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SPECIAL EDITION

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MADEIRA TODAY AD

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M A D E I R A T O D AY ADMISSIONS


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M AD EIRA IS AN IND EPEND E NT B OARD I NG AND DAY SCH O O L E D U C AT I N G M O R E T H A N 3 0 0 G I R L S I N G R A D E S 9 –1 2 . O U R C A M P U S O V E R LO O K S T H E P OTO M AC R I V E R F R O M 376 SC ENIC AC RES IN MC LE AN, VI RG I NI A, 1 5 MI NU T E S FRO M WA S H I N G TO N , D.C . M A D E I R A I S A P L AC E F O R S T U DY, F O R P L AY, F O R CO M P E T I T I O N . I T I S A S TA R T I N G P O I N T FO R JOU RNEYS OF THE M I ND T H AT A RE, AT T H E SA ME T I ME, JO URNEYS INTO THE WO RLD.


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Contents 02

FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL 6

06

ACADEMICS

10

CO-CURRICULUM

12

ATHLETICS

18

ARTS

22

STUDENT LIFE

26

LOOKING AHEAD

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ALUMNAE PROFILES: STEAM

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CAMPUS EVENTS

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13 QUESTIONS


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FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL

“ M A D E I R A I S A M I X T U R E O F T H E F A S T C O S M O P O L I TA N P A C E O F W A S H I N G T O N , D . C . — W I T H A B O O M I N G C U LT U R A L L I F E , T H E B U Z Z O F P O L I T I C S , A N D T H E M I X O F D I V E R S E N AT I O N A L I T I E S —A N D T H E BEAUTY AND SERENITY OF A 37 6- ACRE PROPERTY WHERE ONE C A N G E T C A U G H T U P I N N AT U R E B Y W A L K I N G I N T H E W O O D S A N D A D M I R I N G T H E S P E C TA C U L A R V I E W S O F T H E P O TO M A C R I V E R . ”

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I

am often asked what I love most about my work at Madeira. The answer comes easily—the girls, of course! When I came to Madeira in 2010, I fully expected to enjoy Madeira girls as students; what has been a pleasant surprise is meeting and befriending so many extraordinary Madeira women of all ages and generations. I am consistently impressed by how they have all made a

mark in some way, be it in their professional lives, their personal communities, or in the global forum. They are all so different, yet share a commonality unique among Madeira women. Madeira has changed some in my time; I have focused on introducing new technology and implementing innovative approaches to classroom instruction. But the lessons I learned in my first year are still worth sharing, because the core of Madeira remains the same. MADEIRA’S LOCATION IN THE WASHINGTON, D.C. AREA IS IDEAL. Madeira is a mixture of the fast, cosmopolitan pace of Washington, D.C.—with a booming cultural life, the buzz of politics, and the mix of diverse nationalities—and the beauty and serenity of the 376-acre campus where one can get caught up in nature by walking in the woods and admiring the spectacular views of the Potomac River. OUR ACADEMIC PROGRAM IS UNIQUE. The difference that Madeira brings to educating today’s “women who will change the world” is that we are steeped in, and increasingly learning more about, gender research—specifically how girls learn. Madeira fosters the growth of the individual while cultivating collaboration. Our faculty and staff are highly qualified, but more importantly, they love working with our students and are truly passionate about what they do. The academic program is rigorous, challenging, and exciting. And our CoCurriculum program provides real-world experiences that prepare students for college and beyond. OUR COMMUNITY IS DIVERSE AND HIGHLY ACTIVE. Madeira welcomes students representing 20 states and 15 countries, and more than one-third are students of color. School life blends boarding and day students, all of whom may participate in late afternoon athletic and performing arts activities and clubs before sharing dinner with friends. In the safety of this environment, Madeira students develop a clear identity, become comfortable with who they are, feel compelled to voice their opinions, and are active members of an increasingly global community. MADEIRA STUDENTS LEAVE PREPARED FOR LIVES OF LEADERSHIP AND SUCCESS. Madeira prepares each girl to face successfully the challenges awaiting her as she moves into the world of higher education at its most demanding. The proof of this experience is easy to recognize in Madeira’s graduates. This special issue of Madeira Today features seven alumnae who work in STEAM careers: an architect, a nuclear cardiologist, and animation special effects technician, a documentary filmmaker, an engineer working in the wilderness, and a very recent alumna with her eyes set on a career in patent law. We’re excited to introduce you to accomplished Madeira alumnae.

Pilar Cabeza de Vaca Head of School

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A MADEIRA EDUCATION

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ACADEMICS

TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY IDEAS The new millennium prizes

discipline to slow down, to absorb,

collaboration over competition,

and to reflect. Madeira is a place

global perspectives over one-dimen-

where all this happens. A Madeira

sional thought. Those with the cour-

education offers academic exper-

age to tear down walls and build

tise in the service of the individual

networks are the ones who change

student. Every girl takes courses

the world. To get there, students still

in math, science, history, English,

need excellent research skills, ana-

world languages, and the fine and

lytical skills, quantitative reasoning

performing arts. With the guidance

skills, and written, oral, and visual

of her advisors, each girl designs

communication skills. They need

a tailored yet flexible academic

to be able to think clearly, to sort

plan within Madeira’s innovative

through the volume of content that

modular course schedule. So that

the Information Age produces, to

the footprints she leaves behind

filter it, organize it, and make sense

are as unique as the swirls on her

of what they read, hear, and see. In

fingertips.

a world of speed, students need the

“MADEIRA HAS MADE ME STOP, THINK, AND ANALYZE.” JESSICA, A MADEIRA SENIOR

Students doing environmental engineering projects turn Madeira’s Black Pond into a site for hands-on fieldwork. Students who excel in mathematics fill the Multivariable Calculus and Linear Algebra class, a college-level course beyond AP BC Calculus. Excellent training in the STEAM disciplines (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics) prepares girls to rise in what are still male-dominated fields.

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In chemistry and physics, a masterybased learning approach gives students opportunities to understand the material deeply.

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ACADEMICS

A REAL-WORLD RESUMÉ Co-Curriculum is at the core of Madeira’s educational philosophy, and it has been for nearly 50 years. Five-week internships that rival those of college programs allow students to learn from experience in settings beyond the classroom as they go to work daily during their Co-Curriculum module. Sophomores engage in service at local schools and centers. Juniors serve on Capitol Hill in congressional internships that are central to the Madeira experience. Seniors choose from more than 300 internships or design their own with expert guidance from full-time Co-Curriculum staff. Examples have included honing

Service at the Kilmer Center, a Fairfax County Public School for students age 5–22 with severe intellectual disabilities and autism, is part of the sophomore Co-Curriculum.

entrepreneurial skills at a local bakery, assisting a neurosurgeon, and conducting research at the National Institutes of Health. By senior year, Co-Curriculum becomes an opportunity to test career aspirations and gain valuable professional skills—well before most young people get the chance.

“THROUGH CO-CURRICULUM, I’VE LEARNED THAT I LOVE POLITICS, I WANT TO GO INTO LAW, AND I CAN MAKE IT IN THE REAL WORLD.” MADDIE, A MADEIRA SENIOR

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“I had a great experience with Co-Curriculum on the Hill. I loved my office, and they thought I was so smart because I went to Madeira. Everyone else I worked with was probably 23 or still in college, and they were incredibly intimidated to be on Capitol Hill. And I wasn’t, because this is what Madeira girls do. All those writing skills and personal skills that I learned as a Madeira intern on the Hill are things that I still use today in my career.” —Sara Akbar ’92

Seniors intern at art museums, hospitals, and other sites in and around the District, such as Fairfax Animal Rescue, the Phillips Collection, and the National Institutes of Health.

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Co-Curriculum Counts Garfield Elementary School

11

Sophomores 78 sophomores interned at these nonproďŹ t organizations and schools.

13

9 13 3

78

3

SOPHOMORES

Food for Others

5

Kilmer Middle School

12 9

NOVA Head Start

HOUSE

74

Juniors Junior interns were hosted by 27 Republican and 45 Democratic offices; 42 in the House, 30 in the Senate. 25 offices were led by women members. 12 Congressional offices hosted Madeira interns in two modules.

JUNIORS

SE

The League of Conservation Voters hosted one intern.

N AT E

The House Energy and Commerce Committee hosted one intern.

Seniors The senior class interned at 71 different businesses and organizations in the following industries. Four interned at locations outside the D.C. metro area: 2 in Florida, 1 in New York, and 1 in California.

24%

25%

NonproďŹ t, Community, & Social Services

Health Sciences

84

4% 4%

SENIORS

18% Journalism, Communications, & Marketing

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10% 14% Science, Technology, Engineering, & Mathematics

1%

Legal

Business & Finance Education

Arts, Entertainment, Sports, & Recreation


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teachers how they spent their 5-week internships and what they learned in the process.

Hiam Agha

Zharia O’Neal

Lift Me Up

Split This Rock!

Hiam returned to Lift Me Up, a nonprofit organization where she had spent time during her sophomore year. “I’ve seen a transformation in the kids there,” Hiam said. In order to spread awareness about this form of therapy, Hiam took to social media on behalf of the organization and posted stories and successes about Lift Me Up.

Zharia spent her Co-Curriculum time at Split This Rock!, a slam poetry nonprofit organization driven to give teens the opportunity for emotional therapy and a sense of accomplishment through art.

Dominique Ross The Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (Bethesda Naval Hospital)

Samantha Halo Equus Foundation (Wellington, FL)

Samantha spent her five-week internship in Wellington, Florida at a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that benefits injured horses. She learned about the Equus and its mission, then focused on fundraising efforts and learning about the relationship between nonprofit work and politics.

Jordan Isaac The M Group Architects

For her Co-Curriculum capstone project, Dominique researched the complicated cultural and operational events that precipitated the hospital’s merging of the Army and Navy medical centers. Her favorite part of her experience was her time observing the operating room, specifically the orthopedic surgeries because “they have great tools.” Clearly undaunted by the realities of surgery, Dominique hopes to become a forensic pathologist.

Jordan interned at The M Group Architects in Reston, VA, an architecture and interior design firm specializing in commercial real estate. She focused on environmentally friendly construction and sustainable building practices, specifically learning about the LEED certification requirements for commercial buildings.

Dara Summey

Sarah Kang

Katy Tidd

US Geological Survey

Animal Welfare League of Arlington

In her time at US Geological Survey (USGS) focusing on water preservation issues in Norman, Oklahoma, Sarah tapped into her interest in science while working in a lab studying environmental ecosystems and climate change.

Katy was most interested in the business component of the shelter and was eager to learn more about the hiring process and personnel management. In observing how an animal control shelter is run, Katy said she learned about public service and employee work ethic.

FAIR Girls

Dara spent her Co-Curriculum at FAIR Girls, a DC-based nonprofit working to help women in sex trafficking and victims of abuse. She explored how nonprofits establish connections for fundraising to help educate the world on an issue.

Samantha Halo interned at Equus Foundation in Wellington, Florida. “This was the most amazing experience of my entire life.”

Benny Xu Fornash Jewelry

Benny explored her interest in small business by examining how the jewelry store Fornash attracts customers. She got a behind-the-scenes look at operations and merchandise management and learned that wholesale and online sales were the lifeblood of the company rather than retail customers.

Johnna Yazgan INOVA Fairfax Hospital

Johnna worked as a volunteer at Fairfax Hospital Campus. Having five full weeks to focus her interest, Johnna decided to study the elements of the hospital’s operations that lead to increased patient happiness, examining what aspects of the hospital experience most affect patient comfort— from the height of the ceilings to nurse communication.

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AT H L E T I C S

WINNING SPIRIT Madeira girls are not ones to brag, but when it comes to sports they don’t shy away from victory. In recent news, the swim team won the Independent School League Conference championship. Five riders advanced to the Interscholastic Equestrian Association national finals. A field hockey goalie was chosen for the Futures Elite Academy, a step on USA Field Hockey’s Olympic Development path. Personal bests combine with team success at Madeira, where winning isn’t everything, but it means a whole lot. If personal fitness is your goal, yoga, Pilates, and karate are just a few of your options. Competitive or non-competitive, sports and

Hurd Sports Center includes a gym, side-by-side volleyball courts and a basketball court, weight room, competitive swimming pool, dance studio, and athletic training room.

fitness activities will teach you persistence, balance, and the satisfaction of pushing your limits on the court, on the field, in the pool, and in the ring.

“I’M AN ATHLETE, SO BEING ON THE FIELD IS JUST NATURAL FOR ME. BEING THERE CAN MAKE ONE OF MY WORST DAYS TURN INTO ONE OF MY BEST.” SHELBY, A MADEIRA JUNIOR

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Madeira fields varsity and JV teams in 12 sports, including lacrosse (pictured), track and field, tennis, squash, soccer, swimming, and volleyball.

Madeira is nationally known for its riding program, which welcomes serious competitors and first-time riders alike. In-house shows, interschool meets, and local and rated competitions off campus offer opportunities to compete. More important than collecting ribbons is the support and sportsmanship everyone exhibits toward teammates and fellow competitors.

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By Ashley Smith, Communications Manager

The 2015–2016 swim season is one for the Madeira record books. With every meet, came more broken records and team improvements. The team of 41 swimmers and divers finished the regular season undefeated and captured the 2016 Independent School League Championship. The Snails claimed seven events and set four meet records that evening, including Madeira’s freestyle relays. Earning points for the Red and White were Captain Kylie Jordan ’16 (1st 200 IM*, 100 Butterfly), Maddie Heilbrun ’18 (1st 100 Backstroke*, 200 Free), Izzy Gati ’18 (1st 50 free, 2nd 100 free), Captain Claire Simpson ’17 (12th Diving), Meaghan Doyle ’19 (11th 200 Free, 3rd 100 Backstroke), Giovi Moriarty ’18 (6th 200 IM, 6th 100 Breaststroke), Romi Gould ’17 (10th 50 Free), Captain Mary McCarthy ’16 (9th 100 Butterfly, 9th 500 Free), Lindsay Lukehart ’19 (10th 100 Butterfly, 7th 100 Backstroke), Captain Jackie Tidd ’16 (11th 500 Free) and Sophia Bernstein ’19 (10th 100 Breaststroke). Next, the team went on to take fifth place at the super-competitive Washington Metropolitan High School Swimming and Diving Championships at the Germantown Aquatic Center. The Snails finished behind four Montgomery County public schools, making Madeira the top-ranked independent school. In total, the team broke six team records at Metros: Jordan (200 IM, 100 Butterfly, 50 Free, 100 Free) and the 200 and 400 Freestyle Relays. Kylie Jordan placed first in the 100 Butterfly and posted a time of 1:59.81 to win the 200 IM as well. Both times earned her an automatic All-American standing. She earned another All-American nod in the 100 Free, leading off the 400 Free Relay in 50.56. In the 200 Free Relay (Gati, Moriarty, Heilbrun, Jordan) the Snails took the first of their first-place relay wins with an automatic All-American time of 1:35.72 at the prestigious high school meet. The 400 Free Relay (Gati, Doyle, Heilbrun, Jordan) took second with an All-American consideration time of 3:30.89. Maddie Heilbrun placed third Madeira’s record-breaking 400 Freestyle in the 200 IM and fourth in the 500 Freestyle. Izzy Gati placed sixth in the Relay team: Isabella Gati ’18, Kylie Jordan ’16, 100 Backstroke and tied for fifth in the 100 Free. The two sophomores comMaddie Heilbrun ’18, and Meaghan Doyle ’19. bined to score 75.5 points, giving the Snails the scoring punch needed to break into the top five. The 200 Medley Relay (Doyle, Moriarty, Lukehart ’19, Rushforth ’19) placed 19th, scoring crucial points. Also representing Madeira were Captain Mary McCarthy in the 500 Freestyle, Lindsay Lukehart, and Sophia Bernstein in the 100 Butterfly and Meaghan Doyle in the 100 Free and 100 Backstroke. Riding high from Metros, the team traveled to Virginia Tech to compete in their final meet of the season—the Virginia Independent School Athletic Association State Championship. Kylie Jordan led the charge with first-place finishes in both the 200 Free (1:47.32) and 100 Butterfly (53.00), setting state records for both events in All-American qualifying times. Jordan earned another All-American time in her 100 Freestyle (49.94) relay lead-off swim. Izzy Gati took second place in both the 100 Freestyle and 100 Butterfly, earning an All-American qualifying time in the 100 Butterfly. Maddie Heilbrun earned third place in both the 200 IM and 100 Backstroke. Heilbrun’s 200 IM time was an All-American time. Madeira’s relay teams were on fire, winning both the 200 Free Relay (Gati, Moriarty, Heilbrun, Jordan) and 400 Free Relay (Gati, Doyle, Heilbrun, Jordan) in state record and All-American times. The Snails broke both state records in the preliminary session and again at finals. The 200 Medley Relay (Doyle, Moriarty, Lukehart, Rushforth) qualified for the championship finals placing eighth. Meaghan Doyle placed 10th in the 100 Backstroke and Giovi Moriarty placed 13th in the 100 Breaststroke and 15th in the 200 IM. Claire Simpson placed 15th in the 1 Meter Diving. Leading the Snails to an undefeated season and outstanding state meet performance, Madeira Coach Rod Montrie was named the VISAA Coach of the Year. “This was a stellar season performance by a highly motivated bunch of athletes,” beamed Montrie. “Not only was it our best finish at states in ten years, but it was the first time Madeira has finished 1-2 in an event. Our freestyle relays were truly impressive.” Rounding out the incredible season, four girls garnered All-Met honors: Jordan as Swimmer of the Year, and the 200 free relay (Gati, Moriarty, Heilbrun, Jordan). Individually Gati and Heilbrun also earned honorable mention nods. 14 MADEIRA ADMISSIONS


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M E E T K YL I E JO R DA N

Kylie is the most decorated swimmer in Madeira history. In August 2015, She qualified for the 2016 United States Swimming Olympic trials that will take place June 26– July 3. The Washington Post named her All-Met Swimmer of the Year for 2015–16. This fall she will join the Duke Blue Devils. • ISL CHAMPION 100 FL & 200 IM • METRO CHAMPION 100 FL & 200 IM • METRO MEET RECORD 100 FL • FRANK L. MARTIN AWARD WINNER FOR BEST SWIM AT METROS • VSIAA STATE CHAMP 100 FL & 200 FR • VISAA SWIMMER OF THE YEAR (4 CONSECUTIVE YEARS) • 4 INDIVIDUAL ALL-AMERICAN TIMES (200 IM, 200 FR, 100 FR, 100 FL) • ANCHORED 2 ALL-AMERICAN RELAYS (200 FR & 400 FR) • SET 3 VISAA INDIVIDUAL STATE RECORDS (100 FL, 200 FR, 100 FR) • ANCHORED 2 STATE RECORD SETTING ALL-AMERICAN RELAYS (200 FR & 400 FR)

GLOR IA NNA PI C IN I P H OTO G RAP H Y

• ONLY SWIMMER IN VISAA HISTORY TO SWIM 8 FINALS AND BREAK 8 RECORDS

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Riding Lessons

By Nicole Kolmstetter ’17

“ H E E L S D OW N !” is a common phrase that riders of all skill levels have heard at some point from their trainers. At Madeira, our trainers follow “heels down” with an explanation of why your heels have to be down, and how not having your heels down impacts your balance, your seat, and your ability to use your leg aid. The thorough teaching is just one aspect of the Madeira riding program that makes it so phenomenal. Of course, a riding program would not exist without horses. From the time that Director of Equestrian Programs Ian McCartney arrived at Madeira, he has been working on rebuilding the lesson herd. This includes finding good quality horse donations, he explained, but also “elevating the care of the horses, so they can do more and we can keep them longer,” McCartney says. Madeira now has about forty horses, and developing the lesson herd is an ongoing process. “He’s a good horseman… he does things the right way,” says Barn Manager Sue Louther about Mr. McCartney. “We all have strong feelings about taking care of the horses. We try and use them only once or twice a day. They all have a day off, maybe two, every week.” Ms. Louther says the girls are riding better, going to better shows, and getting better ribbons due to the program’s constant vigilance on proper horsemanship and proper riding. Each of the four riding instructors at the Madeira stables teach a little differently, but as a rider, having these instructors gives one a holistic view on not just how to be a rider, but how to be a horsewoman. From your first day at the barn, whether you are a beginner or an advanced rider, you are taught and given the responsibility to tack up your horse and take care of it afterward. It is not uncommon to see students grazing their horses on the hill on a hot day, or toweling their horses down after a great lesson. One of my favorite things to do after my Friday jumping lesson is to leisurely graze my pony Rambler on the hill, having had a great week and smiling because tomorrow is a Saturday. Now, I call Rambler “my pony” not because I own him, but because I love him, and I love to ride him. I have ridden him a lot in the past year, which has allowed me to both develop my riding technique and form a connection with the pony. The beauty of the Madeira riding program is that you will be put on different horses and ponies for your lessons, but not so many that you never ride the same one. Riding a horse several times in a row allows me to work consistently on specific technical aspects, but riding different horses allows me also to apply and improve on what I have learned.

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From L to R: Sue Louther, Barn Manager; Malinda Grice, Riding Instructor, Ian McCartney, Director of Equestrian Programs, Jessica Leonardi, Assistant Director, Equestrian Programs and IEA Coach, and Madeira horses Bristol, Luna, and Frankie.

I transferred to the Madeira School as a sophomore. One of the big draws for me was that Madeira’s excellent riding program is right on campus, and an optional part of the school program. I ride twice a week, and students who compete on the Interscholastic Equestrian Association (IEA) team ride three times a week. I have become very close friends with riders in the program, not only because I see them twice a week during lessons, but because they are my academic classmates as well. Seeing my classmates at the stables fosters the sense of community that is integral not only to the riding program, but to the Madeira community as a whole. Riding Instructor Malinda Grice, who is also a dorm adult and lives on campus, agrees that having riding integrated in the school program makes Madeira special. “We have the opportunity to be more involved in the girls’ [total] experience,” Grice says. Students have the opportunity to take lessons for any number of modules as well as join the IEA team. If a student wants to show but not be on the team, she also has the option to ride in a schooling show at Madeira every few months. No matter the rider’s skill level, “This is a community that is here solely to help you meet your riding goals,” says Jessica Leonardi, assistant director of the program and coach of the IEA team. “Within the framework of our riding program, we will certainly help you to do that. It’s a really wonderful community to be a part of.” When I asked Ms. Leonardi what makes Madeira’s riding program special, she says, “The spirit of the students. As a whole, the Madeira students that I have interacted with are a really mature but fun group of girls to work with. The program itself is very inclusive, which is unusual for any barn where you have beginner and advanced riders at the same time. We really try to maintain the openness, the place everybody can hang out, can feel safe and at home, and meet their own riding goals, whatever they may be for each person. That togetherness and team spirit is what sets [Madeira] apart from other programs,” Leonardi says. In the four years that Mr. McCartney has been the equestrian director, he has essentially rebuilt the entire riding program, along with Ms. Leonardi, Ms. Louther, and Ms. Grice, both literally and figuratively. The facilities have undergone a number of improvements, such as the addition of a wash stall and a barn renovation in 2015. A new barn roof is slated to be installed this summer. The riding team has also benefited from a new horse trailer for their many out-of-town meets. The program itself is highly structured in terms of instruction, lesson planning, maintenance of the facility, and horse care. In addition, an emphasis has been placed on building the IEA About the Author: Nicole Kolmstetter ’17 team. Until Mr. McCartney came, the team had not had anyis a senior day student one qualify for Nationals since 2005. This year, the team was from Arlington, VA. first at Regionals, second at Zones, and has qualified for She plays cello in the Madeira Orchestra and is Nationals, which is held at the end of April. a two-year member of I’m just weeks away from completing my junior year, and the equestrian program. I’m going to make a point of cherishing my senior year expeIn the summer of 2015, Nicole interned with the rience of riding at Madeira as much as I have these past two Madeira Communications department and years. Something tells me I am making memories here that during her junior year, interned on Capitol Hill will last a lifetime. M with Congresswoman Kay Granger (R-TX).

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ARTS

CREATIVE EXPRESSION You are an individual. You have

cello, bass, and guitar and play

your own interests, tastes, and

in the orchestra. You can dance

passions. Your uniqueness comes

for the Madeira Select. You can

through in the clothes you wear,

direct a play for the One-Acts

in the words you use—in all the

Festival, produce a film for the

choices you make. But nowhere

Madeira Film Festival, and write

does who you are come through

or illustrate Madeira’s literary

more than in the arts. At Madeira,

magazine, GATE. You can compete

you can sing and act. You can

in an art show or a poetry slam.

draw, paint, take photographs,

No matter what your passion, at

and throw pots. You can study

Madeira you can shine from the

voice, piano, violin, viola, flute,

studio to the spotlight.

Photography is one of many art mediums possible at Madeira. Advanced techiques were explored by Madison Sotos to create this unique effect below.

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Washington’s highly active arts community makes its presence felt on the Madeira campus, and Madeira’s arts programs occasionally burst onto the stages of D.C. For example, dancers from the Washington-based CityDance Company are frequent visitors, and Madeira musicians have performed at the Kennedy Center with the D.C. Youth Orchestra.

Madeira’s visual arts program, which includes sculpture and ceramics, spans four well-lit studio spaces.

“I SPEND A LOT OF MY TIME IN THE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER DOING WHAT I ENJOY WITH AWESOME PEOPLE.” LIKANDO, A MADEIRA SENIOR MADEIRA ADMISSIONS

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The Madeira Arts production of Kiss Me, Kate was a high-spirited success! Kiss Me, Kate is a 1940s musical written by Samuel and Bella Spewack, with music and lyrics by Cole Porter. The story line revolves around the production of a musical version of Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew, and the conflict on and off-stage between Fred Graham, the show's director, producer, and star, and his leading lady, his ex-wife Lilli Vanessi. A secondary romance concerns Lois Lane, the actress playing Bianca, and her gambler boyfriend, Bill, who runs afoul of some gangsters. This year’s cast put their own spin on it by setting the show in the 1980s. In the opening number, Another Op'nin', Another Show, the ensemble sang and danced in their very best eighties attire, without a neon headband or leg warmer amiss. Seniors Emily Barre as Fred Graham, and Faith Slaughter as Lilli Vanessi, kept the audience in stitches as they convincingly played out the characters' on and off-stage tumultuous relationship. Another comedic treat was the portrayal by Mary Kate Gould ’17 and Kerstin Shimkin ’17 of two local gangsters. Congratulations to the entire cast and crew.

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STUDENT LIFE

THE MADEIRA EXPERIENCE

Madeira is a welcoming home to boarding and day students from 14 countries and 20 states. During the application process, girls decide whether they would like to live on campus or, if they live locally, commute to school daily. Sometimes students begin as day students and finish their last years as boarders, living in one of six dorms, which host about 25 students each. Campus is also home to nearly 40 Madeira adults and their families, which adds to the family-like atmosphere and builds a sense of community. Day and boarders alike enjoy the common dorm spaces as a place to hang out or study, and day girls are often invited to sleepover. Madeira, with the help from student leaders, offers a slate of activities for girls to choose from every weekend, like concerts in D.C., shopping trips, social events with other independent schools, and super-fun dorm events. At Madeira, the line between boarder and day student blurs because there is always something happening on campus.

“I MADE MY BEST FRIEND HERE.” ALLIE, A MADEIRA JUNIOR

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Sports, arts, horseback riding, comfortable living spaces, great campus food and weekend excursions break up what is a demanding academic schedule for Madeira students.

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STUDENT LIFE

MAD EIR A TRA DI TI O N S Red and White Teams The epic Red-White Battle is held at the start of each school year, and that is when all new students and faculty learn which team they are to join for their years at Madeira. Since 1929, the two teams have competed for points during special days and competitions throughout the year. To find out who is winning, ask the Red and White captains or go to madeira.org/red-white. Miss Greenway The Miss Greenway pageant is an annual dorm even where girls showcase their knowledge of Madeira trivia, hidden talents, and dorm pride. This year, Lilly Moriarty won the judges’ hearts with her song, “Dinosaurs in Love” and took home the crown for New Dorm.

Top: Red & White Teams. Bottom: Miss Greenway, senior bell

Crossing the Oval Dating back to the days of Lucy Madeira, walking across the sacred space in the heart of campus has been forbidden, but that’s not to say the Oval isn’t enjoyed! It is permitted to meet someone in the middle, and the beautiful green space is often used as a place to hang out on sunny afternoons and even as an outdoor classroom. Senior Bell Located in Main, only seniors are allowed to ring the bell. Juniors run to the bell the moment graduation ends to ring it for the first time. (Fun fact: When the dorms were modernized in the summer of 2014, engineers had to design a complex pulley system to retain the functionality of the bell.)

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100 Days Seniors mark their last 100 days at Madeira during a special All School Meeting. Dressed in white (teachers and underclassmen are not to wear white on that day), they process into the Chapel/Auditorium and lead the school in the Madeira cheer. Each class presents a special gift to the seniors. Founder’s Day This all-day celebration, which used to take place annually on Miss Madeira’s birthday (May 19), now takes place on a surprise date in spring. Girls enjoy a day without classes and the Oval becomes a carnival-like atmosphere. It always ends with strawberries and ice cream on the Oval. 13 Red Roses Madeira graduates carry 13 red roses on Commencement Day, which symbolize the 13 original students who enrolled in Miss Madeira’s School in 1906. Halloween Parade The Halloween parade around the Oval is a hilarious display of girls and teachers in costume. The tradition dates back to the early 1990s. Thanksgiving Seniors get up in front of the whole school and share what they are thankful for at the All School Meeting prior to Thanksgiving Break. Former Head of School Dr. Elisabeth Griffith instituted the tradition.

Top: 100 Days. 2nd Row, Left: Founder’s Day. Right: 13 Red Roses. 3rd Row, Left: Halloween Parade. Right: Thanksgiving.

We love the Snails Madeira’s Snail mascot dates back to 1968. #HailtheSnail #GoGoEscargots

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LOOKING AHEAD

MADEIRA WOMEN Brave, caring, independent—these

courageous enough to make your

are some of the words that current

voice heard in the most crowded

Madeira students use to describe

room. Biomedical engineer, lawyer,

one another. They are qualities

filmmaker, diplomat, or social

that Madeira women carry with

entrepreneur—whatever career you

them throughout their lives. When

choose, the confidence you build

you graduate from Madeira, you

and the friendships you make here

are marked by a set of skills and

will serve as your foundation. You

attitudes that you share with all

will prove that Madeira takes girls

other Madeira alumnae. You are

and turns them into women who

confident in your abilities and

lead remarkable lives.

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Graduation at Madeira is a celebration of academic achievement and friendship.

“I HAVE FOUND MYSELF AT MADEIRA. EVERYONE WHO COMES HERE WALKS OUT A DIFFERENT PERSON.” SUSAN, A MADEIRA SENIOR

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LOOKING AHEAD

2016 COLLEGE ACCEPTANCES Red text indicates schools where students enrolled.

University of Aberdeen • The University of Alabama • American University • The American University of Paris Appalachian State • Babson College • Bard College • Bard College Berlin • Barnard College • Baylor University Belmont University • Boston College • Boston University • Brandeis University • University of British Columbia Bryn Mawr College • Bucknell University • University of California, Berkeley • University of California, Davis University of California, Irvine • University of California, Los Angeles • University of California, Riverside • University of California, San Diego • Carnegie Mellon University • Centre College • Chapman University • College of Charleston Christopher Newport University • Clark University • Colgate University • University of Colorado at Boulder • Colorado College • University of Connecticut • Cornell University • Dartmouth College • University of Denver • Dickinson College • Drew University • Drexel University • University College Dublin • Duke University • Durham University Eckerd College • University of Edinburgh • Elon University • Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University • Emory University Emory University – Oxford College • Fordham University • Franklin University Switzerland • Furman University • George Mason University • The George Washington University • Georgetown University • Georgia Institute of Technology Greensboro College • Grinnell College • High Point University • Hobart and William Smith Colleges • Howard University University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign • Indiana University at Bloomington • Ithaca College • James Madison University • Johns Hopkins University • University of Kentucky • Kenyon College • Lehigh University • Louisiana State University • Lyndon State College • Macalester University • Marist College • Marquette University • University of Mary Washington • University of Maryland Baltimore County • University of Maryland College Park • McGill University McMaster University • Mercer University • Miami University of Ohio • University of Miami • Michigan State University Millersville University • New York University • University of North Carolina Chapel Hill • North Carolina State University • Northeastern University • Northwestern University • University of Notre Dame • University of Oklahoma Pennsylvania State University • University of Pennsylvania • University of Pittsburgh • Pratt Institute • Purdue University • Queen’s University • University of Redlands • Reed College • Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute • Rhode Island School of Design • Rhodes College • Rice University • Richmond, The American International University in London University of Richmond • Rochester Institute of Technology • University of Rochester • Rollins College • Rutgers University – New Brunswick • Saint Louis University • University of San Francisco • Santa Clara University • Scripps College • Sewanee: University of the South • Skidmore College • Smith College • University of South Carolina Southern California Institute of Architecture • University of Southern California • Southern Methodist University Spelman College • University of St. Andrews • St. Edward’s University • St. Mary’s College of Maryland • Stanford University • Suffolk University • Swarthmore College • Syracuse University • Temple University • Texas Christian University • The Ohio State University • University of Toronto • Trinity College • Tufts University • Tulane University United States Coast Guard Academy • United States Merchant Marine Academy • Ursinus College • University of Vermont • Villanova University • Virginia Military Institute • Virginia Polytechnic Institute • University of Virginia Wake Forest University • Washington College • Washington University in St. Louis • Widener University • College of William & Mary • Williams College • The College of Wooster • Worcester Polytechnic Institute • Yale University

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College counseling starts early at Madeira, so when the time comes to apply to college, you will have a plan built on years of thought and conversation that is sure to evolve as you grow. Madeira seniors have always gained admission to the most highly selective colleges and universities in the country. Madeira graduates also have access to a network of alumnae that is 6,000 members strong.

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Higher

Reaching

6 Madeira alumnae do admirable work in their STEAM careers

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SP

LIGHT O

N

K

N

IN

G

M

O

now

AE

MADEIRA LO

w

OT

AHEAD–A

LU

ith all the talk these days about getting girls interested in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) subjects, one would think this hasn’t already been happening. Of course Madeira has been graduating girls interested in these topics for many decades. Add the letter “A” for “Arts” and a robust STEAM program is in full swing at our school. In this issue of Madeira Today, we’re profiling six alumnae who are making an impact both in our country and abroad with their work in STEAM careers. From Dr. Panithaya Chareonthaitawee ’83, a nuclear cardiologist who heals physical heart problems at the Mayo Clinic, to Holly Lloyd ’85, a special effects technician who creates lighting effects for animated characters to show emotion and movement in feature films at Pixar, these alumnae have great experiences to share in these profiles written by fellow Madeira alumnae. In curating these stories of our accomplished alumnae, some connections were made. Two of the women profiled have worked in Rwanda on major projects: Sharon Saul Davis ’78, an architect, designed and built the Women’s Opportunity Center and Elizabeth Leiter ’02, a documentary filmmaker, is also working in Rwanda on a series of short films that follow girls from a small Rwandan village to college in the United States. Leiter said, when learning about Davis’ building complex, “I’ve been there!” She wasn’t aware it was created by another Madeira alumna, but now wants to connect with Davis to discuss their respective projects. Taylor Ganz ’05 put her engineering degree to work at the National Outdoor Leadership School. She says that while working on a lynx conservation project in Colorado she tapped into her background in science and her experience in the wilderness to travel in high risk terrain where avalanches are frequent. Kim Lytle ’15 just graduated, but already has one patent in her name and two others pending approval with the US Patent and Trademark Office. Now she’s studying at the University of Virginia’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences.

Read on to learn more about these accomplished alumnae>

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Sharon Saul Davis ’78

Sharon Saul Davis is on a Lifelong Process of Discovery BY ROBBIE OXNARD BENT ’83

Sharon Saul Davis ’78 started painting in oils when she was six years old. The daughter and granddaughter of artists, she continued to paint with her mother throughout her childhood and also took watercolor classes each summer, dreaming of being an artist when she grew up. During her four years as a boarding student at Madeira, Davis made art her “main thing.” Sitting in her stunning, sunny architecture studio in the West Village, Davis recalled her Madeira years. “I spent weekends, whole afternoons and evenings in the art studio. By the time I was a senior I was in the studio all of the time. Art was fabulous at Madeira. Marcia Myers was a fantastic teacher as was Alex Castro, the head of the art department. Both were artists in their own right and very inspirational.” In addition, she said, “My English teacher, Ms. Katz, helped me to see how language is a part of art.” Davis thought she was bad at math but her teacher, Captain Mills, disagreed. “For some reason, he was convinced I was great at math and because he was convinced, I actually became good at math. I made it all the way to pre-calculus!” The oldest of five children, Davis was thrilled at the idea of being away from home and cherished her four years at the school. “My closest friends are still from Madeira,” she said. For her senior year Co-Curriculum job, Davis worked at the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History in their design department. “I was working with artists and seeing the cutting edge of design.” She worked on signage for a permanent exhibit called The Atom Smasher. “They had a huge blow up of an architectural drawing silk-screened onto the wall and my job was to stand on a ladder with a paintbrush removing all of the little extraneous marks.” The Co-Curriculum helped instill in Davis a love of volunteering. “Throughout my life, I’ve had so many experiences and made so many relationships I wouldn’t have had if I’d expected to be paid.” She is currently serving on the boards of the Friends of the High Line and the Van Alen Institute for Projects in Public Architecture. Davis majored in Studio Arts at Trinity College and then moved to New York City to paint. After a few months, she “started to lose confidence and momentum.” She was worried she wouldn’t be able to support herself as an artist, so she got a job as a commodity trader at Chemical Bank and began the MBA program at New York University. During this time she also married and started her family. After she graduated from NYU, she worked as an analyst at the New York Venture Fund and then many years later, after her third child was born, she decided to take time away from her career. When she was ready to start working again, she wanted a career change, but wasn’t sure in which direction to go. While on an Outward Bound program for adults in Colorado, Davis realized she wasn’t getting enough intellec-

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tual stimulation in her life. When she returned home she met with a career counselor who had Davis take several tests. “All of them pointed to architecture as a career,” Davis said. “So I took an architecture studio class at Barnard College and was hooked.” Davis made the brave decision to radically switch careers at the age of forty-two. Davis was accepted to the Columbia Graduate School of Architecture, IMAGES LEFT Planning and Preservation. “All of the other students were in their twenAND BELOW ties,” she remembered. “No one was married and no one had a kid. All of LEFT: Sharon Saul Davis; them already knew the technology and I knew none of it. It was very intimRwandan Share Houses, idating.” But Davis went to school full-time and persevered, graduating with Rwinkwavu, Rwanda; Garrison Country her class three years after matriculating. When asked if she wished she’d House, Garrison, NY discovered architecture earlier in her life, she said she has no regrets about BELOW: Women’s her life path. “If I’d gone to graduate school twenty years ago, I would have Opportunity Center, learned a completely different kind of architecture. So there’s a serendipity Kayonza, Rwanda to it.” She said that the earlier career choices she made were “practical in the moment but I held onto my passions and didn’t let go.” She credits Madeira with helping instill in her the courage it took to dramatically shift careers. “I grew up in a traditional family where my mother never worked outside of the home. I don’t know if I would have had the confidence to say ‘I can do it’ or the willingness to gamble and say ‘I’m going to try and do it’ without those years at Madeira. I thank Barbara Kaiser and the other faculty members who were mostly women.” She also had two female mentors who helped during her transition into architecture, both of whom eventually encouraged her to take the leap to become one of a minority of women sole-proprietors of architecture firms in the country. After graduating from Columbia in 2006, Davis launched Sharon Davis Design. “The reason I didn’t go to work with an architecture firm and do the standard three-year internship was to have control over my schedule. My family needed me. Owning my own firm means I have a lot of control—I can scale up or back depending on what’s going on with my family.” Running her own firm also gives her the freedom to take risks in her designs and the ability to take on projects that matter to her. Davis’ first major project was the Women’s Opportunity Center in Rwanda. The design includes eight round classrooms and several larger community buildings with rounded edges, all made of brick. The classrooms, with their suspended roofs angled above the round bases, look like ladybugs as they spread their wings to take flight. When she visited Rwanda during the design process, Davis observed that the women were spending hours every day walking to collect water. So she designed slanted roofs in order to collect rainwater. Future students made the bricks for the buildings using clay from nearby sites. At night, light emanates from trellis-like openings in the brick and the community glows with life. “I wanted to design a place that the women felt was especially for them, that was a welcoming community space.” At the Center, according to Davis’ website, women learn “income-generating skills, such as animal husbandry and processing techniques that can sustain food cooperatives.” The Center has won numerous awards and was named the 2013 Metropolis “Game Changer” in archi-

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tecture. Davis said that for the design, “I was given a huge amount of freedom. I was hired by Women for Women International and it was great having their support all the way through. I can’t believe someone let me build this!” Davis is passionate about the design process. “It’s the most meaningful part of my work,” she said. “To start, I collect as much information as I can about the country’s culture, people and children.” In her research, she talks to people, goes to exhibits and reads literature—fiction, nonfiction, children’s stories and fables. “Then I look at site considerations—What’s the land like? Is it in an earthquake zone? Do they have enough water?” And then she visits. “That’s the most critical thing; seeing their homes, seeing their lives, and hearing their stories. Once I have all of this information, the design slowly comes to me. You keep asking questions until it starts to evolve. It’s a sifting through and then everything comes together in your mind when you sleep—that’s when you process everything. As an artist, you’re putting yourself on the line every time. It’s personal. Every time someone looks at what you’re doing, you feel ‘that’s a part of me.’” Davis laughed thinking about how some people ask her at the start of a project, “What’s it going to look like?” She said, “I have no idea. I have to spend a hundred hours before I know what it will look like. And I love the process of discovery. It’s like being a kid again.” Since the Rwanda project, Davis said, “A lot of the people who call me want to build schools in Africa, but have no money.” And Davis has learned that foundations want to give money to people, not structures. But she believes in the “transformative power of design.” “One of the things I’m working toward now,” she said, “is figuring out a way to measure the difference for students between being in a school that’s a typical African school, and a school with design. We need to prove to foundations that a well-designed structure is doing something for the person. So I’m getting into this side project about how to measure design and the influence it has on the person. Hospitals always do this—they measure the quality of health in the community in the beginning versus five years later. But there are no studies that are numeric. They’re all qualitative. So this will be something totally new.” Davis thrives on new challenges and has clearly found her path in life!

Sharon Davis Design: Garrison Treehouse, left, and Davis House, Garrison, New York

About the author: After graduating from Barnard with honors in English, Robbie Oxnard Bent ’83 took a detour to Goldman Sachs and a Harvard MBA, a jog over to Paris to work in the jewelry industry, and a move to New York to become executive director of The Posse Foundation, her favorite job ever. Posse sends multi-cultural teams (or ‘posses’) of students to college together so that they can act as a support system for one another. Robbie is still involved with Posse as a board member, writing coach and career mentor. A few years ago, she reconnected with her childhood love of reading and writing and went back to school to get an MFA in creative nonfiction writing. She graduated in May and is now working on her book and teaching college writing at SUNY Purchase.

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Panithaya Chareonthaitawee, MD ’83

Panithaya Chareonthaitawee, MD ’83 BY CASEY MEANS, MD ’05

Flexibility. It’s a trait that many of us wish we practiced, but few of us succeed in embodying. Dr. Panithaya Chareonthaitawee has mastered flexibility as a key to great success. As a widely-published researcher, Mayo Clinic’s Nuclear Cardiology Laboratory Director, the Associate Program Director of one of the premier Internal Medicine residency programs in the world, a mother, educator, artist, and former Ivy League Varsity athlete, this Madeira alumna knows that flexibility is a key to staying balanced in the midst of an ultra-busy and high-pressure life. “When I see a patient go through so much, I’ve learned that life can be very short, and can throw you curve balls, and you have to roll with it. In Cardiology, there can be unexpected loss.” Her words to live by? “Don’t take anything for granted, and be flexible.” The daughter of a physician, Dr. Chareonthaitawee grew up in Thailand until the age of 10, and then moved to Denmark. When her grandmother died and her mother had to return home to care for her grandfather, she was given the option to try boarding school. When looking at high school programs, “Co-Curriculum caught my eye. It totally blew my mind. I applied, got in, and came over with a suitcase. That was the beginning. It wasn’t necessarily an easy experience, but it taught me a lot.” When she came to Madeira as an international student, she was initially interested in politics and art, and so the junior year Capitol Hill experience and participation in Model UN were highlights of her time at the school. As a senior, she went on to work at the Museum of Natural History putting together museum exhibits. “I was working down under in the basement of the museum. It was amazing. It allowed me to feel comfortable working with different groups of people. What ultimately came out of that was the knowledge that I like to work with people and to help people.” Of Co-Curriculum, she says: “To know what you’re going to like to do, you have to try it.” Despite a passion for the Humanities, she was destined to take a different route. “My dad was a physician, so I had some interest in that, but I wanted to explore other areas as well. I gave it a good try, but came back around and decided to explore medicine. As a student at Columbia, I did some volunteer work and research at a hospital and decided I wanted to do pre-med, and I haven’t looked back.” At Columbia, she was on the Varsity volleyball team, while also pursuing the notoriously brutal pre-medical curriculum. “Madeira prepared me very well for that rigorous environment, and having to find a balance between work and play.”

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This balance is something she still excels at. She finds time to stay active and spend time with her daughters, and although she has transitioned from “creating art to art appreciation,” she still “loves to paint, and my kids and I will sometimes paint together just for fun.” Her daughters, ages 14 and 16, are her first priority. “Family always comes first. It’s a fine balance to make that happen, and I can’t say it’s been easy. I do a lot of multitasking. When looking for jobs, it’s important to consider whether there is a culture of collegiality. We have that at Mayo. You have to evaluate whether the practice, the colleagues, and the institution are willing to work together. I help my colleagues out when they need help and vice versa. Because I have different professional roles—clinician, educator, researcher, and administrator, most of which are not 9am–5pm—I work hard and need flexibility. You have to love what you are doing. If you don’t love what you do, the entire family will suffer.” Her daughters have grown up hearing about the Madeira experience, and have had a chance to try it out for themselves. This past summer, one of her daughters participated in a fashion camp for two weeks, part of Madeira’s “Girls First” program, during which girls learn design and hands-on sewing, go to art museums downtown, and even interview people in malls about what fashion inspires them. “My daughter made a whole dress, and had never before used a sewing machine.” Of the experience of returning to Madeira after 30 years, she says, “I went back to visit her [during Girls First] and it was amazing. What was most surprising was what is still the same. It had the same feeling of being remote and far away, but still so close to DC at the same time. There are so many opportunities.” These days, Dr. Chareonthaitawee estimates that she spends the majority of her professional time seeing patients and doing nuclear cardiology procedures, and the rest of her time as Associate Program Director overseeing more than 175 Internal Medicine residents, directing the Nuclear Cardiology Laboratory, helping out with the Cardiology Fellowship, and research. Aside from this, she has served as faculty in over 50 national and international meetings, co-authored over 90 scientific papers and abstracts, book chapters, editorials, and review articles, and is the Vice President Elect of the Board of Directors of the Cardiovascular Council of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. Describing her field of Nuclear Cardiology, she says: “In essence it’s the opposite of x-ray, where x-ray is radiation coming from outside the patient; in nuclear, radiation is coming from inside the patient. [Radioactive tracer] collects in the heart, and we use a special camera and computer programs to interpret the image. We are mainly looking at blood flow to the heart, for blockage of the heart arteries, and whether the heart muscle is alive.” Unfortunately, with Cardiology, “there will always be patients. There is never a paucity of heart disease.” Her route to this highly specialized career started at Columbia, then took her to Northwestern Medical School for four years, Mayo Clinic for six years of Internal Medicine Residency and Cardiology Fellowship, and then to the Imperial College School of Medicine in London to pursue additional training in Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography. For Madeira girls considering a career in medicine, she notes that it would be a good idea to spend some time with a physician and see what they do every day, and see the good and the bad. With a career in medicine, “even though it’s a long road, the rewards are so great. You get to help people every day. You guide people toward their objective and goals, and do research which helps in a more global sense.” As for helping people, this is something Dr. Chareonthaitawee is doing in every role she takes on. Juggling a variety of roles, she maintains an exceptionally positive attitude and energy that radiates through the phone during our conversation. Certainly, Dr. Chareonthaitawee deftly embodies the kind of life that a Madeira education inspires its girls to live: a life of service, leadership, intellectual discovery, and balance.

About the author: Casey Means, MD, graduated from Madeira in 2005 and went on to complete college and medical school at Stanford University. She is in her 2nd year as an Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery resident in Portland, Oregon. In addition to research manuscripts, she has published short stories and poetry about practicing medicine, most recently a poem entitled “C-Section” in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

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Holly Lloyd ’85

At Pixar, Holly Lloyd ‘85 helps light the way BY MEGHAN LASLOCKY ’85

A Pixar film is visual perfection. Each story takes us to new aesthetic heights, as with the glint and dazzle of Merida’s hair and her bear-mother’s fur in Brave, the warm glow of Paris in Ratatouille, and most recently, the luminescence of the character Joy in Inside Out. The breathtaking lighting that has become the hallmark of Pixar films is attributable to lighting technical directors like Holly Lloyd ’85, who has worked at Pixar since 1996. “I always describe it to my parents as putting frosting on the cake,” she says. “Other people have worked so hard creating these beautifully intricate worlds for you to light. You get to make them look beautiful. You’re showing off all the hard work that so many people have done before you.” At Pixar, lighting happens near the tail end of a long, linear production process, one that starts with many iterations in terms of script-writing and narrative storytelling, and then meanders from drawing for art and story through the technical disciplines that center around cinematography, modeling, shading, animation, special effects, lighting, and rendering. The process is remarkably chaotic given the end result. “It’s a very messy process,” Holly says. “Because the film is this shining, beautiful object at the end, you get the impression that it’s this finely-honed machine creating it for four years. For the first two years, even the story is constantly rewritten and rearranged, exploded and put back together. Various components are thrown back and forth among departments, and everyone has to contend with technical bugs. It’s not pretty. But it’s only by everyone hammering on it that it turns out so well.”

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Holly attributes some of her success on the job to her tenacity—her willingness to sit in her office and debug the process. Indeed, she says, her work is about 60 percent “geek time”, requiring constant fiddling with elaborate digital lighting tools. The remaining 40 percent is making art. “The goal in film lighting is to focus the viewer’s eye,” says Holly, “and make sure that the story-point that the director is trying to get across in that particular scene is communicated visually.” Lighting uses color, value and composition to achieve that goal. When working on Monsters Incorporated and Finding Nemo, Holly would spend hours at a time in a dark room with a director of photography (the head of lighting at Pixar) reviewing lighting in a particular film sequence. “They would give me notes, like, ‘Can you make this a little more blue, can you make this a little more red, can you make this cooler or warmer.’ My job would then be to parse that language to fulfill the director’s vision, and by proxy the director of photography’s vision, for the mood of that scene.” That, she says, is a challenge because everyone’s perception of color is subjective. After working on several feature films, and short films in between (which are her favorites), Holly became a technical director in the Marketing/Creative Services department at Pixar which has more family-friendly hours than in production. Holly’s professional background, pre-Pixar, was in architecture and journalism. She has an undergraduate degree in architecture from Princeton and a Masters in Journalism from Stanford, and early in her career, she worked at architecture firms and for magazines. At Pixar, she says, those early interests inform her work. “Pixar offered this wonderful combination of the storytelling I loved in journalism and the building of actual things that I enjoyed in architecture and 3-D design,” she says. And even earlier, during her time at Madeira, she was very interested in art. She remembers working on an AP Art project for Marcia Myers, who taught at Madeira from 1973– 1989. It was what she now calls a “super-noodly” color study in a geometric pattern, and she stayed up until midnight for weeks working on it. “I remember being super obsessed with that, and it often reminds me of the type of work that I do now, where I’m obsessing over tiny little details of color and value and light.”

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But she notes that back then, she had no idea that one could make a living as a technical artist, coming as she did from a family of doctors and lawyers and diplomats. “I had no concept you could support yourself with a creative existence. I had no role models for that,” she says. Now, more than twenty years into her career at Pixar, Holly makes a point of being a mentor, particularly for girls and young women, and harnessing Pixar’s cultural power to do good things for women within the context of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) initiatives. She’s coordinated a mentorship program with the Julia Morgan School for Girls, a private middle school in Oakland that connects girls with female technical directors like herself and exposes them to the nitty gritty of the actual work. “I always show them the software I use and the pictures I’m making,” she says. “It makes it more real than the jargon the kids get on a more superficial tour of Pixar. Showing girls early on what these jobs really look like is crucial. I want to make sure that they know that these jobs exist.” Pixar sponsored a 7-week “Girls Who Code” summer immersion program last summer, which introduced about 25 girls to computer science and taught them about everything from robotics to web design to mobile app development. Holly hopes to extend that corporate mentorship to the organization Black Girls Code which is based in Oakland near where she lives. She’s also been very involved in “The Science Behind Pixar,” an exhibit at the Museum of Science in Boston, working with Pixar’s in-house documentary film crew and providing them with imagery and animation to help explain and demystify Pixar’s filmmaking process from a technical perspective. This imagery has also been used for “Pixar in a Box,” a partnership with Khan Academy, a free online resource that in this case shows students how math concepts they learn in school are connected to the creative challenges Pixar technical directors face every day. In addition to sharing with girls just what she and other women at Pixar do, Holly makes a point of communicating what it takes to succeed, and what women have to offer. “I tell them not to be intimidated, and that to be a technical director, you have to be very stubborn about problem-solving. When you’re debugging something, for example, you need to be really tenacious about wanting to solve the problem. Sometimes, though, you need to reach out for help and not be too proud to ask for help. That’s something women do really well in this sphere: collaborate to problem-solve. Young women who learn all these skills in school, like I did at Madeira, can build on that in their technical careers.” Women now make up only 20 percent of Pixar’s technical director workforce. But Holly hopes with outreach and education to girls, plus recruiting and mentoring, that will change dramatically in the next ten years.

About the author: Meghan Laslocky ’85 is a writer, editor, and producer living in the Bay Area. She is author of The Little Book of Heartbreak: Love Gone Wrong Through the Ages (Plume/Penguin).

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Elizabeth Leiter ’02

Elizabeth Leiter, Seeing the World in Full Color BY KATHERINE OXNARD ELLIS ’82

Elizabeth Leiter, class of 2002, isn’t afraid to admit when her perceptions turn out wrong—which makes her a filmmaker to keep your eyes on. If you ask most people what they like best about adulthood, they’ll probably say competence. Most of us can’t wait to shed the discomfort of ignorance — the awkwardness of being the newbie. And then there’s Elizabeth Leiter. When we talked by phone, this remarkable young filmmaker told me again and again how interviewing people on camera meant having her assumptions repeatedly blown to bits. It happened on Leiter’s very first film shoot, the Academy Award-nominated documentary “God Is the Bigger Elvis,” about a group of Catholic nuns in a New York abbey. “I had a lot of preconceived ideas, like, why would any body become a nun in this day and age?” Leiter sheepishly admits, but went on to say “These women were bright, caring and conscientious. So I found that I respected their way of life — the way they interact with the world.” Amazingly, Leiter discovered that one of the nuns, Mother Margaret Georgina Patton, was a Madeira graduate — and that they shared a familial connection. “Her grandfather was general George Patton, and my grandmother was General George Patton’s masseuse,” Leiter says, clearly awed by the connection. In fact, Leiter’s view of the cloistered life was so upended, she has even returned to the Abbey of Regina Laudis for a personal retreat. Next came an HBO documentary and then a television series with Lisa Ling on OWN (Oprah Winfrey’s network) and later CNN. The topics ranged from the perils of working as a confidential informant to the heartbreak that families of killers experience. One episode in particular, about female strippers, reminded Leiter to check her judgment at the door. “I thought I understood the dynamic of a strip club — and I did on a superficial level,” she admits. “But it exposed me to the push-pull between money and power and sex. The world is always much more gray when you pull back the layers.” A dancer with academic aspirations impressed Leiter deeply. “She’s in her forties, has her masters in creative writing and wants to become a professor. She has seen so much of humanity, and it’s this well for her writing. I really respect her — that’s how she put herself through school. It exposed my own biases that all women who do it are bad, or that they got forced into it. I even met a few that truly liked it.”

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The willingness of Ling’s subjects to reveal themselves on camera also taught Leiter the power of nonfiction storytelling. “When you’re working on a documentary,” she explains, “you get a backstage pass into somebody’s life. Whether you’re filming somebody going through chemo, or talking to their lawyer about their child’s death — it stuns me every time.” Those moments are gifts she never takes for granted. “A mentor [told] me this is something to be extremely appreciative of,” she says, “because it’s magic. It’s not scripted. Nobody asked them to stand where they’re standing, IMAGES BELOW: or say what they’re saying. You’re watching pure human experience happen right Leiter, right, in front of you.” with Lisa Ling, Leiter’s next project fused that passion with a love of travel, especially in center, and Africa, where she lived after college. Teaching reproductive health and dancers from the “Road Strip” HIV/AIDS education to women in Tanzania, Leiter found herself “washing episode of the clothes by hand, soaking beans for 12 hours before I cook them, building my own series This is Life fire. But I get to go back to the States, go out to dinner and use a washing with Lisa Ling machine. And I realized how manual labor takes women out of the civic world — on CNN. why women aren’t prime ministers. They’re busy doing really hard work. But I loved it so much. Anytime I get to go to Africa for work, I’m on cloud nine.” She got her wish in 2014, when she was hired as a director, producer and writer of a short documentary seemingly tailor-made for her: “Girls of Gashora.” The film follows Rwandan students at a girls’ boarding school for several years before they eventually leave for US colleges. “These young women were born in the year after the genocide,” Leiter explains. “So I could never say that I completely relate. But I could empathize with how big this life change was going to be [for them].” She has since filmed several students as they’ve transitioned onto American college campuses. “I’m so grateful to be able to go back and hang with them.” Leiter laughs, adding, “It’s one of the most fun projects I’ve done.” That sense of fun through sisterhood harkens back to her days at Madeira, when she, Biz Wells, and Caitlin Elmore Limoncello (both Madeira class of 2002) made “little study videos of funnier aspects of American history. We thought John C. Calhoun’s hair looked crazy, so we did a skit about how he [stuck] his finger in an electrical socket, [then] we made our friend’s hair stand up. Silly stuff,” she admits. But as another Madeira friend, Susie Colley (also Madeira class of 2002) recently reminded her, “That was [my] first foray into filmmaking!” After graduation she studied art history and modern history at St. Andrews University in Scotland, but an interest in film “was always there. Still, I remember thinking, I’ve missed the boat — you probably have to study this in college.” It was Colley who changed the course of Leiter’s life with a phone call. After Tanzania, Leiter “couldn’t get a job in [international] development for love or money. Susie had worked for one of Bill Moyers’ PBS shows, so they asked her, ‘Do you know anybody who would like to intern?” I thought, I’m too old to intern — I’m 24! But I took that internship, and it turned into being a production assistant for the Moyers show Faces of America.” On her very first shoot, Leiter got to work with none other than Academy Award-winning actress Meryl Streep. “When that ended, I didn’t know that this [would] keep panning out. But it did, and now I’ve been doing it for six years. And I’m very grateful that it did.” She has taken that gratitude to shoots all over the world: Lebanon, Peru, Rwanda (twice), Somaliland and India, to name a few. “I love love love working internationally,” she confesses, “but the language barrier is intense, most importantly for the emotional connection. In more conservative parts of the world,

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Leiter’s short documentary: The Girls of Gashora–College Bound www.youtube.com/watch?v= UERFcsyavE4

though, women are still incredibly friendly and physically warm. It’s important to give hugs and eye contact, so they understand you’re really there and want to get to know them.” One experience stands out for Leiter as especially grueling but rewarding: a project for OWN’s Belief series, filming Syrian refugees in Lebanon. “It was was my first international shoot, and it was Ramadan, so we couldn’t eat or drink publicly. And as a woman, covering your head [when] it’s very hot can be challenging. But it’s important to be respectful of the culture, especially if you want to ask people about the private and dramatic aspects of their life.” The logistics were challenging. “We had to get permission from Hezbollah — and that’s not easy.” She sighs. “They do not take kindly to the western media. They were tracking us. We had little burner cell phones. You don’t have internet access. Electricity and water is going on and off. As soon as we started driving out to the mountains, I [thought], if something goes wrong, it’s gonna go really, really wrong.” Again, Leiter marvels at how the experience turned her views upside down. “The women refugees were some of the nicest I’ve ever seen,” she says. “Greeting me with hugs and kisses, always offering tea and coffee — even though they could not drink any. Incredible kindness.” When the women asked how the shoot would help them, Leiter had to weigh her response. “It is a sticky situation,” she says, “the ethical line of a journalist. You want to give people hope that what they’re doing could have some impact. But there’s something important about saying, “We see you suffering. We are sorry for your suffering. And we’ll take that back and tell other people.” Indeed, that program had the chance to have an impact when it aired on OWN in October 2015. With multiple television shows, documentary films and commercials under her belt, Leiter hopes to launch her own projects in the near future. She certainly has the self-confidence and the chutzpah, qualities she says she gained at Madeira. “I was so lucky to be educated at Madeira. I was around strong women; I was told to just be myself and I was allowed to come into my own. I don’t think a lot of young women grow up hearing that. And it impacted me in college, where I wasn’t afraid to say what I thought. And it propelled me to go do other things.” Asked what advice she might offer women interested in a film career, she does not focus on the technical side. Instead, she feels that “life experience is very important. Seeing the world in full color is very important. Being engaged with the world around you is very important. So the more experiences you have, the better.” Despite her growing expertise, Elizabeth Leiter will probably always look at her subjects with freshness, curiosity, and a willingness to admit that she doesn’t know everything — that, in fact, her assumptions could be dead wrong. I, for one, can’t wait to see what she discovers next.

About the author: K. W. Oxnard has written and edited professionally since 1989. Since then her nonfiction has appeared in publications such as Women Outside, Canoe & Kayak, MaineBiz, fusion, Longevity, Career Insights, Women’s Sports + Fitness, Hooked on the Outdoors, Savannah, South and Georgia Public Broadcasting’s Georgia Gazette. She holds an MFA in Fiction Writing from New York University, and her short stories have been published in literary magazines such as Story, TatlinsTower.com, GlobalGraffMag.com and Reed. She was the co-editor of the 2002 edition of Maine: An Explorer’s Guide, and her fiction and essays have appeared in several anthologies, including the essay “Babyquest” in DESIRE: Women Write About Wanting from Seal Press; a short story, “Latitudes,” in NOT WHAT I EXPECTED: The Unpredictable Road from Womanhood to Motherhood by Paycock Press; and the essay “Livin’ Like Larry” in TEXTING: Clear Communications for Various Contexts. Oxnard writes a regular op-ed column for the Savannah Morning News. In 2004 she returned to her hometown of Savannah, Georgia, where she is working on her first documentary film. She lives near downtown Savannah in a 1927 Arts & Crafts home with her husband, two stepchildren and a crazy 13-year-old Pomeranian.

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Taylor Ganz ‘05

Engineering an Outdoor Career BY LAURA TEMPLE, MADEIRA TODAY EDITOR

Anyone who knows Taylor Ganz (Madeira class of 2005) won’t be surprised to read that she drafted her graduate school application by headlamp from inside a snow cave in Wyoming. “Actually, living in a snow cave is incredibly comfortable,” she says. In her training for the work she does with National Outdoor Leadership School (NOLS), she had to learn the skills necessary to go out and work in the wilderness without getting into a survival situation. “Planning skills are extremely important,” says Ganz. After graduating from Madeira, Ganz earned a BS in Mechanical Engineering as part of a “threetwo” engineering program. She started at Lewis and Clark College with a three-year Physics major and finished the final two years at University of Southern California with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. While all her college classmates were interning at big aerospace and defense companies, all Ganz could think about was how to engineer her life so she could work outdoors. “Throughout my college summers, I worked as a horse packer, a wilderness ranger, a fly-fishing guide and an alpine climbing guide. When I was 21 years old, I was going on solo week-long backpacking trips as a wilderness ranger to monitor and inventory the High Sierra. I really do like to be outdoors,” she says. When she graduated from college, Ganz found a position at NOLS as a research and curriculum intern, but was in that position for just a few months before taking a course to become a field instructor. For more than four years now she’s been a field instructor for NOLS. “The great thing about the schedule is that I work about 20–25 weeks full time—that means I work up to 90 days straight, but then have a nice period of time off to explore or travel,” Ganz says. Ganz explained that one winter she worked for US Forest Service’s Rocky Mountain Research Station on a lynx conservation project for which she got to tie together her background in science, experience in the wilderness, and ability to travel in high-risk terrain where avalanches are frequent. The study area was outside of Telluride, Colorado, and there were two components to the project. One team would go out and trap and fit the lynx with GPS collars. Then the lynx’s GPS tracks were mapped on a spatial and temporal scale to show how and where they traveled in the San Juan Mountains. The other part of the project was a team who would go out and give back-country travelers such as snowshoers, Nordic skiers, and snowmobilers GPS devices to track where they went. Overlaying the

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recreation data on the lynx map allowed researchers to see if people being in the back country at certain times were impacting how the lynx traveled. “What’s really interesting about these studies, although the technique is fairly new and little has been published yet,” she says, “is that typically a lot of wildlife are less impacted by people in the backcountry than we might have thought.” Ganz says that she has always enjoyed looking at the world from a scientific perspective and has clear memories of her mother and Mrs. Pratt conspiring to get her into AP Physics class at Madeira. “I remember Mrs. Pratt being so excited about physics and getting us to look at something that impacted our everyday lives,” she says. Ganz had grown up in Los Angeles prior to boarding at Madeira for high school. She was not excited about going to high school in Los Angeles, and her parents were supportive of her interest in finding a boarding school that had an equestrian program, as she enjoyed riding. “When I came to Madeira, I loved the supportive environment. My parents liked it because there were strong academics in addition to the equestrian program. I think we just loved the sense of community that was here, which I feel like hasn’t changed since I graduated,” Ganz says. Transitioning from Madeira to college was easy for Ganz. “I got to college and actually felt underwhelmed,” she says. “So many of my classmates were learning how to live on their own for the first time; they were learning how to do laundry and meet those basic time management skills. I already had so much of that under my belt, so my first semester was not particularly challenging.” Extra time allowed her to explore outdoor sports, which have been a significant part of her life. When asked what advice she would give to a current Madeira girl approaching science, math, or engineering as subjects or as a career, Ganz says, “Just go for it and find out what excites you. There are so many things that I now realize are career opportunities that I didn’t know were out there when I was at Madeira or even when I was in college. Find ways to make science relevant to you and to what you are interested in, and understand that it is everywhere.” Ganz is not yet finished with her formal education. This year she began a graduate program at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies for a research-based master’s degree in Environmental Science. Her long-term goal is to use science and research as a catalyst for changing policy around water management in the west, and informing land management decisions. “I think I would like to focus on using watershed and stream restoration as a tool for conservation,” she says. We couldn’t end the interview without asking Ganz to share an example of “Function in disaster, finish in style.” She shared this experience: “Working in a wilderness environment, you always know something is going to happen, you just don’t know what it’s going to be. My first time as the lead instructor on a course was on a threeweek expedition into the Wind River Mountains in Wyoming. On day three, we had a student who had a medical emergency; he had complete and total memory loss—Global Transient Amnesia—and we had to organize a helicopter evacuation out of the wilderness from a satellite phone. I was cutting in and out of reception the entire time. To make matters worse, there was a pattern of really terrible weather every afternoon—big thunderstorms—so we didn’t know if we would be able to land a helicopter. When we finally did get a helicopter, they could only land two miles away from where we were because of the rough terrain. We had to build enough trust with this student to lead him through two miles of off-trail travel. This was despite the fact that he didn’t know where he was or who we were. In the wilderness you have limited resources, but you figure out how to work together and what unique skills you each bring to the table. In the end you work together as a team to function in disaster and finish in style.”

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Kim Lytle’15

Kim Lytle, Passion From a Young Age Blossoms BY KATHERINE KIES ’07

It is rare from such a young age to know exactly what you want to do with your life and it is even rarer to be able to pursue it at a young age. With Kim Lytle ’15, this is exactly the case and she has continued to pursue that same passion and transform it into well-conceived long-term career goals. It all began when Kim was seven years old and she was one of many kids struggling to master the two-wheeler. However, unlike many of her fellow seven year olds, she did not just cry, walk away or continue to scrape those knees trying to learn, Kim worked on an invention to aid the process. She knew there had to be a better way to learn and so she invented a mechanism that monitors the balance of the bike and when it starts to tilt too far to one side, training wheels are deployed. However, she not only conceived the idea for the mechanism but she also submitted it for a patent. This process took 3 years but she eventually succeeded in gaining her first patent —through this experience an inventor was born! Kim’s parents have played a critical role in fostering Kim’s passion and curiosity from a young age. Both scientists by training and her dad also a patent attorney, they supported her interest in problem solving and inventions, and helped take this interest to the next level through the patent process. Since her first patent for the bicycle, Kim has submitted two other patents which are currently pending approval. An impressive record for someone just 18 years old. One patent is an enhancement to her bicycle mechanism allowing sensor software to learn the child’s habits and adapt through the training process. The second enhancement is a device to assist with hearing impairment. Kim has a family history with hearing impairment at a young age and she saw a need to assist children with this issue. She developed a stationary device that would sit in the child’s room and when it hears another voice speaking, it will repeat what the voice is saying but amplify the sound. This allows for children to clearly hear what is being said and not be left confused and feeling disengaged. Kim is observant and articulate, which has allowed her to take everyday problems and create adaptive solutions to resolve these issues. Kim’s dedication to engineering continued on a well-defined path at Madeira. She pursued a science and math-heavy course load through Madeira’s STEAM program, including AP Computer Programming, an iPad development course, AP Computer Sciences, AP Physics, AB and BC Calculus and more. She particularly credits Ms. Pratt, Ms. Wright, Ms. Roshan, and Mr. Hernandez as being remarkably impactful in her Madeira experience for their dedication to teaching and allowing her to pursue her passion in and out of the classroom.

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One of her most notable experiences was participating in a one day competition at the University of Maryland with the Computer Programming Club. Their faculty representative, Ms. Wright, entered the team into a computer programming competition. The theme of the competition was the Big Six Hero and all the problems for the day were centered on this. While they did not win that day, Kim said there were a couple things that made this so remarkable for her. One, they were the only all-girls team, and it did not deter one member of her team one bit. Two, none of the team had ever participated in a competition like this, so they had to strategize on the best way to divide skill sets and tackle each problem. Kim noted there was definitely some adapting that occurred throughout the day to better handle the challenges and time limits. Three, Ms. Wright had sought out this opportunity for the team and taken her Saturday to drive the team to University of Maryland to participate. This is a perfect example of continuing learning out of the classroom and how the little things can truly have the biggest impact. Kim’s second most impactful Madeira experience also occurred out of the classroom during the Co-Curriculum program. Her senior year, she worked for Network Designs, Inc., also known as NetDes, an IT contractor. Through this internship, she was exposed to a lot of different sides of the IT work they did and even got to get her hands dirty cloning hardware for Lenovo computers. Kim also extended her curiosity beyond engineering at Madeira. During her time there she competed in volleyball, squash, softball, karate, and horseback riding. She also learned classical guitar and was captain of the red team. Kim’s dedication in and out of the classroom, combined with her thoughtful and well-articulated career goals, earned her the PINK award her junior year at Madeira. The PINK award is awarded to one student each year who demonstrates passion and drive toward a well-defined career path and includes a cash prize to help pursue it. In Kim’s case, she used it to file for her last two patents. This is just another example of the passion Kim has embodied through her life and time at Madeira. Kim graduated having thrived on all the enrichment Madeira had to offer and funneling it toward her future career goals. Kim now attends the University of Virginia’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences where she has chosen to live in the International Residential Housing to broaden her cultural experience at UVA. Through her UVA education, she hopes to pursue an internship at the US Patent and Trademark office and then eventually attend law school so that she can become a patent attorney and consult with inventors on their patent ideas. Needless to say, Kim has well-defined goals, just as she had at a young age, and she will continue to achieve them with the same determination that has gotten her to this point. Like many Madeira graduates, Kim Lytle has a bright future ahead full of endless opportunities, but her dedication to her passion and her demonstrated ambition will allow her to excel in ways even she may not be able to fathom yet. Kim may be early on in her career but she has a clear path ahead and many successes in her future. About the author: Katherine Kies graduated in 2007 from Madeira and continued on to Cornell’s School of Hotel Administration to pursue her passion for hospitality and Food and Beverage (F&B). Similar to Kim, Katherine has known for a long time the field she wanted to pursue and Madeira helped to foster that passion. After completing her BS in Hotel Administration with a minor in interior design, Katherine worked for an F&B consulting company in NYC. Most recently she has joined a hotel company as their Corporate F&B Manager where she oversees the F&B operations of 31 hotels across the country. She splits her time between NYC and DC for work. And, when she is not working you can find her exploring new food spots, baking, traveling or training for her first marathon!

For more details, links to web pages/projects about these alumnae visit madeira.org/STEA M_alumnae 46 MADEIRA ADMISSIONS


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Campus Events FA M I LY W E E K E N D

OCTOBER 9–10, 2015

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P H OTOS: 1. Madeira girls cheering on the Snails 2. Delaney Flaesch ’16 enjoying campus with her family 3. Abigail ’17, Betsy and Charles Stephenson P’16,’17 4 . Lenier Johnson P’18 and Cynthia Knight 5. Sinclaire ’17, Tyree and Melanie Jones P’17 6 . George and Peggy Sotos P’11,’17 and Madison ’17 7. Pam Fairchild ’80, P’16 and Elizabeth Leslie ’16 8. Family Weekend All School Meeting Panelists, Katherine Lee ’07, Stephanie Volk ’03, Jenny Enos Hurst ’06, and Stephanie Bednarek ’03 9. Christine Lee ’17 enjoying campus with her family 10. Nkem ’19 and Onochie Haffner P’18,’19

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ANNE FOREST BUTLER ’18 With a love of science, sports and music, Anne Forrest Butler has found a home away from home as a boarding student at Madeira. The Charlotte, North Carolina sophomore sat down with us to answer 13 questions about school, family, friends, and of course, Madeira!

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Do you have any siblings? Yes, I have two younger sisters named Cricket and Roane. Cricket is in 8th grade and Roane is in 5th grade.

2.

Do you have any pets at home in North Carolina? Yes, I have a puppy dog named Winston. He is a Boston terrier/French bulldog mix and he is deaf; my family had to teach him sign language.

3.

What are 3 words you would use to describe Madeira? Challenging. Supportive. Exciting.

4.

Why did you choose Madeira? I chose Madeira because I loved the vibe it gave off. When I visited Madeira, the girls were all very friendly, but they also seemed confident and smart.

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Winston Butler

5.

Why do you like going to an all-girls’ school? Classes in an allgirls’ school are so much better then in co-ed schools. Girls are so much more focused in class, and they learn so much more.

6.

What is the best part of being a boarder? Living with your friends; honestly, the girls in my dorm are the closest friends I've ever had and I consider them sisters.

What is the best thing about living and/or going to school near DC? There is so much to do! On the weekends my friends and I have a blast shopping and eating in Georgetown, being touristy and visiting museums in D.C., and going to watch movies at Tysons mall.

8.

What activities, sports, and clubs are you involved in? How have these activities enriched your Madeira experience? I played field hockey and lacrosse last year and this year, too! I became really close with the girls on both teams, and it was really fun. I also play the violin in the orchestra, and I am involved in a new club called WIP, which is a workout/healthy living club that my friend and I started.


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Calleva Farms

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Where is your sophomore year Co-Curriculum placement, and what do you do there? I’m at Calleva Farms for my placement this year and it’s super fun! We get to feed animals, plant fruits and vegetables, and tend the gardens. Basically, you get to be a farmer for five weeks.

9.

It must have been exciting to win the PINK Award. Can you tell us what you used the prize money to pursue? Yes, it was so exciting to win the PINK Award, especially as a freshman! I used my PINK Award money to attend a week-long summer camp at UNC, where I got to learn about this really cool open-source electronic board called in Arduino. Then after the camp, I used the rest of my Pink Award money to purchase an Arduino Robotic kit, and I built my own robot that is powered and programed by an Arduino. (Editor’s note: PINK stands for Passion, INitiative, and Knowledge. It is awarded to one girl each year so that she may pursue a passion.)

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Describe your favorite Madeira memory. One beautiful, sunny weekend last spring, my friends and I decided to have a picnic on the Oval, and it was one of those amazing days I will never forget.

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What is your favorite Madeira tradition and why? I love the ringing of the senior bell. Whenever I hear it I always think about how one day I’m going to be a senior.

13.

What is one piece of advice you would give a student who is interested in attending Madeira? You should definitely come to sit in a class, meet some real Madeira girls, and see how beautiful the campus is!

MADEIRA ADMISSIONS

49


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QUICK FACTS HISTORY

ACADEMICS

STUDENT LIFE

Lucy Madeira founded The Madeira School in the Dupont Circle neighborhood of Washington, D.C., in 1906. The school moved to its current location 12 miles northwest of the District in 1931. Head of School Pilar Cabeza de Vaca appointed in 2010.

• Curricular integration across science, technology, arts, and mathematics and literature, history, and world languages

• Around 100 student-run clubs and activities • Opportunities to gain leadership experience through student government, community service, yearbook, and more

• Co-Curriculum emphasizing real-world experience and applied learning

• Six dormitories housing around 25 students each and a House Adult

• 19 AP courses as well as college-level mathematics beyond AP calculus

LOCATION AND CAMPUS

• A 376-acre campus in McLean, Virginia, 15 minutes from Washington, D.C.

• Expansive Student Center with lounge area, pool table, and basement with snack bar, mail room, and lockers for day students

CO-CURRICULUM

• Encompasses a student center, classroom buildings, art and dance studios, dormitories and faculty housing, a 590-seat auditorium, indoor and outdoor athletic facilities, playing fields, horse stable, and a ropes challenge course

Madeira’s Co-Curriculum Program, winner of the prestigious National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS) 2003 Leading Edge Award, is now almost 50 years old. This comprehensive service-learning program stands alone in secondary education, providing opportunities for volunteerism and internships similar to those offered at colleges and universities. The objectives of the Co-Curriculum Program are threefold: to provide internship opportunities in government, health care, education and the private sector, taking advantage of Madeira’s proximity to Washington, D.C.; to foster in students an appreciation of and exposure to volunteerism; and to allow a Madeira student to pursue her unique interests and passions while being aware of the needs of both the local and global communities.

• Overlooks the Potomac River STUDENTS

• 315 students (in 2015) from 14 countries and 20 states plus the District of Columbia • 53% boarding students • 47% day students • 31% students of color • 15% international students FACULTY

• Dining Hall serving three meals each day for boarding and day students FINANCIAL AID

• Madeira grants nearly $3,000,000 in financial aid annually • Merit scholarships are also available to limited number of applicants

ATHLETICS

• 34 faculty members

• 12 interscholastic team sports include cross country, field hockey, soccer, volleyball, tennis, basketball, squash, swimming and diving, lacrosse, softball, and track and field

• Student-faculty ratio of 9:1 • 28 teachers with master’s degrees or higher • 38 units of housing for faculty/staff

• Competitive horseback riding in all seasons • Independent School League (ISL) competition

COME FOR A VISIT OPEN HOUSES

270

832 8 GEORGETOWN PIKE

MARYLAND 495

McLEAN VA 22102- 1200

National Institutes of Health

Great Falls Park

703-556-82 7 3

www.madeira.org

These events provide a great introduction to Madeira’s program and community. They include a brief presentation and a campus tour.

Bethesda

TOURS AND INTERVIEWS G EO R

McLean

WASHINGTON, D.C.

HIN

S ROAD

GTO

AC CES

AS

ES

W

DU L L

GE

N

Dulles International Airport

EM

Georgetown

M

O

RI

A

L R PA

Tysons Corner

AY KW

Kennedy Center

Applicants and a parent/guardian are required to have an interview with an admission representative. During your visit you will also have an opportunity to tour the campus with a current student. These visits must be arranged in advance.

VIRGINIA White House & National Mall

66

Pentagon 66

495

Arlington

395

2 miles

Ronald Reagan National Airport

Alexandria

MADEIRA EVENTS

We encourage you to visit the campus for events open to the public, such as a play, a concert, or an athletic event. Contact us at 703-556-8273 to schedule a tour and interview as part of the application process. For directions, an events calendar, and more, visit us online: www.madeira.org

Madeira Today - Admission Edition  

Spring 2016

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