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WINTER 2019

8328 GEORGETOWN PIKE M C L E A N VA 2 2 1 0 2 - 12 0 0

MADEIRA TODAY

HBP FSC GOES HERE

Reunite with fellow alumnae at upcoming events NEW YORK CITY, NY

SAN FRANCISCO, CA

HOUSTON, TX

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

MARCH 17, 2019

APRIL 10, 2019

Reception at

California Academy of Sciences

Menil Collection

New York Yacht Club

Reception with students &

Private Tour followed by

teachers

Reception at Bistro Menil

ISSUE 199

www.madeira.org/events

N E W S PAC E S, N E W FAC E S


I N TO DAY ’S WO R L D

MADEIRA’S MISSION IS MORE RELEVANT THAN EVER. Madeira is boldly leading the way, educating girls to flourish in and out of the classroom. Our transformational education has lifelong impact. Madeira is a thriving place for girls to become their best selves.

#MADEIRA DIFFERENCE 1

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


Contents Madeira Today WINTER 2019, Number 199

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O BSERVAT IO NS O N T HE OVAL

Published by The Madeira School 8328 Georgetown Pike, McLean, VA 22102

Editor: Karen Joostema Design: LucidCreative.co Photography: James Kegley Freed Photography Ryan Maxwell Photography

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2018–19

Jaylaan Ahmad-Llewellyn ’96 Missy Baker Boney ’79

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4

M O DULAR AC ADEM IC PROGRAM

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WHY WE T EAC H AT M ADEIRA

Gregory W. Brown P’19 Pilar Cabeza de Vaca Head of School Brooke Stroud Carnot ’88, P’21

William Eric Clark P’18 Lee Carol Cook P’18 Parents’ Association President Gaither Smoot Deaton ’88 Alex Christine Douglas ’99

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WOM EN WHO WILL

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C HANGE T HE WORLD

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NOT YOUR AVERAGE

William F. Dunbar P’17

HISTORY C LASS

Anne Faircloth ’87 Mary Frediani P’11 Richard P. Hall

Carrie Southworth Johnson ’95

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A LOOK AT DO RM RENOVAT IONS

Heather Muir Johnson ’77 Joy Johnson ’77 Harry J. Klaff P’12, ’13, ’17 Louise Stillman Lehrman ’58 Pamela J. Mazza P’15, ’19 Avery Miller ’86, P’19 Nancy Miller Montgomery ’60

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CO - C URRIC ULUM

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AT HLET IC S SPOT LIGHT

Michelle Malek Olson ’86

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30

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Reena Lawande Pande ’92 Tracy G. Savage ’66 Kumea Shorter-Gooden ’70 Catherine Harris Shraga ’70 Board of Trustees President Catherine Rosenthal Stuart ’73 Anita Patel Tolani ’91 Board of Trustees Secretary Kate Wisniewski Weir ’02 Alumnae Council President Audrey Baxter Young ’80 Madeira Today is published for alumnae, parents, and friends of the School. Send any comments or suggestions to: KJoostema@madeira.org To unsubscribe from Madeira Today send your name and address to: madeiraalumnae@madeira.org

ALUM NAE AUT HORS

ARTS SPOT LIGHT

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FAM ILY WEEKEND

ALUM NAE EVENTS

C LASS NOT ES

COVER IMAGE: The new Maynard Quad and renovated South Dorm


WHAT’S NEW

At Madeira some initiatives remain “new” for many years. We still refer to “New” Dorm, the “new” schedules, and sometimes, even the “new” Head! Of the three, the schedules are the newest, and five years in, I look back on the discussions around the table as we were getting ready to launch this major change in how we structure teaching and learning. RE-THINKING OUR ACADEMIC SCHEDULE

Our newly articulated teaching philosophy­— learning should be active, experiential, and joyful—neatly expresses what we want our girls to encounter.

As with any change, bringing about a totally new structure brought considerable challenge to our community, and I still remember the day before we made the announcement there was palpable trepidation at our administrative meeting. However, as educators, we were more than aware that schedules are but a structure, albeit essential, that determine how and when students learn. At the outset, changing how we organized the day or the entire school year was not our goal. As we researched best practices, discussed what faculty believed best supported learning, and rethought what we needed to teach in terms of skills and content, we realized that in order to bring teaching and learning more in tune with the needs of a changing world, we would have to rethink how we structured schedules. Our newly articulated teaching philosophy­—learning should be active, experiential, and joyful—neatly expresses what we want our girls to encounter. Upmost in our minds five years ago was the goal of preparing young women to be lifelong learners and successful in a world which requires global and cultural understanding, finely honed communications skills, teamwork, discernment, and problem solving. We were also concerned about the rising levels of stress and distress among adolescents, which affects girls most profoundly and stands in the way of learning. We were striving to create a setting that would nourish intellectual development as well as emotional health. NEW SCHEDULE SUCCESSFUL

Five years into the Mod schedule, we have achieved success beyond our expectations. The longer class periods allow for deeper and more interactive learning, and encourage girls to draw connections among different disciplines, both on their own and through newly created interdisciplinary studies. Breaks between periods allow both physical and mental respite. Five-week modules allow them to experience the world of work as well as to explore interests and passions. The distribution of time throughout the day requires girls to learn time management and is also more humane in providing them ample time to study, 2

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


HEAD OF SCHOOL

continue to be involved in sports and performing arts, and to have time to socialize with their friends. For teachers, the Mod schedule provides time to work collaboratively on curriculum development, to create new and stimulating experiences for the students, and to pursue professional growth throughout the school year. THRIVING WITH THE MOD SCHEDULE

How are we measuring success? Our graduates continue to demonstrate that they are ready to thrive at a range of fine higher-educational institutions in this country and abroad. Scores in standardized tests (APs, SATs, ACTs) have remained consistently reflective of the academic rigor of our program. We are able to recruit and retain highly professional faculty who are excited to teach here. Senior exit interviews with each departing class consistently reveal that Madeira girls have a transformational experience and feel ready and well prepared to go onto the next stage of their lives. Miss Madeira’s school continues to thrive as an innovative leader in girls’ education.

F R O M T H E E D I TO R Campus was abuzz this summer with the renovation of South Dorm and Maynard Quad. We wanted to share photos and stories of Madeira’s newly renovated spaces with you. In addition to all the construction in the buildings, there were foundations of another type being laid on Madeira’s campus—namely the bonds of friendship that are formed by the girls that call Madeira “home.” The changes on campus brought about through the generosity of our donors will shape the lives of Madeira girls for generations KAREN JOOSTEMA Send comments to KJoostema@Madeira.org

to come. Beyond the dorms, Madeira has no shortage of inspiring faculty and amazing students: Ethical hacking expert. International fencing champion. The Voice television show contestant. Model UN Outstanding Delegate. Keynote student presenter at the Department of Education’s National Private School Leadership Conference. Read about these and more in this issue. From stories of today’s Mod schedule to the renovated spaces of tomorrow, please enjoy Madeira Today.

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THE MODS: 5 YEARS IN M A D E I R A’ S I N N OVAT I V E AC A D E M I C P R O G R A M I S T H R I V I N G

MOD BASICS

3 CLASSES PER MOD

MOD 1

MOD 2

CLASS 1

A BLOCK 8:30–9:50

30 min Break/Conference/Club time

CLASS 2

B BLOCK 10:20–11:40

Lunch/Advisory

CLASS 3

C BLOCK 12:50–2:10

30 min Break/Conference/Club time FALL SPORT OR ACTIVITY

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


WHAT BEGAN IN 2012 as an initiative to re-imagine teaching and learning and

to re-think the academic day, was rolled out in 2014 in a new schedule which supported the School’s educational priorities and values and which was the backdrop for newly designed curriculum. Commonly referred to as “the Mod schedule,” the academic year is divided into seven, five-week modules (“Mods”). Now in its fifth year, the program is thriving and receiving national attention as other schools look to meet the demands of educating for a fast-changing world. “Every day is a good learning day,” says M.A. Mahoney, Dean of Academics and Faculty. “With a fresh start every five weeks, the Mod schedule never gets old.”

7 mods per academic year CO-CURRICULUM IS ONE MOD

5 weeks per mod

MOD 3

CLASS LENGTH

MOD 4

MOD 5

MOD 6

5-WEEK INTERNSHIP

EACH BLOCK = 1 CREDIT

80 mins

MOD 7

9TH ON-CAMPUS PREP 10TH COMMUNITY SERVICE

80 mins

11TH CAPITOL HILL 12TH CAREER INTEREST/ PASSION

3 CREDITS = TRADITIONAL FULL-YEAR CLASS

WINTER SPORT OR ACTIVITY

80 mins

SPRING SPORT OR ACTIVITY

3 seasons of sports/activities WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 5


MOD Benefits: MOD 1

MOD 2

ENGLISH II

COCURRICULUM

Designed for individual growth and goals. No two student schedules are identical

DEEPER LEARNING

A BLOCK 8:30–9:50

PERSONALIZED EXPERIENCE

Focusing on 3 longer classes,

30 min Break

allows time to absorb, reflect, and recharge

CLASSROOM INNOVATION

B BLOCK 10:20–11:40

with open blocks in between,

PHYSICS

5-WEEK INTERNSHIP

5-week dynamic blocks foster innovation and encourage girls

Lunch/Advisory

Full-time, 5-week Co-Curriculum internships

FRESH START EVERY 5-WEEKS Each Mod brings new perspective

ALGEBRA II

30 min Break/Conference/Club time D BLOCK afternoon

REAL-WORLD WORK EXPERIENCE

C BLOCK 12:50–2:10

to try new topics

FIELD HOCKEY

What is THE MOD Schedule? Today’s Madeira girls have never experienced anything other than the modular schedule. They take three classes during each five-week Mod, and are required to take part in an afternoon sport or activity each season. One Mod each year is reserved for a Co-Curriculum internship in grades 10–12. Each instructional block is awarded one credit. Three credits are equivalent to most full-year courses in a traditional schedule. The five-week blocks open up more elective options. Students might take a one-mod class that would not have fit in a traditional schedule. Popular examples include Forensic Science, Mindfulness and the Brain, Topics in STEAM, and The Art Museum.

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Each girl meets one-on-one with the academic dean to develop her personalized schedule. No two student schedules are identical! SEEDS SOWN IN THE “WEDNESDAY PROGRAM” During Wednesday Profes-

sional Development (PD) sessions in 2012, when the girls were on Co-Curriculum, the faculty discussed best practices in pedagogy and new ideas, but most were not possible within the constraints of traditional 45-minute class periods. Head of School Pilar Cabeza de Vaca challenged the faculty to think from a more student-centered perspective that included an immersive Co-Curriculum experience, reflected a healthy day, and made learning a vibrant, experiential process. The Mod schedule did just that.

A PALPABLE C H ANGE Designing

new curriculum for the Mods required departments to be highly collaborative. Faculty used the summer of 2014 to re-imagine curriculum and create digital portfolios. Mahoney recalls how this stimulating work resonated with faculty, and had an immediate impact on the vibe of the school. “When school started, it immediately felt really good, even knowing we had a few pieces to fine tune,” Mahoney remembers. “For students, having three subjects at a time and managing a day that starts at 8:30 (rather than 7:30 or 8:00)—that was a game changer. For teachers, having 80 minutes for immersive teaching felt great. They were delighted to put that PD and curriculum planning to work.”


Sample 10th Grade Schedule MOD 3

MOD 4

MOD 5

MOD 6

MOD 7

PHYSICS

PHYSICS

ENGLISH II

MODERN WORLD HISTORY

ENGLISH II

30 min Break/Conference/Club time

SPANISH II

MODERN WORLD HISTORY

ALGEBRA II

FORENSIC SCIENCE

SPANISH II

MINDFULNESS & THE BRAIN

MODERN WORLD HISTORY

Lunch/Advisory

ALGEBRA II

PHOTOGRAPHY

SPANISH II

30 min Break/Conference/Club time KARATE

MORE STUDENT-CENTERED EXPERIENCE Five years in, Cabeza de Vaca

is proud of the results. “We have amazing courses…a lot more collaboration and interdisciplinary work…exceptional teaching…a willingness to take risks… five dedicated weeks for meaningful Co-Curriculum internships…the ability to have daily labs, daily advisory time, and weekly class meetings…it is definitely a more student-centered classroom experience.” Mahoney concurs and adds that having non-classroom contact with the students, such as frequent advisory group meetings, has proven beneficial. “Social-emotional learning is so important, as adolescents are challenged by stress and anxiety. Being part of a small group daily, which Madeira’s Mod schedule allows, mitigates some of the challenges.”

DANCE

PD TIME LEADS TO CURRICULUM INNOVATION Faculty innovation contin-

ues to flourish. Mahoney credits built-in PD/Collaboration Blocks as the catalyst for this inspiring work. Resulting curriculum changes include adding Art History to English 3 Modernism, leveraging the Makerspace and FabLab to create a World History timeline, and linking the junior year US History curriculum and research paper to the Capitol Hill internship. MODS DIFFERENTIATE MADEIRA

The Mod schedule sets Madeira apart from its peers. Madeira’s academic program has been presented as an innovative model at domestic and international conferences, including National Coalition of Girls’ Schools (NCGS) and National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS). Independent School Management (ISM) validated that Madeira’s innovative

academic program synthesized the best practices to support student learning and community building. LOOKING FORWARD As others look

to adopt a similar model, Madeira persists in looking forward. The faculty continue to create new courses and grow interdisciplinary offerings. A challenge to the evolving new courses is that Madeira does not have all the space needed to support the programs. The new academic building that will be funded through the All the Difference campaign will bring further interdisciplinary opportunities and allow the School to deliver additional innovative programs. Cabeza de Vaca’s bold move to the Mod academic model has paid off. It supports great teaching and deep learning, and Madeira is thriving with the results. WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 7


Why We Teach at Madeira Madeira Mission

Innovation & Support

Our Students

Diverse & Welcoming

I was teaching in China when I first saw Madeira’s mission of launching women who change the world. My then fivemonth old daughter was crawling around. I read the mission and then looked at her. I got really touched and started to tear up. I thought, man, I need to get myself there. My three years at Madeira have only strengthened my belief in the mission.

I joined Madeira because of the theater program. I was excited by the opportunity to create imaginative set designs, teach students to build, and pass on my love of technical theater. I choose to stay at Madeira because of the opportunities to grow and be innovative in my approach to education. I have never been afraid of change and I appreciate that Madeira wants to stay on the cutting edge. The arts at Madeira are well-loved and supported, something I haven’t found in many

I have long told our students that they are the School. Theirs is a fierce desire to know and to be heard, and I hear them. From my first moment at Madeira, I knew a great commitment had been made to stoke this fire inside. I bear the happy privilege of tending it.

What brought me to Madeira and makes me feel appreciated and welcomed is the diversity of faculty and staff and the diversity of the student body. Madeira is such a welcoming and accepting community! Students, faculty, and staff come from different ethnic, cultural, political, and socioeconomic backgrounds, and they contribute equally to the well-being of our Madeira community.

GLEN RUSSELL MATH DEPARTMENT CHAIR

other schools. SASHA NEWMAN ARTS DEPARTMENT CHAIR

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DR. KEITH WARD ENGLISH DEPARTMENT CHAIR

DR. XIAOFU DING WORLD LANGUAGES DEPARTMENT CHAIR


Madeira’s passionate and inspiring faculty includes teachers who have previously worked at some of the most prestigious schools in the country, some long-time Madeira veterans, and others who left Madeira for a time and have returned. We asked a few why they choose to be part of Madeira’s mission to develop young women who will change the world.

Girls Leadership

Excellent Reputation

Empowering Young Women

Supportive Community

3 things drew me back. They were here when I started teaching at Madeira 15 years ago. 1. Fostering leadership in girls. Not just for the sake of the tagline, but allowing girls to dig into who they are and to feel comfortable with themselves. 2. Elite education without entitlement. To be aware that not everyone lives like we do. Many schools grapple with this challenge, but Madeira keeps its girls grounded. It’s one thing to talk about social justice, but another to work in support of a larger purpose. 3. Academic skills. Madeira blends age-old structures and traditions with innovative ideas.

I chose to teach at Madeira because of its excellent reputation, and I thought it would be fun and interesting to teach at a girls’ school. I choose to stay at Madeira because I’ve discovered that I love teaching young women. At this point in my life, being middle aged and having raised my own two daughters, I have a lot to teach students beyond instruction in writing and literature. It’s highly rewarding to work with these inspiring young women as they develop their voices and grow into their full potential.

I choose to teach at Madeira because of the students and the way that the School empowers young women. Madeira graduates are so impressive and are the future leaders of this world. It’s inspiring and such a great honor to teach here.

I continue to teach at Madeira because of the community of people I have found here, both students and adults. The students are dedicated and want to learn and form relationships with adults and with each other. The adults want to support each other and Madeira’s mission, along with their desire to help students be their best, most thoughtful selves. And together, we all pitch in to take care of and look out for each other in this small community.

KATE SCOTT STEAM SPECIALIST

BECKY ZAHRADNIK ENGLISH TEACHER

SHEILA MCGRORY ENGLISH TEACHER

SHIELDS SUNDBERG HISTORY TEACHER WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 9


Women Who Will Change the World Keynote at Department of Ed Conference

Empowering girls in Iran

World-Class Fencer

In September, Theresa was the only high school student invited to speak at the Department of Education’s National Private School Leadership Conference. Theresa shared her experience at Madeira and why she chose to attend an independent school. Theresa also discussed Madeira’s mission: “We aren’t just launching women to change the world. We’re a little too impatient for that. We’ve decided to go ahead to start building the new world we wish we saw.” Theresa also serves as Head of Boarding during her senior year at

Sophie has been actively involved with the Omid Foundation, an organization that works to help and empower women who are victims of sexual, physical, or mental abuse in Iran. She was asked to choreograph a dance for the organization’s annual gala. As a high school student, she choreographed a dance that exemplified empowerment and that followed an Omid girl’s journey. “I felt like it was most important to convey the core of the foundation, which is the girls and their lives and what they’ve overcome.”

Top-ranked international fencer, Michaela Joyce recently won 2nd place at the Epee Cadet European Cup fencing competition in Heidenheim, Germany, which hosts the best young fencers from around the world. The silver medal followed her double bronze medal performance at the North American Cup in Kansas City, MO. Michaela is currently ranked #1 in the 14 and under age category for Women’s Epee (Epee is a point weapon, where the goal is to hit first anywhere on the opposing athlete’s body). Michaela is proud to represent TEAM USA Fencing and notes, “I love fencing because it gives me an opportunity to improve and push myself to be the best person and athlete I can be.”

Madeira. THERESA CARR ’19

SOPHIE FOULADI ’19

MICHAELA JOYCE ’22 10

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


A Madeira education helps a girl find her voice…and then use that voice to make an impact. By preparing students in the classroom at the same time as exposing them to real-world work, Madeira’s program builds confidence. A Madeira girl is confident in her abilities and courageous enough to make her voice heard. Even as high school students, Madeira girls are already living Madeira’s mission of women who change the world. We celebrate the many talents and accomplishments of our impressive student body.

Accomplished Pianist

Model UN Outstanding Delegate

“The Voice” Contestant

International Thespian

Angela is an accomplished pianist who has been the accompanist for Madeira’s Glee for 3 years, a position that was previously held by adults. She was the first student to perform as the soloist in a piano concerto with the Chamber Orchestra. She was selected because of her superior musicianship, ability to prepare a large work in a short time, and her commitment to performing with personality as well as accuracy. “If my music can help people recall a memory or make them feel special, that’s very satisfying for me.”

Casey was awarded Outstanding Delegate at the Yale Model Government Europe (YMGE) competition in Budapest, Hungary. Casey competed on the All-American Model UN team, a highly selective Model UN (MUN) national travel team, which won Best Large Delegation at the competition. YMGE focuses on European politics, and delegates debate current issues that have significant global implications. Sara Rhodin, advisor to Madeira’s Model United Nations team, spoke highly of Casey. “Like a professional diplomat, she always maintains a measured tone and is calm under pressure. Her argumentation is eloquent, informed, and engaging.”

Riley attended an open audition for The Voice of China, which is China’s version of The Voice television show. The initial audition was in Houston, TX and Riley got first place. She was then invited to sing at the final audition in Shanghai, where she represented the “US division.” Other geographic areas represented were the United Kingdom, Singapore, and Australia. Riley made it very far and wants to try again this year to see if she can go

Chapin was the only high school student invited to a prestigious musical theater program last summer in Bavaria, Germany. She lived and studied theater with dozens of collegeage students. The reason Chapin was invited to participate as a high school student was because of her time at Madeira. The organizers felt that Madeira’s boarding program prepared Chapin to live on her own well enough so that she could handle being abroad. Chapin shared, “The experience was incredible and helped me improve my musical theater skills drastically.”

ANGELA HE ’19

even further. RILEY XIONG ’19

CHAPIN BROWN ’19

CASEY OCASAL ‘19 WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 11


Madeira students don’t just read about history. They experience it. Influence it. Madeira students make history.

Not Your Average CAPITOL HILL IS MADEIRA’S “LIVING CLASSROOM”

Imagine a high school course that not only offers classroom learning, but integrates practical workplace experience as well. Madeira offers this extraordinary combination as part of its history curriculum, leveraging Madeira’s signature Co-Curriculum internship program and the School’s proximity to Washington, DC. US History lessons and the Co-Curriculum experience are natural partners because working in the “living classroom” of Capitol Hill as interns for members of Congress— with direct exposure to the legislative process—is a hallmark of junior year at Madeira. An example of a Madeira student influencing legislation is Caroline McCullers ’19, who used her junior year Capitol Hill internship with Congressman José E. Serrano to directly affect national policy. Caroline researched and presented a bill on student loan debt to Congressman Serrano and convinced him to co-sponsor the bill, known as H.R. 3572—“Making College More Affordable Act.”

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COURSE COMBINES HISTORY LESSONS WITH CURRENT EVENTS

“One of the goals we have at Madeira is that Co-Curriculum should not just be ‘Co’ but actually embedded with and part of a student’s regular curriculum,” notes History Teacher Larry Pratt. Here is how the course works. Juniors spend one five-week “module” interning on Capitol Hill, experiencing the US government firsthand. They take a US History course the same year. With these requirements in mind, the course seeks to (1) combine standard US history lessons with current events, analyzing how these lessons apply to the world today; (2) prepare the students for their Capitol Hill internships by teaching them about the government and how the legislative process works.

Pratt continues: “The students learn about the American Revolution and the adoption of the Constitution. Then, instead of continuing like a traditional history class would, we evaluate how the Constitution functions today, with a legislative focus in mind. The students learn what the role of government is, what the branches do, and how the system works together. It is important that the students understand the full picture and comprehend what their member of Congress is doing.”


History Class STUDENT PASSION ISSUE CONNECTED TO INTERNSHIP

In addition to learning about how the legislative process works, students must be prepared to participate in it. Before the internships, students choose an issue that is of strong interest, then seek to work with a representative who has a connection to that particular issue. By selecting their passion issue and learning about the legislative process of government beforehand, students are better prepared for their internships. Since they are working full-time for five weeks, they are able to take on substantive projects and come away with an experience not many other people, let alone teenagers, can boast.

In evaluating Madeira student intern Aves Mocek’s ’19 contributions to the office of Senator Angus King, the Senator’s office commented: “Aves is clearly mature beyond her years; most of our staffers routinely forgot she was still in high school and not one of our college interns.” STUDENTS PROPOSE LEGISLATION

The work is not done once the students return from Capitol Hill. In addition to their capstone projects, which students complete concurrently with their internships, they must apply the research skills they learned during their placements to draft a legislative proposal that their member of Congress would support. “The idea is to have an authentic proposal that they can share with their office on a particular issue

they’ve been working on,” Pratt explains. “Part of the requirement for the proposal is that it has to be an issue that the student’s representative would support. Even if the student disagrees with her representative on the political spectrum, she still has to anticipate the representative’s objections and tailor her solution so that it would be acceptable to the office.” UNIQUE EXPERIENCE. IMPRESSIVE RESUMÉ.

By experiencing history firsthand, with front row seats on Capitol Hill for historic events, and an opportunity to impact policy, Madeira students graduate with solid resumes that rival those of college students. Combining traditional US history lessons with practical experience in the inner workings of the US government, a lengthy and substantive Capitol Hill internship, and a research project that calls for actual legislative proposals, makes Madeira’s history curriculum anything but average.

WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 13


LEAVE NO DORM BEHIND 5 MONTHS TO RAISE FUNDS TO

RENOVATE

THE 5TH AND FINAL DORM! $ A LL F UNDS

5 M O N TH S

5TH D O R M

We can’t put a shovel

To complete renovations

North Dorm is the only

in the ground until all

and be ready for students by

non-renovated dorm. Every

funds are in place.

fall 2019, construction must

girl deserves a modern

start this summer, meaning

space. Let’s get the

funds must be in place

5th dorm done!

by spring.

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


GIVING ALL STUDENTS THE SAME QUALITY RESIDENTIAL LIFE EXPERIENCE When Madeira began this Campaign, our dorms, which

been beautifully and thoughtfully renovated, while preserv-

are more than 80 years old, were in urgent need of renova-

ing the character and charm of the buildings. Completing

tions to bring them up to the living standards that today’s

renovations for North Dorm will allow us to give all of our

students and parents expect. Through the generosity of

students the same quality residential experience.

early Campaign donors, Main, East, West, and South have

RENOVATED DORMS

UNRENOVATED DORM Common rooms and kitchenettes

1920’s kitchen, small unappealing hangout spots

Bathrooms

Leaky faucets, decaying pipes, small showers, unreliable hot water

Faculty apartments

Not up to par with competitors; too small for families WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 15


What is Old is

The Transformation of Madeira’s Dorms

New Again

Madeira’s dorms have provided students with comfort, lasting memories, and a “home-away-from-home” for more than 80 years. After decades of memories, improvements were long overdue. RENOVATIONS OVERDUE

As Debby Loeb Brice ’63 notes, “When I came to visit, the dorms were the same as when I was there more than 50 years ago.” Nancy Alyea Schiebel ’49, P’88 adds, “The dorms were certainly nothing to speak of back when I was a student, but no major renovations had been made since then, so I knew it was time to upgrade those facilities.” CAMPAIGN FUNDS RENOVATION OF 4 DORMS

The All the Difference Campaign donations to date have made the renovations possible in four of the five dorms.

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


The renovations address the changing needs of today’s and tomorrow’s students, while preserving the character of yesterday.

What was included in the renovations?

IMPROVEMENTS FELT

STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL RENOVATIONS:

Improvements to Madeira’s campus are not only seen, but truly felt by the entire community.

• Geothermal heating and air conditioning • New pipes and plumbing • Tankless hot water heaters • Upgraded technology infrastructure • Waterproof building foundations • New energy efficient windows • ADA accessible entrances and first dorm elevator SPACE EXPANSION AND AESTHETIC CHANGES: • Expanded community spaces • Additional adult residence in each dorm • Adult residences expanded to include a large kitchen and living area • Renovated dorms now include: • Modernized bathrooms • Enlarged common rooms: with comfortable sofas and chairs, bright carpeting, and a large AppleTV • Kitchenette: microwave, refrigerator, coffee machine, sink • Improved lighting • Hardscape and landscape renovation around the Oval • Reconstruction of Main Terrace with new additional offices below • Maynard Quad renovation: flagstone patio, red sectional couches, patio tables, chairs, umbrellas, and a fire pit

WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 17


Renovated Spaces Have Yielded More Students Improvements to Madeira’s campus are highly visible, and they are having a direct impact on the perception of Madeira in the marketplace. Renovated spaces have yielded more students and top faculty. Modernization has improved our energy efficiency and reduced expenses.

ADMISSIONS IMPACT

ATTRACT TOP FACULTY

Renovations a significant factor in admissions growth

More faculty apartments increase the adult presence on campus

Prospective students and

Each renovated dorm includes a

parents are impressed by the

second faculty apartment — one

new facilities. We have seen our

that can fit a family. Each apart-

admissions grow from a student

ment has a large kitchen and liv-

body of 308 in 2012 to 325 in

ing area, which allows the adults

2018. The renovated dorms are

to host the students to bake,

more welcoming and align more

meet, or watch a movie. Renovat-

closely with our peer schools.

ed housing has made living on

As families visit schools, they

campus more desirable and has

want to be able to visualize their

attracted top new faculty, who

daughter in a comfortable, home-

otherwise could not afford the

like environment. The renovated

high-cost-of-living DC area.

dorms provide just that.

Students consider Madeira to be a second home.

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W H AT I S O L D I S N E W A G A I N

and Top Faculty GEOTHERMAL UPGRADES

A commitment to energy efficiency Madeira is committed to embracing “greener” goals that improve energy efficiency. Each renovated dorm includes geothermal heating and air conditioning, modern pipes and plumbing, new energy efficient windows, waterproof building foundations, and tankless water heaters. The tankless water heaters are a perfect example of Madeira’s commitment. They ensure that the students Faculty apartments are large enough

never run out of hot water, and

to host students.

use 30–50% less energy than a traditional tank system. In addition, the environmentallyfriendly geothermal system and energy-efficient windows have led directly to reduced expenses for the School. Geothermal system room.

Renovated faculty apartments are perfect for families with children.

“The new geothermal system makes the dorms easier to maintain. It is efficient, it is quiet, and it saves Madeira money.” — Ed Hamer, Director of Facilities

WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 19


Marrying Madeira’s Historic Exterior Charm with At a quick glance, the exterior of the dorms look remarkably

KITCHENETTES

similar to how they always

Food matters!

have. And that’s the point.

Madeira girls love their snacks!

The renovations preserve the

Kitchens are a natural gathering

character of Miss Madeira’s iconic brick buildings while modernizing the interiors for the changing needs of today’s and tomorrow’s students.

spot for any home, and the renovations provided a much needed upgrade. Kitchenettes have been expanded with modern appliances, so students can now grab coffee or tea at their leisure, make snacks in the microwave,

The common areas are warm

and store food in the family-

and inviting, the bathrooms

sized refrigerator.

are bright and functional, and there are now enough outlets in the bedrooms for our “connected” students. Comfortable common spaces with room

COMMON ROOMS

to gather.

Enlarged spaces encourage bonding and social activities With more inviting and spacious areas, the renovated common rooms are enriching student life. They provide a home-like atmosphere where girls enjoy socializing, playing games, and watching movies.

“I primarily hang out in renovated dorms because the space is more welcoming and bigger. The amount of “welcome-ness” in a renovated space is very different from an unrenovated dorm.” — Gigi Jacobsen ’20, Day Student 20

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


W H AT I S O L D I S N E W A G A I N

Modern Interiors Renovations include air conditioning, climate control, and plenty of outlets for today’s “connected” students.

BEDROOMS

A place to call home Students enjoy coffee and tea in the morning in the new kitchenettes

A comfortable room, with airconditioning, climate control, plenty of outlets, and endless possibilities for making memories and forming lifelong bonds.

BATHROOMS

Modern bathrooms… much appreciated! The renovated bathrooms have sleek, modern fixtures. With new plumbing, girls now have consistent hot water and don’t have to deal with leaky faucets any longer!

The dorm bathrooms have been completely renovated with sleek, modern fixtures.

WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 21


New Exterior Spaces Add New Energy Improving community gathering spaces is a priority for the Residential Life initiative of the Campaign. Madeira has made a point to revitalize the outdoor spaces on our campus. Our iconic Oval has been repaved, landscaped, and beautified. Maynard Quad, which was leveled and rebuilt to include a flagstone patio, firepit, and seating areas, has quickly become a favorite spot for girls to

Maynard Quad provides a new space in the heart of campus.

gather. Additionally, a terrace was constructed behind Main, showcasing Madeira’s signature view of the Potomac and providing a spectacular backdrop for campus events. MAYNARD QUAD

“The renovated dorms allow prospective families to visualize the community aspect of Madeira in a new way. When they see comfortable spaces with room to gather, they can imagine their daughter making Madeira home.” — Matti Donkor, Director of Enrollment Management

The new hangout spot Maynard Quad provides a wonderful place in the heart of campus for students to relax on red Adirondack chairs, warm up by the fire pit, and enjoy hanging out on the cozy couches. Maynard Quad has quickly become a favorite spot for club meetings and impromptu gatherings.

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


W H AT I S O L D I S N E W A G A I N

and Possibilities With an unparalleled view of the Potomac River, Main Terrace is an incredible space.

MAIN TERRACE

That view! Main Terrace has been a terrific addition. It takes advantage of Madeira’s location and unparalleled view of the Potomac River and provides a fantastic hosting space.

THE OVAL

Iconic charm beautified The new hardscaping and landscaping around the Oval upgraded the most memorable part of campus without changing its essence. The iconic Oval remains the hub of campus. New hardscaping enhances iconic look of the Oval.

WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 23


LE T ’S FINISH THE JOB

Renovating the dorms and exterior spaces has attracted prospective students and top faculty, made the boarding experience more joyful, and made alumnae proud. Four dorms, the Oval, Main Terrace, and Maynard Quad have all been transformed. NOW... we need to finish the job by raising the funds to renovate North Dorm. Consider donating to the Campaign. Let’s give all of our students the same great experiences.

The changes brought about through the generosity of our donors will shape the lives of girls for generations to come. The bonds and memories formed inside Madeira’s special buildings—home for a time to the girls who inhabit them—last a lifetime.

24

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


W H AT I S O L D I S N E W A G A I N

Classmate Challenge leads Class of 1958 to Name South Dorm Common Room CLASS OF 1958

Makes a Difference • Five have served on Madeira’s Board of Trustees • Seven sent their daughters to Madeira • One sent her granddaughter to Madeira CLASS WORKS TOGETHER IN DEVOTION TO EACH OTHER AND TO MADEIRA The Class of 1958 celebrated their 60th reunion this past year. Their yearbook was dedicated to Miss Maynard with a quote that read, “Her guidance, friendship, and inspiration, are those qualities on which we may reflect with deepest Louise Stillman Lehrman gratitude in the years to come.” As a class, the women have demonstrated these qualities over the years through their devotion to each other and to Madeira. Louise Stillman Lehrman, who serves on Madeira’s Board, says that it is not by accident that her classmates have stayed connected. She says two of her classmates, Joan Hulme Perera, who serves as class agent, and Leslie Meek Fitch as class secretary, have been the glue that have kept Joan Hulme Perera the class together. She credits their dedication and enthusiasm as the key to many of the Class of 1958’s successes. One such success is their convergence to raise money to renovate our dorms. Louise proposed a challenge to her class: she would match each gift 2:1 if they would pledge to the All the Difference Campaign to renovate the dorms and name South Dorm’s common room in honor of their class. The class successfully raised the funds. Leslie Meek Fitch Louise was inspired to give to the dorms and encourage her class to join her because, “Serving on the Board, I have witnessed the girls living in both the newly renovated dorms and the old, literally ORIGINAL dorms! Main, East, West, and South have been modernized to include air conditioning, community spaces, modernized plumbing, and electrical needs of the present. In order to continue to attract girls of the highest quality, Madeira needed to make these capital improvements. And now North Dorm is the only non-renovated dorm.” “Please everyone, participate in this effort, so that during the summer of 2019, North Dorm can join the others,” Louise adds. “And come to your reunions and see for yourself. You will be very proud of your old school on this and so many other fronts!” For over 60 years, these women have been committed to their class and to Madeira. The next time you are on campus, go see the plaque in the South Dorm common room dedicated to these amazing women. They are an inspiration to the School and to our community.

• One has a son who taught at Madeira • Three have received Louise Wheelock Willson ’48 Outstanding Volunteer Award • Many have served on the Alumnae Council, Reunion Committee, and were Class Agent or Secretary • Historically have had high participation in giving to the Madeira Fund and won The Festina Lente Cup for highest participation of reunion years

WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 25


CO-CURRICULUM

» STUDENT USES

CO-CURRICULUM PLACEMENT TO IMPROVE NATIONAL SECURITY Credits Madeira for Strong Computer Science Foundation and Building Confidence Talk about Madeira girls making an impact—Trudy Painter ’19 used her senior year Co-Curriculum placement at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab to improve national security!

» T E ST I N G

S E C U R I T Y V U L N E RA B I L I T I E S O F S H I P

N AV I G AT I O N After earning a highly selective spot as an

ASPIRE intern for Johns Hopkins, Trudy was assigned to a research team studying industrial control system security. Specifically, Trudy’s team examined the security vulnerabilities in cargo ships and navigation systems. Her small team consisted of a supervisor, two full-time researchers, and interns. Though the team had several college-age interns from the US Naval Academy, Trudy was the only high school student. In true Madeira girl fashion, Trudy ended up training the Naval Academy interns. 26

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


Madeira has given me a strong foundation in STEAM and increased my knowledge about computer sci-

»

ence. The development I experienced in an all-girls environment helped me feel really confident in going beyond my school community.

» E XC E L L I N G

» MADEIRA

ST U DEN T H ACKS IN TO SYST E M One of Trudy’s responsibilities was to write a script that would fit onto a flash drive, which could hack into the navigation system when the drive was plugged into a computer. Trudy says that it was a very rewarding, albeit a somewhat unnerving experience. “I really enjoyed the project. Some days were hard because this was the first time I had done research independently, where nothing was very well documented. I definitely had to figure things out by myself that I hadn’t seen anywhere else. In the end, I’m proud that that my original work will be affecting national security. It is exhilarating to say that I improved ship navigation security. It was also a little scary because I was able to figure out how to hack into the system.” Trudy credits the Johns Hopkins lab with teaching her about systems that she wasn’t very familiar with before. “In relation to cybersecurity, I had only worked with IP addresses before this internship. Working with industrial protocol systems at Johns Hopkins, there are no IP addresses—it’s an entirely different world that I was not familiar with. It’s also very poorly documented and difficult to learn. It required a lot of patience—for example, I combed through entire manuals and source code in search of vulnerabilities. The experience taught me so much.” When Trudy began her internship, the project was in the experimental phase. Her full-time colleagues presented the team’s findings and were rewarded by becoming a fully-funded project, thanks in large part to Trudy’s contributions.

»

I N M A D E I R A’ S S T E A M P R O G R A M

Trudy has been an excellent computer science student at Madeira and has taken AP Computer Science, plus several STEAM classes, is President of the STEM Club, and on Madeira’s coding team. “All of these activities prepared me to be confident entering my internship,” she notes. Trudy’s projects at Madeira include: a waterproof shoe designed for children in developing countries that grows with the foot of the child; a robotic hand; a long-range RFID scanner with a custom printed circuit board rigged to steal key card information, which demonstrates vulnerabilities of the security system; and a web server Trudy built with salvaged parts.

» MADEIRA BUILDS SKILLS AND CONFIDENCE Trudy

appreciates the confidence and skills Madeira helped her build. “Madeira has given me a strong foundation in STEAM and increased my knowledge about computer science. The development I experienced in an all-girls environment helped me feel really confident in going beyond my school community.” Outside of school, Trudy has joined a hacking and cybersecurity team that’s predominantly male. “I’m able to be really confident in what I do and excel in that environment.” That confidence also helped Trudy stand out when she attended Virginia Governor’s School for Math, Science, and Technology. “I was actually elected my Governor’s School Class President, and I don’t think that would have been possible without my experience at Madeira,” Trudy reflects. Beyond her STEAM passions, Trudy is an all-around active Madeira student, as Senior Class President and a three sport Varsity athlete since 9th grade (Field Hockey, Basketball, and Lacrosse). Not surprisingly, Trudy plans to study computer science in college. WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 27


ATHLETIC S New Talent Powers Madeira Athletics Forward The Madeira Athletic Department began the fall season full of energy and excitement for our Snails to return to campus and to unveil the new additions to our Athletics staff. Certified Athletic Trainer Jon DiCandilo and Varsity Volleyball Head Coach Peter Bristotte entered the 2018–19 school year eager to contribute. Both value developing long lasting relationships.

JO N DICAN DI LO, C E RTIF IE D ATHLE TIC TRAINE R Jon comes to Madeira with 20 years of experience in fitness and health education. Jon is a Certified Athletic Trainer (ATC) and Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS). Most recently, Jon worked in Japan with a professional men’s basketball team as their strength coach. Prior to that, Jon was the Head Athletic Trainer at The Hill School in Pennsylvania. Jon oversaw athletes participating in 31 varsity sports. Jon’s experience working with high school athletes has given him a strong understanding of athlete development and best practices to return to sport after injuries. Jon enjoys working with students in their lifelong pursuit of learning. When Jon isn’t helping Snails recover from injuries, he loves outdoor activities and nature.

PE T E R BR I S TOTTE, VAR S I T Y VOL L EYBALL H EAD COACH Madeira also welcomed Peter Bristotte as our Varsity Volleyball Head Coach. Peter currently serves as Club Director and Elite coach for the Loudoun County volleyball program. Peter previously served as a professor in the physical education and sports department at the University of Campinas in Campinas, Brazil. Peter also coached with Sociedade Hipica de Campinas, a youth volleyball organization. Peter enjoys traveling, playing the piano, Crossfit, and making homemade bacon cheeseburgers.

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


ALUMNAE AUTHORS

AMERICAN WILDERNESS: THE STORY OF THE HUDSON RIVER SCHOOL OF PAINTING BARBARA BABCOCK MILLHOUSE ’52

40+ reproductions of some of their greatest paintings in this historical overview of the Hudson River School of landscape painting and the lives and works of artists Thomas Cole, Frederic Church, Asher Durand, Sanford Gifford, Albert Bierstadt, Jasper Cropsey, Worthington Whittredge, William Merritt Chase, Martin Johnson Heade, John Frederick Kensett, George Inness, and other American landscape painters who created a new and quintessentially Americanstyle of art in the early and mid-19th century. Inspired by the Hudson River Valley and the rugged wilderness of the Catskill Mountains, many of these artists ventured forth to capture unspoiled scenes of the American West, New England, or South America.

RETHINK CREATIVITY MONICA H. KANG ’06

Monica H. Kang, CEO of InnovatorsBox® thought she had it all: a purposeful career in nuclear nonproliferation, great friends and mentors, and a life in a city she loved. So why did she feel stuck? Rethink Creativity teaches you and your team how to start constructing a creative mindset by allocating time to change up your daily routine. It will help you rediscover the passion you felt your first day on the job! Not only will leaders and managers benefit from proven strategies, thoughtprovoking questions, and effective training techniques, but as you move through the book, you’ll start enjoying your work more, be a better leader, and find new ways to be creative, curious, and innovative every day.

2018 NORTH CAROLINA AWARD BESTOWED UPON BARBARA B. MILLHOUSE ’52! Barbara was awarded

the North Carolina Award for Fine Arts, the state’s highest civilian honor, which honors Millhouse for her work over the past 50 years in establishing Reynolda House Museum of American Art in Winston-Salem, where she has created a world-class collection in her ancestral home, built by her grandparents. The award notes Millhouse’s “vision, energy, and passion have resulted in one of the most outstanding collections of American art in the country, and the preservation of one of North Carolina’s most beautiful historic homes.”

THE PREVENT AND REVERSE HEART DISEASE COOKBOOK ANN CRILE ESSELSTYN ’53

Ann writes: “We love our food! When all 20 of us Esselstyns gather together, our days are full of fun— biking, backflips off the dock, runs, family baseball, and badminton. But the most fun is cooking and eating together. Everyone cooks, even the grandchildren. The one person who doesn’t cook is my husband. He is the full-time dishwasher. When Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease was published in 2007 and became a New York Times bestseller, it made an impact we couldn’t even imagine. We’ve heard from people all over whose lives have been changed by Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease. Why did it resonate? Because the program works, and the science is irrefutable. In 1985, while a general surgeon at the Cleveland Clinic, my husband started a heart disease study with 18 patients. Some of those patients were so sick they had been sent home to die. Incredibly, after 12 years, those patients were thriving on plant-based, no-oil diets. 20 years later, compliant patients continued to thrive.”

WE REGRET TO INFORM YOU ARIEL KAPLAN ’95

Mischa Abramavicius is a walking, talking, top-scoring, perfectly well-rounded college application in human form. So when she’s rejected not only by the Ivies, but her loathsome safety school, she is shocked and devastated. All the sacrifices her mother made to send her to prep school, the late nights cramming for tests, the blatantly résumé-padding extracurriculars (read: Students for Sober Driving) ... all that for nothing. As Mischa grapples with the prospect of an increasingly uncertain future, she questions how this could have happened in the first place. Is it possible that her transcript was hacked? With the help of her best friend and sometimes crush, Nate, and a group of eccentric techies known as “The Ophelia Syndicate,” Mischa launches an investigation that will shake the quiet community of Blanchard Prep to its stately brick foundations. In her sophomore novel, A. E. Kaplan cranks the humor to full blast, and takes a serious look at the extreme pressure of college admissions.

WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 29


A RTS S P OT L I G H T

New Faces Bring New Classes to the Arts Department Celebrating creativity in each student The arts department is growing and changing. Madeira welcomes four new teachers, each of whom brings a unique approach to creating art —from the classroom to the stage. Curriculum has been updated to incorporate more contemporary techniques and artists, and artistic core values were re-defined to transform and celebrate creativity in each student.

ANN MILLER, VISUAL ARTS TEACHER Ann Miller, Visual Arts Teacher, is excited to be a full-time member of the arts department. Along with teaching sculpture, drawing, painting, and photography, Ms. Miller introduced a new Programming for the Visual Arts course. In this popular class, students learn coding skills and explore computer graphics to create interactive drawing programs. Unlike traditional drawing classes, more than half of the art for this course is drawn on a computer.

H E AT H E R F E T R O W, D I R E C TO R O F C H O R A L M U S I C Heather Fetrow, Madeira’s new Director of Choral Music, brings her passion for music and entrepreneurship to the arts department. She introduced Entrepreneurship in the Arts dinner discussions with professional artists and entrepreneurs, addressing how students can utilize their skills as artists to become women who will change the world. Ms. Fetrow remarks, “I am excited to bring to Madeira guest artists who will offer diverse perspectives on the opportunities to create change within their industries.” In addition to this new endeavor, Ms. Fetrow is the Music Director for Mamma Mia! this winter. 30

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


ARTS

LOV E ’ S L A B O U R ’ S LO S T

K E L S E Y M E I K L E J O H N , T H E AT E R T E A C H E R After serving as Choreographer for the past six musicals, Kelsey Meiklejohn joins the theater program as our new Theater Teacher. Ms. Meiklejohn shares, “I’m excited to explore more opportunities for students to become leaders in the program, while building on the structure of the classes and productions to outline a pre-professional model of theater.” Ms. Meiklejohn completed her first show as Director with the fall production of Love’s Labour’s Lost.

A DA L I A TO N N E YC K , PRODUCTION MANAGER Also joining the theater program this year as Production Manager is Adalia Tonneyck. Ms. Tonneyck has served as the Costume Designer for multiple Madeira shows over the last five years and is excited to bring her knowledge and love of all things technical theater to the program. Ms. Tonneyck is working with Arts Department Chair Sasha Newman to re-design the Stagecraft class, incorporating more contemporary female playwrights into the production design curriculum.

WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 31


S E P T E M B E R 2 8 – 2 9, 2 0 1 8

Family Weekend


M OT H E R / DA U G H T E R L EG AC Y FA M I L I E S

>

Deanne Johnson-Anderson ’83, Daughter Adriana Anderson ’22; Beth Ann Trapold Newton ’82, Daughter Annie Newton ’20; Jennifer Donaldson ’82, Daughter Samantha Janes ’22; Ingrid Schneider ’85, Daughter Kelly Nance ’19 L TO R (WITH DAUGHTERS IN FRONT ROW) :

NOT PICTURED: Jacqueline Arends ’81, Daughter Caroline Cruze ’20;

Virginia McNeer Callaghan ’84, Daughter Addison Callaghan ’21; Brooke Stroud Carnot ’88, Daughter Olivia Carnot ’21; Ayse Uzer Crowley ’88, Daughter Holly Crowley ’20; Susie Bryan Kondracki ’85, Daughter Alice Kondracki ’21; Avery Miller ’83, Daughter Aves Mocek ’19; Elizabeth Turner Rutkowsky ’83, Daughter Marion Rutkowsky ’20 WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 33


A LU M N A E E V E NTS ASPEN, COLORADO—JULY 2018 HOSTED BY: Betsy Pell Burgess ’81 & John Burgess 1. Eleanore De Sole ’68, P’00, ’02, Betsy Pell Burgess ’81, Bettie McGowin Miller ’60, P’88 2. Cornelia Burgess, Betsy Pell Burgess ’81, Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, Tess Burgess

1.

2.

MA D E I R A WO M E N I N W I N E—JUN E 2 018

NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND— JULY 2018

Seavey Vineyard, St. Helena, CA HOSTED BY: Sandy Heussler Carney ’72 at the New York Yacht Club

1. Carolina Kuczynski Reid ’81, Suzanne Deal Booth, Kimberly Hughes-Moazed ’81, Diana Sanson ’82, Ben Compton 2. Stephen Fortier, J.J. Volk–Fortier ’01, Matt Ridjaneck, Emily Gerdelman Ridjaneck ’03

1. Sandy Heussler Carney ’72, Joya Hoyt Burgess

3. Pat Hughes P’81, Dorie Seavey, Mary Ellen Pigott Hughes ’53, P’81

1.

2.

3.

2. Warren Moore Miller ’68, Sarah Garcia-Mata ’69, Cathy Stone ’69, Bill Miller

1.

2.

34

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019


A LU M N A E E V E N TS CO N T I N U E D >

WA SH I N GTO N , DC­—JULY 2 018 HOSTED BY: Kristen O’ Donnell ’08 Rose on The Roof 1. A  ngela Dean Bennett ’08, Kelsey Kelly ’10, True Nicholson ’10, Theresa Givens-Mauldin ’10, Christina Dean ’11 2. B  ree D’Alessio ’08, Kate Kamber ’08, Kristen O’Donnell ’08

MORNINGS AT MADEIRA JULY 2018

1.

On Campus 1. The Principles of Energy with Stephanie Chewning ’81 2. Painting The Potomac with former Madeira art teacher David Bottini

1.

2.

CAPE ELIZABETH, MAINE­— AUGUST 2018 2.

HOSTED BY: Julie Sprague ’66 P’98 & Julie Hume Talmage Gordon ’98 1. Julie Sprague ’66 P’98, Tracy Savage ’66, Sarah Pettit Daignault ’66 2. John Concannon, Christina Weppner ’66, Gael May Yatsevitch McKibben ’58

1.

2.

DA L L A S, TE X AS —S EP TEMB ER 2 018 HOSTED BY: Floramay Ervin Racz ’88 1. Floramay Ervin Racz ’88, Tara Bailey ’90, Tanya Vaughn McDonald ’88, Polly Holyoke ’77 2. M  ary Lucille Coffman Quick ’07, BJ Murchison Coffman ’74 3. F  loramay Ervin Racz ’88

1.

2.

3.

WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 35


D EN VE R , CO LO R A D O — S EP TEMB ER 2 018

CROSS RIV ER, NY— OCTOBER 2018

HOSTED BY: Elizabeth Quainton Anderman ’85 & Evan Anderman at the Evan Anderman Photography Studio

HOSTED BY: Susan Howe Thorn ’58

3. Dunia Dickey ’99, Kelly Hobbs-Perry ’88, Meg Armstrong ’10

1. Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, Kathy Kenyon P’19, Susan Howe Thorn ’58, Louise Stillman Lehrman ’58, Trustee, Jaylaan AhmadLlewellyn ’96, Trustee

4. Reid Armstrong ’92, Kelley Johnson Boyd ’92

2. Regina Previti ’05, Jill Glenney ’05

1. Mary Day Fitzgibbon ’87 & John Fitzgibbon 2. Elizabeth Quainton Anderman ’85, Priscilla Craven ’82, Barbara Hoversten ’70, Mary Louise Edwards

1. 2.

1.

3.

4.

2.

C L EVE L A N D, O H I O —O CTO B ER 2 018 HOSTED BY: Elinore Evans ’70 & Connie Norweb Abbey ’70 at the Holden Arboretum’s Murch Canopy Walk 1. John Rampe, Elinore Evans ’70, Paul Abbey, Connie Norweb Abbey ’70 2. Madeira guests enjoying a tour of The Holden Arboretum 3. Madeira alumnae & friends gathered at Connie & Paul Abbey’s home. Terry Meyer Prendergast ’73, Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, Joan Conklin Moody ’67 proudly hold the Madeira banner.

2.

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2019

1.

3.


R A L E I G H , N O RTH CARO LI N A—O CTO B ER 2 018

TAMPA , FLORIDA—OCTOBER 2018

HOSTED BY: Madeira Board of Trustee Members Anne Faircloth ’87 & Catherine Rosenthal Stuart ’73 at the North Carolina Museum of Art

HOSTED BY: Anne Arthur Pittman ’91 & Drew Pittman

1. Hosts Anne Faircloth ’87 & Cathy Rosenthal Stuart ’73

1. Alumnae, former staff & Head of School, Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, gather in Tampa

2. Mike Thornton P’18, Holli Thornton P’18, Georgina Zeng P’14,’15,’21, Erica Zeng ’14 3. A  llie Mendelsohn ’83 , Allison Winfield Kalloo ’83, Joan Mendelsohn P’83, Ann Lord Sparrow ’68, Richard Laxar, Katie Lord ’71

2. Darcey Callender ’89, Anne Arthur Pittman ’91

1.

2. 1.

2.

3.

CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA—OCTOBER 2018 HOSTED BY: Darby Collins-Smith ’68 Books & Books 1. Darby Collins-Smith ’68, Tilly Strauss ’79, Kathryn Moore ’00 2. Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, Janá Sigars-Malina P’20 3. Beth Anne Carr P’19, Michael Gellatly, Tilly Strauss ’79, Caitlyn Gart Goodman ’07, Richard Smith

1. 2.

3.

WINTER 2019 MADEIRA TODAY 37


WINTER 2019

8328 GEORGETOWN PIKE M C L E A N VA 2 2 1 0 2 - 12 0 0

MADEIRA TODAY

HBP FSC GOES HERE

Reunite with fellow alumnae at upcoming events NEW YORK CITY, NY

SAN FRANCISCO, CA

HOUSTON, TX

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

MARCH 17, 2019

APRIL 10, 2019

Reception at

California Academy of Sciences

Menil Collection

New York Yacht Club

Reception with students &

Private Tour followed by

teachers

Reception at Bistro Menil

ISSUE 199

www.madeira.org/events

N E W S PAC E S, N E W FAC E S

Profile for The Madeira School

Madeira Today Winter 2019  

Madeira Today Winter 2019  

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