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MADELAINE

AFSHAR


303.884.0547 2920 South Cook St. Denver, CO. 80210 madelaine.afshar@gmail.com Hello. I’m Maddy Afshar, a product designer from Denver Colorado. I aspire to work in the outdoor industry and drive humanity forward through compassion and good design. Recently, I have been designing a collection of gear bags for Axxes Industries. While there, I designed technical products for my client Kargo that are made to last a lifetime. I have had the opportunity to learn not only about the manufacturing process, but how to design with intention and quality. At Axxes Industries, I received advanced training in the soft goods manufacturing industry where I was able to rapidly prototype products and streamline their existing process. I gained experience in pattern making, along with cutting, sewing, and tacking. I frequently met with the director of the company and presented my designs along the way. Through trial and error along with field testing, I arrived at the final concept featured in the Spring 2018 collection. I am passionate about design and how I can make a positive impact on someone’s life. For me, design is so much more than making a product look aesthetic and beautiful. Design is about creating a connection and empathizing with the people I serve. It is my hopes to continue learning and advancing my knowledge and tools within the world of design.


Madelaine afshar PRODUCT DESIGNER

EXPERIENCE PRODUCT DESIGNER / AXXES INDUSTRIES / LOUISVILLE, COLORADO / FEB 2017-PRESENT • • •

Co designer of Kargo bags Designed 3 full collection gear bags for vehicles including the heirloom collection Frequently traveled to Colorado factory working closely with the manufactures.

• • • •

Created Digital and analog patterns Prototyped and finalized designs Responsible for hardware, and fabric selection Made in depth tech packs for clients

DESIGN INTERN / ATELIER INTERIOR DESIGNS / DEN, COLORADO / FEB 2016- DEC 2016 • • •

Management of files and client information Organization of client intel Preparations for client visits

• •

Handling social media accounts Responsible for selecting client based fabric swatches from Denver Design District

SALES ASSOCIATE / BIKESOURCE / DEN, COLORADO / MARCH 2010-PRESENT • • • •

Responsible for product knowledge Informative and friendly customer service Knowledge of POS systems Scheduling employees

• • •

Mechanical experience Identifying and conceptualizing solutions for customers needs. Promoting the love of cycling and wellness

EDUCATION BS INDUSTRIAL DESIGN / METROPOLITAN STATE UNIVERSITY OF DENVER / DEN, COLORADO / 2013-2017 HISTORY OF ART AND VISUAL CULTURE / UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ / SANTA CRUZ, CA 2012-2013 ORCHESTRA / DENVER SCHOOL OF THE ARTS / DEN CO / 2006-2012

SPECIAL TOOLS • • • •

Adobe Suite Solidworks AutoCad Keyshot

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Sewing Pattern Making Pattern Smith Prototyping

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Digital and analog sketching Photography Customer Service Communication


Team Kargo is comprised of outdoor enthusiasts and avid adventurists. Based in Superior, Colorado, our team has 30 combined years of design, and manufacturing experience. We strive for innovation and quality to bring you timeless products that will last a lifetime. Kargo designs lightweight, stylish and easy-to-use products that aid in gear travel, so you can get out and do more. What began as a simple carry solution to transport groceries and small items, quickly evolved into a successful product line of protective gear bags to assist in all outdoor adventures.


PROTOTYPING

Round one

The first prototype made was similar in shape and form as the traditional duffel. This shape was easier to place items in and out of, but due to the lack of rigidity, the bag fell flat. You essentially needed three hands to operate the task of filling it. Two hands to hold it open, and an extra to pack. Though this bag was difficult to use, I was still able to gain insight into parts that did work. One of the features that did work well was the dividers. I designed them to clip in and out of the bag making it versatile, and modular. The material choices for the first bag also had some issues. The prototype uses a nylon based water resistant fabric that was UV protective, but gave it a very scratchy feel. Because this is a product that you interact with using your hands, I wanted to achieve a more inviting feel, but not compromise on durability and functionality.

Round two The second round of prototypes has greater success and matched my vision better. I padded the sides adding structure and security. From there, I changed the lid to open wider in order to fit more gear with ease.

hardware Picking hardware was based off of the research and context analysis of a typical gear bag. I decided to use acetal instead of nylon due to the fact that the hardware needs to perform under harsh conditions where temperatures reach below zero. Nickel plated cam buckles were chosen because of the strength and durability. Through product testing, I found that the original nylon webbing stretched while wet, compromising the function of the tie downs. I then discovered a polyester webbing that gave similar texture to the nylon but did not stretch under pressure.


2” web tacked

1,000 D Cordura

GETTING TECHNICAL rival

Logo

rival

I have created an in-depth technical pack for all of the products I’ve designed for Kargo. Working with the factory based in Colorado has given me insight into the methods and processes for manufacturing.

2-1” reducers

Mesh pocket

1” D-Ring 1” webbing

bags have layers Each Kargo bag was examined for its purpose and identity within a collection. From there, specific materials were chosen to reflect the best materials for the design of the bags. After much investigation I was able to define the best fabric, webbing and foam for the job.

1000 DENIER NYLON

* Cordura nylon with DWR coating. Picking the right shell material was imperative to retain the quality and durability of the bag.

LD24 FAUX EVA (3/8” FOAM)

I decided to use this foam due to its memory, and ability to reshape itself. The foam needed to be soft enough to take impact from the gear inside, but firm enough to offer rigidity and structure to the bags over form.

400 PACKCLOTH NYLON

* Cordura nylon with DWR coating. When choosing a liner, I found it important to keep the bag water resistant but not add too much additional weight to the bag.

10oz TPU VINYL

In the spots where the bag would be subject to the most wear (inside the bag) I found it important to choose a fabric that is durable yet easy to clean, and wipe down.

1050 DENIER NYLON BALLISTIC

* Cordura nylon with DWR coating. Picking a material for the bottom of the bag proved to be one of the most important parts due to the fact that the bag needed to hold up to the test of time. The bag is always touching the bottom to a variety of surfaces. A heavier weight nylon will add thickness to the material in a critical spot.


DESIGNING A COLLECTION Each Kargo bag was examined for its purpose and identity within the collection. From there, specific materials were chosen to reflect the best materials for the design of the bags. After thorough investigation I was able to define the best fabric, webbing and foam for the job. Three bags emerged from the research collected. First, the Kargo Rival bag, which is the tallest and most narrow bag. This bag has straps integrated onto the back of the bag intended to mount to a truck tailgate. The second bag, the Kargo Xtend is our largest bag. This design has no tailgate attachment straps. Instead, the bag is designed to mount to the end of the truck bed, in the rear of an SUV or in the trunk of a sedan. The last bag, Kargo Prevail, is the most versatile bag of the three. This medium sized bag has removable tailgate straps, and can mount to all areas within the vehicle.

Rival / xtend / prevail rival

117 LITERS 19”X 9”X 42”

xtend

176 LITERS 16” X 16”X 42”

prevail

rival

rival

132 LITERS 16” X 12” X 42”

rival

rival

Charcoal Gray Cyana Blue Earth Mellow Desert Sand rival

rival

rival

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rival

FALL 2017 COLOR WAY


process The manufacturing process starts with making functional patterns that the sewers can read and understand. Each manufacturer creates patterns differently. At Axxes, I was able to learn the industry standards and then conform to their specific pattern language. I made both physical and digital patterns of all three bags within the collection.

process There are several steps involved with making a bag. First, the fabric is cut and sewn using the patterns. Hardware is added to the piece at each stage. From the initial sewing, the piece goes to the bar tacker where tacks are added to increase durability. The rest of the bag is then sewn. The final stage includes seam taping the edges, and cutting any extra strings. The bag is then flipped right side out and placed into packaging.

made in colorado Manufacturing in the United States has many great benefits that in my opinion outweigh the extra costs. First is the overall quality of bags. U.S manufacturers are held to higher standards, and have access to quality materials and hardware. This translates to longer lasting products backed by higher ethical and moral standards. Workers in the States are paid above a minimum wage, making this method of manufacturing more sustainable, and responsible. At Kargo, we’re committed to sustainability and continuing to reduce our impact on the environment. For me, the first step is making a product that will last a lifetime. Kargo products have a lifetime guarantee! We encourage our supporters to visit the manufacturing facility, to learn more about the company. We strive to educate and innovate.


The Adventure Begins The new Kargo Prevail bag is a simple and stylish way to transport all of your important gear to your final destination.


Bottle Opener Objective: Design a functional bottle opener to be CNC milled out of a single piece of metal. Limitations include a maximum of 7 tools and a total of two operations on the CNC mill. Designing Brief: Create a bottle opener using the aesthetic and design language of a company, and ultimately relate design choices to unit costs.

DESIGN LANGUAGE Miir is a company based out of Seattle Washington. They create quality goods ranging from water bottles, to backpacks and bikes. They have a very unique design aesthetic that is both curvaceous and masculine. While designing the SiiV bottle opener, I wanted to emphasize their strong profiles within the bottle shapes, yet still serve a function for a bike and bag. This would essentially tie all of their products into one cohesive design.

Key Chain

Pocket Clip

UNIT COST With every tool change, and op, a cost is added. Ordering 1,000 steel units places the unit cost at $80. Changes to the design including singular chamfers greatly reduce costs.

Opener

15mm Hex


PACK Public Transportation is becoming more popular in urban centers around the word every year. With a demographic of urban commuters on the rise, the need for innovative designs is necessary. Design Objective: Redesign an aspect of public transportation to better the community. After research and investigation the problem in the world of public transportation became clear. The trains, buses, and bikes in the fleet have problems with cleanliness, space, and functionality, but the larger problem comes from the interaction between people and the transit lines. This project lead me on a path to redesign backpack, bags, and carry ons for light rail users.

THE PROBLEM Current carry solutions limit the public transportation commuter’s ability to adapt to their needs and environments.


THE PROBLEM WITH LIGHT RAIL Public transportation has the ability to make people mobile and give them a sense of confidence. I found this to be my main inspiration while re designing an aspect of the light rail system. Mobility is a luxury that is limited by confined spaces. Observational research shows that 63% of riders on the light rail in Denver carry at least one carry item with them, making these spaces even more cramped. From the research, I concluded that physical space within a train was my limiting factor. I cannot change what is in your bag, but instead where your bag rests in relationship to you, other passengers and the train itself.

inspiration The first bag is a simple tote. This form is useful for carrying items that vary in size. It is easy to pack, and quick to understand. The second bag is functional and takes organization and modularity into its framework. This design compartmentalizes your belongings, but can be difficult to understand. There is an urban outdoors feel to the bag, and it communicates durability. The last design is elegant and organic. It has form and function. It was my goal to combine all of the positive features and forms of these bags into one cohesive design that fits the environment and public transportation user. The bag simply must adapt to the user, and the changing spaces.


Time to sketch Initial sketches were fast and dirty but led me into the final direction. Taking bits and parts from the forms, I arrived at a simple tote backpack. This however was still lacking the aesthetic of the urban transit rider that I was hoping to achieve. From there I dialed down the specific materials which ultimately drove that urban aesthetic.

materials • X-Pack • Heavy weight nylon • Rainwear • Waterproof zipper

considerations • Adaptable • Light weight • Packable • Waterproof • Durable • Functional • Color pops • Understandable


CONVERT TO THE SPACE AROUND YOU The final concept works around a limited space. With this design , the user can enter the train in backpack mode, and quickly convert over to shoulder strap mode simply by removing one arm strap. The bag slings the side of the user, making it more versatile, and functional.

BACKPACK MODE • • •

Single strap Easy access cinch top Quick zip front pocket

EXTRA SPACE MODE • • •

Integrated Tote Double volume Detachable liner

SLING MODE • • •

Adjustable strap 360 access Easily removed


KEEP MOVING FORWARD


“Nothing compares to the simple pleasures of riding a bike.� -JFK


SPOKE. Mountain biking is the thrilling sport of riding bikes on dirt! But it’s more than just that. For many, mountain biking fosters connections to the mind, body and earth. The outdoor industry is one of the leading sectors of economic income in the United States, where mountain biking accounts for less than 10%. Pushing the mountain biking industry forward will lead to innovative designs, and generate a healthier and more sustainable MTB industry for future generations, in years to come.


ADVANCING MOUNTAIN BIKING

Pro Riders

In order to advance the sport of mountain biking it is imperative to understand the relationship between current riders, and future riders. “Pro” riders (participants who ride weekly) play a key role in the inclusion of new participants. There is also a strong correlation between product innovation & design and the number of participants within the mountain biking industry. With more participants, comes better design, which will inevitably advance the sport of mountain biking within the outdoor industry.

Healthy Sustainable Active- Mountain Biking Industry

Innovative Product Design

Increased Product Sales

More Participants

20%

current participation MEN WOMEN Outdoor Industry Association annual participation

20%

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research shows that only 20% of mountain biking participants are women. Further research suggests that the majority of active women surveyed have never participated in the sport of mountain biking. On the contrary, the majority of men surveyed participate weekly. The target group for then increasing these numbers will directly address the largest untapped market women who have never participated.

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INCREASED GOAL FOR FEMALE PARTICIPATION INCREASED GOAL FOR MALE PARTICIPATION

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CURRENT PARTCIPATION

CURRENT PARTCIPATION

barriers of entry INCREASED GOAL FOR FEMALE PARTICIPATION GOAL FOR of MALE One ofINCREASED the leading causes lowPARTICIPATION participation in mountain biking is the barrier of entry. For the leading demographics for increasing participation, these barriers can be summed up within three main sectors. The first is perceived safety, which is amplified by misinformation, lack of confidence, and overall fear of sustained injury. The second main barrier is the lack of accessibility. Bike ownership can be a barrier due to price, commitment, intimidation and stigma surrounding the mountain biking culture. The third barrier is community, or more specifically, the social issues one faces within the identity of the sport of mountain biking.

• • •

Safety Accessibility Community


SPOKE. SPOKE. Introducing

SPOKE. Introducing

SPOKE.


SPOKE. <

EVENTS.

r.sigma

Kenosha Pass >

TRAILS.

Happening this week

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Let’s Learn the Basics! Friday, November 3 Interested

r.sigma

Kenosha was beautiful today!

charles.ride

Alderfer Three Sisters >

Filters

Clinics

Rides

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Demos

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Alderfer Three Sisters 159 Votes

Let’s Learn the Basics! Friday, November 3 Interested

the app This multifaceted app allows first time participants, and current riders to experience the world of mountain biking in a whole new light. At its core, the app is a socializing tool intended to expand the community and identity of the mountain biking industry. Members can curate custom content and are able to see daily photos in real time. Current riders can “mentor” other members (per request). Using this platform, all users can begin to find and build their community. The second sector of the app directly confronts the issues of accessibility within the industry. The app features a peer-to-peer gear rental system, which opens the door for possibility. The final sector of the app covers the necessary safety tools for mountain biking. “Trails” allow the user to see updated mountain bike trails around the globe. Here, there is potential to invite other riders to participate with the user, or can be used simply as a safety alert to other riders.


the wearable Incentives gives reasons for participants to use the app. With every ride or mentorship completed, the user receives points that are translated to bonuses. The bonuses range from discount industry products, to upgrades within the app. After an alloted amount of rides, the user then gains a green “bar” on their connect. badge.

WEAR IT ON YOUR WATCH BAND

10 RIDES 50 RIDES 250 RIDES

SNAP IT TO YOUR HANDLE BARS

the wearable The app can’t live by itself. The system creates this sense of community though multiple levels of interaction. One of these key interactions comes from the gamification of the sport of mountain biking. The purpose of the connect. is simple, aid in the connection of the community, and give a physical reason to participate. The connect. is in itself a “badge of honor” where the light bars directly reflects the success of the rider.

SOUND

+connect

VIBRATION

LIGHT


SPOKE.

Ride like a champion


THANK YOU


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