness on the knowledge about space, spatial quality and deeper understanding of spatial language. VISUAL Capability to appreciate proportion, colour, hue and optical sensititvity to stimulate thinking and deliver communication. LOGIC Ability to develop reasoning, concrete concept , practice critical thinking and make logical justifications. INTERPERSONAL Ability to communicate with group members, having constructive conversation with fellow teachers.

DESCRIPTION GC/RIBA Attributes helped me to develop within the structure of the outlined undergraduate courses and syllabus prepared within the school. However, I also find it important to keep track of my personal development as human being in general. Education should encompasses room for growth, to get betteprepared for life. Eventhough that is the main intention, I would never deny subjects in architecture Part 1 influence most of them.

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COURSE TYPE

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COURSE NAME COURSE | SUBJECT The initials courses will become the code, in accordance to the respective given colour, seen in content page.

ARB | RIBA GENERAL CRITERIA DESIGN TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

The bars will allocate self reflective assessment in reference to the criteria outlined by ARB and RIBA for Part 1

PAGE NAVIGATION There are four academic years, with two semesters for each. The bars will navigate the pages across courses .

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

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OVERALL SEMESTER

SELF ASSESSMENT

ACADEMIC YEAR

SPA

VIS

LOG

INT

ACADEMIC TERM

REFLECTION Section includes self reflective thoughts of the overall semester. The comments comprised of general comments of the courses, academic performance, and personal progress in learning.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES This reflection encompass the progress I have gained as a person throughout the years studying architecture. They are personally assessed for each academic year.

/# /# Photo/ Diagram / Sketches description 7


YEAR

I

SEMESTER

I


ART & DESIGN

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

COURSE CODE /ARCH07001

COURSE CODE /ARCH08003

INTRODUCTION TO WORLD ARCHITECTURE

AROUND THROUGH +BEYOND FRAME

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

ELEMENTS

COURSE CODE /ARCH08001

BRIEF

BRIEF

The first design course introduces students to the foundational knowledge and skills appropriate to the practice of architectural design. Design is seen as a process involving imagination, representation and communication, analysis and research, iteration and reflection. Throughout the semester, students work on a series of design projects, which require individual and group submission of models and drawings. Working in a studio environment, students undertake a number of studies that introduce some of the essential elements of architecture, such as path, threshold, opening, membrane and enclosure. These studies are underpinned by a concern for the role of place and embodiment in the experience of architecture and the built environment. Studio exercise are supplemented by a series of lectures on practical and theoretical issues associated with the design process.

The Art and Design course is made up of a series of 2 and 3 week projects running through semester 1. The projects are devised to introduce, explore and challenge your art and design research and thinking. The projects come directly from the Edinburgh College of Art and Design 1st and 2nd year courses. They are adapted so that valuable transferable skills can be developed for Architecture and Landscape Students. Art and Design history and theory is touched upon through the lectures, tutorials and individual research and in keeping with your art college context a practice led approach is at the centre of your learning. The visual and text based documentation of research (sketchbooks and prototypes) as well as the final outcomes of the projects create an ever expanding portfolio through the semester. This portfolio, alongside the verbal and text based support of it, becomes the evidence for assessment of the learning outcomes of this course.

T he course begins with an examination of Ancient Egyptian,Greek, and Roman architecture, the architecture of the Middle Ages, Islam, Pre-Columbian America, and the first great re-evaluation of Antiquity in the Italian Renaissance. It goes on to survey the Renaissance in Britain and northern Europe and the subsequent influence of the Italian Baroque in these areas. Later, other significant cultural traditions in the history of architecture are introduced, such as those of India, China, and Japan. Semester 1 concludes with an examination of the theoretical, cultural, and stylistic aspects of the architecture of the European Enlightenment.

LO1

LO1

LO1

LO2

LO2

LO2

LO3

LO3

BRIEF

Awareness of basic architectural elements and issues that inform their disposition in architectural design. Awareness of different dimensions of the design process, from analysis and research individually and in teams to iteration and reflection in the formation of architectural designs.

LO3

Awareness of appropriate representational and communication methods to prepare and present design proposals.

Demonstrate experimentation and fundamental understanding of drawing using a range of techniques and materials. Demonstrate an awareness of Art and Design process in researching, testing and developing ideas to find creative solutions. Communicate ideas and complete work in a well structured and coherent way.

Throughout the course the development of building technology and the social, religious, and political understanding of buildings are recurring themes. Excursions into the related fields of landscape architecture and urban design necessarily appear from time to time.

Demonstrate knowledge of the history and theories of architecture and their related arts before c.1800. Demonstrate appreciation of the significance of a critical approach to architectural precedent in the context of design. Demonstrate development of verbal and visual communication skills in key themes of the module demonstrating a critical and reflective approach.

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COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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COURSE NAME ELEMENTS

DESIGN HEAD INTASK A WINDOW 1Duration Week

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION Sectiononincludes Based images description of a familiar of design design aims stages certain person task, this project to and design and set of questions thatthree-dimensional students need to construct a stylized, tackle throughout the exercise. portrait bust of this person, interacting with the basic architectural element of a window. This may take the form of an imaginative, metaphorical assemblage.

/1 /3

The assemblage objective is to reflect and express the characteristics of a subject. To kick start this project, 5 words describing the character of the person should be presented and discussed.

CONCEPTUAL IDEAS

CONCEPTUAL IDEAS

DESIGN RESPOND Section The three-dimensional will generally comments assemon the gained understanding about blage inside a frame of 50x50 of the my project as outlined by the course. It will best friend is designed using the planar also comprises on the learning curve, materials like metal sheet, cards, reflection, and the future projectionand on plastic sheet.thoughts. As she is an ambivert, the collected both horizontal and verticality of the design is balanced out and different character has been explored throughout the process.

/4

MAQUETTES

FINAL MODEL /2 MAQUETTES FINAL MODEL

/1 Portrait of Eza, her own painting of herself. /2 Hand sketch of reinterpretation of Eza's portrait. /3 Progress models of the "Head in the Window". Different usage of geometry and colour. /4 Progress model of the "Head in the Window". Different usage of materiality. 10


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COURSE TYPE

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COURSE NAME

GROUND + WALL DESIGN TASK 1Duration Week

DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION

/1

The project aims to explore the Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain spatial and physical qualities of the set of questions students needeleto ground and wall that as architectural tackle throughout the exercise. ments for the making of path and place. The project seeks for an exploratory approach, which reflects not only on the ideas proposed but on the methods used and processes applied. There will not be a set scale of work but it is essential that the proposals consider the spatial consequences of understanding the constructed landscapes at different scales.

/1 Zoom in to the variations of geometry clay can create.

/2 The model showing the flexibility of clay in creating both wall and ground. /3 Picture showing the occupation of people inside the design.

/2

DESIGN RESPOND Ground and generally wall bothcomments set difSection will ferent limitations. In this design, on the gained understanding about the wall becomes thecourse. wall, imitatprojectgrows as outlined by the It will ing andthe nature. Onecurve, type also earthworks comprises on learning of materialand canthe explore rich amount reflection, futureaprojection on of experience, thetexture, collected thoughts. and structure.

/5 The drawings of the ground and wall.

/3

/4 Photos showing the textures on the ground. 11


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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

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ELEMENTS COURSE NAME

DESIGN FRAME +TASK CANOPY Duration 1 Week

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION Section The project includes aims to description explore the of design task, design stages and certain spatial and physical qualities of the set of questions that students need to frame and the canopy as architectural tackle throughout the exercise. elements for the making of path, place and shelter. The project seeks for an exploratory approach, which reflects not only on the ideas proposed but on the methods used and processes applied. There will not be a set scale of work but it is essential that the proposals consider the spatial consequences of understanding the proposed structure at different scales.

/1

/2

DESIGN RESPOND Section The design will generally explores acomments minimal on approach the gained to create understanding an organic about frame. the project Assisting as the outlined swirling by the frame course. is theIt will ciralso cular comprises geometry of onground the learning and canopy. curve, reflection, and the future projection on the However, collected in the thoughts. parallel study of frame and canopy, the language of canopy used by my colleague is the opposite,. Hence the I use series of squares and strings to create a more linear canopy.

The canopies, are both testing the opacity of light.

/3

/1 Model of frame by myself. The canopy is completed by Bryan Wee. /2 Model of frmae done by Bryan Wee and the canopy designed by me. /3 Drawings of Frame and Canopy. 12


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COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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COURSE NAME ELEMENTS

DESIGN TASK + REPRESENTATION SPACE, SCALE

/1

Duration 1 Week

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of The previous projects explored design design instages and tocertain the ideatask, of space relation each set of questions that studentselements. need to of the studied architectural tackle throughout the exercise. This week’s project is to further focus on the concept of space as the result of individually reflecting and re-assembling the different architectural elements with a purpose, in order to further explore its physical and perceptive qualities.

/2

/3

DESIGN RESPOND

/4

SPAC

E Section

will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will DESIGN RESPOND also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on collected The space design is the combinathe thoughts. tion of experience tested in previous exercises. Ground, wall, and the canopy are made playful and exploratory in a sense that the scale is befitting to the perception of one human being.

/1 Extraction drawing of the wall element of the space. /2 Extraction drawing of the frame element from the overall space. /3 Elevation drawing. /4 Plan drawing. /5 Photos of the model.

/5 13


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COURSE NAME ELEMENTS

WRITER'S RETREAT | LOCATION + SURVEY 2 Weeks

DESIGN TASK Duration DESCRIPTION The area in which the Writer’s Retreat project will INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION

be located is a section of land in the North of Edinburgh Crammond Island and city comprising Section includes description of River Almond. A grou of 8 students will survey the four design task, design stages and certain different sites to set of questions that students need analyse the physical conditions andtospatial qualities of tackle throughout theassigned exercise.in for my group is at River these sites. The site Almond

/1 The sound of the river stream has always been one of the best feature about the site. The deciduous leaves colour up the view in Autumn.

/2 The model done by group work, with a sprinkle of Photoshop touch.

RESPOND River Almond is analysed in DESIGN RESPONDgeographical, and terms of historical,

social context. Al the informations are gathered and will re-evaluated a group Section generally in comments for the deeper understanding on how on gained understanding aboutRiver the Almondasprovide thebybest condition for project outlined the course. It will a writer to get aon conducive retreat. also comprises the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts. Credits : Yedija Markus Mia Alecksic Theo Glencross Bryan Yee Shivani Suchak Aya El-Shahid Chris Tholmie

/3 River Almond has been documented as being used for thousands of HISTORY OF RIVER ALMOND years, due to its convenient location, flowing into the Firth of Forth. The catchment area of the river became a focus of industry during the Industrial Revolution in the 18th and 19th centuries, primarily the coal and shale in-dustries, resulting in the river becoming incredibly polluted, an issue it is still recovering from to this day.

WRITER’S RETREAT SITE ANALYSIS

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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

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ELEMENTS COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

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COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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COURSE NAME ELEMENTS

DESIGN TASK DEVELOPMENT 2Duration Weeks

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION Section includes Development should description consider the of real sizes, matedesign task, design rials, structure, light,stages and theand waycertain the space is inhabited. set of questions thatsequential students need to that explore the scale, make models At 1:50 tackle throughout the exercise. chosen strategy for the Retreat. There should be an initial set of 1:50 plans, sections and elevations supporting the models and exploring possible further development of the project.

/2 Roof plan drawing. First floor drawing. Ground floor drawing.

DESIGN RESPOND DESIGN Various mediums are used to RESPOND create deliberate prototypes for the retreat design. The concept is driven Section will generallyofcomments from the misconfiguration one peron the gained understanding about the fect cubes into several organic forms project as outlined by the course. It will as possibilities. also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

/3 The model showing the design. /1 Models exploring the forms.

/4 The skecthes during design development.

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ART & DESIGN

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

COURSE CODE /ARCH07001

COURSE CODE /ARCH08003

INTRODUCTION TO WORLD ARCHITECTURE

AROUND THROUGH +BEYOND FRAME

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

ELEMENTS

COURSE CODE /ARCH08001

BRIEF

BRIEF

The first design course introduces students to the foundational knowledge and skills appropriate to the practice of architectural design. Design is seen as a process involving imagination, representation and communication, analysis and research, iteration and reflection. Throughout the semester, students work on a series of design projects, which require individual and group submission of models and drawings. Working in a studio environment, students undertake a number of studies that introduce some of the essential elements of architecture, such as path, threshold, opening, membrane and enclosure. These studies are underpinned by a concern for the role of place and embodiment in the experience of architecture and the built environment. Studio exercise are supplemented by a series of lectures on practical and theoretical issues associated with the design process.

The Art and Design course is made up of a series of 2 and 3 week projects running through semester 1. The projects are devised to introduce, explore and challenge your art and design research and thinking. The projects come directly from the Edinburgh College of Art and Design 1st and 2nd year courses. They are adapted so that valuable transferable skills can be developed for Architecture and Landscape Students. Art and Design history and theory is touched upon through the lectures, tutorials and individual research and in keeping with your art college context a practice led approach is at the centre of your learning. The visual and text based documentation of research (sketchbooks and prototypes) as well as the final outcomes of the projects create an ever expanding portfolio through the semester. This portfolio, alongside the verbal and text based support of it, becomes the evidence for assessment of the learning outcomes of this course.

T he course begins with an examination of Ancient Egyptian,Greek, and Roman architecture, the architecture of the Middle Ages, Islam, Pre-Columbian America, and the first great re-evaluation of Antiquity in the Italian Renaissance. It goes on to survey the Renaissance in Britain and northern Europe and the subsequent influence of the Italian Baroque in these areas. Later, other significant cultural traditions in the history of architecture are introduced, such as those of India, China, and Japan. Semester 1 concludes with an examination of the theoretical, cultural, and stylistic aspects of the architecture of the European Enlightenment.

LO1

LO1

LO1

LO2

LO2

LO2

LO3

LO3

BRIEF

Awareness of basic architectural elements and issues that inform their disposition in architectural design. Awareness of different dimensions of the design process, from analysis and research individually and in teams to iteration and reflection in the formation of architectural designs.

LO3

Awareness of appropriate representational and communication methods to prepare and present design proposals.

Demonstrate experimentation and fundamental understanding of drawing using a range of techniques and materials. Demonstrate an awareness of Art and Design process in researching, testing and developing ideas to find creative solutions. Communicate ideas and complete work in a well structured and coherent way.

Throughout the course the development of building technology and the social, religious, and political understanding of buildings are recurring themes. Excursions into the related fields of landscape architecture and urban design necessarily appear from time to time.

Demonstrate knowledge of the history and theories of architecture and their related arts before c.1800. Demonstrate appreciation of the significance of a critical approach to architectural precedent in the context of design. Demonstrate development of verbal and visual communication skills in key themes of the module demonstrating a critical and reflective approach.

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ART + DESIGN COURSE TYPE AROUND, THROUGH+BEYOND FRAME COURSE NAME

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DESIGN+ TASK MARK GESTURE 1Duration Week

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION Section This one includes day project description begins with of design task, of design stagesdrawing and certain the concept a gestural as a set questions thatAstudents to self of contained form. signatureneed or raw tackle throughout the exercise. mark removed from association. With a playful and intuitive approach, the project explores fast and expressive abstract drawing exercises. Through this journey one hopes to not only recognise the innate qualities of action and mark but explore the formal elements of composition, scale, repetition, framing and form. There are four stage processes of the exercise; a valid entity, selection and repetition, selection of scale, and investigation.

/4

/2

DESIGN RESPOND Section The mark willis generally a fluid stroke comments that on the gained understanding about imitate my signature swirl stamped the on project as outlined by the course. It will various documents, during both imporalso comprises on the learning curve, tant and casual occasions. reflection, and the future projection on Thecollected gesture thoughts. design came in naturally the throughout years of writing my personal signature. The mark also resembles a curly hairline, in which I really love to doodle on.

/1 /2 /3 /4

/1

Final Mark and Gesture. Mark and Gesture on acrylic. Mark and Gesture using string and ink. Mark and Gesture, in the making.

/3 18


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OBSERVATION + REPRESENTATION 2 Weeks DESIGN TASK Duration DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Following on from the gesture

project we take these marks and forms on a journey Sectionthrough includes of thedescription city. Combindesign task, design stages and certain ing the abstract gestures and plays with set of questions that students need to composition with a range of methods tackle throughout the exercise. of observation.

/2

/3

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the DESIGN RESPOND project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, Edinburgh is projection a city filled reflection, and thecity future on withcollected spectacular views. At multiple anthe thoughts. gle, various perceptions are captured and drawn. The drawings also use various recyclable materials. Through observation, many interpretation can be formed.

/4 /1

/1 The hand sketch of Grassmarket using pens and markers. /2 Interpretation of Edinburgh city plan, using recyclable materials. /3 Edinburgh cityscape, seen from Edinburgh Castle. /4 Drawing of the journey for "Observation and Represantation" on steps, using inks

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ART + DESIGN COURSE TYPE AROUND, THROUGH+BEYOND FRAME COURSE NAME

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DESIGN TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

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DESIGN TASK + REPRESENTATION OBSERVATION 2Duration Weeks

DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION There a parallel opportunity Sectionis includes description of design task, designand stages and certain for Observation Representation set of questions need to during site surveythat forstudents Ar Design : Eletackle throughout the exercise. ments. The students are asked to sketch and draw what are observed during the walk to River Almond.

DESIGN RESPOND

/2

The sketches at River Almond and Cramond Island are slightly messier than those during the walk in the city. Most of the mediums include the available soil, coal, and the leaves collected on site. Nature indeed speaks differently from man made built environment.

DESIGN RESPOND

/3

Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

/1 /2 /3 /4

Leaves found at River Almond. Tree sketch using River Alond soil. Drawing of Cramond Island using coal. Drawing of River Almond using markers.

/4 /1 21


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TIME TRAVELLERS MESSAGE 2 Weeks

DESIGN TASK Duration DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Using the locations of the Jour-

ney one is asked to come up with a message Section includes descriptiondigiof in any form (material, design task, design stages and certain tal, event) that is designed to function set that students needyou to specific period of time that overofa questions tackle throughout the exercise. will be given – this could be as little as 5 seconds or as much as 5000 years. What message do you have to give and is it a message for now or the future? How does your message transform and function through time? Think about how you design for the two functions – place and time – and how you will promote this to others.

DESIGN RESPOND People and time do change with the streams of progressing time. In a period of RESPOND 5 years, human would grow DESIGN older, walls and statues would get slowlySection corroded, different marks will more generally comments would get embarked on routes. on the gained understanding aboutNevthe project as outlined by the course. It will ertheless, buildings would stand still, also comprises on the learning keeping the memories intact in curve, place. reflection, and the future projection on People pass by on a certain road, every the collected thoughts. day, or for few times, but never were they asked on how they feel about that place in relation to the season they are in.

/1 “Shape it!” wire is designed to be a medium for people to express themselves. So those who by chance pass by Grassmarket, Victoria Street, The Hub or Edinburgh Castle in the city of Edinburgh would have the opportunity to interact with it. You can shape it into any forms you like. Magically you will realize that time and place do affect how the wire is bent. Reflection of emotions can be seen through how they preferred the wire to be shaped. At the end of the 5-year period a collection of emotional expressions would have been built. /2 Four seasons in a year would results in variety of responses on the wire when carried out at fixed places. In 5 years, people would improve, having different way of thinking, learn and reflects, leaving behind past memories. They would have different preferences, opinions, thoughts and perceptions. It is useful to have a medium to reach into what lies inside people’s minds and souls when they get associated with time and place. Emotions are there inside of us to be appreciated, acknowledged and respected. To get them displayed is one of the means to cherish them.

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ART + DESIGN COURSE TYPE AROUND, THROUGH+BEYOND FRAME COURSE NAME

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INTERVENTION 3 Weeks

DESCRIPTION DESIGN TASK

Duration As we considered in the Time Travellers Message the designer and artist has certain responsibilities and multiple factors to consider through time. key factor in this process is clarifying what the AINTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION problem is andincludes how thisdescription informs your Your Section of design. research into the social and environmental factors design task, design stages and certain are to clarifying problem, andtoso to defining set key of questions thatthe students need your and working through to you solution! It is tacklebrief throughout the exercise. time to revisit the methods you have explored in all the previous projects. Intuitive and incisive drawing and exploring of locations, mind mapping, sharing and testing ideas, resolving and communicating the whole process with clarity and care.

DESIGN RESPOND Grassmarket area can pursued to gain the interest various kind of people of the intention of installation when it is intervened. The openness offered by Grassmarket allows maximum interactive possibilities of outcomes where collections of reactions can be gathered to revoke the awareness of the surrounding in Edinburgh. When natural installations are placed by creating easily recognizable greenRESPOND objects, it reconcile the place with the DESIGN its past of it being an untouched valley while at the same time fulfilling the resounding need of a greenSection will generally comments on the gained understanding about the er world. project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on can the learning Grass installation beprojection used curve, to on reawaken the reflection, and the future name itself as it can be an effective tool to be a sithe collected thoughts. lent-but-loud speaker to voice out what is actually the Earth demanded from human. Grass installation does stand out in Grassmarket, though ironically they have the same name and when it is reachable to the public they will lose their abstraction as they can be seen, touched and smelled by the visitors. The language initiate by the grass installation is through sensory stimulation rather than basic wordy medium of communication.

/3 Grass installation on Grassmarket.

/1 Doodle of the Intervention main idea.

/2 Sketches of the installation ideas. /4 Grass installation on Grassmarket.

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ART & DESIGN

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

COURSE CODE /ARCH07001

COURSE CODE /ARCH08003

INTRODUCTION TO WORLD ARCHITECTURE

AROUND THROUGH +BEYOND FRAME

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

ELEMENTS

COURSE CODE /ARCH08001

BRIEF

BRIEF

The first design course introduces students to the foundational knowledge and skills appropriate to the practice of architectural design. Design is seen as a process involving imagination, representation and communication, analysis and research, iteration and reflection. Throughout the semester, students work on a series of design projects, which require individual and group submission of models and drawings. Working in a studio environment, students undertake a number of studies that introduce some of the essential elements of architecture, such as path, threshold, opening, membrane and enclosure. These studies are underpinned by a concern for the role of place and embodiment in the experience of architecture and the built environment. Studio exercise are supplemented by a series of lectures on practical and theoretical issues associated with the design process.

The Art and Design course is made up of a series of 2 and 3 week projects running through semester 1. The projects are devised to introduce, explore and challenge your art and design research and thinking. The projects come directly from the Edinburgh College of Art and Design 1st and 2nd year courses. They are adapted so that valuable transferable skills can be developed for Architecture and Landscape Students. Art and Design history and theory is touched upon through the lectures, tutorials and individual research and in keeping with your art college context a practice led approach is at the centre of your learning. The visual and text based documentation of research (sketchbooks and prototypes) as well as the final outcomes of the projects create an ever expanding portfolio through the semester. This portfolio, alongside the verbal and text based support of it, becomes the evidence for assessment of the learning outcomes of this course.

T he course begins with an examination of Ancient Egyptian,Greek, and Roman architecture, the architecture of the Middle Ages, Islam, Pre-Columbian America, and the first great re-evaluation of Antiquity in the Italian Renaissance. It goes on to survey the Renaissance in Britain and northern Europe and the subsequent influence of the Italian Baroque in these areas. Later, other significant cultural traditions in the history of architecture are introduced, such as those of India, China, and Japan. Semester 1 concludes with an examination of the theoretical, cultural, and stylistic aspects of the architecture of the European Enlightenment.

LO1

LO1

LO1

LO2

LO2

LO2

LO3

LO3

BRIEF

Awareness of basic architectural elements and issues that inform their disposition in architectural design. Awareness of different dimensions of the design process, from analysis and research individually and in teams to iteration and reflection in the formation of architectural designs.

LO3

Awareness of appropriate representational and communication methods to prepare and present design proposals.

Demonstrate experimentation and fundamental understanding of drawing using a range of techniques and materials. Demonstrate an awareness of Art and Design process in researching, testing and developing ideas to find creative solutions. Communicate ideas and complete work in a well structured and coherent way.

Throughout the course the development of building technology and the social, religious, and political understanding of buildings are recurring themes. Excursions into the related fields of landscape architecture and urban design necessarily appear from time to time.

Demonstrate knowledge of the history and theories of architecture and their related arts before c.1800. Demonstrate appreciation of the significance of a critical approach to architectural precedent in the context of design. Demonstrate development of verbal and visual communication skills in key themes of the module demonstrating a critical and reflective approach.

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COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY INTRODUCTION COURSE NAMETO WORLD ARCHITECTURE

DESIGN ESSAY TASK

Duration Letter from Raphael to Pope Leo X : Reconstruction of Rome.

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION

INTRODUCTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to The essay is the to summarise tackle throughout exercise. what Raphael says about architectural drawings in his letter to Pope Leo X and suggest why it clearly excited him.

DESIGN RESPOND The essay is constructed into five subtitles; Introduction, Reconstruction of Ancient Rome, Styles of Ancient Roman Buildings and Ornaments Order, Comparisons of Modern and Classical Building, Architectural Theory, and Instruments For Drawings.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

Recorded in the year of 1519, Rafaello Sanzio da Urbino, known as Raphael the Italian painter, a distinctive letter was given to Pope Leo X that revealed an extensive interest on Roman ancient architectural remains. Although it was recorded that the letter was not Raphael’s standalone opinion about the topic, together with Baldassare Castiglione, a humanist, and probably with the help of Antonio da Sanggalo the Younger, the letter has survived three versions of writings ; first one in Mantua (1515), second one in Munich (1520) and third one is the printed version since 1733.

Later, he compared the modern with classical buildings. He unintentionally commented on the difference in appearance and meanings of both styles without contrasting one another.

The essay summarised the content of the letter in which there are all important key titles that construct the ancient Rome in written form.

Next, he introduced in his letter a device he used to complete the drawings. Raphael thoughtfully explained an excellent description of instructions to make the magnetic compass. After the device is made and used on the site, one can get to record the measurements for plan drawing.

In the beginning of his letter, Raphael manifested his appreciation upon Pope X’s request for him to reconstruct ancient Rome through his certain willingness to complete the drawing with all the important details as he was devastated and entirely upset with the ruination of the Roman Empire at that time. In the letter, he highlighted the three periodic styles of buildings in ancient Rome, namely, buildings commissioned by wealthy people, the buildings constructed with Goth influence, and the buildings existed during Raphael’s time. Raphael also did examine the orders of ornaments in Roman period and there are five of them: Doric, Ionic,Corinthian, Tuscan and Attic, each of them had different underlying values.

He also emphasised the importance of theoretical thoughts before architecture. Similar theory will create similar style of architectural language, and produce persistent symbols found in ornaments and the details of each buildings. He came into a conclusion that his drawings were derived from the same theoretical classical principal.

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Bibliography Campbell, I. and Nesselrath, A. (2006), The Codex Stosch: Surveys of ancient buildings by Giovanni Battista da Sangallo, Pegasus: Berliner Beiträge zum Nachleben der Antike, 8, pp. 9-90 Hart, V. and P. Hicks (2006) Palladio’s Rome, New Haven and London, pp. 177192 Appendix: The letter to Leo X by Raphael and Baldassare Castiglione (c. 1519)

The letter subsequently is completed by a clear explanation on type of drawings he produced for the understanding of the readers. He described precisely the definition of plan, section and perspective drawings.

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ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY COURSE TYPE INTRODUCTION COURSE NAMETO WORLD ARCHITECTURE

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DESIGN TASK PRESENTATION

Duration Nashq E- Jahn Square.

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to One is required do one piece of work in tutackle throughout the to exercise. torial class during the course of the semester, which will involve giving a class presentation.

DESIGN RESPOND The naqsh e jahan square symbolize the whole city itself though it’s not the mere city. It displays the Persian art of Safavid era in Isfahan.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

/1 The square (Maidan).

/2 South –i-Shah Mosque.

• Built by Shah Abbas I the Great • In 1597, he moved his capital from Qazfin to Isfahan when the city was still a ruin • In his town planning he was influenced by the Timurid architecture of Herat • Planner and engineer : Sheik Bahai • Rectangular • 510m long, 165m wide • As a meeting place for ruler, ceremony, market, tournament and polo field • Flat-topped wall made by bricks • Series of two-storied arcades linking monumental buildings

• Walls of polychrome tiles • 2 minarets 42m high with arched portal as entrance • 386m long and 139m wide • Always seen against the sun • The majestic beauty of its architecture symbolise men’s eternal search to reach the heaven. • Decoration - Muqarnas vaults – stalactites / honeycomb at Iwan • Decoration - Use of mosaic tiles on the exterior - seven-color mosaic tile both at domes and walls • Peacocks motif ( reflecting the willingness of builders to put animal motif aside from geometric and calligraphic pattern) • Gold and silver layers of Nasta'liq Script (poem) on the wooden wall • Brickwork patterns in the domes

/3 East- Sheikh Lotfollah Mosque.

• Built by Shah Abbas I the Great • In 1597, he moved his capital from Qazfin to Isfahan when the city was still a ruin • In his town planning he was influenced by the Timurid architecture of Herat • Planner and engineer : Sheik Bahai • Rectangular • 510m long, 165m wide • As a meeting place for ruler, ceremony, market, tournament and polo field • Flat-topped wall made by bricks • Series of two-storied arcades linking monumental buildings

/4 Grand Baazar.

• 17th century AD • 2km vaulted street, linking new city with the old city ( from Friday Mosque ) • Decoration: Iwan flanked by galleries, crowned with Sagittarius mosaic tiles • The primary movement system of the baazar forms a central linear circulation space. • In daylight, the sunlight get into the baazar through the holes in the opez of the domes, it means that the baazar is lit by the shafts of sunlight from celestory and rooflight. • The clerestory is made up of sun-dried mud and straw plaster • Branching from the central area of the baazar is variety of enclosed spaces (mosques, madrasah (school), hammas (baths ), serais (warehouses) , bargain markets, shopping arcades. • Near southern ends, the baazar is linked with the dome streets, namely Qaysariya. • Bout Qaysariya : Built by Shah Abbas – he intended to create grand architecture for his new capital city. • At each street crossing, rises a dome having 40 m intervals , has different crafts on it (giving special names to each part of the baazar) , until it passes under last lofty dome, marking the entry to Maidan Shah.

• The domed vestibule acts as spatial pivot, interlocking the forecourt with the interior courtyard. 26


OVERALL SEMESTER

SELF ASSESSMENT

YEAR 1 ACADEMIC YEAR SEMESTER 1. ACADEMIC TERM

SPA

VIS

LOG

INT

REFLECTION Section The firstincludes semesterself gave reflective me a newthoughts perspective of the overall semester. comments of on self taught culture The all subjects. Thecomprised basic undergeneral comments of the courses, academic perforstandingand of personal space is progress gained, and slowly I get to pay mance, in learning. attention on the smallest things on the architecture and buildings around me.

The courses were very helpful in preparing me both insights of the past, and what the present holds in this field. The most interactive subject was Art and Design, and I personally enjoy expressing my understanding about both architecture and creative learning through weekly submissions.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES In design subject, the knowledge of space was something that was still new to me. Slowly, through readings and design exercises, the understanding slowly opens opportunity for me to start giving my own opinions and critically reflects on the fundamentals.

Art and Design, however, offers me a different language of interpretation about architecture. Driven by self expression and creativity, architecture has no limits, it gravitates creative productions to have some logical reasoning. Ar History makes me appreciate the past and the origins of the multiracial and multicultural architectural theories. Every decision has underlying factor, and every architecture is highly influenced by all that is not architecture; people, religion, emotion, money, etc.

/# /# Photo//#Diagram Sketches Favourite/ spot, full of description energy, full of colours,

and new hopes. 27


YEAR

I

SEMESTER

II


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY + ENVIRONMENT

COURSE CODE /ARCH08004

COURSE CODE /ARCH08002

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

FROM REVIVALISM TO MODERNISM

PRINCIPLES

ASSEMBLY

COURSE CODE /ARCH08005

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

This course introduces the theme of assembly in architectural design. It is focused on the capacity of structure, construction, and materials to create architecture. These physical factors as are considered alongside more ephemeral conditions such as light and sound. The way architecture establishes variable distinctions between exterior and interior spaces is also examined. The course asks students to develop these themes through consideration of a relatively simple programme such as a dwelling. To this end, students work on an integrated series of design exercises and projects. Students produce design proposals that are represented by a range of techniques ranging from expressive to scale drawings and models. The ambition of the course is to help develop an understanding of the relationship between architecture, structure, construction, materials and aspects of the environment by exploring the relationship of the parts to the whole in architectural design.

This Principals Unit is designed to introduce us to critical structural technological and environmental principles that underpin architectural design. It seeks to help understand not only how buildings need to work functionally to keep their occupants safe and secure, but also how such considerations can produce deeper, more meaningful architecture. From the unit we will learn how buildings can be seen as interacting systems and that structural, material and environmental strategies are interlinked.

This course surveys key topics in architectural history from the early nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. It examines the nineteenth century stylistic revivals, and introduces the apparently contradictory theme of modernity in architecture. It also discusses the nineteenth century development of new and more sophisticated typologies along with the novel materials and technologies that made this possible.

LO1

Awareness of principles of assembly, materiality, specific constructional and environmental logics and how they inform the design of architecture.

LO2

Capacity to manipulate architectural form in the consideration of LO2 interior, exterior space and context in the resolution of simple programmes.

LO3

Skills in the representation of simple architectural designs, including design process, in the portfolio format.

LO1

The revivalist and the modern are also discussed in terms of the conflict between industrial and anti-industrial that saw the architectural technology of the Crystal Palace juxtaposed with the emergence of the Arts and Crafts Movement. The course traces the complex ideas that lie behind the emergence of Modernism in the early decades of the 20th century. It concludes by considering the revision of Modernism in the 1950s and 60s and the recent emergence of a Post-modern consciousness.

Understanding of the key concepts in the physical behaviour of structural systems and their application in architecture.

LO1

LO2

LO2

Appreciation of the integral nature of material assembly and environmental systems to the development of architectural designs.

LO3

Breadth of knowledge and understanding of the principles of architectural structures, material assembly, environmental systems and sustainability in the built environment.

Knowledge of the major movements in nineteenth and twentieth century architecture. Skills in researching, analysing and writing in relation to LO1.

LO3

Verbal and visual communication skills in relation to LO1.

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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

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ASSEMBLY COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASK MATERIAL WORLD : ROTATIONS 1Duration Week

/1 Bricklaying exercise with studiomates.

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section description of design exerThrough includes a series of one - week design task, design stages and cises completed in rotation overcertain the first five weeks set of questions that students need to architectural of the semester, students will develop tackle throughout the exercise. design skills within defined parameters set by small design programmes. Each brief requires the student to consider the aesthetics and key constructional possibilities of a set material.

RESPOND All materials behave distinctively with one another. Each of them offers different aesthetic values and structural performances. Some design are more prone to specific material usage, and the exercise is really useful start to acknowledge their set of limitations.

/2 Understanding stones, during a visit to Direlton Castle.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

/3 Casting plaster.

/4 Timber joisting. 30


GC

COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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COURSE NAME ASSEMBLY

BRICK: MODESTY BOX 1 Week

INTRODUCTION DESIGN TASK

A

Duration Design challenge : You are to design a single storey building to be used as a sports changing room in parkINTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION land. The building must be predominately made of brick, can use other materials for of the roof, windows but you Section includes description etc. Thetask, spaces should makeand as certain much use of daylight as design design stages possible, while maintaining theneed privacy set of questions that students to of the people tackle throughout who are changing.the Youexercise. must consider the assembly of the brick. Consider the qualities of the wall, inside and outside, dividing and enclosing space. You need to develop a means of roofing the building, exploring options with maquette

B

B

A

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as RESPOND outlined by the course. It will DESIGN also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected Brick is thoughts. a very humble material consists of exclusively raw material loam or clay, dried and unite four natural elements when fired. Bricks resist harsh weather and extreme climate. The gym is designed to create circular walls, a way to test an organic performance a rigid brick can offer.

/1 1:50 section of the Modesty Box

/2 1:200 Plan

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GC

COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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COURSE NAME ASSEMBLY

STONE : STEAMROOM 1 Week

INTRODUCTION TASK DESIGN Design challenge : You are to design a small Duration

stone building for use as a spa steam room. Assume a location outdoors near a spa hotel. Guests will arINTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION rive in bathing trunks/ suit, robe and sandals. The building must be predominately built of stone, but Section includes of or as cladyou can use stone as a description solid material, design task, design stages and certain ding. There must be at least one window and one set of questions students to room and a door. buildingthat should have need a steam tackleThe throughout the exercise. relaxation ante-room/s, it will be a small building, catering for a maximum of around 8 people.

/1 Model of the steamhouse, made from dried clay.

/2 Model of the steamhouse, showing the interior.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

/3 Long section of the steamhouse. 32


ts

ove ced otht is ces.

GC

COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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COURSE NAME ASSEMBLY

DESIGN TASK CONCRETE : BOATHOUSE 1Duration Week

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section challenge includes :description of Design You are to dedesign task, design certain sign a boathouse for stages a smalland rowing club set an of inland questions need to on river.that Thestudents club owns 8 kaytackle throughout the exercise. aks (length 3300mm width 780mm) and 2 double rowing shells (length 7200mm, width 560mm). These will be stored in the main space.

DESIGN RESPOND Concrete comes in many guises. It can cast various patterns and reliefs, it ables to be moulded into both basic and funky pattern.

The design resembles boat shape. Twin building reside inside the context, behaving like parked boats by the river.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

/1 Model of the twin boathouses. /2 Sketches of the design, testing the possibilities of concrete as facade.

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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

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ASSEMBLY COURSE NAME

TIMBER / STEEL : TEAHOUSE DESIGN TASK 1Duration Week

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Design You are to of design a small Section challenge: includes description design task, and certain teahouse setdesign in an stages extraordinarily beautiful locaset ofThe questions that students tion. site is surrounded by need trees,tobeside a loch, tackle throughout the exercise. and with distant views to mountains beyond. The views are best from over 3m above adjacent ground level, but you cannot use the trees for any form of support - the teahouse must be freestanding. This is a very small teahouse, being remote, it can only seat 6 people at one time at the table, but informal places to sit and drink may be created in addition to the table. Views from inside to outside are very important to the success of the place.

RESPOND Timber is a material with unique charisma- it is after all has historic resonance that is still evident in the greate frames of the medievel period and earlier.

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1:50

DESIGN RESPOND

Steel skin gives a clean appearance , and able to reSectionchanges will generally comments flect subtle in the sky view that falls on it. on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts. FIRST FLOOR PLAN 1: 50

/1 Model of the teahouse. material world : TEA HOUSE /2 1: 100 Plan of the teahouse.

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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

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ASSEMBLY COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

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COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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COURSE NAME ASSEMBLY

STRANGELY FAMILIAR 4 Weeks

INTRODUCTION DESIGN TASK

Incorporating public spaces within a house inDuration troduces thresholds between a realm, which is essentially private and spaces where visitors may come INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION for a service or to buy an artefact. The house then becomes a hybrid of living and working. Each of the 4 studios Section includes description of but with a willdesign have the same private brief, design task, stages and certain different site. There also three ‘twists’. set of questions thatare students needdifferent to tackle throughout the exercise. Chocolatier twist:

Display / sales Kitchen (approx area 25m2) (couverture preparation / bench space, double sinks, chocolate warmer, fridge, layout space, packing area for on-line sales) Storage – packing, ribbons, boxes, moulds, wet and dry ingredients Objects – Spatulas, forks, tongs, moulds

DESIGN RESPOND The project brings through a series of decision making attempt to satisfy the most comfortable DESIGNin RESPOND rooms within the boundaries set by lines when designing, according the utilities needed Section will to generally comments by athe chocolatier. on gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also on theto learning curve, Hencecomprises it is important outline the standard daily life reflection, and the future projection on pace and work basiscollected of a chocolatier to allow him/her the thoughts. in synergy. It is true that chocolatier is a perfectionist, because he deals with accurate measuring to create a new found chocolate formula. The space where he works is fairly a combination of both of playground and a laboratory. Natural light and moderate temperature are highly necessary as to give the chocolates a perfect texture and taste.

/1 Plan drawing

/2 Exploded axonometric drawing of Chocolatier House

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COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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COURSE NAME ASSEMBLY

DESIGN TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

37


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY + ENVIRONMENT

COURSE CODE /ARCH08004

COURSE CODE /ARCH08002

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

FROM REVIVALISM TO MODERNISM

PRINCIPLES

ASSEMBLY

COURSE CODE /ARCH08005

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

This course introduces the theme of assembly in architectural design. It is focused on the capacity of structure, construction, and materials to create architecture. These physical factors as are considered alongside more ephemeral conditions such as light and sound. The way architecture establishes variable distinctions between exterior and interior spaces is also examined. The course asks students to develop these themes through consideration of a relatively simple programme such as a dwelling. To this end, students work on an integrated series of design exercises and projects. Students produce design proposals that are represented by a range of techniques ranging from expressive to scale drawings and models. The ambition of the course is to help develop an understanding of the relationship between architecture, structure, construction, materials and aspects of the environment by exploring the relationship of the parts to the whole in architectural design.

This Principals Unit is designed to introduce us to critical structural technological and environmental principles that underpin architectural design. It seeks to help understand not only how buildings need to work functionally to keep their occupants safe and secure, but also how such considerations can produce deeper, more meaningful architecture. From the unit we will learn how buildings can be seen as interacting systems and that structural, material and environmental strategies are interlinked.

This course surveys key topics in architectural history from the early nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. It examines the nineteenth century stylistic revivals, and introduces the apparently contradictory theme of modernity in architecture. It also discusses the nineteenth century development of new and more sophisticated typologies along with the novel materials and technologies that made this possible.

LO1

Awareness of principles of assembly, materiality, specific constructional and environmental logics and how they inform the design of architecture.

LO2

Capacity to manipulate architectural form in the consideration of LO2 interior, exterior space and context in the resolution of simple programmes.

LO3

Skills in the representation of simple architectural designs, including design process, in the portfolio format.

LO1

The revivalist and the modern are also discussed in terms of the conflict between industrial and anti-industrial that saw the architectural technology of the Crystal Palace juxtaposed with the emergence of the Arts and Crafts Movement. The course traces the complex ideas that lie behind the emergence of Modernism in the early decades of the 20th century. It concludes by considering the revision of Modernism in the 1950s and 60s and the recent emergence of a Post-modern consciousness.

Understanding of the key concepts in the physical behaviour of structural systems and their application in architecture.

LO1

LO2

LO2

Appreciation of the integral nature of material assembly and environmental systems to the development of architectural designs.

LO3

Breadth of knowledge and understanding of the principles of architectural structures, material assembly, environmental systems and sustainability in the built environment.

Knowledge of the major movements in nineteenth and twentieth century architecture. Skills in researching, analysing and writing in relation to LO1.

LO3

Verbal and visual communication skills in relation to LO1.

38


TECHNOLOGY COURSE TYPE + ENVIRONMENT

GC

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PRINCIPLES COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASK GATEWAY 1: MATERIAL SYSTEM 1Duration Week + 5 Weeks

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION Section includes description of There are 6 gateways in the design and certain course. task, This design gatewaystages asks what are the set of questions that students to fundamental components fromneed which tackle throughout the exercise. architecture is made. Starting from what we can mine and harvest, the creating of building components is explored and how these can be assembled together to start to make parts of buildings.

DESIGN RESPOND DESIGN The RESPOND following diagrams are showing the production of clay facing brick. Throughout gateways, there are mulSectionthewill generally comments tiple on materiality thatthe has on theknowledge gained understanding about project as outlined by the course. It will been covered, in a very scientific and also comprises fashion. on the learning mathemathical The restcurve, of the reflection, and the future projection on gateways are quizzes, the collected thoughts.questions and answers.

/1 /2 /3 /4 /5 /6 /7 /8 /9

Clay extraction. Clay preparation. Extrusion. Forming. Colouring. Firing. Quality testing. Packaging. Shipment.

39


TECHNOLOGY COURSE TYPE + ENVIRONMENT

GC

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PRINCIPLES COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASK BUILDING HIERARCHIES 1Duration Week

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION Section includes This short projectdescription allows you ofto design stages and certain developtask, skillsdesign in understanding strucset of questions that students need tural and constructional hierarchiestoin tackle throughout the exercise. building design. The output for this project will address Learning Outcome 1 in which to “Understanding of the key concepts in the physical behaviour of structural systems and their application in architecture”.

DESIGN RESPOND DESIGN The building chosen for the assignRESPOND ment is Edinburgh Festival Theatre Foyer. Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

40


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY + ENVIRONMENT

COURSE CODE /ARCH08004

COURSE CODE /ARCH08002

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY

FROM REVIVALISM TO MODERNISM

PRINCIPLES

ASSEMBLY

COURSE CODE /ARCH08005

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

This course introduces the theme of assembly in architectural design. It is focused on the capacity of structure, construction, and materials to create architecture. These physical factors as are considered alongside more ephemeral conditions such as light and sound. The way architecture establishes variable distinctions between exterior and interior spaces is also examined. The course asks students to develop these themes through consideration of a relatively simple programme such as a dwelling. To this end, students work on an integrated series of design exercises and projects. Students produce design proposals that are represented by a range of techniques ranging from expressive to scale drawings and models. The ambition of the course is to help develop an understanding of the relationship between architecture, structure, construction, materials and aspects of the environment by exploring the relationship of the parts to the whole in architectural design.

This Principals Unit is designed to introduce us to critical structural technological and environmental principles that underpin architectural design. It seeks to help understand not only how buildings need to work functionally to keep their occupants safe and secure, but also how such considerations can produce deeper, more meaningful architecture. From the unit we will learn how buildings can be seen as interacting systems and that structural, material and environmental strategies are interlinked.

This course surveys key topics in architectural history from the early nineteenth century to the late twentieth century. It examines the nineteenth century stylistic revivals, and introduces the apparently contradictory theme of modernity in architecture. It also discusses the nineteenth century development of new and more sophisticated typologies along with the novel materials and technologies that made this possible.

LO1

Awareness of principles of assembly, materiality, specific constructional and environmental logics and how they inform the design of architecture.

LO2

Capacity to manipulate architectural form in the consideration of LO2 interior, exterior space and context in the resolution of simple programmes.

LO3

Skills in the representation of simple architectural designs, including design process, in the portfolio format.

LO1

The revivalist and the modern are also discussed in terms of the conflict between industrial and anti-industrial that saw the architectural technology of the Crystal Palace juxtaposed with the emergence of the Arts and Crafts Movement. The course traces the complex ideas that lie behind the emergence of Modernism in the early decades of the 20th century. It concludes by considering the revision of Modernism in the 1950s and 60s and the recent emergence of a Post-modern consciousness.

Understanding of the key concepts in the physical behaviour of structural systems and their application in architecture.

LO1

LO2

LO2

Appreciation of the integral nature of material assembly and environmental systems to the development of architectural designs.

LO3

Breadth of knowledge and understanding of the principles of architectural structures, material assembly, environmental systems and sustainability in the built environment.

Knowledge of the major movements in nineteenth and twentieth century architecture. Skills in researching, analysing and writing in relation to LO1.

LO3

Verbal and visual communication skills in relation to LO1.

41


GC

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY COURSE TYPE

1

2

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FROM REVIVALISM TO MODERNISM COURSE NAME

ESSAY

Edinburgh College of Art

DESCRIPTION DESIGN TASK

Duration A building in Edinburgh dated between around 1750-2005 is chosen INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION to write a critical analysis, taking into account the following factors and any othersSection includes description of that may be appropriate: Siting; design task, design stages and certain plan; elevations; style; materials; relaset of questions that to students needfuncto tionship of interior exterior; tackle throughout the exercise. tion; decoration and relationship of this to structure; ideological and/or historical basis/sources (if any) of these; later additions/alterations and the effect of these; history; importance in architectural history generally, or for the City, or in the architect’s career/development; in your opinion whether the building is convincing /successful in its design and function.

ECA is located in the heart of Edinburgh Old Town. The College is one of the oldest and largest of its kind in Europe with a history that dates back to 1760. July 11, 1907, marked the historical beginning of gradual planning for well-constructed Edinburgh College of Art when Prince of Wales II laid the foundation stones. It is located in a former cattle market in Lauriston, Edinburgh and was first known as Municipal Art School. As the name suggests, the school provides multi-disciplinary art education alongside with another three independent art institutions namely the Board of Manufactures' Academy (established 1760), the Life School of the Royal Scottish Academy, the Art Department of Heriot-Watt College, and Robert Rowand Anderson's School of Applied Art. The first plan for ECA was proposed by sculptor James Pittendrigh MacGillivray (1856—1938). His idea of space was centralised on preparing the building to accommodate the sculpture casts which were an important donation from the Board of Manufactures. The architects involved for the construction of ECA from planning to completion included John More Dick Peddie, Charles Kinnear, and Washington Browne. The project was granted by James Forbes Smith.

The definition of Beaux Art style on ECA’s façade is solely due to the red sandstones on a symmetrical facade, giving the ambiance of French military eclectic layout on a monumental scale. The first phase was completed during the commencement of the first academic session in October 1908 where it involved the west wing side stretched from the main entrance and The second phase of building was begun in 1911 and completed for the 1912. By this later date, circulation space was further rationalised and extra accommodation was provided at the eastern extremity. Bibliography Fazio, M., Moffet, M., Wodehouse, L., A World History of Architecture Third Edition, (London, 2014). Glendinning, M., Maclnnes, R., MacKechnie, A., A History of Scottish Architecture From The Renaissance to The Present Day, (Edinburgh, 2002). Gifford, J., McWilliam, C., Walker, D., Edinburgh, (London, 1984).

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

42


ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY COURSE TYPE

GC

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11

FROM REVIVALISM TO MODERNISM COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASK ESSAY

Duration College of Art Edinburgh

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION Section includes isdescription of The presentation prepared into design task, history, design stages and certain four topics; significance, strucset of questions students need to ture, feature.that tackleand throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

• In 1982 Francois Mitterrand (France president) initiated the competition as a completion to give grandeur to centre of La Defense, the futuristic district for localized business administrative zone - to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the French Revolution in 1989. • La Defense -linked to the growth of French and foreign firms built on the site. • There were 424 drawing submissions; the selections were limited to 23 French based architects’ designs. • The decision of the selection was made by the ministry of environment of government, hence remains a political one. • In 1983 the design by Danish architect, Johann Otto von Spreckelsen was chosen as the winner, announced on 25th May, only known on 30th of May. • The style of La Defense is Post Modern. • His design was to be a demonstration of his theories set forth at the Copenhagen technical university where he spent many years designing structures based on the observations of lines of passage of force in matter. • Spreckelsen decided to resign and the architectural responsibility transfer contract with Paul Andreu was officially signed on 1st August 1986 43


OVERALL SEMESTER

SELF ASSESSMENT

ACADEMIC YEAR YEAR 1 ACADEMIC TERM SEMESTER 2

REFLECTION As a whole, the time in semester 2 of Section includes self spent reflective thoughts the semester. The comments comprised was overall more challenging. During this term, I'm still of general of the courses, academic perforadjustingcomments to the knowledge of Western Archimance, and personal progress in learning. tecture and theories, their appreciation of what is good design and what is bad design.

The separation of the technology and environmental subject and design create difficulties to bridge between the two. I also find it hard to apply the understanding of Ar History in my design.

SPA

VIS

LOG

INT

SELF ATTRIBUTES The knowledge about home and housing design are what I treasure the most during the first year design subject. This is because, later in the years to come, these are the most fundamental learning that I need to keep on revising and upgrade.

First year of undergraduate learning also help me appreciate and improve my hand skills of both drawings and model making. As I am still new with the knowledge about architecture and modernity, to me, communicating ideas have been challenging, now that people are able to question my design decision more critically.

/# /# Brief /gateway to Oban during the semester , /# Photo/ Diagram Sketches description

alone and almost miserable.

44


YEAR

II

SEMESTER

I


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY + ENVIRONMENT 2A

COURSE CODE /ARCH08007

COURSE CODE /ARCH08028

ELECTIVES

FOUNDATION OF JAPANESE LANGUAGE

BUILDING ENVIRONMENT

IN PLACE

COURSE CODE /ASST07008

BRIEF

BRIEF

DESCRIPTION

First year architectural design, Elements & Assembly, examined ways in which architecture is indebted to its own means of construction; it introduced students to a tectonic vocabulary and a range of materials and building systems. Architecture conceptually is an intriguing enquiry of the mind. How to produce a building from one’s own ability as a hard ask, it will bring with it huge rewards and is essentially a creative act. In Place followed by Any Place begins your search for what is architecture and how you relate to that search.

Technology and Environment 2A, Building Environment examines building design in relation to exterior and interior environmental performance. Building on the Stage 1 courses Technology and Environment: Principles and Architectural Design: Assembly, the course develops skills and abilities to assess, analyse and design buildings in relation to exterior environmental conditions such as micro-climate modi cation, energy and water conservation and integration with landscape as well as interior conditions such as natural and artificial lighting control, acoustic performance, and ventilation strategies.

This is a course for beginners with no previous knowledge of Japanese, designed to introduce the Japanese Language and culture. It provides an introduction to the two basic Japanese scripts, hiragana and katakana. It aims to give absolute beginners a basic, working knowledge of spoken and written Japanese through learning fundamental grammatical structures and basic vocabulary for everyday life. The engagement of the subject is based on the context of Japanese culture, customs and events to gain an awareness of cultural diversity.

Following the first year design method we pick up far more complicated themes to what makes an architecture. In researching different aspects of what an architecture can have you will have the opportunity to learn and begin to incorporate your personal interpretation of what architecture is.

LO1

Investigate through design-research architectural and urban issues that impact on architectural design decisions.

LO2

Respond to brief and site by synthesizing a range of programmatic components, formal and spatial strategies, and contextual themes of modest complexity within an architectural design.

LO3

Effectively explore and communicate design ideas and propositions, articulate by visual means an architectural argument, individually and in teams, in a range of digital and analogue formats.

The course places emphasis on designing for passive environmental performance, but introduces mechanical systems as a supplement. The course also examines the application of sustainable building practices, including qualitative and quantitative assessments of environmental performance. Case study project site visits and design-based coursework place emphasis on design integration and applying theory to practice.

LO1

Recognise key exterior and interior environmental principles in architectural design.

LO2

Apply these principles to architectural designs that integrate with site; address human thermal, acoustic, and lighting comfort; and minimise energy consumption.

LO3

Communicate the relationships between building and environment using appropriate visual, verbal, and written means.

46


GC

COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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4

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7

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11

COURSE IN PLACENAME

DESIGN PROJECTTASK 1 -4 Duration 4 Weeks

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section includes description Each week, by taking chapter of 3, 4, 6 design task, design and 7 from Ching'sstages book, and five certain models are set of questions that students need to made for the Friday studio incorporating tackle throughout the exercise. research, knowledge and understanding of what have been read. The projects are Form and Space, Organisation, Circulation, Proportion and Scale. These experimentations will soon be used for design development for Architecture School.

DESIGN RESPOND In defining the beginning of space exploration, I get to grab the simplest and easiest approach of what actually creates boundary. I realized that one spontaneous idea can only be deliberate when it is within a very fundamental DESIGN RESPOND order, or law. Hence dealing with what is very specific and have planarSection arrangement can be the first step to will generally comments brainstorm further doubtful about and unansweron the gained understanding the project as outlined by the course. It will able possibilities. What is simple, yet is not also comprises simple at all. on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts. A space that can adapt distinctive ability to fascinate, so that the students would go out of their curiosity to their limits. A space that can go beyond speaking the mind of the inhabitants, that can nourish their visions.

/3

/1

/2

/1 Five models per week projects. /2 Five models per week project reflections. /3 Five models per week project final concept model, a theoretical construction.

47


GC

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

IN PLACENAME COURSE

ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL EDINBURGH 4 Weeks DESIGN TASK Duration DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION The main task of the course is the de-

sign of an architecture school Edinburgh. The project Section expected includes description of the to develop from design task, isdesign stages and certain analysis of precedents and the need site analysis. set of questions that students to Knowledge of the physical conditions of the tackle throughout the exercise. site, the social and cultural makeup of the school population, should feed into the design itself. The sites chosen neither require complete submersion of the proposed building in its environment nor suggest complete autonomy of the singular building. Instead, they suggest some level of negotiation, which enables a certain freedom for the design yet requires some level of accommodating the local. The project is particularly interested in developing the students’ skills in the laying out of a building: circulation and access systems; communal and public spaces; considerations of function and use; spatial organisation. The designs are expected to suggest spatial DESIGN RESPOND qualities and functional rigour; to consider inhabitation a social act; comments and to account Sectionaswill generally on understanding about the forthe thegained building’s relation to its locus. project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

/1 Site photos. /2 Site photo collage. /3 Architecture School site section.

/1

/3

/2

48


GC

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

IN PLACENAME COURSE

ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL EDINBURGH Process

DESIGN RESPOND DESIGN TASK

Duration The school was intended to be designed in a way it sits on the ground running INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION through the contours like a river flowing down the landscape. Section includes description of design task,street design stages and certain sit Siteof: Keir is located besides set questions that students need ECA, to firmly in between the and George Hetackle throughout theVennel exercise. riot School, several metres away from various attraction in Edinburgh like Grassmarket and Victoria Street, and most importantly when facing north, it faces the Edinburgh Castle. Hence, There are two dominant richness that can be gained from the site, The Edinburgh Castle and south sunlight.

/1 Architecture school plan dratf drawing.

Design: The designs are formed from series of trials of rearrangement of the interiors and repositioning the roof lights.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

/2 Architecture school form finding. /3 Architecture school interior precedents.

/4 Architecture school maquette model on site.

49


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

GC

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

IN PLACENAME COURSE

ARCHITECTURE DESIGN TASK SCHOOL EDINBURGH Process Duration

DESIGN RESPOND INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION The building is permeable Section includes descriptiontoof light, design task, stagesitand welcome anddesign celebrating fromcertain north and set of questions that students need to right south, from top and the bottom , from tackle throughout the exercise. and sometimes left. The light find itself way to the inside, and not leaving, only shifting around until it's time to set and be gone for the day.

The way one values light should be the same in valuing shadows. From far or close, from people or stone from everyone and every­ thing. Because they speak coherently with light, like the way yin and yang do.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

50


GC

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

IN PLACENAME COURSE

ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL EDINBURGH Proposal

DESIGN TASK RESPOND

Duration The school sits in a manner that conceptualizing the language of imINTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION perfections ( human creation ) engage ( nature). with perfections Section includes description of design task,about design certain Everything thestages schooland including set questions need to the of furniture andthat thestudents room arrangetackle exercise. ment isthroughout an examplethe of sort. The idea is to instil the concept on the way how to students should learn and how the teachers should teach.

The school is designed to lie on on the site replicat­i ng the attitude of river flowing down the landscape. The floorings and the tables were prominently ar­r anged according to the contour lines offered by the context. The walls were sometimes stretched and corroded to making up the most of the furniture and rooms.

/1

/2

/3

/4

/5

/6

Credits : Nichakant Pattanapeeradech Melika Tojjar

DESIGN RESPOND

Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on /1 Architecture school : Cafe the collected thoughts. plan and section drawing. /2 Architecture school : Library plan and section drawing. /3 Architecture school : Theatre plan and section drawing. /4 Architecture school : Studio plan and section drawing. /5 Interior precedents. /6 Architecture school plan drawing. /7 Architecture school section drawing.

/7

51


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY + ENVIRONMENT 2A

COURSE CODE /ARCH08007

COURSE CODE /ARCH08028

ELECTIVES

FOUNDATION OF JAPANESE LANGUAGE

BUILDING ENVIRONMENT

IN PLACE

COURSE CODE /ASST07008

BRIEF

BRIEF

DESCRIPTION

First year architectural design, Elements & Assembly, examined ways in which architecture is indebted to its own means of construction; it introduced students to a tectonic vocabulary and a range of materials and building systems. Architecture conceptually is an intriguing enquiry of the mind. How to produce a building from one’s own ability as a hard ask, it will bring with it huge rewards and is essentially a creative act. In Place followed by Any Place begins your search for what is architecture and how you relate to that search.

Technology and Environment 2A, Building Environment examines building design in relation to exterior and interior environmental performance. Building on the Stage 1 courses Technology and Environment: Principles and Architectural Design: Assembly, the course develops skills and abilities to assess, analyse and design buildings in relation to exterior environmental conditions such as micro-climate modi cation, energy and water conservation and integration with landscape as well as interior conditions such as natural and artificial lighting control, acoustic performance, and ventilation strategies.

This is a course for beginners with no previous knowledge of Japanese, designed to introduce the Japanese Language and culture. It provides an introduction to the two basic Japanese scripts, hiragana and katakana. It aims to give absolute beginners a basic, working knowledge of spoken and written Japanese through learning fundamental grammatical structures and basic vocabulary for everyday life. The engagement of the subject is based on the context of Japanese culture, customs and events to gain an awareness of cultural diversity.

Following the first year design method we pick up far more complicated themes to what makes an architecture. In researching different aspects of what an architecture can have you will have the opportunity to learn and begin to incorporate your personal interpretation of what architecture is.

LO1

Investigate through design-research architectural and urban issues that impact on architectural design decisions.

LO2

Respond to brief and site by synthesizing a range of programmatic components, formal and spatial strategies, and contextual themes of modest complexity within an architectural design.

LO3

Effectively explore and communicate design ideas and propositions, articulate by visual means an architectural argument, individually and in teams, in a range of digital and analogue formats.

The course places emphasis on designing for passive environmental performance, but introduces mechanical systems as a supplement. The course also examines the application of sustainable building practices, including qualitative and quantitative assessments of environmental performance. Case study project site visits and design-based coursework place emphasis on design integration and applying theory to practice.

LO1

Recognise key exterior and interior environmental principles in architectural design.

LO2

Apply these principles to architectural designs that integrate with site; address human thermal, acoustic, and lighting comfort; and minimise energy consumption.

LO3

Communicate the relationships between building and environment using appropriate visual, verbal, and written means.

52


TECHNOLOGY COURSE TYPE + ENVIRONMENT 2A

GC

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

BUILDINGNAME ENVIRONMENT COURSE

ASSIGNMENT 1 : DESIGN TASK PAVILLION MICROCLIMATE Duration 10 Weeks

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section includes description of itThe Environment design task,Built design stages and concerns certain self ofprimarily with of need human set questions thatmatters students to comfort, building performance and sustainable tackle throughout the exercise. environments. It considers both exterior and interior environmental issues related to low-energy building performance.

DESIGN RESPOND As a group, we decided to design a cafe on St George Square Garden. The cafe is a sheltered space for three main spaces, namely the eating space, computer room and meeting place. The target of the occupants include the student of Edinburgh University, the staffs and the visitors during the univerDESIGN sity's openRESPOND day. The main concept of the cafe is where the wind swirls made up a curvy Section will generally building providing a both re­lcomments axing and comon the gained understanding the fortableasspace within fromcourse. theabout harsh weathproject outlined by the It will er outside. also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected Weather it is thoughts. summer or winter, the space try to in­c orporate with the context to make every room function feasibly.

Credits: Catherine Wu Nichakant Pattanapeeradech Dhamintha Wickremasinghe

53


TECHNOLOGY COURSE TYPE + ENVIRONMENT 2A

GC

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

BUILDING ENVIRONMENT COURSE NAME

ASSIGNMENT 1 : DESIGN TASK PAVILLION MICROCLIMATE Duration Site and Bioclimatic Study

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESIGN RESPOND Section of EdGeourge includes Square isdescription located in the design stages and certain inburghtask, Citydesign Scotland, having the average set of questions thatbetween students15need to 3todegree annual temperature tackle throughout the exercise. celcius .

George square consists of four quadrants. And we decided to choose the fourth quadrant, taking in approach scheme, wind flow, and sunlight path into considerations. In general, the site sit geographically in which it has low amount of sunlight, windy, cold and under heating is the main issue. The wind in winter is the strongest, compared to other seasons, moving from southwest towards northeast; moving from quadrant three to quad­r ant four, diagrammatically on George Square Garden. Hence the wind eddies formed in both quadrant two and three would be an issue. Quadrant four is where the junction connecting University Library DESIGN RESPOND and the main city road takes place. Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

54


TECHNOLOGY COURSE TYPE + ENVIRONMENT 2A

GC

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

BUILDINGNAME ENVIRONMENT COURSE

ASSIGNMENT 1 : MICROCLIMATE PAVILLION Shadow | Light | Ventilation DESIGN TASK Duration DESIGN RESPOND INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Shadows casted inside the building

predetermine how much light is needed withinSection a singleincludes space. description The strategyoftaken design task, design stages and an certain during winter is that by providing adequate set of questions students need to amountthroughout of artificialthe light within the building. tackle exercise. The trees surround­ing the cafe are deciduous, allowing more sunlight passing through the bare branches towards the cafe front. During summer, the cafe is protected from strong sunlight from the surrounding trees. This will only allow an enough amount of daylight penetration. Low penetration of natural light, would eventually allow more fo­c used manipulation of artificial light. Space and light; the correla­ tion they have with one another is inevitable. The amount of light poured within an enclosed room play an important role affecting the conscious dimension perceived by the occupants; hence natu­rally affect their DESIGN RESPOND physiology psychological collectivity. Section will generally comments Thethe cafe uses understanding both natural ventilation on gained about the sysproject as outlined by the course. It will ventems; cross ventilation and stack effect also comprises on the learning curve, tilation. Such an approach allow for a buildreflection, andper thecent future onat the ing to use 60 lessprojection energy, and the collected thoughts. same time im­p roves the air quality. Though the wind that may come in can be strong, the . variations of floor heights breaks the strong wind flow, creating milder breeze of natural air ventilation.

55


TECHNOLOGY COURSE TYPE + ENVIRONMENT 2A

GC

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

BUILDINGNAME ENVIRONMENT COURSE

ASSIGNMENT DESIGN TASK 1 : WORKBOOK Duration

DESIGN RESPOND INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Assignment 1 Workbook exericse is Section includes description of design task, indesign stages Excel and certain completed Microsoft sheets, in set of questions that students needistobased which most of the design decision tackle throughout the exercise. on practicality and numerical calculations. The priority of the design is not aesthetic or form, rather it concerns on the interior comfort and the energy sustainability.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

56


TECHNOLOGY COURSE TYPE + ENVIRONMENT 2A

GC

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

BUILDING ENVIRONMENT COURSE NAME

ASSIGNMENT 2 : ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS DESIGN TASK CASE STUDY Duration 4 Weeks

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section includes description of Working as a pair, design task, design stageswith andanother certain from yourof design studio choose a case set questions that group, students need to study throughout from those the given, and analyse the tackle exercise. information available; as given to you, in the presentation, slides, and other material available written and in drawing format. Each student will produce their own environmental section drawings for the building, each choosing a drawing(s) that will work well together presented as a paired group. The sections, (as a paired drawing set) must analyse at least two contrasting periods; climatic, diurnal or other environmental strategies employed during use of the building.

DESIGN RESPOND The building chosen is Termitory House in Vietnam. Termitary house is located to the DESIGN RESPOND site that adapt the activities of the people in Da Nang, which is sight seeing. The house Section willfor generally comments is suitable l only temporary staythe as peron the gained understanding about manent as accommodation causes project outlined by thewould course. It willseveral inconveniences occupants. One of also comprises on for thethe learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the main factor is lack of safety measures the thoughts. and collected less privacy. The house would be an example of exhibition home, but not for real residency.

Credits: Catherine Wu

57


TECHNOLOGY COURSE TYPE + ENVIRONMENT 2A

GC

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

BUILDING ENVIRONMENT COURSE NAME

ASSIGNMENT 2 : ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS DESIGN TASK CASE STUDY 4Duration Weeks

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESIGN RESPOND Section includes description of

design task, design stages and certain set questionsis that students to of Vietnam located closeneed to the tackle throughout the exercise. equator, is a country of hot humid climate. The climate in Vietnam varies greatly from north to south with three distinct climatic zones. Tropical monsoons occur from October to April in the centre and from May to September in the north and south. It is almost totally dry throughout the rest of the year. It can get exceptionally hot, however, all year round, but the north has a cooler time between October and April. Temperatures around the country can reach up to 40C in the height of the hot and rainy season (May to September), but the northern highlands and Hanoi can often seem chilly and damp in the winDESIGN RESPOND ter. It's important to note that Da Nang willthe generally comments city sitSection next to sea shore, hence on the gained understanding about the the humidity level and rainfall per project as outlined by the course. Ityear will are high. also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

58


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY + ENVIRONMENT 2A

COURSE CODE /ARCH08007

COURSE CODE /ARCH08028

ELECTIVES

FOUNDATION OF JAPANESE LANGUAGE

BUILDING ENVIRONMENT

IN PLACE

COURSE CODE /ASST07008

BRIEF

BRIEF

DESCRIPTION

First year architectural design, Elements & Assembly, examined ways in which architecture is indebted to its own means of construction; it introduced students to a tectonic vocabulary and a range of materials and building systems. Architecture conceptually is an intriguing enquiry of the mind. How to produce a building from one’s own ability as a hard ask, it will bring with it huge rewards and is essentially a creative act. In Place followed by Any Place begins your search for what is architecture and how you relate to that search.

Technology and Environment 2A, Building Environment examines building design in relation to exterior and interior environmental performance. Building on the Stage 1 courses Technology and Environment: Principles and Architectural Design: Assembly, the course develops skills and abilities to assess, analyse and design buildings in relation to exterior environmental conditions such as micro-climate modi cation, energy and water conservation and integration with landscape as well as interior conditions such as natural and artificial lighting control, acoustic performance, and ventilation strategies.

This is a course for beginners with no previous knowledge of Japanese, designed to introduce the Japanese Language and culture. It provides an introduction to the two basic Japanese scripts, hiragana and katakana. It aims to give absolute beginners a basic, working knowledge of spoken and written Japanese through learning fundamental grammatical structures and basic vocabulary for everyday life. The engagement of the subject is based on the context of Japanese culture, customs and events to gain an awareness of cultural diversity.

Following the first year design method we pick up far more complicated themes to what makes an architecture. In researching different aspects of what an architecture can have you will have the opportunity to learn and begin to incorporate your personal interpretation of what architecture is.

LO1

Investigate through design-research architectural and urban issues that impact on architectural design decisions.

LO2

Respond to brief and site by synthesizing a range of programmatic components, formal and spatial strategies, and contextual themes of modest complexity within an architectural design.

LO3

Effectively explore and communicate design ideas and propositions, articulate by visual means an architectural argument, individually and in teams, in a range of digital and analogue formats.

The course places emphasis on designing for passive environmental performance, but introduces mechanical systems as a supplement. The course also examines the application of sustainable building practices, including qualitative and quantitative assessments of environmental performance. Case study project site visits and design-based coursework place emphasis on design integration and applying theory to practice.

LO1

Recognise key exterior and interior environmental principles in architectural design.

LO2

Apply these principles to architectural designs that integrate with site; address human thermal, acoustic, and lighting comfort; and minimise energy consumption.

LO3

Communicate the relationships between building and environment using appropriate visual, verbal, and written means.

59


ELECTIVES COURSE TYPE

GC

1

2

3

4

5

6

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8

9

10

11

FOUNDATION COURSE NAMEOF JAPANESE LANGUAGE

FOUNDATION JAPANESE LANGUAGE 1 11 Weeks

DESIGN TASK Duration SUMMARY The classes are based on two books; INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION

Japanese For Busy People 1 Kana Version Busy People: KanaofWork and Japanese Section for includes description book. task, design stages and certain design set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise. aims are: The course I. To provide an introduction to the two basic Japanese scripts, hiragana and katakana. II. To give absolute beginners a basic, working knowledge of spoken and written Japanese through learning fundamental grammatical structures and basic vocabulary for everyday life. III. To provide an introduction to Japanese culture, customs and events to gain an awareness of cultural diversity. The course outcomes are: i. introduce yourself and others including nationalities and occupations. DESIGN RESPOND ii. talk about a nearby object and its owner. iii. talk about dates, times and numbers. will generally iv. askSection the prices of items comments in a store and on the gained understanding about the make a as purchase. project outlined by the course. It will v. askcomprises what the on size, andcurve, country of also thecolour, learning origin of anand item and buy the item. reflection, theis,future projection on the collected thoughts. vi. talk about where you will go, when, and with whom. vii. talk about travel destinations, places and people to visit and means of transportation. viii. talk about numbers of things or people that exist in a particular place.

60


OVERALL SEMESTER

SELF ASSESSMENT

ACADEMIC YEAR 2 YEAR ACADEMIC TERM SEMESTER 1

SPA

VIS

LOG

INT

REFLECTION During term, self I find model making is of Section this includes reflective thoughts the overall semester. comments comprised not only a medium forThe design or proposal pres- of general of the courses, academic perforentation,comments but the practice is also useful as thinkmance, and personal progress in learning. ing tool.

In the design portfolio, There are abundance of reflections written. It means that the design through modelling exercise really open rooms for conversations. More demand digital skill from the school can be seen in technology subject. However, the most interesting part of the semester is the space to venture something different by taking any available elective subject. Language subject helps me to de-stress and refocus on anything about architecture.

SELF ATTRIBUTES Although the culture was new to me, spatial study and analytical observation through massive amount of model making gave me another alternative to be creative. However, to digitally communicate my design, I find my software skills were nothing new from what I knew from high school. The move from hand skill to digital skill was not difficult, but to meet the expectation as second year student was not easy. Group work really help us complimenting each other's work. In terms of logical intelligence, I would say I have never been more logical than before. Weekly demand of critical reflection for design subject pushed me to be more talkative architecturally. Team work help me to develop a professional side. The most effective practice is a fair work division among members, and willingness to learn from each other.

/# /# Favourite ride/ofSketches the semester, Edin > Dundee. /# Photo/ Diagram description

For good food and few more laughs. 61


YEAR

II

SEMESTER

II


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY + ENVIRONMENT 2B

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY 2B

COURSE CODE /ARCH08006

COURSE CODE /ARCH08027

COURSE CODE /ARHI08007

ANY PLACE

BUILDING FABRIC

CULTURE + CITY

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

First year architectural design courses, Elements & Assembly, examined ways in which architecture is indebted to its own means of construction; it introduced students to a tectonic vocabulary and a range of materials and building systems.

Building Fabric explores the applications of the principles of structural analysis and design, as well as construction technology, implemented in the first year technology and design courses.

The course considers the notion of City as the exemplary setting of our social condition. Whist the city is understood to embody organising principles and to be constituted according to the commands of political thought, the course concentrates upon the city conceived also otherwise. It is the scene of self-conscious community and is our monument to shared memory. If the essential act of the city, politically conceived, is one of walling or penning, the city conceived socially is a scene of processing and gathering together. The architecture and city planning of accord is the subject of the course. The lecture programme falls into two parts, the first dealing with our acts of pilgrimage and congregation – for the purposes of religion, entertainment and improvement. The second part deals with our celebration in architecture of what we share metaphysically – social memory and the memorial.

Second year Architectural Design constitutes an exploration of how architecture can be indebted to things beyond itself. In Place explored the ways in which immediate contextual inputs could inform the design process, whereas Any Place will deal with the exploration of architectural design conditions that specifically extend beyond the level of the local. Among such conditions we can list those concerned with function, programme, spatial experience or insertion within a broader socio-cultural context. Buildings come between us and our environment, they put us into place. The design of building is indebted - on the one hand - to the nature of the things and activities it places, and – on the other – to the qualities of the locations they take place in. Any Place, will ask students to make building design proposals that respond firstly to the things and activities they accommodate and the location (Rome) and situations they occupy. Secondly to architectural, special & cultural explorations of the meaning of library.

Moving up in the degree of complexity in design, structural stability and serviceability are examined as a result of a wider range of actions. The process of dimensioning structural elements is scrutinised to provide insight to the rationality involved. Discussion of the design of these elements and their expression in structural forms classified broadly as linear and cellular addresses the majority of medium-sized construction and covers collectively the main material systems (timber, steel, concrete, masonry), highlighting their relevance to architectural design. This is further explored in their tectonic expression in processes of material system choice, architectural synthesis and assembly, actually the essence of how a building communicates its qualities to its users.

Skills in researching, analysing and writing in relation to LO1.

LO1

Ability to develop architectural designs that appropriately respond to a series of explicit investigations through research on relevant topics.

Apply the mechanisms of design of structures that address increasingly complex interactions between forms, human use and the environment of a site, in terms of imposed actions and the impact of the chosen material.

LO2

LO2

LO3

Capacity to progressively develop a synthesis of programmatic components, formal and spatial strategies, and contextual themes of intermediate complexity within an architectural design.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of connections between architecture and the social, economic and political circumstances within which it is located - tested by the Essay.

LO2

LO1

Capacity to progressively develop a synthesis of programmatic components, formal and spatial strategies, and contextual themes of intermediate complexity within an architectural designs.

LO1

LO3

Verbal and visual communication skills in relation to LO1.

ELECTIVES

Understand the process of choice and assembly of material systems in the design of buildings to provide internal conditions of comfort and its aesthetic expression.

FOUNDATION OF JAPANESE LANGUAGE 2

LO3

Understand the range of applications of the principles of assembly and structural performance with regards to the main material systems (masonry, timber, steel and concrete) in the design of medium-sized buildings.

COURSE CODE /ASST07016

BRIEF This course is for post-beginners with some knowledge of Japanese language or students who successfully completed (i.e. passed) Foundation Japanese Language 1. It aims to provide further basic grammatical structures and vocabulary for everyday life situations. The course will give an introduction to some basic Kanji (Chinese characters) that will engage with basic understanding of Japanese culture, customs and events to gain an awareness of cultural diversity. 63


COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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EXPLORATION 5 Weeks

DESIGN TASK INTRODUCTION Duration INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Thinking and acting. To think is better than to act (make). But yet as architects we’re expectedincludes to make!description So you areofto re searchSection Using design the task,written designword. stages and BBC’s certain‘In our archive 2012 Episode’s 1-5 - and Time’ set of questions that students need to other relevant sources.theExplore the meaning of tackle throughout exercise. the contemporary Library in the 21st cen. to you. Explore in model proposals, from your presented research, of what possibilities exist for ‘reading’ the ‘written word’. Explore the buildings relation to specified non-local conditions, i.e. internet/Google, through which it relates to a broader context.

DESIGN RESPOND

The first few weeks were devoted to discover a practical way to device a design that recon-cile both parallel reaction of how human gets dis-traction through reading and DESIGN RESPOND how the reading space would give room for distractions to occur. Section will generally comments on the gained understanding the in There are several drawings about of models project as outlined by the course. It will whichcomprises matures from thelearning very basic concept also on the curve, of a space and reverberate to projection create an on internal reflection, the future divergence.The experiments were a direct the collected thoughts. translation of a simple and general reading experience. A book contains a space to itself, allowing read-ing to be in another world, from a seriously knitted Issues of world problems to a closed off world beyond daily imagination, they offered some or total degree of dissemblance of actuality.

64


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SURVEY

/1 Via Gullia photos.

2 Weeks

DESIGN TASK INTRODUCTION Duration In your allocated group, research SITE for your INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION design exploration from week 2, in Rome. Prepare for a group site survey in next week’s visit to Rome, prepare Section includes description of to explore a specified urban site. Prepare design task, design stages and certain the of sites relationthat to specified set questions students non-local need to conditions throughthroughout which it relates to a broader context; the tackle the exercise. networks of human movement, and environmental phenomena, which cut across it.

DESIGN RESPOND

Like a labyrinth in a forestry , like any other historical site in the globe, Rome is heavily pregnant with all peculiar gem-like traces of stories from the past and what compromises ahead way towards the future. The narrow alleyways are all crossing at each other, having endless conversation like a web in our neurons, like how the galaxy is vast and tangled mysteriously. It is a paintings of The real world, an emblem ofRESPOND the complexion of inner mind, a complex DESIGN world. It is both chaotic and precise piece of urbanization. Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined of by one the course. It will settlement Not acomprises masterpiece , but a curve, gradual also on the learning planned from multitudes of decisions. A limreflection, andsmall the future projection on ited collected box of marginalize the thoughts. frame of text would not do the justice as how Rome can be interpreted as . It’s like an open book, readied to be explored , or like synopsis of a majestic story of humanity of the past. Oysters are tasty, but within it is an enchanting tiny little pearl. That is how the small site along the Via Giulia could be nonchalantly described .

/2

/3

/4

/2 Library maquette model. /3 Site plan. /4 Maquette on site drawing. The prominence of the verticality recalls of a welllike feature seen in cliffs, whereby the waterfall run down from the highest peak, a repercussion of serenity.

/1 65


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SPACE DRAWING DESIGN TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section the During includes site survey, description we were of asked to redesign task, design stages cord individual drawing of and spacecertain concept. The parset questions that students alleloftask with site survey is to need help to for further detackle throughout the exercise. sign development of Library.

DESIGN RESPOND

It is always feasible to acknowledge the evident physical space as define by the norm. Yet there was always layers of obscurity than what is perceived by the naked eye. The focus on the space study done in the heart of Rome was adjusted to human as an incident of space ;where the residence is the unseen soul. It is a device to quickly analyse human as a perfect architecture that is capable to both react and control the unpredictable and often the distracted energy the soul has to endure.

DESIGN RESPOND

The captured motions of selectable group of human were Section observedwill thoroughly sliced into several generally and comments layers viewpoints and yet about might the not be even as on the of gained understanding project outlinedaccurate. by the course. It will are depicclose asasanything The drawings also comprises on how the learning tion of where and the soul curve, might be behaving reflection, and the future projection on responses that sometimes unheard inside, it givesthoughts. the collected of. Naturally, every individuals has more to herself/ himself than what is expressed. To get to know in more depth of how a space can provide another space for distraction, human being is an exemplary precedent.

/1 Space drawing. /2 A visit to MAXXI Museum.

66


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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

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MAKE SPACE DESIGN TASK 3 Weeks Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section includes Students will develop description their proposals of by testdesign design stages and certain‘parti’ against ing theirtask, initial spatial and functional set questions that students of the need site. to It is expected the of specific conditions tackle throughout the exercise. that this will lead to the careful reconsideration and modulation of the initial, site-less proposals.

DESIGN RESPOND

The overall location is seen as at first as full volumetric empty vessel ready to be filled. The story of decision making continues until the end of the available week. Bit by bit pieces of volume is taken away, as the dialogue of the building continues to respond with the context and as the program gradually gets well defined.

/1 Parti diagrams.

DESIGN There are RESPOND no absolute mathematics to quantify the

abstraction of concept ; how it slowly settled to will generally comments be an Section actual building . The diagrams are a series of on the gained understanding about the schematic layers, meant to be understood for an project as outlined by the course. It will express reader. on Thethe clarifications were explained also comprises learning curve, up until theand very stepsprojection be-fore the reflection, thefew future on proposal for project is thoughts. finalized. the collected

/2 Conceptual models.

/3 Library model.

67


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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

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MAKE SPACE DESIGN TASK

/1 Parti diagrams.

3 Weeks Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section includes of on a spec Develop the Designdescription of your Library designurban task,site. design stages and certain ified Design a building that responds to set questions that students to of movements andneed environmental phethe of patterns tackle throughout the exercise. nomena that cut across its site, and to the dynamic character of the programme it accommodates.

DESIGN RESPOND

The Distractive Library is a space that speaks for itself, borrowing the spirit of fictitious book stories blowing people away from the realm of reality to the gateway of everywhere beyond logic.

/2 Elevation drawings.

The mechanism follows the scheme of how one concentric concentrated space is blended with the gateway of distractions coming from roof lights. The metallic gold wall plate continues to be the base DESIGN RESPOND of study table. Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the The public and private space manipulation is reproject as outlined by the course. It will solved by using the approach of circulation and also comprises the Seagram learning curve, function seen inon bith Building and Italreflection, and the future projection on raised ian Palazzo.The books are elevated and on a the collected thoughts. podium , honoring the way knowledge can eliviate one’s status.

/3 Drawings.

/4 Sectional axonometric drawing. 68


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COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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11

COURSE NAME ANY PLACE

DETAIL DESIGN 2 Weeks TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION

Resolve a detailed part of the de sign of Section includesExplore description of the Library. the tectonic design task, design stages and certain and spatial character of the this space in set of questions that students need toto its further detail, resolving its relation tackle throughout the exercise. environmental context, and satisfying the environmental requirements of your choice of social use.

DESIGN RESPOND

The wall extrusion appear exploded and destroyed to give access of light. The wall of main circulation has random openings.

The wall is introduced as both a connector of the source of disturbance and focus. The wall continues to be study table and closed up to be the roof light . The main circulation is completely DESIGN RESPONDglazed. The cube box reading towers changed into chimney-like shape.Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. Itare willcareThe stairs in the main circulation also comprises on the learning curve, fully playfully and uses louvres reflection, andarranged the future projection on on the wall as openings. the collected thoughts.

/1 Section drawings.

/2 Interior drawings. 69


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY + ENVIRONMENT 2B

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY 2B

COURSE CODE /ARCH08006

COURSE CODE /ARCH08027

COURSE CODE /ARHI08007

ANY PLACE

BUILDING FABRIC

CULTURE + CITY

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

First year architectural design courses, Elements & Assembly, examined ways in which architecture is indebted to its own means of construction; it introduced students to a tectonic vocabulary and a range of materials and building systems.

Building Fabric explores the applications of the principles of structural analysis and design, as well as construction technology, implemented in the first year technology and design courses.

The course considers the notion of City as the exemplary setting of our social condition. Whist the city is understood to embody organising principles and to be constituted according to the commands of political thought, the course concentrates upon the city conceived also otherwise. It is the scene of self-conscious community and is our monument to shared memory. If the essential act of the city, politically conceived, is one of walling or penning, the city conceived socially is a scene of processing and gathering together. The architecture and city planning of accord is the subject of the course. The lecture programme falls into two parts, the first dealing with our acts of pilgrimage and congregation – for the purposes of religion, entertainment and improvement. The second part deals with our celebration in architecture of what we share metaphysically – social memory and the memorial.

Second year Architectural Design constitutes an exploration of how architecture can be indebted to things beyond itself. In Place explored the ways in which immediate contextual inputs could inform the design process, whereas Any Place will deal with the exploration of architectural design conditions that specifically extend beyond the level of the local. Among such conditions we can list those concerned with function, programme, spatial experience or insertion within a broader socio-cultural context. Buildings come between us and our environment, they put us into place. The design of building is indebted - on the one hand - to the nature of the things and activities it places, and – on the other – to the qualities of the locations they take place in. Any Place, will ask students to make building design proposals that respond firstly to the things and activities they accommodate and the location (Rome) and situations they occupy. Secondly to architectural, special & cultural explorations of the meaning of library.

Moving up in the degree of complexity in design, structural stability and serviceability are examined as a result of a wider range of actions. The process of dimensioning structural elements is scrutinised to provide insight to the rationality involved. Discussion of the design of these elements and their expression in structural forms classified broadly as linear and cellular addresses the majority of medium-sized construction and covers collectively the main material systems (timber, steel, concrete, masonry), highlighting their relevance to architectural design. This is further explored in their tectonic expression in processes of material system choice, architectural synthesis and assembly, actually the essence of how a building communicates its qualities to its users.

Skills in researching, analysing and writing in relation to LO1.

LO1

Ability to develop architectural designs that appropriately respond to a series of explicit investigations through research on relevant topics.

Apply the mechanisms of design of structures that address increasingly complex interactions between forms, human use and the environment of a site, in terms of imposed actions and the impact of the chosen material.

LO2

LO2

LO3

Capacity to progressively develop a synthesis of programmatic components, formal and spatial strategies, and contextual themes of intermediate complexity within an architectural design.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of connections between architecture and the social, economic and political circumstances within which it is located - tested by the Essay.

LO2

LO1

Capacity to progressively develop a synthesis of programmatic components, formal and spatial strategies, and contextual themes of intermediate complexity within an architectural designs.

LO1

LO3

Verbal and visual communication skills in relation to LO1.

ELECTIVES

Understand the process of choice and assembly of material systems in the design of buildings to provide internal conditions of comfort and its aesthetic expression.

FOUNDATION OF JAPANESE LANGUAGE 2

LO3

Understand the range of applications of the principles of assembly and structural performance with regards to the main material systems (masonry, timber, steel and concrete) in the design of medium-sized buildings.

COURSE CODE /ASST07016

BRIEF This course is for post-beginners with some knowledge of Japanese language or students who successfully completed (i.e. passed) Foundation Japanese Language 1. It aims to provide further basic grammatical structures and vocabulary for everyday life situations. The course will give an introduction to some basic Kanji (Chinese characters) that will engage with basic understanding of Japanese culture, customs and events to gain an awareness of cultural diversity. 70


GC

TECHNOLOGY COURSE TYPE + ENVIRONMENT 2B

BUILDINGNAME FABRIC COURSE

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

/3

/4

ASSIGNMENT 1 : TIMBER FRAME 8 Weeks

INTRODUCTION DESIGN TASK

Duration The walkway can be considered as a “new wall” that moves around around any of the ruined walls, overview the courtINTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION yard (W) or the East wall, even recreate the entire Sectionenclosure. includes Essentially description a offootbridge/task, walkway on stages supports heights of design design andofcertain set questions students need to yourofchoice, the that location and layout of the tackle throughout the exercise. boardwalk (linear or curved in plan) should be chosen to allow comfortable access to visitors and to provide a new narrative for the castle, through either volumetric recreation and its relationship to the ruins or views to the castle and the area. /1

DESIGN RESPOND

The project is specified to advocate an appealing and neatly connected juxtaposed DESIGN RESPOND timbers, bonded by intri-cate connectors, promoting both aesthetic and struc-tural approach Section will generally comments forthe design process of the walkway. on gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will Decisions for the elements also comprises on structural the learning curve, for each reflection, and the future projection of the detail-ing of the walkway’sonconstructhe thoughts. tioncollected was based on the layout proposed and the data collected from the site investigations. Initially, the sizing of the deck on top of the stone pillars were broader, as it needs to hold the step downs strategically. At that point, the deck was supported by slightly bigger columns with cruciform oriented four sided struts which were placed at an interval of 2.5m spacing. The decking on top of the Great Hall’s stone wall was held by a smaller but similar columns.

/1 Precedents. /2 Plan and section drawing. /3 Timber connections of the design. /4 Exploded axonometric drawing.

/2 71


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BUILDINGNAME FABRIC COURSE

DESIGN TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

72


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BUILDINGNAME FABRIC COURSE

ASSIGNMENT 2 : PAVILLION 4 Weeks

INTRODUCTION DESIGN Building on your first project that started recTASK reating Durationthe visitors’ experience in the Haliburton phases of Dirleton Castle around the Great Hall, you will complete the project by designing and detailINTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION ing a pavilion on the North end, the Dais Chamber, which eventually “stitches” visuallyofthe medieval Section includes description past of task, the castle, the certain original impression design designrestoring stages and of of the The North will be setthe of volume questions thatarea. students need pavilion to tackle throughout the exercise. resolved in its envelope and roof construction, and sizing calculations will take place for the structure. /1 Plan drawings.

DESIGN RESPOND DESCRIPTION

Section will generally comments theIngained addition to the proposed on understanding about walkway the project as outlined by the course. It will in Assessment 1, this project aims to furalso on the learning curve, ther comprises enhance visitors’ experience at the reflection, and the future projection on sitethoughts. of Dirleton Castle. The brief historical the collected requires a proposal of a pavilion to be located on the North end. This Pavilion will perform as an education-al space and will need to be able to accommodate seating for 30 people. In terms of construction and materiality strategies, the project specifies the need for the structure to be laid in a sympathetic and reversible manner within the ruin in order to preserve the historical fabric.

/3 Design elements. /4 Design strategies.

/2 Elevation drawings. 73


TECHNOLOGY COURSE TYPE + ENVIRONMENT 2B

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BUILDING FABRIC COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

74


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY + ENVIRONMENT 2B

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY 2B

COURSE CODE /ARCH08006

COURSE CODE /ARCH08027

COURSE CODE /ARHI08007

ANY PLACE

BUILDING FABRIC

CULTURE + CITY

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

First year architectural design courses, Elements & Assembly, examined ways in which architecture is indebted to its own means of construction; it introduced students to a tectonic vocabulary and a range of materials and building systems.

Building Fabric explores the applications of the principles of structural analysis and design, as well as construction technology, implemented in the first year technology and design courses.

The course considers the notion of City as the exemplary setting of our social condition. Whist the city is understood to embody organising principles and to be constituted according to the commands of political thought, the course concentrates upon the city conceived also otherwise. It is the scene of self-conscious community and is our monument to shared memory. If the essential act of the city, politically conceived, is one of walling or penning, the city conceived socially is a scene of processing and gathering together. The architecture and city planning of accord is the subject of the course. The lecture programme falls into two parts, the first dealing with our acts of pilgrimage and congregation – for the purposes of religion, entertainment and improvement. The second part deals with our celebration in architecture of what we share metaphysically – social memory and the memorial.

Second year Architectural Design constitutes an exploration of how architecture can be indebted to things beyond itself. In Place explored the ways in which immediate contextual inputs could inform the design process, whereas Any Place will deal with the exploration of architectural design conditions that specifically extend beyond the level of the local. Among such conditions we can list those concerned with function, programme, spatial experience or insertion within a broader socio-cultural context. Buildings come between us and our environment, they put us into place. The design of building is indebted - on the one hand - to the nature of the things and activities it places, and – on the other – to the qualities of the locations they take place in. Any Place, will ask students to make building design proposals that respond firstly to the things and activities they accommodate and the location (Rome) and situations they occupy. Secondly to architectural, special & cultural explorations of the meaning of library.

Moving up in the degree of complexity in design, structural stability and serviceability are examined as a result of a wider range of actions. The process of dimensioning structural elements is scrutinised to provide insight to the rationality involved. Discussion of the design of these elements and their expression in structural forms classified broadly as linear and cellular addresses the majority of medium-sized construction and covers collectively the main material systems (timber, steel, concrete, masonry), highlighting their relevance to architectural design. This is further explored in their tectonic expression in processes of material system choice, architectural synthesis and assembly, actually the essence of how a building communicates its qualities to its users.

Skills in researching, analysing and writing in relation to LO1.

LO1

Ability to develop architectural designs that appropriately respond to a series of explicit investigations through research on relevant topics.

Apply the mechanisms of design of structures that address increasingly complex interactions between forms, human use and the environment of a site, in terms of imposed actions and the impact of the chosen material.

LO2

LO2

LO3

Capacity to progressively develop a synthesis of programmatic components, formal and spatial strategies, and contextual themes of intermediate complexity within an architectural design.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of connections between architecture and the social, economic and political circumstances within which it is located - tested by the Essay.

LO2

LO1

Capacity to progressively develop a synthesis of programmatic components, formal and spatial strategies, and contextual themes of intermediate complexity within an architectural designs.

LO1

LO3

Verbal and visual communication skills in relation to LO1.

ELECTIVES

Understand the process of choice and assembly of material systems in the design of buildings to provide internal conditions of comfort and its aesthetic expression.

FOUNDATION OF JAPANESE LANGUAGE 2

LO3

Understand the range of applications of the principles of assembly and structural performance with regards to the main material systems (masonry, timber, steel and concrete) in the design of medium-sized buildings.

COURSE CODE /ASST07016

BRIEF This course is for post-beginners with some knowledge of Japanese language or students who successfully completed (i.e. passed) Foundation Japanese Language 1. It aims to provide further basic grammatical structures and vocabulary for everyday life situations. The course will give an introduction to some basic Kanji (Chinese characters) that will engage with basic understanding of Japanese culture, customs and events to gain an awareness of cultural diversity. 75


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Bibliography

ESSAY TASK DESIGN

To what extent quote by Eyre “never more than Duration two boards and a passion” can be a definition of theatre? INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set questions that students need to of Richard Eyre, a renowned tackle throughout the exercise. director and a producer of Marry Poppins at Broadway in February 2007 once quoted on the heart of theatrical plays as “never more than two boards and a passion”. Eyre seemed to take a similar approach on the concept that almost disregards the need of a proper building to provide a defined experience for stage plays by Brook Atkinson, an American theatre critic as claimed in 1974, “theatre is not the thing. Nothing is really important except the performances on stage”.

Upon introducing Eyre and his belief, the essay discuses on several rebuttals on his statement, including the topics on what defines a theatre, the history of theatre during ancient times, how spaces are maDESIGN nipulated RESPOND with the presence of actors, the audience, and the discussion on tectonics Section will From generally comments the and scenography. the discussions, on the gained understanding about the relevance of Eyre’s by quote has been respecproject as outlined the course. It will tivelycomprises argued. on the learning curve, also reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

In respect to the history, Eyre’s viewpoint is seen to be a traditional practice habituates itself in modern days. The first birth of theatre building dated back from the 5th century BC in Athens, Greek. The space for the stage and the seat were moulded according to the ritual performances, chorus in which dancers sing and dance in full circle on temporary wooden stage. The audience would sit on the bare hillside to watch the performance. A century later, the auditorium was built on site using stone, marked as a permanent space for the festive. The closest example of Greek classical theatre can be acquired from the features in Epidarus, which was built around 340 BC. There was the stone base for altar, in the centre of orchestra, mainly to accommodate the religious ceremony. The seats were raised on tiers and separated by aisles are still seen been adapted in modern theatre space set.7 Since performances on stage were originated to have a higher purpose on entertaining the gods, hence the architecture codifications for the theatre were both divine and straightforward. Later on the design for theatres were adapted differently, in Rome and across the world as it is now eventually becomes a space for plays of another reason. Subsequently spatial schemes for theatre stages and buildings also adopt changes and evolutions accordingly to what society needs. During that time, essential plays elements were as simple as the script for the story and the masks wore by actors, representing the characters. With the invasion of technology and the born of new material during the mid of 16th Century, more and more elements in theatre making had surface, being increasingly demanded to be perfectly measured such as the sound system, the lights and shadows of the space, the patterns and the lines. Architecture has the ability to govern all the detailing needed to rectify an ordinary play to be a majestic masterpiece. Eyre’s “two boards” is seemingly unfit to clarify a co cise presence of architectural richness in the making of a successful theatrical play.

In conclusion, Eyre’s quote “never more than two boards and a passion” is a noble concept whereby he finds there is no separate entity between architecture and scenography, but would be quite a challenge to be defined in a specific practicable approach when seen in historical perspective and linguistic perspective for the definition of the theatre itself.

Kolbiaka M., Bank R., Alliano K., Theatre/Performance Historiography, Time, Space, Matter, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, pp.43

There should not be any competition of which would outdo another because to realize a theatre both as building and a play, all the tools and components are equally fundamental and in need to be greatly measured. In reality, there are more subjects available to be examined to proof Eyre’s statement.

Brejzek T., The scenographic (re-)turn: figures of surface, space and spectator in theatre and architecture theory 1680–1980, Routlegde, 2015, pp.17-30

Over time, the history, the presence actors and audiences and the form of performances would slowly behave differently from the present, as it is now compared to the past. Hence optimistically, Eyre’s quote “never more than two boards and a passion” may contains a certain extent of truth, but it is rather inadequate ethically to be the definition of what a theatre is.

Benedetti J., The Art of The Actor Routledge, New York, 2007, pp.3

Curl J.S., Oxford Dictionary for Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Oxford University Press, 2006, pp. 772 Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture, Penguin Books, 1999, pp.571 Fair A. Setting the Scenes Perspectives on Twentieth Century-Architecture, Farnham, 2015 Freshwater H.,Theatre and Audience, Palgrave Macmillan, 2009, pp.5 Gascoigne B., “History of Theatre” HistoryWorld. From 2001, ongoing. http://www.historyworld.net/wrldhis/ PlainTextHistories.asp Joseph S., Actor and Architect, Manchester University Press, 1969, pp.8 Kolbiaka M., Bank R., Theatre/Performance Historiography, Time, Space, Matter, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, pp.19 Wickham G, A History of Theatre, Phaidon, 1985

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ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY COURSE TYPE

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CULTURENAME + CITY COURSE

NOTES General Features: - Built in 1948, extension to accommodate more demand for flight transfer in La Guardia Airport

PRESENTATION DESIGN TASK

John F. Kennedy Airport, New York. Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION Section The presentation includes isdescription based on theof"Dedesign design and certain parting"task, lecture thatstages specifies on Airport set of questions that students need to stuy. throughout the exercise. tackle This airport can aid directly in the work of the United Nations. It will be the front door of the United Nations. Men and women from the far corners of the earth will land here in their search for peaceful solutions to their countries’ difficulties. Representatives of the United Nations will take off from here for the troubled areas to make peaceful “on-the –spot” settlements...We favor the greatest possible freedom in international travel and communication, because we know that knowledge leads to understanding. -Harry S. Truman.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

- Initially named as New York International Airport -Renamed as JFK Airport ion 1963 -Has 6 terminals -Discussions focused on Terminal 3 and TWA Terminal The terminals were very distinct Strategy: Every terminal is managed by different designers and managerial administration. Competitions were held. Increase efficiency by privatisation- increase competition. Connected by taxiways. Comments on Le Corbusier : An airport should be naked. Why is it significant: -The born of modern airport design-open plan-open facade-transparent conversion 5 minutes - when a person arrives until he departs Step counts, volume of the space Rituals TWA Terminal Airport adapted the approach of the same attitude, maximise the usefulness of the service. Le Corbusier commented on the change of airport design- architecture needs to compensate the enjoyable experience in aviationtively argued.

77


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECHNOLOGY + ENVIRONMENT 2B

ARCHITECTURAL HISTORY 2B

COURSE CODE /ARCH08006

COURSE CODE /ARCH08027

COURSE CODE /ARHI08007

ANY PLACE

BUILDING FABRIC

CULTURE + CITY

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

First year architectural design courses, Elements & Assembly, examined ways in which architecture is indebted to its own means of construction; it introduced students to a tectonic vocabulary and a range of materials and building systems.

Building Fabric explores the applications of the principles of structural analysis and design, as well as construction technology, implemented in the first year technology and design courses.

The course considers the notion of City as the exemplary setting of our social condition. Whist the city is understood to embody organising principles and to be constituted according to the commands of political thought, the course concentrates upon the city conceived also otherwise. It is the scene of self-conscious community and is our monument to shared memory. If the essential act of the city, politically conceived, is one of walling or penning, the city conceived socially is a scene of processing and gathering together. The architecture and city planning of accord is the subject of the course. The lecture programme falls into two parts, the first dealing with our acts of pilgrimage and congregation – for the purposes of religion, entertainment and improvement. The second part deals with our celebration in architecture of what we share metaphysically – social memory and the memorial.

Second year Architectural Design constitutes an exploration of how architecture can be indebted to things beyond itself. In Place explored the ways in which immediate contextual inputs could inform the design process, whereas Any Place will deal with the exploration of architectural design conditions that specifically extend beyond the level of the local. Among such conditions we can list those concerned with function, programme, spatial experience or insertion within a broader socio-cultural context. Buildings come between us and our environment, they put us into place. The design of building is indebted - on the one hand - to the nature of the things and activities it places, and – on the other – to the qualities of the locations they take place in. Any Place, will ask students to make building design proposals that respond firstly to the things and activities they accommodate and the location (Rome) and situations they occupy. Secondly to architectural, special & cultural explorations of the meaning of library.

Moving up in the degree of complexity in design, structural stability and serviceability are examined as a result of a wider range of actions. The process of dimensioning structural elements is scrutinised to provide insight to the rationality involved. Discussion of the design of these elements and their expression in structural forms classified broadly as linear and cellular addresses the majority of medium-sized construction and covers collectively the main material systems (timber, steel, concrete, masonry), highlighting their relevance to architectural design. This is further explored in their tectonic expression in processes of material system choice, architectural synthesis and assembly, actually the essence of how a building communicates its qualities to its users.

Skills in researching, analysing and writing in relation to LO1.

LO1

Ability to develop architectural designs that appropriately respond to a series of explicit investigations through research on relevant topics.

Apply the mechanisms of design of structures that address increasingly complex interactions between forms, human use and the environment of a site, in terms of imposed actions and the impact of the chosen material.

LO2

LO2

LO3

Capacity to progressively develop a synthesis of programmatic components, formal and spatial strategies, and contextual themes of intermediate complexity within an architectural design.

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of connections between architecture and the social, economic and political circumstances within which it is located - tested by the Essay.

LO2

LO1

Capacity to progressively develop a synthesis of programmatic components, formal and spatial strategies, and contextual themes of intermediate complexity within an architectural designs.

LO1

LO3

Verbal and visual communication skills in relation to LO1.

ELECTIVES

Understand the process of choice and assembly of material systems in the design of buildings to provide internal conditions of comfort and its aesthetic expression.

FOUNDATION OF JAPANESE LANGUAGE 2

LO3

Understand the range of applications of the principles of assembly and structural performance with regards to the main material systems (masonry, timber, steel and concrete) in the design of medium-sized buildings.

COURSE CODE /ASST07016

BRIEF This course is for post-beginners with some knowledge of Japanese language or students who successfully completed (i.e. passed) Foundation Japanese Language 1. It aims to provide further basic grammatical structures and vocabulary for everyday life situations. The course will give an introduction to some basic Kanji (Chinese characters) that will engage with basic understanding of Japanese culture, customs and events to gain an awareness of cultural diversity. 78


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ELECTIVES COURSE TYPE

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FOUNDATION COURSE NAMEOF JAPANESE LANGUAGE 2

FOUNDATION DESIGN TASK JAPANESE LANGUAGE 2 Duration

DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION

Course aims: I. To provide Section further includesbasic description of grammatical design task, design stages and certain structures and of vocabulary everyday lifeneed situations. set questionsfor that students to tackle throughout the exercise. II. To give an introduction to some basic kanji (Chinese characters). III. To provide an introduction to Japanese culture, customs and events to gain an awareness of cultural diversity.

/1 Kanji words for money. /3 Kanji words for months.

Course outcomes: On completion of this course, you will be able to: > talk about everyday activities. > state how frequently you do something and give a brief reason for why you do it. > order at a restaurant. > talk about the characteristics of things and people. >use basicRESPOND greetings when visiting people and reDESIGN ceiving guests. >talk Section about giving and receiving gifts and express will generally comments gratitude. on the gained understanding about the project as your outlined by theoncourse. will experienc> express thoughts things,Itabout also comprises on the learning curve, es. reflection, and the future projection on >make/answer a telephone call. the collected thoughts. > invite someone/accept or reject someone’s offer. >give a reason for offering someone something. > talk about schedules in detail such as weekend plans and travel plans. >ask someone to do something for you. > give directions.

/4 Extra Kanji vocabularies.

/2 Kanji words for days.

人 学生 先子女 男大小本 79


OVERALL SEMESTER

SELF ASSESSMENT

YEAR 2 ACADEMIC YEAR SEMESTER 2 ACADEMIC TERM

REFLECTION

The semester celebration of of Section includeswas self areflective thoughts the overall semester. The From comments everything architecture. site comprised visit, to of general comments of the courses, academic perforappreciating history, a visit to art museum, mance, and personal progress in learning. sketches and interpretation, knowing structure and performance; an encyclopedia of mediums.

It was a semester that I took extra subject, for the sake of productivity. I also get to see my own lacking when the design subject this time around is individual project.

SPA

VIS

LOG

INT

SELF ATTRIBUTES

How does my understanding about space improved? Nothing much, despite all the excitements. There were no significant change on how I perceive and understand space and spatial design.

However, in technology subject, the strenuous precision of outcomes really gets me put the importance of structural performance and materiality as design decision priority. The group work helped me to catch up in digital skills and the appreciation for rendering and realistic presentation. Ar History proved to be the most consistent subject that I found difficult. The lectures and the topics we had to cover seem disconnected to both technology and design subject.

/# /# Second home/ inSketches Semester description 2, thanks to the heavy /# Photo/ Diagram

analytical works required.

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YEAR

III

SEMESTER

I


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE

ARCHITECTURAL THEORY

COURSE CODE /ARCH10001

COURSE CODE /ARCH10027

COURSE CODE /ARCH10002

WORKING LEARNING

EXPLORATION

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

In this unit, the design exercises will be curated within the theme of Mecha Anime to illustrate the phenomenon of ‘horror’ through ‘machinic/ mechanical becomings’ in architecture. Horror Fiction plays itself out in a variety of literary and cinematic genres. At one end of the literary genre we have JG Ballard, and at another end HP Lovecraft. Similarly, in Cinema we have Blair Witch at one end of the spectrum and Event Horizon at another end. In both scenarios, there is little reference to the architectural object; and both are either Drama or Science Fiction.

The MA (Hons) Architectural Practice: Working Learning is an honours level course that introduces students to architecture as a professional practice. The course addresses a range of topics - the architect/ client relationship, the role of professional bodies, legislative framework and modes of procurement – in order to offer students a framework of professional knowledge, preparing them for future employment. A series of lectures offered at the start of the course examines what it is to be a professional architect; how has a definition of the role of the architect emerged, what transformations has it undergone, and what are the social and technical drivers behind these changes? The lecture series will attempt to situate changes in modes of professional accreditation, the sequencing of work, regulatory requirements, building contracts, and forms of appointment, within their historical context. We will also look at core competencies that will be required by students seeking employment; the ability to develop a CV, a professional portfolio, interview skills, working with on-line research databases, and recording professional experience.

This course explores the relationship between theory and architecture. We will use a range of case studies to look at how theory can challenge assumptions and offer new ways of thinking about key problems. This will involve close readings of philosophical texts, architectural Theory texts and exemplary architectural projects.

LO1

LO1

LO2

LO2

LO3

LO3

Using the work of Morphosis as a point of departure, the analysis practice outlined will use micro-processors and animation to develop kinetic architectures (machinic architectures). In the buildings and projects of Morphosis, the design strategies are confronted with a masterful play of tectonic form and surface. Objects are nested into each other, forms fold and intersect, and the architecture aspires to lift of from the ground. Metaphorically speaking, there is an enormous amount of potential energy in their projects.

The course will enable students to explore the relationship between architecture and other areas of culture. It will also provide you with an expanded interpretive framework for understanding architectural production.

Given the potential of these projects for flight and levitation, we invite students to interrogate Morphosis’ and work towards animating the architecture. Literally, setting Morphosis in motion.Speculative proposals will be sited in Maillaig Harbour as part of a broader fictional/sci-fi ‘horror’ scenario . LO1

Demonstrate ability to adhere to a design methodology that builds on the conceptual framework and key theoretical, cultural, and representational concerns outlined in the project brief.

LO2

Demonstrate knowledge of the ways in which research and analysis of context, program and construction inform architectural design and the ability to synthesize these concerns to develop a coherent architectural proposal.

LO3

Demonstrate ability to communicate research findings and design proposals using appropriate and varied modes of visual, verbal and written production.

An understanding of business management and knowledge of the legal and statutory frameworks within which Architectural Design is practiced and delivered. An understanding of the role of the client, Architect and related professions in the costing, procurement and realisation of architectural design projects. An understanding of the role of the Architect in society, including knowledge of professionalism and emerging trends in the construction industry.

Knowledge of contemporary design theories and the ways in which they can inform specific approaches to, and practices of architectural design. Ability to demonstrate and analyse through careful argument how architectural production fits within wider philosophical, historical, social, political and economic discourses. Ability to research issues in architectural theory, to critically reflect upon them, and to organise and present those reflections in the format of scholarly writing.

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COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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COURSE NAME EXPLORATION

EXERCISE 1 : MACHINE LEARNING, ANALYTICS AND INFOGRAPHICS DESIGN TASK 2 Weeks Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Synopsis Section : Drawing includes anddescription Animating of Kinetic design Objectstask, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout The first task will the be exercise. a 2-week exercise to draw/redraw, in illustrated concept form, an existing piece of architecture with a potential for animation. Following the film screening, which will offer stylistic references for drawing, students will work individually within groups and draw an existing architectural reference as a single technical and illustrated drawing. This exercise will be followed by an introduction to micro-processors using raspberry pi.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments The assignment is individual task, in on the gained understanding about the which the task is to reinterpret and redraw project outlined by theFaustino. course. ItThe willreinSky'scomprises theasLimit by Didier also on the learning curve, terpretationand hasthe tofuture includeprojection the idea of reflection, on how it now able tothoughts. be kinetically alive. the collected

/1 Reinterpretation of Sky's the Limit. 83


COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

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COURSE NAME EXPLORATION

EXERCISE 2 : DRAWING, APPROPRIADESIGN TASK TION AND SCENARIO DEVELOPMENT Duration 2 Weeks

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section includes description of of Students will work in groups on a building design task, designEach stages andwill certain higher complexity. group redraw an set of questions that students need example of a Morphosis project andtoadjust tackle throughout the exercise. or modify as appropriate to the part of the harbour selected for intervention.

Following the skills developed in Exercise 1, each group will develop a scenario for their site and modify the building program and site to suit the intended scenario. At the end of this exercise, there should be scaled drawings and preliminary models of the modified building placed on the selected site on the harbour.

DESIGN RESPOND Section generally comments AEC Art will Centre in Taiwan offers us on the gained understanding the little to no information for about the exercise. project as outlined by the course. It will Hence, as a group we learning initiate acurve, thorough also comprises on ,the observation through readings and online reflection, and the future projection on resources to redraw everything about the the collected thoughts. building.

84


COURSE TYPE DESIGN ARCHITECTURAL

GC

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COURSE NAME EXPLORATION

DESIGN EXERCISE TASK 1B : DATA ANALYTICS Duration 4 Weeks

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION This exercise be carried out exclusive Section will includes description of design task, design stages and certain ly using MySQL Workbench and a Server/ set of questions students need to Data Visualization will be Virtual Machine. that tackle throughout the exercise. done in two formats: I-Quantitative Analytics and Infographics: Tableau II-Qualitative Analytics and Infographics: Processing The main intention at this stage is for students to aquaint themselves with High- Level Data Collection and Representation at different scales. III-Global: North Atlantic Region (Norway, Iceland, Greenland, Canada/Newfoundland) IV-Regional: Scotland and UK

DESIGNLochaber RESPOND V-Local: and North West Scotland Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will DESIGN RESPOND also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on collected Our group theme is Earth. We use this the thoughts. opportunity to use geological morphology as thought concept for our site. Later, it becomes the spine of our design ideas, using the metaphor of anthropocenic scenario.

85


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

GC

1

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11

EXPLORATION COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESIGN RESPOND

Section includes description of The scenario is developed design task,site design stages and certainto be set of questions that needIt togrows an antrhopocenic citystudents in Mallaig. tackle throughout the exercise. to be one of the busiest hub in UK with the existence of Hyperloop. The concept aims to criticise the current extreme global pollution practice and the unhealthy urban lifestyle pace that results the dehumanisation of human being in general.

Credits: Luke Oldaker Sam Wilson Safwan Ismail Anton Andrev Maive Mulgrew Wanqing Li /1 Anthropocenic Mallaig Harbour

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

/2 Invention of Hyperloop Station on site

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COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

GC

1

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COURSE NAME EXPLORATION

DESIGN TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

87


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

GC

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

EXPLORATION COURSE NAME

EXERCISE 3 : ADAPTATION DESIGN TASK AND SIMULATION 5Duration Weeks

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

INTRODUCTION In this exercise, students will work in groups to build their drawings and models up to the aesthetic criteria established in Exercise 1. Students will also work individually to animate a portion of their models or drawings/virtual models using Raspberry Pi. The animated portion of the model will be any aspect of the model that addresses the student’s specific interest or intervention on the site. 88


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

GC

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

EXPLORATION COURSE NAME

EXERCISE 3 : ADAPTATION AND SIMULATION DESIGN TASK 4 Weeks Duration

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION The requirement at this description stage is to create in Section includes of design design stages or andinfrastructure certain detail atask, hybrid structure set of questions students need which negotiatesthat water, geology andtoair (intackle throughout the exercise. cluding any artificial intelligence and aquatic life forms). Particular attention should be paid to the Shipping (Cargo and General Transportation), Fishing (Leisure and Commerce), and Leisure Industries (Jetties and Horbours) Through this exercise, students should be in the position to demonstrate ‘technical resolution’ and design synthesis.

DESIGN RESPOND DESIGN Exercise is revised, and further reinRESPOND terpretation on Sky's the Limit now has to theoretical challengecomments developed in answerSection will generally on the gained Exercise 2. understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning Prasitic Tower is future designed fromcurve, the reflection, and the projection on extraction of bridge supports-turned-towers. the collected thoughts. These towers are flooded with compact residency due to expected shortage of land in 2150.

89


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE

ARCHITECTURAL THEORY

COURSE CODE /ARCH10001

COURSE CODE /ARCH10027

COURSE CODE /ARCH10002

WORKING LEARNING

EXPLORATION

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

In this unit, the design exercises will be curated within the theme of Mecha Anime to illustrate the phenomenon of ‘horror’ through ‘machinic/ mechanical becomings’ in architecture. Horror Fiction plays itself out in a variety of literary and cinematic genres. At one end of the literary genre we have JG Ballard, and at another end HP Lovecraft. Similarly, in Cinema we have Blair Witch at one end of the spectrum and Event Horizon at another end. In both scenarios, there is little reference to the architectural object; and both are either Drama or Science Fiction.

The MA (Hons) Architectural Practice: Working Learning is an honours level course that introduces students to architecture as a professional practice. The course addresses a range of topics - the architect/ client relationship, the role of professional bodies, legislative framework and modes of procurement – in order to offer students a framework of professional knowledge, preparing them for future employment. A series of lectures offered at the start of the course examines what it is to be a professional architect; how has a definition of the role of the architect emerged, what transformations has it undergone, and what are the social and technical drivers behind these changes? The lecture series will attempt to situate changes in modes of professional accreditation, the sequencing of work, regulatory requirements, building contracts, and forms of appointment, within their historical context. We will also look at core competencies that will be required by students seeking employment; the ability to develop a CV, a professional portfolio, interview skills, working with on-line research databases, and recording professional experience.

This course explores the relationship between theory and architecture. We will use a range of case studies to look at how theory can challenge assumptions and offer new ways of thinking about key problems. This will involve close readings of philosophical texts, architectural Theory texts and exemplary architectural projects.

LO1

LO1

LO2

LO2

LO3

LO3

Using the work of Morphosis as a point of departure, the analysis practice outlined will use micro-processors and animation to develop kinetic architectures (machinic architectures). In the buildings and projects of Morphosis, the design strategies are confronted with a masterful play of tectonic form and surface. Objects are nested into each other, forms fold and intersect, and the architecture aspires to lift of from the ground. Metaphorically speaking, there is an enormous amount of potential energy in their projects.

The course will enable students to explore the relationship between architecture and other areas of culture. It will also provide you with an expanded interpretive framework for understanding architectural production.

Given the potential of these projects for flight and levitation, we invite students to interrogate Morphosis’ and work towards animating the architecture. Literally, setting Morphosis in motion.Speculative proposals will be sited in Maillaig Harbour as part of a broader fictional/sci-fi ‘horror’ scenario . LO1

Demonstrate ability to adhere to a design methodology that builds on the conceptual framework and key theoretical, cultural, and representational concerns outlined in the project brief.

LO2

Demonstrate knowledge of the ways in which research and analysis of context, program and construction inform architectural design and the ability to synthesize these concerns to develop a coherent architectural proposal.

LO3

Demonstrate ability to communicate research findings and design proposals using appropriate and varied modes of visual, verbal and written production.

An understanding of business management and knowledge of the legal and statutory frameworks within which Architectural Design is practiced and delivered. An understanding of the role of the client, Architect and related professions in the costing, procurement and realisation of architectural design projects. An understanding of the role of the Architect in society, including knowledge of professionalism and emerging trends in the construction industry.

Knowledge of contemporary design theories and the ways in which they can inform specific approaches to, and practices of architectural design. Ability to demonstrate and analyse through careful argument how architectural production fits within wider philosophical, historical, social, political and economic discourses. Ability to research issues in architectural theory, to critically reflect upon them, and to organise and present those reflections in the format of scholarly writing.

90


GC

ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE COURSE TYPE

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WORKING LEARNING COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASK 1 : SHORT ESSAYS ASSESSMENT Duration 4 Weeks

DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION This assignment intended of to test Section includes isdescription design task, design stages certain students’ understanding of and issues of professet of questions that students need to sesional practice introduced in the lecture tackle throughout the exercise. ries. Through four short essay questions, it asks students to investigate a selection of those issues in greater detail.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

REGULATION

OFFICE STRUCTURE

CONTRACTS

PROFESSIONALISM

In the UK, building regulations applied, outlined by Building Act 1984 is briefing developers legislation on standard specification for building operations, thus effecting the way a building designed. The statutory guidance in the Approved Documents consists of 14 parts from approved documents encompassing safety ,accessibility , wastage limit, and environmental damage performance standards, namely Part A until Part R. This essay focuses on governmental purpose of UK building regulations in Approved Document M Volume 1 and the architectural implications on the requirements.

The essay discusses on limitations of advantages of Limited Liability Partnerships (LLP) as office structure in architectural companies. LLP was first Introduced by the Limited Liability Partnership Act 2000, is essentially a combination of partnerships and limited liability companies . To simplify, an LLP is a form of legal business entity with limited liability for the members where at minimum should at least involves an agreement between two person.

This essay aims to compare ‘Traditional’ and ‘Design and Build’ contracts in building procurement. Traditional contract in general aligned with RIBA Plan of Work; one of the specific design tools in building procurement compromising eight tasks with detailed specifications. This means that procurement work demonstrates a linear design stages from pre-design phase until post construction activities. In Design and Build contract, the sequences of the design process until completion does not necessarily follow the Plan of Work .

This essay is to argue for the protection of the title ‘architect’ in the UK. According to Oxford Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture , Architect is a “person capable of preparing the plans, elevations and sections of the design of a sophisticated building with an aesthetic content and to supervise its construction in accordance with the drawings and specifications”15. As the definition implies , architect is someone who deserved to get protected if he has qualified education, register with UK authorities, and benefit from professional indemnity insurance .

The essay arguments are based on the contract comparisons on design flexibility, quality of design, and certainty of cost.

Firstly, title ‘architects’ are protected if someone went through qualified architectural education. In the UK, statutory bodies like ARB and professional bodies like RIBA actively involved in architectural education assessment16. The approved programmes dedicated for teaching and learning architecture provides comprehensive theories and long years of trainings to set out the minimum standards of entry to the architects’ profession. This to avoid disputes build trust for clients that they are dealing with an architect with ample knowledge to design.

In general, “Approved Document M: access to and use of buildings, volume 1: dwellings” covers the regulations on access to and use of dwellings. The guidance also contained three categories including ‘visitable dwellings’, ‘accessible and adaptable dwellings’, and ‘wheelchair user dwellings’. As the name suggest, the rules aim to formulate the basic procedure ensuring there is proper access and convenient configuration for functioning rooms for the people to dwell in the space.

One of the many convenience adopting LLP is the hybrid structure of it will promote members to organise themselves flexibly and operate in efficient manner for competing in the global market. This because LLP managerial structure encourages engagement between senior staff, improve levels of conversation internally and the responsibility of the company management spread equivalently in the practice. However, there is no distinction between ownership, administration and management in the office. This freedom of membership in LLP means that there are no shareholders, directors or secretary. All members are required to get registered as self-employed.

Traditional contract involves lengthy requirement of consultations in between client and architects before the necessary informations are passed to contractors for on site constructions. This means client has most control over the design flexibility and quality prescription including the detail works. In contrast, Design and Build procurement method is heavily reliant on contractors. Most of the design responsibilities are under contractors obligation. Contractors have control over the changes required for the design13. The Build and Design contract is only feasible for simple projects as it does not suggest meticulous design decisions at early stage. Hence, in terms of design flexibility, it is better to impose the duty to specialised design professionals if the projects issued are more complex.

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WORKING LEARNING COURSE NAME

ASSESSMENT 2 : DESIGN REPORT TASK DESIGN 4 Weeks Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION Section includes learning description of This work-based assigndesign task, design stages and certain ment asks students to consider the imset of questions thatraised students need to plications of issues in the lecture tackle throughout the exercise. series on a design project they have experience of. It familiarises students with conventional professional media, in this case, the ‘Design Report’. Students whose Placement does not offer them experience of a relevant design project should use this exercise as a means of gaining further understanding of professional practices, through research into a specific project, or interviews with practitioners. In the UK, a ‘Design Report’ is a document submitted to a local council in support of a Planning Application. It explains the concepts behind a building proposal to the planning authorities, making reference to any pertinent factors that are considered to be material DESIGN RESPOND considerations by the Planning Authority. Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

BACKGROUND Name of scheme : Murphy House Client : Richard Murphy Structural engineer: Create Engineering M&E consultant: Max Fordham Quantity surveyor: McLeod and Aitken Lighting consultant: Scott Kelly Colour consultant: Linda Green Main contractor: Inscape Joinery

APPRAISALS “The New Town Conservation Area Character Appraisal states that the area is typified by the formal plan layout, spacious stone built terraces, broad streets and an overall classical elegance. The buildings are of a generally consistent three storey and basement scale, with some four storey corner and central pavilions." Policies • Policy Des 3 (Development Design) : Assessing development design. • Policy Env 1 (World Heritage Site) : Quality protection of the World Heritage Site and its context. • Policy Env 3 (Listed Buildings - Setting) : Identifies the circumstances in which development within the cartilage or affecting the setting of a listed building will be permitted. • Policy Ca 1 (Central Area) : Criteria for assessing development in the Central Area. • Policy Env 6 (Conservation Areas Development): Criteria for assessing development in conservation areas.

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ASSESSMENT 3 :REFLECTIVE ESSAY 4 Weeks TASK DESIGN Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION Section description The finalincludes assignment is an essayofofferdesign task, design stages certain ing a personal reflection onand a topic relevant set of questions that students need to The to contemporary professional practice. tackle throughout the exercise. choice of topic is open but should engage with architecture as a profession in its wider social and economic contexts. Students might choose to focus on, and extend their understanding of a topic raised in the lecture series. Students who secure placements in an architects practice might select a topic that affords reflection on their own work-experience. Students conducting self-directed practice or research might select a topic that draws upon, supports and extends that activity.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

"The essay reflects specifically on changes in RIBA frameworks and UK regulations on buildings since the economic downturn in 2008 and analyse the changes in architect’s role in the society. The discussion outlines on the updated legislations compared with the previous law in architecture industry in the UK, and how these analysis help to recalibrate my impression of architect’s duty inside and outside the construction field. The topics cover closely the divergent of responsibilities in architecture since 2008 from analysis of RIBA Plan of Work, Approved Document Building Regulation : Part L, and ARB Code of Conduct. These arguments eventually summarise my shifts in view as new entry and how do I equip myself to be part of the field."

"2013 Changes To The Approved Documents For Part L Of The Building Regulations - Designing Buildings Wiki". Design Buildings Wiki, 2014. https://www.designingbuildings.co.uk/wiki/ 2013_changes_to_the_approved_documents_for_part_L_of_the_building_regulations. Architects Registration Board,. Architects Code: Standards Of Conduct And Practice. London: ARB, 2009. Architects Registration Board,. Prescription Of Qualifications: ARB Criteria At Parts 1, 2 And 3.London: ARB, 2010. Blundell Jones, Peter. Architecture And Ritual; How Buildings Shape Society. 1st ed. London: Bloomsbury, 2016. Brown, Mark, and Alice Ross. "Residents Overlooked By Tate Modern Extension Should 'Get Net Curtains'". The Guardian, 2016. https://www.dezeen.com/2016/09/07/tate-modern-gallery-visitorsaccused-spying-neo-bankside-residents-observation-deck/#disqus_thread. DCLG., APPROVED DOCUMENT L1A. 1st ed. [S.l.]: NBS RIBA ENTERPRISES, 2016. Frearson, Amy. "Tate Modern Visitors Accused Of Spying On Neo Bankside Residents". Dezeen,2016. https://www.dezeen.com/2016/09/07/tate-modern-gallery-visitors-accused-spying-neobankside-residents-observation-deck/#disqus_thread. Guillery, Peter. Built From Below: British Architecture And The Vernacular. 1st ed. New York: Routledge, 2011. "Landscapes For The Anthropocene". Futurearchitectureplatform.Org, 2016. http://futurearchitectureplatform.org/projects/d70fb521-5c91-46f4-9f74-d95000c54e00/. Moser, Cliff. Architecture 3.0. New York: Routledge, 2014. NBS,. "What Is BIM?". NBS, 2016. https://www.thenbs.com/knowledge/what-is-buildinginformation-modelling-bim. "RIBA Plan Of Work - Designing Buildings Wiki". Design Buildings Wiki, 2017. https://www.designingbuildings.co.uk/wiki/RIBA_plan_of_work. The Building Regulations 2010 APPROVED DOCUMENT 7 Materials And Workmanship. 1st ed. London: NBS, 2013. The Impact Of The Recession On Construction Professional Service; A View From An Economic Perspective. London: Construction Industry Council. http://www.citb.co.uk/documents/research/ cicprofreport-economicpers_tcm17-18670.pdf. Thompson, Arthur. Architectural Design Procedures. Amsterdam [u.a.]: Elsevier, Architectural Press, 2004. “United Kingdom Construction Output 1997-2017”. TradingEconomics, 2017. http:// www.tradingeconomics.com/united-kingdom/construction-output.

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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

ARCHITECTURAL PRACTICE

ARCHITECTURAL THEORY

COURSE CODE /ARCH10001

COURSE CODE /ARCH10027

COURSE CODE /ARCH10002

WORKING LEARNING

EXPLORATION

BRIEF

BRIEF

BRIEF

In this unit, the design exercises will be curated within the theme of Mecha Anime to illustrate the phenomenon of ‘horror’ through ‘machinic/ mechanical becomings’ in architecture. Horror Fiction plays itself out in a variety of literary and cinematic genres. At one end of the literary genre we have JG Ballard, and at another end HP Lovecraft. Similarly, in Cinema we have Blair Witch at one end of the spectrum and Event Horizon at another end. In both scenarios, there is little reference to the architectural object; and both are either Drama or Science Fiction.

The MA (Hons) Architectural Practice: Working Learning is an honours level course that introduces students to architecture as a professional practice. The course addresses a range of topics - the architect/ client relationship, the role of professional bodies, legislative framework and modes of procurement – in order to offer students a framework of professional knowledge, preparing them for future employment. A series of lectures offered at the start of the course examines what it is to be a professional architect; how has a definition of the role of the architect emerged, what transformations has it undergone, and what are the social and technical drivers behind these changes? The lecture series will attempt to situate changes in modes of professional accreditation, the sequencing of work, regulatory requirements, building contracts, and forms of appointment, within their historical context. We will also look at core competencies that will be required by students seeking employment; the ability to develop a CV, a professional portfolio, interview skills, working with on-line research databases, and recording professional experience.

This course explores the relationship between theory and architecture. We will use a range of case studies to look at how theory can challenge assumptions and offer new ways of thinking about key problems. This will involve close readings of philosophical texts, architectural Theory texts and exemplary architectural projects.

LO1

LO1

LO2

LO2

LO3

LO3

Using the work of Morphosis as a point of departure, the analysis practice outlined will use micro-processors and animation to develop kinetic architectures (machinic architectures). In the buildings and projects of Morphosis, the design strategies are confronted with a masterful play of tectonic form and surface. Objects are nested into each other, forms fold and intersect, and the architecture aspires to lift of from the ground. Metaphorically speaking, there is an enormous amount of potential energy in their projects.

The course will enable students to explore the relationship between architecture and other areas of culture. It will also provide you with an expanded interpretive framework for understanding architectural production.

Given the potential of these projects for flight and levitation, we invite students to interrogate Morphosis’ and work towards animating the architecture. Literally, setting Morphosis in motion.Speculative proposals will be sited in Maillaig Harbour as part of a broader fictional/sci-fi ‘horror’ scenario . LO1

Demonstrate ability to adhere to a design methodology that builds on the conceptual framework and key theoretical, cultural, and representational concerns outlined in the project brief.

LO2

Demonstrate knowledge of the ways in which research and analysis of context, program and construction inform architectural design and the ability to synthesize these concerns to develop a coherent architectural proposal.

LO3

Demonstrate ability to communicate research findings and design proposals using appropriate and varied modes of visual, verbal and written production.

An understanding of business management and knowledge of the legal and statutory frameworks within which Architectural Design is practiced and delivered. An understanding of the role of the client, Architect and related professions in the costing, procurement and realisation of architectural design projects. An understanding of the role of the Architect in society, including knowledge of professionalism and emerging trends in the construction industry.

Knowledge of contemporary design theories and the ways in which they can inform specific approaches to, and practices of architectural design. Ability to demonstrate and analyse through careful argument how architectural production fits within wider philosophical, historical, social, political and economic discourses. Ability to research issues in architectural theory, to critically reflect upon them, and to organise and present those reflections in the format of scholarly writing.

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ASSESSMENT 1 :REFLECTIVE DESIGN TASK JOURNALS Duration 10 Weeks

DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design The purpose of the stages journaland is tocertain provide an set of questions that students need to opportunity to develop skills in engaging tackle throughout the exercise. critically with architectural theory, exploring the relationship between architecture and theory more widely, and producing succinct, well-supported accounts of your own position on selected issues. The journal format works best when it is drafted on a lecture-by-lecture and weekby-week basis.

THEORY IN DESIGN

HERMENEUTICAL PROCESS

NON-HYLOMORPHIC DESIGN

THINGING TIME

Philosophical theory’s importance in design process is emphasised when Mary Midgley narrate the analogy of philosophy using plumbing as they both are a highly similar system; complex, hidden but grounded very deeply within human being as a notion and an inborn character before outwardly expressed as an idea or an opinion. Theories are basically innate and alive within human, being constantly in use during design process.

As both defined in Stanford Encyclopaedia and quoted by Snodgrass and Coyne Is Design Hermeneutics? , hermeneutic is a process of interpreting and understanding a subject . As both defined in Stanford Encyclopaedia and quoted by Snodgrass and Coyne Is Design Hermeneutics? , hermeneutic is a process of interpreting and understanding a subject. Hans Heidegger argued that hermeneutic model is a circular methodology in thinking process, a form of atomic language, rooted from “human science”. However, given that RIBA’s Plan of Work is outlined in a linear sequence, it grasps on a more logic realm of process stages in making a design. This reflection will argues on weather the unity of “human science” and “natural science” can occur, focusing on how linear RIBA guidelines and circular model of understanding process play their roles in design process.

In non-hylomorphic model, an architect is demanded to understand the deep understanding the structure complexity of materials and its operations from raw to production in order to give a fair anecdote to the materials once assembled and form a family of structure, space and ambiance. In reality according to architectural columnist for The Fanumbral, Leopard Lambert, “architects still “suffer” from a fundamental lack of knowledge for the matter’s behaviour and properties”. His idea was a mere translation from the critique by Gilbert Simendon of hylomorphic theory.

Heidegger’s idea of extra emphasising on experiencing things is almost a toning down of actual today’s colour of urban landscape . Nowadays, people wants to run at a faster track of life, a one-click civilisation, where “experience” might not involve presence anymore. A space is inhabited, but the occupier might be in the neighbouring country, “walking” the downtown using Google Map.

“Any powerful new idea calls for a great deal of change, and the more useful that idea is going to be, the more need there will be to work out these changes fully”2. Agreeing with the statement ,as an architecture student, whenever drawings and models are developed and opened, there are always more room for reinterpretation and redefinition. Theories are not only borrowed and used, they are generated and reconstructed itself over time and again. Theories do tend to conflict, as it is born out of various whys and fusion more whys.

PANOPTICISM REVERSED

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

Panopticon was a prison design created by Jeremy Betham, a social theorist who was inspired by the design of Russian locating central desk for supervisors to observe the workers during his visit to Krichev to visit his brother. Panopticon offers a direct impression of power embodied in the eyes of the one who deserve to observe in the central watch tower through the explicit spatial arrangement. Reflecting upon the design learning in ESALA Architecture School, we students are always aware about the critic and review session that are scheduled were a form of examination. A person would stand in an open space room, and the chairs would be arranged surrounding the presenter, for people to sit, watching and listening.

The technology is creating a technicity society of multitaskers, investing on devices and services that are faster, easy, and convenient. The increasing demand of fast delivery, fast transportation, fast food and fast dating businesses16 show that there is a phenomenal change of social landscape that requires a rethinking on how these on-demand fast-paced life experience can include Heidegger’s ideology the “thinging thing”; a timely and usually costly process in appreciating materials and architecture as a whole.

KITCHEN: POWER TO PRISON

LOCATING NATURE

ARCHIGRAM

The position of kitchen in English home space is used as an attempt to infuse architecture with gender to construct a theory of the politics that happen in the smallest unit of community ; a household.

Joseph Rykwert, an Architecture Professor of Pennsylvania University once mentioned that human in relation to it’s surrounding can always decide what to build for themselves, after a series of intentional decision-making processes as a form of project. The comment was supported by Tim Ingold in which by the comparison, human, compared to nonhuman are able of human to extract and modify all the useful informations, to benefit them, particularly in making sense of a space called home.

If architects are teachers, then architects as well need to learn from their students, all the nonarchitects. The idea proposed by James Till in Architecture in Participation on architecture should not isolate itself from the people encompasses an amount of truth and would be provided example through this reflection. Failure in architectural participation between architects as designers and society as users is originated to the failure of both parties to speak the same language. I n 1961, Archigram I was first published introducing the newest approach to architectural theory at that time, where formality should not shy away from modern maxim. The group started to illogically present futuristic landscape in architecture, for example the speculation the idea of urbanism bring relevance of antihumanism in Living City, as reflected by Peter Cook.

In Victorian years, generally a proper house layout had a clear spatial division for both public and private, whereby public rooms were adorned to be displayed to public during social gathering, private are were also specified for women and men, owner and servants. In the years between 1890 and 1940, there was a decline in domestic services, due to the increase in employment in offices and factories. Women started to be able to have jobs outside the house, and this leads to the disappearance of servants quarters at the back of the house and kitchen were pushed forward nearing the living room.

A series of example given by Ingold on beavers and spiders way of staking a specific space as the home were seen as a starting point in architecture design process.

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ASSESSMENT 2 :REFLECTIVE ESSAY Val Plumwood’s DESIGN TASK Dualism in relation to the development projects of Woodland Park Zoo in 1975-1988. Duration

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design design certain Westerntask, systems of stages thoughtand have historically been set of questions that students need to theory/pracconstructed around series of dualisms: tackle throughout the exercise. tice, public/private, male/female, civilisation/nature, human/animal, urban/rural. This way of thinking has come under heavy criticism from all number of sources and has led to an interest in challenging, transgressing and transforming these divides. In the lecture students look specifically at the human/nature and human/animal dualisms, with examples of how they have been troubled within architecture and urban design. We will also look closely at philosopher Val Plumwood’s account of the features of dualistic thinking in order to have a firmer grounding in the consequences of this mode of thought, allowing an assessment of the success of attempts to challenge it.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

"Dualistic thinking in western culture according to Val Plumwood, an Australian ecofeminist philosopher dwells with the understanding of oppressed pairing between two element dynamics rather than balance. The idea on dualism is conceived as an interlocking set of system, in which the system was to be generated by the contrasting structuring pairs, whereby each element has the apparent conflicting role of dictator and subordinate. However, it is important to note that the contrasts should not be simplified as differentials or a straightforward hierarchical-tension analogy. In a sense, dualism is identified as traces of thorough domination of one element over the other that took place becoming apparent. Dualism is not a mere statement of dichotomy, but a constructed internalisation of supremacy in one subject is catalysed by the inscription of inferiority of the dependent object. Hence, dualism is argued to be permanent as the division built in the pairing relationship is naturalised in the culture that dualism itself is a subject of cultural expression. The extents of which dualism has its role in curating the architectural planning in Western culture involves a large parameter of social, economy, political and environmental issues in modern era. The intensification of dualism operation conducted especially in relation of human treatment with nature is caused by and results in problematic unstable handling of multiple priorities in architectural projects that needed to be confronted by designers. Plumwood further analysis about the dualism philosophical pattern in the West consists of the three outlined logical characteristics, namely Backgrounding, Hyperseparation, and Incorporation, including Instrumentalism and Homogenisation of which are the sub-characters of Incorporation. The aspects were extensively implied to the relationship practice structure between human and nature , that this essay would examine the stated qualities of dualism, in relation to Woodland Park Zoo in Seattle and compose an opinion weather the examples given were to counteract or portray the concepts."

Coe, Jon C., “The Evolution of Zoo Animal Exhibits”, The Role of Zoos in Biological Conservation:Past, Present and Future, 1992, AAZPA Symposium, reprinted in ZOO ZEN vol. X, No. 1 (1994):31. Hancocks, David, Bringing Nature into the Zoo: Inexpensive Solutions for Zoo Environments,International Journal for the Study of Animal Problems 1, No. 3 (1980) : 170 - 177. Jones, Grant R., Coe, Jon C., Paulson, Dennis E., Woodland Park Zoo: Long Range Plan, Development Guidelines and Exhibit Scenarios, (Seattle Washington, 1976). Plumwood, Val, Feminism and the Mastery of Nature (London: Routledge, 1993). David Hancocks, Future of Zoos, last modified February, 2012, http://www.zoolex.org/publication/ hancocks/Future_of_Zoos_ Hancocks_2012.pdf Schaul, JordanCarlton, A Critical Look at the Future of Zoos–An Interview with David Hancocks, last modified March 13, 2012, http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2012/03/13/39842/ Woodland Park Zoo, Chronological history of Woodland Park Zoo, last accessed December 17, 2016, http://www.zoo.org/about/ chronologicalhistory. Woodland Park Zoo, Long-Range Physical Development Plan, Development Guidelines, Non-Exhibit Recommendations and Exhibit Scenarios (2004) , http://www.zoo.org/document.doc?id=1352

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YEAR ACADEMIC 3 YEAR SEMESTER ACADEMIC TERM 1

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REFLECTION Sectionyear includes reflective of Third was noself joke. It was athoughts mothe overall semester. The comments comprised of ment of significant turn in my degree life. general comments of the courses, academic perforpresence ofprogress theories, design subWith the mance, and personal in learning. ject has totally changed to be a department of thoughts. Numerous and extensive newness were discovered in all subjects. Ar Practice has also expanded my view about the field. Working force and architecture industry has little to do what is taught in school, and the professional experience can only be gained through direct involvement with the industry.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES The expansion of design scale demanded me to extend my knowledge from spatial to urban design, spined with theories. In the semester, there is an improvement for the appreciation of quality productions. All produced drawings and presentation materials have to be on par with the expectations set on master students. I also gained the ability to reason my decision based on borrowed philosophical views. The presence of theoretical texts also helped me achor my understanding towards the odd and unfamiliar architecture. Group work with a large number of members taught me preseverence and patience, when the communications was not as effective as I expected. It is better to be smart, than to be right. But, learning from one another was still the best feature of team work.

/# /# /There's beauty in every darkness. /# Photo/ Diagram Sketches description

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REFLECTION COURSE CODE /ARCH10026

BRIEF This course focuses on the writing of a reflective report exploring an aspect of architectural practice. The report should engage, provoke and/or ruminate on specific issues or related activities carried out during your Placement period. This course is seen as complimentary to Architectural Placement: Working Learning from last year. The purpose of this handbook is to describe what is required and how best to present your work. This course is intended to: 1. Provide an opportunity for you to reflect, appraise, analyze and present your newfound knowledge and understanding gained through direct experience of a specific aspect of the architectural profession or related activity. 2. Allow you to research and investigate a specific topic relevant to the practice of architecture (or a related activity). 3. Encourage you to articulate and illustrate your work experience (or related activity) in a coherent and professional manner. 4. Invite students to gather information (text and drawings) relating to the practice of architecture (or related activity) and to assemble this material into a lucid format.

LO1

Demonstrate an ability to identify key themes and issues in practice and the workplace.

LO2

Show understanding through critical reflection of the academic, social and cultural contexts of practice and the workplace.

LO3

Demonstrate an ability to communicate effectively and rigorously the process of your practice period.

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ARCHITECTURAL COURSE TYPE PRACTICE

REFLECTION COURSE NAME

MADIHAH AZHAR

UNIVERSITY OF EDINBURGH MA (Hons) Architecture

OBJECTIVE

ABOUT ME DATE OF BIRTH 28 SEPTEMBER 1994 NATIONALITY      Malaysian

University, currently looking for an internship placement in

        +6016 416 3736 |+44759 366 0007           madihah.azhr@gmail.com

AFFILIATION

SOCIAL

MADINA INSTITUTE Humanitarian volunteer| April 2017

Stage backdrop design setup for Little Black Raincloud Involved in furniture arrangement and painting

REFERENCE

IKRAMEDIA UKE Committee | 2014-Present

DOUGLAS CRUICKSHANK Lecturer in Architectural Design Programme Director, Architecture - BA/MA

Design, organise and manage media materials for IKRAM UKE

Email: d.cruickshank@ed.ac.uk

Administrate website, social network page and posts

Tel: +44 (0)131 651 5784

Leader of QU (Qiyadatul Ummah) think tank team

DR. JIM LAWSON

MERCY MISSION Event photographer | 2012

Senior Lecturer ESALA Staff-Student Liaison

Twins of Faith International Islamic Conference 2012

Email: j.lawson@ed.ac.uk

Event photographer in Play N Pray section

Tel: +44 (0)131 650 2619

Students are expected to reflect on the experiences and evidence how the placement period has been an extension of architectural education. Usually this issue is addressed by reflecting on professional practice by ‘working in the field’.

DESIGN RESPOND

Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts. DIRELTON CASTLE INTERVENTION

WRITER’S RETREAT

We Salute Isle of Bute camping with refugees program

BEDLAM THEATRE Stage design volunteer | 2016 

        @madihaaah

Submission provides an opportunity to use (and perhaps develop) academic research and reporting protocols.

ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL

look forward to confidently give full commitment with the firm in

Distribute donations and give moral support to Syrian refugees

Although the placement period is not usually in an academic environment, it will contribute to your architectural education.

CHOCOLATIER HOUSE

and design industry. I seek guidance through proper training as I

        facebook.com/madihah.azhar

Section includes description of placeGiven that attaining a professional design design stages and of certain ment is task, subject to the vagaries the market, it set need to necessarythat to students consider a different kind mayofbequestions tackle throughout the exercise. of placement. In making this decision it may be useful to note the following:

WRITER’S RETREAT

firm where I can acquire the professional knowledge in the built

        London E1 0SH

        linkedin.com/in/madihah-azhar

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION

POR TF O L I O

completion of my degree course. I would like to be part of a design

the future.

        21, Arbour Square,

11 Weeks Duration

Expected Salary : £8 per hour I am a third year undergraduate architecture student in Edinburgh

CONTACT

REFLECTIVE DESIGN TASKJOURNALS

Available dates : 7 July 2017 - 8 September 2017

FICTION CHOCOLATIER LIBRARYHOUSE

MECHAMORPHOSIS ARCHITECTURE SCHOOL

DIRELTON CASTLE INTERVENTION

FICTION LIBRARY

MECHAMORPHOSIS

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PREPARING CV

SPECULATION

"There are few cyclical steps taken in preparing the CV and portfolio. In the beginning, a number of examples of architecture CV and portfolios are gathered from online resources. The materials were analysed closely , compared and referenced according to suitable layout and content that might be used for. There are a lot of CV types available to be referred to, depending on the countries the firms are in. Hence, an extensive research about the layout and the content for architecture CV each country generally required were listed down. The knowledge about the CV types for countries namely in the UK, Europe, New Zealand and Australia were specifically outlined for future use. The choices of countries were not randomly picked, but were put in sequence of my targeted firms to apply for the internship. The reason was because the theories learnt in the course specified in Western architecture."

This journal outlines two speculative issues extracted from The Housing White Paper that was recently released by Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) and inefficiency of BIM model in housing sector, that bring challenges to architecture industry in the UK. The purpose of this journal is to evaluate the concerns and predict the changes in architectural operations. The paper goes through series of analyses of recent statements from the public, UK government and architects, and form a concluding practice verdicts covering economical and social standpoints. The discussions are concentrated on failure of local authorities to supplement rightful affordable housing planning for the people and secondly on the discrepancy between big and small firms in the sector.

GLOBALISATION

COLLABORATION

This journal follows on how architects can utilise globalisation as an optimistic pathway to enhance the approach to the built environment. In a light of globalisation, there’s no time for despondent mindset even though we are in the times of difficult business. Globalisation encouragingly welcome new entrants to challenge the ordinary, calls for high level competency and requires plentiful experts in supply chain optimisation, hence making the market pattern almost impossible to be predicted . The aim of this journal is to give arguments 7 to support the idea that globalisation is not necessarily bad when architects know how to tackle the issue in educating the society. The advantages resulted from globalisation include rising awareness among builders and non-builders on built sustainability, counter argument on design homogeneity controversy, and variance of products are made available.

In this entry, the outlines will follow the analysis on BIM utilities on visualisation and data management and speculate on the possible effects from the technology in the architectural practice. To begin with, BIM is a form of information issuing the digitalised physical and functional characteristic of a design embedded in a model . There are a lot of advantages of using BIM, one of it is its ability in reducing the data model handover glitch making virtual information passover from designer team to contractors to be more efficient. It means that architects and other professionals are able to share design information in various dimension. In 2011, the Government Construction Strategy initiated to reduce costs in designing, constructing and maintaining public buildings resulted in UK Government requisitioned the use of BIM. It means that BIM would be used on all government projects by 2016. Eventually BIM has also been widely adopted for mostprivate sector in architectural projects.

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CONSOLIDATION The fifth journal is a summative eflection on my overall experience during semester two of my third year in completing my degree in MA (Hons) Architecture. The entry would be divided into three parts; my expectations, what I have learnt and my future plan to progress on my career. In these few months, it was my first time preparing all the required documents and apply for internship to companies. From time to time, writing personal statement gets easier, but studying what the applied firm is all about, is getting more difficult, as expected. I suppose learning through experience would be one of the best way to get a little insight on how exactly to be in the industry feels like. I expect the period of months to secure a placement might or might not eligible me any opportunity due to both myself being a new entry and the amount of period for job hunting may take longer than given.

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INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

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Duration PR1MA Seremban Sentral

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION

Section includes The project is the description proposal to ofdevelop 8 design design blocks, stages and PR1MAtask, apartment with certain 5 floors above set of questions that students need the carthroughout park podium equipped withtoresidence tackle the exercise. facilities. The buildings are proposed to be completed on Lot 3902 in Seremban City, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia.

DESCRIPTION

Material Sign Off documentations are mainly compilations on the selection of tiles and paints for all type of space. Included are Unit A, Unit B, Unit C, Unit A toilet, Unit B toilet, Unit C toilet, Unit Kitchen, Gymnasium toilet, Prayer Room, Nursery, and Lobby Area. Included also the list of ironmongeries for all affected spaces.

DESIGN RESPOND

Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

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INTERNSHIP COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASKAREA KEY DESIGN

Duration PR1MA Seremban Sentral

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION DESCRIPTION

Section includes of is Key Design Area description documentation design task, design stages detail and certain a compilation of design decisions set questions thatoptions, studentsmaterials need to and thatofincludes design tackle throughout the exercise. suppliers. Since the construction phase is still at the early stage, the document is reviewed every two weeks for last minute alterations.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

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PR1MA - Fasa 1 CLIENT/DEVELOPER :

PR1MA BRUNSFIELD HOLDINGS SDN. BHD.

NO.8, JALAN WAN KADIR 4, OFF JALAN DAMNSARA, TAMAN TUN DR. ISMAIL, 60000, KUALA LUMPUR. TEL : 603-7726 9898 FAX : 603- 7726 8998

NOTES :-

*This Drawing is Copyright.*

DESIGN TASK DOOR AND WINDOW SCHEDULE Duration KTM Seremban Quarters

1. THE CONTRACTOR MUST CHECK ALL DIMENSIONS ON SITE. ONLY FIGURED DIMENSIONS ARE TO BE WORKED FROM. DISCREPANCIES MUST BE REPORTED TO THE ARCHITECT AND S.O. BEFORE PROCEEDING. 2. THE CONTRACTOR SHALL VERIFY AND BE RESPONSIBLE TO ENSURE THAT ALL THE BUILDING WORKS ARE WITHIN THE BUILDING SETBACK LINES AS REQUIRED BY THE LOCAL AUTHORITIES AND TO INFORM THE ARCHITECT OF ANY DISCREPANCIES IMMEDIATELY. 3. THE CONTRACTOR SHALL EMPLOY A LICENSED LAND SURVEYOR TO CHECK ALL BOUNDARY STONES POSITIONS, BOUNDARY LINES AND TO SET-OUT THE BUILDING SETBACK AND GRID LINES. 4. ALL STRUCTURAL WORKS REFER TO ENGINEER'S DRAWINGS. 5. THE CONTRACTOR SHALL COMPLY TO ALL CONFIGURATIONS AND MICRO DETAILS FROM THE ARCHITECT. 6. THE CONTRACTOR SHALL NOT BE ENTITLED TO CLAIM FOR ANY ADDITIONAL COST OR TIME ARISING FROM THE ABOVE WHERE THERE IS NO INCREASE IN THE QUANTITY OF MATERIALS.

Garisan Sempadan Lot

Rev.

Fencing Wall

REVISION CODE

Signed

Checked

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14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

CONSULTANTS : ARCHITECT :

T. R. HAMZAH & YEANG SDN. BHD.

Section includes of to build is ondescription the suggestion The proposal design design and certain a KTM task, quarters withstages 11 floors that accommoset questions that students need tois accomdateof55 unit housings. The quarters tackle throughout the exercise. panied by facilities and car parks for the residence. The proposed building is suggested to be built on Lot 3902, Seremban, Negeri Sembilan, Malaysia.

T. R. Hamzah & Yeang Sdn. Bhd.

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No. 8, Jalan Satu, Taman Sri Ukay, 68000 Ampang Selangor Darul Ehsan. Tel : (603) 4257 1966 Fax : (603) 4256 1005

C

STRUCTURAL & MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL ENGINEER :

PERUNDING HASHIM & NEH SDN. BHD.

Penthouse, Block C, Plaza Mont'Kiara, No. 2 Jalan Kiara, Mont Kiara, 50480 Kuala Lumpur Tel :603-9287 3701 Fax : 603-9287 3696

Drop off

Fire Pump Room

Surau(F)

Unit 158-4-5, Kompleks Maluri Jalan Jejaka, Taman Maluri, Cheras 55100 Kuala Lumpur Tel :603-9282 1155 Fax : 603-9285 7789

QUANTITY SURVEYOR :

BASAR & HARUN SDN.

NO.16, Jalan Zirkon F7/F, Seksyen 7, 40000 Shah Alam, Selangor Tel : 603-5512 0087 Fax : 603-5512 0067

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT :

VERDANT SPACE SDN. BHD.

8-A, Jalan Tengku Ampuan Zabedah K 9/K, Section 9, 40100, Shah Alam, Selangor Tel :603-5880 4617 Fax : 603-5880 4618

S p a c e

TOWN PLANNER :

FOURMATE DESIGN

NO. 26-2, Tingkat 1, Jalan Pekaka 8/3, Seksyen 8, 47810, Kota Damansara, Petaling Jaya, Selangor Tel : 603-6156 5428 Fax : 603-6156 5436

TRAFFIC CONSULTANT :

PERUNDING TRAFIK KLASIK SDN. BHD. l13A-01-02, Level 13A, PJX-HM Shah Tower, No 16A, Persiaran Barat, 46050, Petaling Jaya, Selangor Tel :603-7932 3266 Fax : 603-7932 3261

STAIRCASE

GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEER :

G&P GEOTECHNICS SDN. BHD.

Wisma G&P, 39-5 Jalan Tasik Selatan 3, Bandar Tasik Selatan, 57000, Kuala Lumpur Tel : 603-9059 5396 Fax : 603-9059 5869

TEL

Service Room

ELV

CW

HR

KL CONSULT ASSOCIATES SDN. BHD.

Y

Corridor

BOMBA lift Stretcher /

nan

g&R

LAND SURVEYOR :

SYARIKAT ABDUL WAHAB

12 Un 200 du mm r B an Gar gu isa na n n

g Wall

etainin

an

STAIRCASE

Bangu

Fencin

ris

Meeting/ Games Room

HR

ndur an U

C

Ga

Lobby

Cold Water Pump Room

IVEWA 6100mm D R

Multipurpose Hall

MDF Room

Surau(M)

risan 12200mm Ga an Undur Bangun

aris mm G

Management Security Office

CIVIL ENGINEER :

122 00 Und mm G ur B aris ang an una n

12200mm Garisan Undur Bangunan

12200

A

B

Section I was assigned will generally to complete comments the documents on the gained understanding about for window and door schedules forthe the costing project as outlined by the course. It will approval purposes. Thelearning project curve, is still at the also comprises on the earliest stage of design, as compared reflection, and the future projection onto PR1MA Housing, which is already in construction stage. the collected thoughts.

Date

Fencing Wall

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION

DESIGN DESCRIPTION RESPOND

Description

No 275-G, Jalan Haruan 5/7, Pusat Komersial Oakland II, 70300, Seremban, Negeri Sembilan Tel :606-633 7228 Fax : 606-633 7219

an r Bangun san Undu ri a G m 9200m

6100mm

Note :

EW A Y D R I V

Fencing &

*indicated consultant corresponded for the drawing & diagram*

Retaining

Wall

Se

adan Lot

mp

mp Garisan Se ad

an

Lo

CONSTRUCTION PACKAGE - PHASE 1 VOLUME 2.3 OPENING & SECONDARY ELEMENTS 31 - Door Schedule & Details

tB

PROJECT TITLE

aru

Cadangan Membina Sebuah Kuarters KTM 11 Tingkat (55 Unit) Beserta Kemudahan- Kemudahan Penduduk Dan Tempat Letak Kereta Di Atas Lot 3902 (Tanah Kerajaan Rezab Keretapi), Bandar Seremban, Daerah Seremban, Negeri Sembilan Darul Khusus. Untuk Tetuan PR1MA Brunsfield Holdings Sdn Bhd ARCHITECT

The following is one of the page example of door schedule for the project.

T.R.HAMZAH & YEANG SDN.BHD. CONSTRUCTION DRAWING DATE: BY :

Location Plan - Level 1

Scale 1:300

TO :

16 AUGUST 2017

T. R. Hamzah & Yeang Sdn. Bhd. (No. Syarikat : 41743A) 8 Jalan Satu, Taman Sri Ukay, 68000 Ampang Selangor Darul Ehsan Tel : 03 4257 1966 Fax : 4256 1005 E-Mail : trhy@trhamzahyeang.com

DRAWING TITLE :

Door Location Plan - Level 1

DOCUMENTATION STATUS : CONTRACT NO. : DRAWING NO. :

___

743/SSPH/A/APT/L(3) 31-01a

DESIGN BY : DRAWN BY :

REV : DATE :

CONSULTANT :

TRHY

16 AUG 2017

NORTH :

CHECKED BY : SCALE :

1:300

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INTERNSHIP COURSE NAME

ASEAN ECONOMIC FORUM Analyst (Graphic Designer)

DESIGN TASK DESCRIPTION Duration

Asean Economic Forum is an inINTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION itiative to be the leading platform for leaders and influencers in govern ments,Section includes of businesses anddescription societies to design task, design stages and certain convene and findthat solutions to the set of questions students needbigto gest issues that face ASEAN and the tackle throughout the exercise. world today and the future. It aspires to generate greater awareness about ASEAN and facilitate regional integration within Southeast Asia. Together with all stakeholders, it aims to foster a stronger bond and understanding especially among the people of Southeast Asia towards a more prosperous and united ASEAN. My responsibilities include the following but not limited to: ● Design relevant AEF promotional materials including but not limited to cover photos, profile pictures and Instagram DESIGN RESPOND photos ● Work closelywill withgenerally social media facilSection comments itator effectively reach outabout to readon thetogained understanding the project as outlined by the course. It will ers via also comprises the learning creative graphicondesigns, videoscurve, and reflection, and the future projection other relevantthoughts. initiatives proposed on the collected ● Collaborate with data analyst to produce attractive infographics which will be used by the writers in their articles ● Working across Aseanite for designing and creative purposes. /1 Special days postings.

/2 Poster for UKABC event in London, 2018, with collaboration with AEF and Aseanite. 105


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SELF ASSESSMENT

ACADEMIC YEAR

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REFLECTION INTRODUCTION

encourages me to be thoughts self ini- of Section The school includes self reflective the overall semester. The active comments comprised tiative and be responsibly finding for job of general comments of the courses, academic perforand get and hired. There progress were a significant change mance, personal in learning. in role as an employee compared to being a student.

SELF PROGRESS

A great amount of trust was given, and I was very excited to be involved in the social housing project under PR1MA.

Since there is a specialisation on work delegated, I spent very little time on producing design materials, but rather compiling them for clients. The skills used in compiling portfolio and proposal presentation is applied.

PR1MA is a well known brand name for social housing in Malaysia, for it has established multiple low cost high quality apartments all over Malaysia.

The internship experience offers me not entirely on designing a space, but how to make the space design habitable.

I also learnt to work collaboratively with senior workers and other people across disciplines in the office.

The trivial works behind close doors of great design is as important as designing. Architecture, is not entirely about designing after all.

/# /# Photo/ Diagram / Sketches/#description Everyday traffic. 106


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ARCHITECTURAL DISSERTATION

ELECTIVES

COURSE CODE /ARJA10002

COURSE CODE /ARCH10022

ON DRAWING

BRIEF

BRIEF

This course provides the student with an opportunity to investigate an architectural topic negotiated with a member of academic staff. The student will undertake sustained and in-depth research and present a coherently argued, fully referenced and appropriately illustrated piece of academic writing.

On Drawing is an exercise in graphic invention, a project to reimagine the idea of the architectural site through the device of drawing. Where the prevailing history of architectural drawing describes the inevitable dominance of descriptive geometry, On Drawing offers a counter narrative1. An acknowledgment of the act of drawing as a method of visual research operating beyond the off- times prescriptive abstractions of geometry, as a design practice at once: investigative, critical, ambiguous, revelatory and inventive. Where the architectural site drawing is most often limited to the metric of the master-plan, the site plan and the building footprint, On Drawing recognises a more complex terrain.2 An unquantifiable landscape of the found and the made, of human artefacts accumulated over time, of geology, climate, stories and histories, as an opportunity for architectural invention. Through a closely choreographed sequence of fieldwork, archival research, thematic drawing exercises and critical reflection, On Drawing calls for the production of an individually authored architectural site drawing together with a pamphlet publication: a complex and finely crafted drawing and an accompanying record of its evolution.

The course aims the students to achieve develop research methods relevant to writing a dissertation, develop the student’s intellectual curiosity relating to the dissertation topic, gain knowledge of a specific aspect of architecture, history and theory, technology, environment, architectural design or related disciplines of arts, cultural studies and landscape and its application in critical debate. It also aims for studens to develop skills in the use of library and research sources including the use of websites and electronic methods of deriving information and develop skills in correct writing style, grammar and syntax and the correct use and acknowledgement of sources.

LO1

Detailed knowledge of the chosen subject demonstrating sufficient understanding of relevant cultural, historical and philosophical themes.

LO2

Ability to construct and synthesise an intellectual argument expressed against stated objectives and presenting original conclusions.

LO3

Ability to product a substantial piece of academic writing, coherent, attractive, illustrated, well-written, using correct referencing conventions and the acknowledgement of sources.

LO1

Demonstrate knowledge of the role of architectural site drawing as a tool for research, analysis and invention.

LO2

Demonstrate experience in a range of drawing strategies – graphic, photographic, analogue and digital.

LO3

Demonstrate the ability to represent a complex architectural site in relation to a rigorous investigation of a given territory through the medium of drawing.

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DRAWER

On Identity and Order

DESIGN TASK DESCRIPTION Duration

The dissertation represents the collective theINTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION oretical analyses to question about the current architectural formation in housing design industry in the Section includes description contemporary social landscape. Theofwritings suggest design task, design stages and certain drawer as a useful symbol to conduct the overall disset of questions that students to course, and conceptualise the need relationship of human, tackle throughout the exercise. things and space, and later produce a judgement on its effectiveness.

Inside of material culture, the drawer metaphor clarifies that the tangible ordering of things through intangible influence is one of the concept that provokes the idea of rationality in human conscience. In the relationship between human agency and things, supposed that the notion of rationality is not a total disconnection of physical acquirement activity, but to be rational means one lives within physical materials without being enslaved by them through irrational buying, driven by description for success and positive feelings. To propose that irrationality encompasses embodiment of symbolical values inside of things, it is a suggestion that intangible values is a factor of one’s naivety in consumption practice.

To put in context, the study looks at the historical background and social bearings in the material culture post World War II in Britain specifically, and in large cities globally. The theme for the research are Identity and Order. The means by which the coherence of discussion is accomplished is through the outline as follows:

The intangible values that shape one’s identity eventually stimulate the structural and hierarchical ordering of physical things, by which objects and spaces are displayed according to their significance. In the materialistic expression then allow oneself to define his accumulation of identity and convey them through materialistic message. What he uses, what he wears, where he goes spending his leisure time and how he spends his money reveal layers of comfortable and luxury affordability in which a form of materialistic language understandable to the society. The orderliness of things is sensed as rational because the language of materialistic hierarchy established is understood by the society as conventional.

The first chapter dwells on the discussion on individuals and their search for identity to define themselves and establish an interpretation of order through materialistic values. Consecutively, in the domestic architectural practice, the second chapter touches on the activity of organising and establishing order in spaces and comprises space identity evaluation in relation to DESIGN RESPOND the subject. The aim of thewill exploration iscomments not to announce itself as Section generally aondocumentation that depicts an infinite the gained understanding about the description on contemporary livingbyand theIt present architecturproject as outlined theabout course. will also comprises on the learning curve, al practice, but to outline several fundamental issues reflection, the future projectionthe oninterrelated conon the ideaand of home, and underpin the collected thoughts. cept of Identity and Order for the projection in housing architecture.

Against this background, architects are the members of materialistic society. Architecture is one of the profession that values the opinions of others to make one’s design as acceptable. In the rise of modern architectural movement and parametric design, architecture industry and education reformed their view on the definition of good and bad design. One of the prominent adoption in the practice is rational attitude. Rational attitude in design term illustrates an architectural practice that is bias towards the tangible element. The design approach is highly mechanised by technology and data.

The architectural appreciation is centred on objectivity, efficiency, sustainability, economical, cleanliness and minimalist aesthetics. The reason it is termed as rational is due to the design logic is based on measurable metrics, dimensionality and quantitative stances. The approach although not new, always makes house design appears homogeneously modern and contemporary. Despite that, sense of homeliness islost along the process, home is made bare from dwelling identity. It is necessary for designers to home the not-home, and one of the advisable step is to acknowledge that rational attitude in housing design is not convenient, although competent industry-wise. Thus, rational attitude should be rephrased as irrational practice. One of the methods to reattain the experience of home inside of house is by assigning meanings through which the identity of space is earned. Spatial identity concerns not only by its physical form, but also incorporate with endowment of nature and social values. These values consist of psychological attribution, spiritual beliefs, and cultural influence. To remove from a space any of the threefold will result in the fragility of boundaries. Earlier, in the discussion about human and things, the intangible elements of values and meanings causes irrationality in consumption activity. Whereby in domestic architecture, the presence of the intangibles complements the irrational practice of modern design by giving a comprehensive connotation to a house, turning a nothome space into home. The complementation is in another, a rationalisation of design practice. Considering that the issues regarding housing design discussed in this dissertation may be far complex than what is written, the limitation of insights from the perspective of other disciplines such as ecology, economy, and political affairs explains that the outcome of the observation may be flawed.

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ARCHITECTURAL DISSERTATION

ELECTIVES

COURSE CODE /ARJA10002

COURSE CODE /ARCH10022

ON DRAWING

BRIEF

BRIEF

This course provides the student with an opportunity to investigate an architectural topic negotiated with a member of academic staff. The student will undertake sustained and in-depth research and present a coherently argued, fully referenced and appropriately illustrated piece of academic writing.

On Drawing is an exercise in graphic invention, a project to reimagine the idea of the architectural site through the device of drawing. Where the prevailing history of architectural drawing describes the inevitable dominance of descriptive geometry, On Drawing offers a counter narrative1. An acknowledgment of the act of drawing as a method of visual research operating beyond the off- times prescriptive abstractions of geometry, as a design practice at once: investigative, critical, ambiguous, revelatory and inventive. Where the architectural site drawing is most often limited to the metric of the master-plan, the site plan and the building footprint, On Drawing recognises a more complex terrain.2 An unquantifiable landscape of the found and the made, of human artefacts accumulated over time, of geology, climate, stories and histories, as an opportunity for architectural invention. Through a closely choreographed sequence of fieldwork, archival research, thematic drawing exercises and critical reflection, On Drawing calls for the production of an individually authored architectural site drawing together with a pamphlet publication: a complex and finely crafted drawing and an accompanying record of its evolution.

The course aims the students to achieve develop research methods relevant to writing a dissertation, develop the student’s intellectual curiosity relating to the dissertation topic, gain knowledge of a specific aspect of architecture, history and theory, technology, environment, architectural design or related disciplines of arts, cultural studies and landscape and its application in critical debate. It also aims for studens to develop skills in the use of library and research sources including the use of websites and electronic methods of deriving information and develop skills in correct writing style, grammar and syntax and the correct use and acknowledgement of sources.

LO1

Detailed knowledge of the chosen subject demonstrating sufficient understanding of relevant cultural, historical and philosophical themes.

LO2

Ability to construct and synthesise an intellectual argument expressed against stated objectives and presenting original conclusions.

LO3

Ability to product a substantial piece of academic writing, coherent, attractive, illustrated, well-written, using correct referencing conventions and the acknowledgement of sources.

LO1

Demonstrate knowledge of the role of architectural site drawing as a tool for research, analysis and invention.

LO2

Demonstrate experience in a range of drawing strategies – graphic, photographic, analogue and digital.

LO3

Demonstrate the ability to represent a complex architectural site in relation to a rigorous investigation of a given territory through the medium of drawing.

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POINT OF VIEW

4 Weeks

INTRODUCTION DESIGN TASK

The Point of View of a drawing is both interDuration nal and external to the image. It is the viewpoint of the draughtsman and the viewing position offered INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION to the audience for the drawing. The aerial view, and the map suggest a degree of distance, the plan Section includes description of control task, and design containment, perspective design stages and certain remembers the position of the maker in the pull of set of questions that students need to lines as they tackle throughout exercise. horizon, the section disappear towards the an imagined describes a site we can never occupy, a view we can never see, and the axonometric excises the subject from the signifiers of lived space as an artefact seen by an imagined eye hovering, uniformly, at 45’. All carry with them a logic and a value system, a set of priorities and judgements with regard to the nature of the site.

/4 Point of View 2 : Night Seeing /1 Point of View 1 : Day Seeing

DESIGN RESPOND The first script follows on my earliest effort to understand the anatomy of stereoscopic vision using Water of Leith as the subject of the surveillance. The first script consists of several nodes, in which DESIGN RESPOND the nodes are the spots for the stereoscopic inspection took place.. eyes are used to see across Section will The generally comments the front. 1,about 2, 3, the blink, the eyes andthe straight on gainedtounderstanding project as outlined by the course. It will captured what they could view. also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, andstayed the future on and I used The collected eyesight still, projection like a camera, the thoughts. my hands to identify where the stereoscopic vision stopped, marked it with memory, and framed the vision photographically. From these point of views of seeing, accordingly, each photo is translated into a planimetric drawing (the plot) that annotate where my stereoscopic vision stops, precedented from Michael Webb's style of annotations.

/2 Point of View 1 : Stops

/3 Point of View 1 : Annotations 111


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POINT VIEW DESIGNOF TASK 4Duration Weeks

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain DESIGN RESPOND set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise. The drawings from previously were extruded into the same height. The extrusion created a new form of existence, born from the language of my stereoscopic vision.

Intended to see all of them from one point, hence, the Water of Leith is straighten, like one strand of string.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts. /1 Straightening the river

/2 Point of View: Straight River

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THE TIME DESIGN TASK 2Duration Weeks

/1 Pamphlet revisited.

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

INTRODUCTION

/2 Time plot

The Time of a drawing is the material that it chooses to recognise and represent, the histories and prehistories nowRESPOND lost to vision that might appear and be acknowlDESIGN edged in the construction of the image. We live in a thickened informed bycomments the past and predicated on the time, in a present Section will generally possibilities of a future. Things move, on the gained understanding about the decay, change and we will always have thebyweather. ThisIt is project as outlined the course. willa reality of the site and it cancomprises be recorded also on inthea drawing. learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

DESIGN RESPOND

The insertion of time element gave me the opportunity to observe closely the light and shadow of my drawing. I use this extrusion as the new instrument to draw a new plot drawing encompassing 'time'.

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DESIGN RESPOND

DESIGN TASK Duration

THE SCALE 2INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Weeks

The book reintroduce the way of seeing, while walking along the river within a time span of nine hours of daylight. The trails were not the explicit bodily journey on site, but actually a form of ''Rhino walk'', using the 3D software to observe accurately the shadow casting accross time of the day (lam - 4pm). The curations are the hybrid of point of view+ time + scale plot, binded as one drawing book. I shall stand at the middle and ensure my vision is filled entirely by the drawing. I would move only my eyeball slowly from left to the right.

Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND INTRODUCTION

Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the The Scale of by a drawing is the decision to represent aspects of the project as outlined the course. It will site as relativelyon bigger or smaller. The architectural scales 1:100, 1:500 also comprises the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on are a generalising shorthand that allows for the important activity of the collected thoughts. transcription between different drawings.8 Scale can be used differently, to establish a hierarchy of importance in an image, to show that which is miniscule as gigantic and vice versa. As we move through space things change in scale and focus all the time. Recognising this in a drawing allows for what the architectural theorist and historian Paul Emmons has described as ‘the imaginative inhabitation of architectural drawings’, for being in the image.

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COURSE NAME

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INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

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COURSE NAME

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INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

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DESIGN TASK RESPOND

Duration This chapter is a compilation of experimentations on drawing incidental shadows, formed out of INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION the negatives of the 'Stereoscopic Book of Vision | of Leith'includes drawing pages, being of flipped. WaterSection description design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

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INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

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OVERALL SEMESTER

SELF ASSESSMENT

ACADEMIC YEAR YEAR 4 ACADEMIC TERM SEMESTER 1

REFLECTION Section includes self reflective thoughtsride of The semester brought me to a different the overall semester. The comments comprised of altogether. Both dissertation and On Drawing subgeneral comments of the courses, academic perforjects reverberate veryprogress little oninmy previous undermance, and personal learning. standing about architecture and architectural drawings. New discovery of what I never understood before drove me to challenge myself to venture into uncertainties. Because both of the unconventional drawing and academic writing experiences were very new to me, I was very unsure in every turn I took during the semester.

SPA

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SELF ATTRIBUTES My understanding on space has altered that now the quest to pass On Drawing subject has nothing to do with typical architectural drawings. Thinking and rethinking of concepts get me to revise my normal perception of space. During the term,the most prominent advancement is achieved through the appreciation of abstract drawing. To supplement my intellectual side, dissertation writing encouraged me to discuss on a specific material in depth.

/# De-stressdescription with Portobello jog. /# Photo/ Diagram //#Sketches

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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECTONICS

This unit is framed through a precise, technological challenge; that of pyro-seismic design. Students will be challenged to address novel structural and constructional concerns, those created by the twin risk of earthquake and fire. Through these concerns, they will think about building structures, and the loads they are subject to, in dynamic terms. It is also framed through specific representational techniques. Students will conduct this structural study by-design, through a series of detailed digital and physical models of precedents, prototypes, programmes and proposals. That is, at the same time as introducing students to technical problems, it will offer them computational tools through which to understand and respond to them. However, the real focus of the studio is not technical, but poetic. These problems and tools are only a way to foreground an aesthetic concern: the role played by environmental hazards and structural solutions in shaping the Japanese architectural language. This studio begins with a study of the pyro-seismic symbolism of Tokyo’s vernacular architecture, typified by buildings that dance like snakes, protected by water-spewing, dragon-headed carp, or buildings that could be dismantled and moved in the event of fire. It then traces the way these precedents inform contemporary engineering and architectural design cultures in Japan, specifically as proto-types for high-rise towers and modular disposable dwellings. It concludes by asking students to make a structurally, representationally and linguistically sophisticated contribution to that culture. It will challenge them to develop their own tectonic language, one that expresses the dynamism of two things we usually take as stable; our buildings and the earth. LO1

Understanding of tectonic, structural, constructional, environmental and contextual matters.

LO2

Ability to research, analyse, synthesize and integrate with design an appropriate technological approach.

LO3

ACADEMIC PORTFOLIO

COURSE CODE /ARCH10025

COURSE CODE /ARCH10005

LOGISTICS

COURSE CODE /ARCH10003

BRIEF

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

PART I

BRIEF

BRIEF

The course requires students to take an aspect of design production and treat it as a process within a complex system such as the creation of a building. The aim is to begin to make connections between your learning in practice and your design work.

This course requires students to curate the academic work produced during their BA/MA degree and present it in the form of an integrated academic portfolio - defined by the Architects’ Registration Board as: ‘a comprehensive chronological record of student’s design project work together with all coursework, including reports, dissertations, sketch books and any other evidence of work, (with project briefs and examination papers), that have been assessed as part of the degree leading to an award of Part 1’. The work to curate and present the portfolio is independent of the work from the courses themselves. The course emphasizes the design and conceptualisation skills required to integrate and present diverse knowledges and media. It is introduced during Years 1 & 2 to ensure that students document their work as part of a personal development plan.

Architecture Design: Logistics focuses on the management of the flows of resources between the stages of basic design and final hand-over, in order to meet the requirements of all agents involved in the processes of implementation of an architectural project. It involves a broad understanding of what constitutes resources, to include material, human (including collaborative work) and temporal aspects of production. The course is organised around a set of process driven practice/research themes introduced by a series of case study talks by academic staff/ practitioners. These may include statutory frameworks, building procurement, collaborative practice, digital modelling and simulation, and manufacturing or construction processes.

LO1

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a specialist theme in relation to the design and procurement of buildings

LO2

Demonstrate ability in applying knowledge of a specialist theme to enhance a design proposition.

LO3

Display aptitude in communication through the production of incisive text and graphical outputs.

LO1

Compose a coherent, well designed and integrated architectural design portfolio that documents and communicates architectural knowledge, skills and abilities, and that synthesizes and presents work produced using diverse media.

LO2

Integrate knowledge in architectural design, technology and environment, histories and theories of architecture and the related arts, professionalism and regulatory frameworks as evidenced through the content of the portfolio.

LO3

Reflect on personal development with reference to the attainment of the ARB/RIBA Part 1 Graduate Attributes through an introductory summative statement, and understand the relationship of the General Criteria to the student’s work, as demonstrated through a referencing system in the portfolio.

Skills in deploying specified two-and three-dimensional representational techniques correspondent with accepted architectural conventions.

121


COURSE TYPE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

GC

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COURSE NAME TECTONICS

DESIGN TASK EXERCISE 1 : PRECEDENT 2Duration Weeks

INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION

Section includes description of study the this first exercise, students will In design task, design stages influence of earthquake andand firecertain on Japanese verset of questions that Students students are needtotoselect a sinnacular architecture. tackle throughout the exercise. gle building precedent to study. Students should study this precedent by completing a detailed digital and physical model of its tectonic character. These models should show all structural members, their mode of jointing, and the way these members and joints form characteristic spatial, iconic or symbolic devices. Students can select any building completed prior to the Meiji restoration (1868).

DESIGN RESPOND In a group of three, we have chosen Yoshimura House, a traditional farmhouse in Osaka PreDESIGN RESPOND fecture as the source to understand the Japanese vernacular language that respond with both fire and Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the earthquake. project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, Yoshimura House to be an interesting resreflection, and the proved future projection on idential precedent. Yoshimura House was a farmthe collected thoughts. house belonged to a rich farmer who afforded to have more than basic necessity from common farmers. Minka, the Japanese folk house, uses a space-structuring principle that is fundamentally different from the style of the well-documented “Japanese house.� A general framework defines an undifferentiated space, supports the roof structure, and carries an elaborate weight of roof structure.

/1 Yoshimura House, Osaka. /2 Interiors.

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DESIGN TASK Duration DESIGN RESPOND INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Yoshimura House, like most tra-

buildings, were description not attachedofto ditional Section includes and stages had noand basements. any foundation design task, design certain The construction of Yoshimura House set of questions that students need to is understood to be the sequence of tackle throughout theinexercise. structure>shelter>function>comfort, which means that safety against seismic typhoon is the design priority. The most unique character of minka houses is the idea of the house is “moved� when fire is approaching. Yoshimura House was constructed using mortise-and-tenon connection method. Hence the assembling and dissembling of the house when fire was approaching is made possible. Moving a house meant discarding everything but the timber structure, disassembling that framework, and reassembling the timbers with a fresh roof and infill walls.

/1 Assembly of Yoshimura House

DESIGN RESPOND

Fire and time have been a great factor that distinguishes the fixedcomments and temSection will generally on the gained understanding about poral elements of the house. Withthe the project outlined by the the course. It willof presenceas of time factor, tectonic also comprises on the curve, Yoshimura House put learning under test. reflection, and theisfuture projection on The collected followingthoughts. diagrams illustrate the the time spent to construct the house until completion in comparison to the way how it gets disassembled and moved away. /2 Dismantling Yoshimura House 123


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TECTONICS COURSE NAME

DESIGN RESPOND Japanese post-and-beam timber construction is particularly suitable in a culture of frequent rebuilding, as it allows many of the most valuable parts of a building to be recycled. Most traditional buildings were not attached to any foundation and had no basements. Base isolation allows the building to be separated from its foundation entirely and let it slide freely during an earthquake, which is a standard for seismic design. The wall framework is composed of short members, and joining of members in longitudinal direction are frequent.

DESIGN TASK EXERCISE 2 : PROTOTYPE 3Duration Weeks

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section includes description of

design task, design stages and certain of Inquestions this exercise, students set that students needwill to tackle throughout the exercise. abstract a contemporary tectonic prototype from their selected precedent. They will then study the performance of this prototype in a simulated earthquake.

The fundamental characteristic of the post-and-beam structure is the system of joinery in which the structural members met at right angles and were joined by the mortise-and-tenon connections using wooden wedges and pegs to secure the joints.

With reference to literatures on seismic design, students will understand their selected precedent as a prototype for contemporary seismic engineering. They will consider whether it provides a model for rigidity or flexibility, resilience or replace- ability.

Yoshimura House is a huge house we are able to slice into thirteen 4m by 4m space modules. Each of the modular quadrant function differently, and featured distinctive intricacies with one another. These modules later become the main prototypes to our tectonic. Each of them consists rich spatial characteristics, and there are different type of activities enabled in each. One modular can sit side by side, but speak different spatial language. We also use these modular units to identify different combination potentials when if reconstructed.

They will produce a revised tectonic model that reinterprets this precedent as the basis for a contemporary architecture. At stake here will be the DESIGN RESPOND development of clear structural principles, but also of iconic, or symSection willspatial, generally comments on the gained understanding about the bolic expression. project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on Credits : Kathythoughts. Lau the collected Yedija Markus

/1 Joints study of Yoshimura House.

/2 Prototypes. 124


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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

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TECTONICS COURSE NAME

EXERCISE 3 + 4 : PROGRAMME AND PROPOSALS DESIGN TASK 6Duration Weeks

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION INTRODUCTION Section a includes description of Create retrospective re-design design task, design stagesinand certain of the building identified exercise 3. set of questions that students need to Structure the new building through the tackle throughout the exercise. tectonic prototype developed in exercise 2. Use the exercise to create a contemporary reinterpretation of the traditional building identified in exercise 1. Students will be supported, through structural tutorials, to complete seismic analysis of their design proposals.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments The prototypes each gives a slight differon the gained understanding about the ence in as time ticks. by Thethepages areItshowing how project outlined course. will the models dance in time, if times is understood also comprises on the learning curve, in a linear fashion. time is required reflection, and the Longer future projection on when the morecollected elementsthoughts. are present. The intricacies of the construction details prolong the completion period when more complex layout and joinery are assembled.

/1 Prototype in the language of time. /2 Time of prototypes construction. /3 Petite Modulars.

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/1 門 Gate

DESIGN TASK RESPOND

Duration All of the design strips gather a number of characters and strokes . Although they INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION encompass different escape strategy, all of the means to get people outof of the them are Section includes description fire safely. design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle the exercise. A gate,throughout a river, closeness, and a door are all responding urgently with the word fire in a distinctive fashion. Each of them carries a unique poetic language of pyro architecture. /2 近 Near

If the focus of the previous analysis is about the post fire event, the message of time in this exercise has turned to frame the event during fire outbreaks to prioritise the safety of the people living inside. The richness of the dance about time resembles the concept of time that is not reduced to mathematical perceptions such as moments and intervals, speed or fastness understood as separate principals. Time, in a way is an intertwined measurement of ArchiDESIGNandRESPOND tecture Fire.

/3 川 River

Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts. /1 /3 /4

/4 戸 Door

/2 126


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

GC

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3

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5

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8

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TECTONICS COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASK Duration

INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of design task, design stages and certain set of questions that students need to tackle throughout the exercise.

DESIGN RESPOND Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

127


DESIGN RESPOND It is accustomed to Japanese architects and urban planners to perceive a plot of a house as a plot of a kanji character. Hence, a street is a sentence, and the city is an essay of architectural writings. This is the fire escape sentence if the house strip is to be positioned in a street in Adachi, Tokyo.


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECTONICS

This unit is framed through a precise, technological challenge; that of pyro-seismic design. Students will be challenged to address novel structural and constructional concerns, those created by the twin risk of earthquake and fire. Through these concerns, they will think about building structures, and the loads they are subject to, in dynamic terms. It is also framed through specific representational techniques. Students will conduct this structural study by-design, through a series of detailed digital and physical models of precedents, prototypes, programmes and proposals. That is, at the same time as introducing students to technical problems, it will offer them computational tools through which to understand and respond to them. However, the real focus of the studio is not technical, but poetic. These problems and tools are only a way to foreground an aesthetic concern: the role played by environmental hazards and structural solutions in shaping the Japanese architectural language. This studio begins with a study of the pyro-seismic symbolism of Tokyo’s vernacular architecture, typified by buildings that dance like snakes, protected by water-spewing, dragon-headed carp, or buildings that could be dismantled and moved in the event of fire. It then traces the way these precedents inform contemporary engineering and architectural design cultures in Japan, specifically as proto-types for high-rise towers and modular disposable dwellings. It concludes by asking students to make a structurally, representationally and linguistically sophisticated contribution to that culture. It will challenge them to develop their own tectonic language, one that expresses the dynamism of two things we usually take as stable; our buildings and the earth. LO1

Understanding of tectonic, structural, constructional, environmental and contextual matters.

LO2

Ability to research, analyse, synthesize and integrate with design an appropriate technological approach.

LO3

Skills in deploying specified two-and three-dimensional representational techniques correspondent with accepted architectural conventions.

ACADEMIC PORTFOLIO

COURSE CODE /ARCH10025

COURSE CODE /ARCH10005

LOGISTICS

COURSE CODE /ARCH10003

BRIEF

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

PART I

BRIEF

BRIEF

The course requires students to take an aspect of design production and treat it as a process within a complex system such as the creation of a building. The aim is to begin to make connections between your learning in practice and your design work.

This course requires students to curate the academic work produced during their BA/MA degree and present it in the form of an integrated academic portfolio - defined by the Architects’ Registration Board as: ‘a comprehensive chronological record of student’s design project work together with all coursework, including reports, dissertations, sketch books and any other evidence of work, (with project briefs and examination papers), that have been assessed as part of the degree leading to an award of Part 1’. The work to curate and present the portfolio is independent of the work from the courses themselves. The course emphasizes the design and conceptualisation skills required to integrate and present diverse knowledges and media. It is introduced during Years 1 & 2 to ensure that students document their work as part of a personal development plan.

Architecture Design: Logistics focuses on the management of the flows of resources between the stages of basic design and final hand-over, in order to meet the requirements of all agents involved in the processes of implementation of an architectural project. It involves a broad understanding of what constitutes resources, to include material, human (including collaborative work) and temporal aspects of production. The course is organised around a set of process driven practice/research themes introduced by a series of case study talks by academic staff/ practitioners. These may include statutory frameworks, building procurement, collaborative practice, digital modelling and simulation, and manufacturing or construction processes.

LO1

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a specialist theme in relation to the design and procurement of buildings

LO2

Demonstrate ability in applying knowledge of a specialist theme to enhance a design proposition.

LO3

Display aptitude in communication through the production of incisive text and graphical outputs.

LO1

Compose a coherent, well designed and integrated architectural design portfolio that documents and communicates architectural knowledge, skills and abilities, and that synthesizes and presents work produced using diverse media.

LO2

Integrate knowledge in architectural design, technology and environment, histories and theories of architecture and the related arts, professionalism and regulatory frameworks as evidenced through the content of the portfolio.

LO3

Reflect on personal development with reference to the attainment of the ARB/RIBA Part 1 Graduate Attributes through an introductory summative statement, and understand the relationship of the General Criteria to the student’s work, as demonstrated through a referencing system in the portfolio.


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

GC

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LOGISTICS COURSE NAME

REFLECTIONS 4 Weeks

INTRODUCTION DESIGN TASK

Duration Reflection: students work in small groups to research the product INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION and processes at work through a typological UK case study, which will be drawnSection includes description of list of suggested design from task, adesign stages andScottish certain contemporary architectural projects or set of questions that students need to may correspond to that encountered tackle throughout the exercise. through a student’s practice experience.

DESIGN RESPOND Theme A (Assemblage) is chosen. The report answers the following questions: >What material systems constitute the primary construction elements of the building, external envelope, floors, roof, openings, etc. and why were these used? >How do they interface with the structural system? >Do atypical circumstances with respect to structural exist, basements, long DESIGN provision RESPOND spans, architectural expression, etc.? >Subsequent structural proviSectiontowillprimary generally comments sion what support is there to building comon the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will ponents which interface with the primary also comprises on of theload learning transfer fromcurve, external structure, reflection, and the future projection on envelope, upper floors, and roof? the collected thoughts. >How has the choice of material system affected the programme? >What logistical challenges did the design require to overcome? As a group, we chose Midden House as case study. /1 Diagrams explaining Design Overview analysis.

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ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN COURSE TYPE

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LOGISTICS COURSE NAME

DESIGN TASK Duration

DESIGN RESPOND INTRODUCTION/DESCRIPTION Section includes description of The report includes discussion design task, design stages and certain on design overview, site and building set of questions that students need to analysis, materiality, tackle throughout thestructural exercise. assembly, structural performance analysis, and other logistics.

/2

There are multiple resources that helped with the completion of the report. The accumulation of analyses soon are extracted for individual application and understanding for AD: Tectonics subject. /3

The individual report is not attached as they are already mentioned in Tectonics pages. Credits: Jazzy Ng DESIGN RESPOND Catherine Wu

Section will generally comments on the gained understanding about the project as outlined by the course. It will also comprises on the learning curve, reflection, and the future projection on the collected thoughts.

/4 /1 /2 /3 /4

Diagrams showing zinc cladding strategy. Important features of Midden House assemblage. Diagrams analysing Midden House structural and moisture performances. Photos of Midden House, outside and in.

/1 131


ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

TECTONICS

This unit is framed through a precise, technological challenge; that of pyro-seismic design. Students will be challenged to address novel structural and constructional concerns, those created by the twin risk of earthquake and fire. Through these concerns, they will think about building structures, and the loads they are subject to, in dynamic terms. It is also framed through specific representational techniques. Students will conduct this structural study by-design, through a series of detailed digital and physical models of precedents, prototypes, programmes and proposals. That is, at the same time as introducing students to technical problems, it will offer them computational tools through which to understand and respond to them. However, the real focus of the studio is not technical, but poetic. These problems and tools are only a way to foreground an aesthetic concern: the role played by environmental hazards and structural solutions in shaping the Japanese architectural language. This studio begins with a study of the pyro-seismic symbolism of Tokyo’s vernacular architecture, typified by buildings that dance like snakes, protected by water-spewing, dragon-headed carp, or buildings that could be dismantled and moved in the event of fire. It then traces the way these precedents inform contemporary engineering and architectural design cultures in Japan, specifically as proto-types for high-rise towers and modular disposable dwellings. It concludes by asking students to make a structurally, representationally and linguistically sophisticated contribution to that culture. It will challenge them to develop their own tectonic language, one that expresses the dynamism of two things we usually take as stable; our buildings and the earth. LO1

Understanding of tectonic, structural, constructional, environmental and contextual matters.

LO2

Ability to research, analyse, synthesize and integrate with design an appropriate technological approach.

LO3

ACADEMIC PORTFOLIO

COURSE CODE /ARCH10025

COURSE CODE /ARCH10005

LOGISTICS

COURSE CODE /ARCH10003

BRIEF

ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN

PART I

BRIEF

BRIEF

The course requires students to take an aspect of design production and treat it as a process within a complex system such as the creation of a building. The aim is to begin to make connections between your learning in practice and your design work.

This course requires students to curate the academic work produced during their BA/MA degree and present it in the form of an integrated academic portfolio - defined by the Architects’ Registration Board as: ‘a comprehensive chronological record of student’s design project work together with all coursework, including reports, dissertations, sketch books and any other evidence of work, (with project briefs and examination papers), that have been assessed as part of the degree leading to an award of Part 1’. The work to curate and present the portfolio is independent of the work from the courses themselves. The course emphasizes the design and conceptualisation skills required to integrate and present diverse knowledges and media. It is introduced during Years 1 & 2 to ensure that students document their work as part of a personal development plan.

Architecture Design: Logistics focuses on the management of the flows of resources between the stages of basic design and final hand-over, in order to meet the requirements of all agents involved in the processes of implementation of an architectural project. It involves a broad understanding of what constitutes resources, to include material, human (including collaborative work) and temporal aspects of production. The course is organised around a set of process driven practice/research themes introduced by a series of case study talks by academic staff/ practitioners. These may include statutory frameworks, building procurement, collaborative practice, digital modelling and simulation, and manufacturing or construction processes.

LO1

Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of a specialist theme in relation to the design and procurement of buildings

LO2

Demonstrate ability in applying knowledge of a specialist theme to enhance a design proposition.

LO3

Display aptitude in communication through the production of incisive text and graphical outputs.

LO1

Compose a coherent, well designed and integrated architectural design portfolio that documents and communicates architectural knowledge, skills and abilities, and that synthesizes and presents work produced using diverse media.

LO2

Integrate knowledge in architectural design, technology and environment, histories and theories of architecture and the related arts, professionalism and regulatory frameworks as evidenced through the content of the portfolio.

LO3

Reflect on personal development with reference to the attainment of the ARB/RIBA Part 1 Graduate Attributes through an introductory summative statement, and understand the relationship of the General Criteria to the student’s work, as demonstrated through a referencing system in the portfolio.

Skills in deploying specified two-and three-dimensional representational techniques correspondent with accepted architectural conventions.

132


OVERALL SEMESTER

SELF ASSESSMENT

YEAR 4 ACADEMIC YEAR

SPA

VIS

LOG

INT

ACADEMIC SEMESTERTERM 2

REFLECTION Section includesofself reflective thoughts of The completion Academic Portfothe overall semester. The comments comprised of SELF ATTRIBUTES lio Part 1comments compilation marked the end of my perforgeneral of the courses, academic years. progress in learning. undergraduate mance, and personal Japanese architecture really pays attention to details and intricacies. This is Japanese design tectonics gave me chance what I have been missing in design exercisto reconnect with the Eastern architecture. es from previous years. The blend of both West and East architectural knowledge created very rich results. The absence of design randomness also trained me to be fully equiped with logical The semester is outlined with the most reasoning and justifications. comprehensive arrangement, that I get to happily relate Logistics, Tectonics, theoSince Mechamorphosis, the quality of outries, and histories, in harmony. puts were taken greatly as priority as well. Specific reflection on courses taken in the However, I learnt that group work was not Academic Portfolio also help me revisit the all time a smooth journey. knowledge and understanding I've gained so far.

/# /# Photo/ Diagram / Sketches description /# Everything Japanese. 133

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