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WINTER 2018

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COME JOIN YOUR FELLOW SNAILS!

ALUMN AE

ISSUE 197

Reunions April 27–28, 2018

SNAIL ART WORK: Nancy Johnson Hillengas ’80

A RT ISSUE


MADEIRAACCOLADES

CONTINUE…

1 PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOL RANKED#

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“Madeira is thrilled to be recognized as the top private high school in the state, and among the finest boarding schools in the country,” says Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, Head of School at Madeira. “We are proud of the transformational impact of a Madeira education—from our innovative academics to our experiential learning beyond the classroom— Madeira lays the foundation for a lifetime of leadership and success.” Madeira earned the number one ranking by scoring highly on a variety of factors, including standardized test scores,

college data, student-teacher ratios, di- also named the 11th Best Girls Private versity, and reviews from students, par- High School in the United States. ents, and alumnae. According to Niche, a According to Cabeza de Vaca, “The acleading educational ranking service, the colades are a testament to the inspiring statistical data used in this ranking was faculty, motivated students, and wonderobtained from the US Department of ful community we share at Madeira. We Education, and analyzed by Niche’s team have always had an exemplary program, of data scientists to create the rankings. and the national recognition is a tribute In addition to the top private high to all associated with Madeira.” school ranking, Madeira earned the top spot as the #1 Best All-Girls High School in Virginia and #1 Best Board- SUPPORT MADEIRA’S RANKINGS ing High School in Virginia, the #4 Best To leave your review of Madeira visit STEM High School in Virginia, and was madeira.org/niche


Contents Madeira Today WINTER 2018, Number 197 Published by The Madeira School 8328 Georgetown Pike, McLean VA 22102

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O BSERVAT IO NS O N T HE OVAL

Editor: Karen Joostema Design: LucidCreative.co Photography: James Kegley & Freed Photography

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FAC ULT Y F UN FAC TS

BOARD OF TRUSEES 2017–18

Ann Baker Boney ’79 Pilar Cabeza de Vaca Head of School Brooke Stroud Carnot ’88, P’21 (on sabbatical) Lee Cook P’19 Parents’ Association President Gaither Smoot Deaton ’88

AT HLET IC S SPOT LIGHT

ARTS SPOT LIGHT

Alex Christine Douglas ’99 William F. Dunbar P’17 Anne Faircloth ’87

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ALUM NAE ART ISTS

Mary Frediani P’11 Anne Murray Gambal ’81, P’10 Richard P. Hall Elizabeth A. Meehan Hewitt ’92

C AM PAIGN UPDAT E

Page Hopkins ’81 Carrie Southworth Johnson ’95 Heather Muir Johnson ’77 Joy Johnson ’77

ALUM NAE EVENTS

Harry Klaff P’12, ’13, ’17 Louise Stillman Lehrman ’58 Pamela J. Mazza P’15, ’19 Tim H. Meyers P’17 Nancy Miller Montgomery ’60 Elizabeth Breul O’Rourke ’73 Reena Lawande Pande ’92

FAM ILY WEEKEND

CO - C URRIC ULUM SPOT LIGHT

Kumea Shorter-Gooden ’70 Catherine Harris Shraga ’70 Board of Trustees President Cathy Rosenthal Stuart ’73 Alumnae Council President Anita Patel Tolani ’91 Secretary Audrey Baxter Young ‘80 Madeira Today is published for alumnae, parents, and friends of the School. Please send any comments or suggestions to: KJoostema@madeira.org To unsubscribe from Madeira Today send your name and address to: madeiraalumnae@madeira.org

CORRECTION: Pg. 2 of the 2016-17 Annual Report incorrectly listed Madeira’s operating surplus. The number should have read $147 thousand (not million). We apologize for this error.

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C AM PUS SPEAKERS

37

ALUM NAE AUT HORS

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C LASS NOT ES

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COVER IMAGE: Anne Palms Chalmers ’60 Blue Ridge Skies-Twilight, scene from a road trip down the Blue Ridge Parkway, VA


Observations on W HY AND NOT STEM

Our program, STEAM, brings an interdisciplinary approach that focuses on systems thinking, engineering, and creativity, coupled with the traditional application of the sciences, the logics of mathematics, and the aesthetics of arts.

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018

Madeira’s strength has always been its identity as an all girls college preparatory high school offering a rigorous academic program complemented by the experiential Co-Curriculum internships. In this learning environment girls thrive, are able to take risks, engage actively in inquiry, become creative problem solvers, and work collaboratively. These are necessary skills to become successful citizens of this era, and, following Madeira’s mission, to become women who change the world. The emphasis on teaching the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) disciplines to today’s youth is not new at Madeira. We have always been a school where scientists and mathematicians can develop to their full potential. As we continue this work, we have chosen to add an “A” to the acronym (for “Arts”) to emphasize the importance of focusing not only on the technical aspects of the STEM disciplines, but also to add the creativity that the arts bring to a holistic education. Thus, our program, STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Math), brings an interdisciplinary approach that focuses on systems thinking, engineering, and creativity, coupled with the traditional application of the sciences, the logics of mathematics, and the aesthetics of arts. The state of Virginia has just announced that computer science, computational thinking, and computer coding will become a requirement of the public school curriculum. Madeira got a head start by adding computer coding as a graduation requirement two years ago. This is an exciting time for Madeira, as we continue to enhance our traditional science and math offerings, build engineering strands throughout our curriculum, delve into robotics, design thinking, and project-based learning, and increase our offerings in computer science, application coding, and digital arts.


the Oval

HEAD OF SCHOOL

Feedback from our recent graduates who have built careers in the STEAM fields suggests that while Madeira’s science and math programs were excellent preparation, it was the addition of strong writing and communication skills which truly set our graduates apart from their peers. Madeira’s curriculum, emphasizing both the STEAM fields and the Humanitites— along with internship experience—has made all the difference in their careers. Our capital campaign to fund the construction of a new academic building will bring together the STEAM disciplines, and will provide the space that our innovative approach to learning, which maintains the traditional disciplines while expanding interdisciplinary offerings, requires.

F R O M T H E E D I TO R Greetings from Madeira! With Madeira’s proud history of art, it’s no surprise that the school’s STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) interdisciplinary program has added an “A” for Arts (STEAM program) to reflect the importance of art across disciplines. This issue celebrates some of the talented Madeira visual artists across the decades (and a few of the teachers who inspired them). Enjoy the beautiful visual journey, courtesy of the accomplished alumnae artists who shared their work with us. KAREN JOOSTEMA

Send comments to

many important ways—from coming back to campus to speak (pg. 34–35) to

KJoostema@Madeira.org

donating to the All the Difference campaign (pg. 26–27) to supervising a Co-Cur-

Madeira is grateful for the wonderful alumnae who support the School in so

riculum intern (pg. 32). I can attest firsthand to the power of an alumna impacting a student through a Co-Curriculum placement, as Dr. Jenny Hoare Lindsey ’84 supervised my daughter, Kristin ’16, in an amazing pediatric cardiology five-week internship. We talk about Co-Curriculum being a life-changing program, and Jenny proved there is no one stronger than a Madeira alumna to share that impact with a student.

From arts and athletics accomplishments to impactful Co-Curriculum intern-

ships to our fabulous faculty and talented alumnae, please enjoy Madeira Today.

WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 3


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like our students, madeirafacultyhave many interests & TALENTS.GETTOKNOW ANEWSIDEOFSOMEOF OUR TEACHERS.

MATH TEACHER

LEe WALKeR Ownshisownbikecompany “I started a frame-building company. I fabricate bikes with custom steel.”

WORLD LANGUAGES DEPT. CHAIR, FRENCH TEACHER

xIAoFU dINg Justwonahalf-marathon “I love to run, it helps clear my mind. Madeira’s campus is perfect for it.”

HISTORY TEACHER

MATthEW SUDNIK SCIENCE TEACHER

CHANDRA SMITH

“I performed in several operas as an

PlayedCarnegieHall…twice

first theater role was as an extra in the

“I play the piano, flute, clarinet, and tenor saxophone. I almost double majored in music.”

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Opera actor

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018

extra when I lived in Pittsburgh. My show Carmen.”

»


SPANISH TEACHER

RITA COoLEY Lawyer “I was a lawyer back in Peru. I practiced commercial and maritime law.”

SPANISH TEACHER

Tulio Campos

ARTS DEPARTMENT CHAIR, TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

Salsa dancer

SAsHa NEWMAn

“I enjoy different forms of dance, but salsa dancing is by far my favorite.”

Nicknamed “Sushi” “My mother nicknamed me ‘Sushi’ because that was her only craving when she was pregnant with me.”

SCIENCE TEACHER

HEidI SANTNER FREeMAN '89 Got married on campus “In 1999, my husband and I got married behind the Chapel Auditorium. The party was in the foyer and the rain plan was actually to have the ceremony on the stage. Fortunately, we did not have to revert to that option.”

HISTORY TEACHER

SHaNA BaRNETt MATH DEPARTMENT CO-CHAIR

gLeNn RUsSELl Taught in China

Ballet dancer “I was a ballet dancer for 15 years. My favorite production is Cinderella.”

“I taught in China for eight years, most recently at the International School of Beijing. During that time, I met my wife and my daughter was born.”

WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 7


FA L L S E A S O N R EC A P

ATHLETICS

VOLLEYBALL After finishing the 2016 fall season as the Independent School League (ISL) Division A Champions, Madeira Varsity Volleyball competed in a higher division in their 2017 campaign. The Snails ended the season with a 10-6 record overall, and finished in the top four teams of a tough ISL AA Division. Junior Sophia Bernstein was named to the All-ISL AA Division team. JV Volleyball finished the season with an 8-6 winning record, highlighted by an intense, three-set victory over Washington Latin’s Varsity team. Madeira Volleyball helped raise $4,300 for breast cancer research through their “Dig Pink” volleyball tournament for the Side-Out Foundation.

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EQUESTRIAN Coming off an International Equestrian Association (IEA) Reserve National Championship title during their 2016–2017 campaign, Madeira Equestrian began their fall season in stride. The IEA team finished first overall at each of the five events this season, and qualified for the post-season. MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018


Fostering Leadership Development Madeira Athletics has always fostered leadership in and out of the athletic arena, and has recently expanded upon this goal by providing leadership development programming. A Student-Athlete Advisory Committee hosts bi-weekly leadership breakfasts for all student-athletes, and convenes workshops for coaches and student-athletes with STRIVE, a nonprofit dedicated to spreading the power of character-driven leadership,

Athletic Director Katie LaRue shared her excitement for the leadership development program by

saying, “I feel that our athletes currently have a basic understanding of what leadership is, but we want to help them develop those skills on a deeper level. Leadership development is a next step for our program. We focus on the contributions that athletes can make to our teams, our program, and to the community.”

FIELD HOCKEY With a new coaching staff, Field Hockey battled until the final whistle during every matchup. Zoe Crawley ’18 helped lead the team by providing great defensive stands in goal for the Snails all season and earning All-ISL post season honors. Field Hockey gave back by hosting a donation drive to help the victims of Hurricane Harvey through the “Make It Fit” Foundation for Autism.

CROSS -COUNTRY The Cross-Country team proved that Snails can be speedy by achieving significant improvements in their racing times throughout the season. In the last race of the season, Annabelle Stack ’21 and Maddie Bennett ’18 finished the ISL Championship race with two of the three fastest times ever recorded by Madeira runners on that course.

SOCCER Behind the guidance of a new coaching staff and led by seniors Bella Godes and Bella Valcourt, the soccer team played stiff competition throughout the year. With a large contingency of underclasswomen, the Snails look to build upon their growth next year. In her first year on the team, Halle Johnson ’21 was honored as a member of the All-ISL A Division team.

TENNIS The tennis team came off a strong 2016 campaign, with Emilija Platukyte earning Second Team All-State and the All ISL AA Division team. A young team, the Snails completed their season with a first-round ISL tournament victory over Georgetown Day. WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 9


ARTS

PERFORMING ARTS

A L L I E H OA N G ’ 1 9

FA L L P R O D U C T I O N U P T H E D O W N S TA I R C A S E This fall the actors and technical crew produced Up the Down Staircase by Christopher Sergel. Based on the novel by Bel Kaufman, students worked hard to become each of the characters in this complex, witty, and challenging ensemble. The actors began their experience during preseason, bonding while on a caving trip, and continuing throughout the rehearsal process. The cast delivered a fast paced and dramatic performance that brought the audience along for the journey. The stagecraft class constructed and put finishing touches on the bold set to help complete the show. The Madeira commuALEX R A P O S O ’ 18

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018

nity is proud that the girls came together as an ensemble to make this moving play a reality.


M A D E I R A DA N C E R S S O A R Madeira dance students are studying contemporary ballet, hip hop, musical theater, and modern/ improv styles. Dance at Madeira includes two troupes, Madeira Dancers, which is open to any level of dancer, and Select for the more technically-advanced student. The Madeira Select dancers attended the WAISDEA (Washington Area Independent School Dance Education Association) dance festival at Sandy Spring Friends School this past October. The students took workshop classes in modern, hip hop, musical theater, jazz, and gyrokinesis. The Select dancers are excited to welcome Zach Heller, a professional dancer with Gus Giordano Jazz company in Chicago, and a former student of Mrs. Sarson, as a guest choreographer. Select Dance hosts several guest teachers and choreographers throughout the year, including master classes and dance conventions. M A D E I R A S E L EC T DA N C E R S

CAST & CREW OF UP THE DOWN S TA I R C A S E

WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 11


MADEIRA

Alumnae

Madeira has always recognized the importance of the arts. Dating back decades, Madeira has produced extraordinarily talented artists who have contributed to the world in their own unique ways — from professional artists to advocates.

Artists

40s

THROUGH THE DECADES

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018

( 1)

(2)

(1) BARBARA JACKSON HAZARD‘49

(2) ADELE HERTER SERONDE ‘43

The Red Trees, oil on canvas

Sargant Mountain, oil on canvas

“I’ve been painting for over 50 years now, and have shown my work in St. Petersburg, Russia and all over the US.”

Known for her unique style of painting, Adele does not use an easel. Instead, she prefers to lay the canvas flat on the ground, often placing additional canvases around it, expanding the painting.


Madeira

added

an “A” to

our

STEM

program,

making

it “STEAM” (Science, Technology,

Engineering, Arts, and Math), which reflects the importance of the arts across all disciplines. All 9th graders take an introductory class, “STEAM Fundamentals,” where they use the design process to analyze situations and solve problems. As part of the All the Difference campaign, the school plans to build a brand new STEAM Center to ensure that the arts are integrated across disciplines and will continue to thrive at Madeira.

Take a journey through decades of art, and enjoy a selection of pieces from some of Madeira’s talented alumnae.

(1)

50s (2)

(1 ) S HEILA BODINE ’55 Photograph, Havana, Cuba, November 2016 Sheila is a street photographer who enjoys working in large cities.

(2) VALERIE WILLIAMS ’56 Vain Cat, Greeting Card “I view my cards as little gifts to my family and friends. Whimsical, sometimes funny, and occasionally political, they provide me with a way to keep in touch.”

WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 13


(1)

60s (2)

(3)

(1 ) A NNE PALMS CHALMERS ’60

(2) ISAB HITZ GOFF ’64

(3) CHRISTINA SCHLESINGER ’64

The Sun is Moving North Again, oil on canvas

Boathouse, oil on canvas

Chagall Returns to Venice Beach, Mural

An oil painting of an ancient oak in Chalmer’s yard. Anne’s art is also featured on this issue’s cover. 14

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018

“ The piece depicts Goff’s family compound on Hitz Point in Sunset, Maine, which was built by her great, great grandmother, Jane Hitz in 1887.

Christina’s mural has been designated an iconic mural of Los Angeles and given landmark status.


(1)

(2)

(3)

(1 ) KEVEN CARNEY WILDER ’66 Purple Garden, oil on canvas “My passion is oils, painting compositions of flowers and flora that verge into abstraction.” Keven began a second career after getting a BFA from the Art Institute of Chicago. “Concentrating on making art at this stage of my life has been endlessly fascinating.”

(2) ROSAMOND PITTMAN CASEY ’69

(3) D OLLY SMITH ’65

Crafty Serpents, oil on canvas

Green Reamer, Colored pencil on Strathmore cold press drawing paper.

“I was interested in the wires beneath our desks, and all that they metaphorically suggested. This led to an exhibition called Tablet & Cloud: Pilgrims in Cyberspace, a series of paintings depicting ourselves in relation to our computers.”

“I am fascinated by the shadows and reflection in glass.” WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 15


(1)

70s

(2)

(4)

(3)

(2) CAROL CAPALBI DELANEY ’72 Reflect on Light and Water “I enjoy art and find that it is a kind of celebration, as well as a meditative reflection.” 16

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018

(2) SUSAN READ CRONIN ’71

(3) R OBIN BROOKS ‘70

XXO, Bronze

Japan, 1990. Concrete, Steel

Susan, author of Bronze Casting in a Nutshell, creates bronze sculptures with allegorical themes. Susan created a limited edition of 60 small writing elephants.

Robin’s art juxtaposes inner quiet with excitement while finding balance, reflecting her story of spending her early formative years in Tokyo before becoming part of the American culture.

(4) ALISON BRUSH ’72 Callie, graphite drawing “I am one of the lucky students who was taught by Anne Truitt at Madeira. Her mentorship has been invaluable to me.”


(1)

(2)

(4)

(3)

(1 ) HART JAMES ’74 Below the Bluffs Looking Up, oil on canvas “I do not view rocks as inanimate objects. I see them as animate and contemplate their movement over the years.”

(2) JENNIFER CORCORAN ‘74

(3) ELIZABETH “TILLY” STRAUSS ’79

(4) LOU SHORE WINSHIP ’78

She Sings to the Stars, A series of films about feminine nature.

Midnight Rush, acrylic on canvas

“Marcia Myers saw something in me and never let me give it up. I just wasn’t a painter… I’m an interior designer.”

Jennifer is a film writer and director.

Elizabeth’s work is centered on marking time, and is a meditation of loss, remembrance, and the endurance of personal identity.

Outdoor Space

WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 17


(1)

80s (2a,b)

(3)

(1) I SA CATTO ‘83 Magpie, Watercolor Isa is a professional artist, teacher, and writer whose work has been widely exhibited throughout the United States and abroad.

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018

(2) NANCY JOHNSON HILLENGAS ‘80 a. Boats b. Festina Lente Nancy is an amateur photographer and watercolor artist.

(3) CHRISTA TOOLE ‘89 Christa’s work explores the subjects of space, energy and transformation, using paint, thread, and wax.


(1)

(2)

(3)

(1 ) TOBY CHIEFFO-REIDWAY ‘89

(2) AMI VITALE ‘89

(3) L AUREN BROCKMAN‘84

Serenity, photograph

Alio, photograph

Acorn Jar, white stoneware

A portrait of Ella at sunset.

Vitale’s journey as a photographer, writer, and filmmaker has taken her to over 90 countries where she has witnessed civil unrest and violence, but also surreal beauty and the enduring power of the human spirit.

“I have always loved the shape of acorns, and living in Raleigh, NC (the “City of Oaks”), it was a natural point of inspiration for a pot.” WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 19


(1)

90s (2)

(1) J ENNIFER SUSSMAN FEHR ‘90

(2) JACQUELINE MORAIS EASLEY ‘92

Through the Eyes of the Beholder, photograph

Peasant Woman, charcoal drawing

“The darkroom beneath the Science Center at Madeira was my home away from home. I am currently a pro photographer in Florida.”

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018

“I was an AP Art student at Madeira. My student drawing earned a national Blue Ribbon Award, and hung in the Corcoran Gallery. I enjoy art as a hobby.”


(2)

(1)

(3)

(1 ) LAURA KNISELY GEISEL‘98

(2) EMERY MIKEL ‘96

(3) C YNTHIA ABERNATHY ‘97

Dreamscape of Freedom, quilt

Woman in Charcoal, Charcoal and conte crayon on gray paper

Koi Mask, tooled leather and acrylic paint

This quilt was a gift for Alexandra Puritz’s ’09 mother. Landscape quilting brings heirloom fabrics together to enhance the emotional beauty. This piece includes fabric from Alexandra’s birth quilt, a piece of her Bat Mitzvah dress, as well as fabrics from Laura’s family history.

“I think I have always been an artist, and was thrilled to find my calling as an art therapist. I use art to help others heal, explore, and express themselves.”

After majoring in Computer Graphics, Abernathy quickly realized that she missed the tactile nature of non-digital art. She specializes in leatherwork for display and costumes. WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 21


Teachers Madeira’s visual art teachers over the

decades have inspired many new artists. Numerous Madeira art teachers have had renowned professional art careers,

WHO INSPIRED MADEIRA ARTISTS

gracing museum exhibits and galleries around the world. A few works from Madeira’s visual art teachers are pictured here. These teachers and many others have shaped and inspired a love of art in countless Madeira students.

ANNE TRUITT P’74,76 Selected Works, Sculpture Teacher at Madeira from 1967–1972 Deceased December, 2004

DAVID BOTTINI Down River Autumn, acrylic on canvas Inspired by memories of Greenway Teacher at Madeira from 1998–2003 22

MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018


CONSTANCE MATTOX Calla Lily, photograph Teacher at Madeira from 2008 to present

MARCIA MYERS Elba, Triptych, fresco on linen Teacher at Madeira from 1973–1987 Deceased November 27, 2008

JANOS ENYEDI Elevated Views, graphite on archival board Teacher at Madeira from 1981–1984 Deceased October 6, 2011

Which Madeira visual art teachers inspired you? Share your stories at madeiraalumnae@madeira.org Want to add your art to Madeira’s Alumnae Artist Page? Submit your art at madeira.org/alumnaeart WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 23


Campaign progress‌ RAISED:

$56.7M *

GOAL:

Total donors

Number of donors who gave their largest gift ever to Madeira Number of donors who have given $1 million or more to the Campaign

RAISED:

4,043 173 11

$32.9M

GOAL : $40 M

RESIDENTIAL LIFE Provide modernized dorms and expanded community areas to keep Madeira competitive in attracting new students

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018

$85M

RAISED:

$10.6M

GOAL: $26 M

STEAM Transform campus with an innovative new interdisciplinary STEAM Center


For more information on the Campaign, visit campaign.madeira.org

RAISED:

ATHLETICS

$0.6M

Build new athletic facilities that rival our academic experience and keep us competitive among peer schools

GOAL: $2M

RAISED:

$9.9M

GOAL : $10 M

MADEIRA FUND RAISED:

$1.3M

GOAL: $5M

Support today’s students with gifts that are put to immediate use

CO-CURRICULUM Endow Madeira’s signature differentiator, which prepares girls in both the classroom and the real world

*

As of 11.20.2017 includes unrestricted funds

WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 25


The Wisniewskis Understand the Importance of Giving

TEACHERS INSPIRE THEIR LARGEST GIFT E VER TO MADEIRA.

Susan continues, “We ended up giving a donation to the school toward the end of Alex’s Madeira career, specifically because of how impressed we were by the teachers.” Kate adds, “We always talk about our friends at Madeira, and I certainly have close friends from high school. But the teachers and the way they pushed me and figured out how to inspire me was really special.”

K

ATE WISNIEWSKI WEIR ’02 remembers when she began to look at high schools. “My mom always told me that high school would be her choice and college would be mine. Fortunately, Madeira ended up being both of our choices.” Kate’s sister, Alex Wisniewski Nance ’06, followed in her footsteps at Madeira, and had an equally impactful, yet very different experience. Madeira was Susan Maybaum’s choice for her daughters because of the high caliber of academics, single-sex environment, and opportunity for each of her daughters to find their own voice at the school. “My daughters are very different people, and Madeira was the perfect school for both of them, for very different reasons,” Susan recalls.

“After I learned the intricacies of giving, this gift was a no brainer for me and my family.” Teachers Inspire Gift Despite their differences, a love for the teaching at Madeira and a desire to support the school after graduation are common threads that they both share. Alex explains, “Mr. Campbell was my favorite teacher. His medieval history class was very impactful. Also math was, admittedly, not my best subject, but Mr. Cai made math bearable. He was the best.”

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MADEIRA TODAY WINTER 2018

Family Commitment to Philanthropy Susan and her husband, Mark, instilled a spirit of giving and philanthropy in Kate and Alex that remains to this day. “My parents always taught us the importance of giving to your alma mater,” Alex said. “Particularly one that had as big of an impact as Madeira did. There was never a question about whether or not we should give.” Breaking a Large Gift into Manageable Chunks Kate continued, “Initially, I did not know a lot about the logistics of a large gift. I had always donated to the School, but I had this vision that if you committed to a certain amount, you had to write a giant check immediately. It does not work that way—the gift can be distributed as a commitment over time. After I learned the intricacies of giving, this gift was a no brainer for me and my family.” The Wisniewskis decided, as an extended family, that they were all at a point in their lives that it made sense to give their largest gift ever to Madeira for the All the Difference campaign. Susan, Kate, and Alex each stressed the importance of funding single-sex institutions and continuous improvements for Madeira to remain competitive in the market. Gift Allows Madeira to Choose Greatest Need The Wisniewskis have designated their gift to be allocated according to the areas of greatest need, and trust the School’s decision process. “I am confident that the School understands how to meet its needs because Madeira certainly met my daughters’ needs,” Susan remarked. Donors like the Wisniewskis, who have given their largest gift ever to Madeira for this campaign, truly help make all the difference for Madeira’s future.


CAMPAIGNGIFTSTORIES

For Gregory & Chapin Brown, Giving is a Collaborative Process Gregory adds, “When she chose Madeira, I was really excited. The high academic rigor and the nurturing environment for young women made it the perfect school for Chapin. The alumnae are the best evidence of the school’s success. I have been so impressed with Madeira alumnae.”

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N ADDITION TO HER REGULAR DUTIES as a student, Chapin Brown ’19 has been involved in a collaborative process with her father, Gregory, to decide the most effective ways to contribute to the All the Difference campaign. Chapin explains, “My Dad was intent on having me as involved as possible so that he would donate something that would be useful and something that I could be proud of. I have enjoyed being involved in the conversation. I was wary at first because I was intimidated to discuss financials, but it’s been very meaningful to me.” Madeira Ties Begin Early The affection that the Browns have for Madeira started long before Chapin enrolled. As a high school student in 1982, Gregory participated in a program that brought students to the Soviet Union. Joining him on the trip were several Madeira girls, who immediately made a strong impression on him. He formed lasting connections with the Madeira girls, staying in contact throughout high school and beyond. He also became close friends with Madeira alumnae when he was a student at the University of Virginia. His strong positive impression of Madeira girls continued, and he always thought that it would be a great place for his daughter to attend. When the time came for Chapin to choose a high school, he did not want to pressure her one way or another. Instead, he provided her a roster of schools and allowed Chapin to make the decision herself. Academic Rigor with Nurturing Environment Chapin remembers the final decision and how her mind always came back to Madeira. “When you walk onto campus, you get such a positive vibe. I did not feel that at any of the other schools. With Madeira, it just felt right.”

Gift Honors Special Person Not only has the process been collaborative, but it’s also been meaningful. Chapin and Gregory are dedicating their gift to Chapin’s late godfather, John Mason Flicker, who was Gregory’s best friend. He and Gregory met at boarding school, Deerfield Academy. Before he passed, John ensured that Chapin had the ability to attend the boarding school of her choice. Chapin would not be at Madeira without John, and she is forever grateful. “John meant so much to my Dad and me. We want his legacy to be honored not only at the place where he went to school, but also at Madeira, because I would not be here without John’s help. It’s definitely touching.”

“My Dad was intent on having me as involved as possible so that he would donate something that would be useful…” Gift Designated to Dorm Modernization The Brown’s gift is designated to the modernization of the dorms. Chapin and Gregory recognized the importance of upgraded spaces, like additional adult apartments, larger common space for the whole dorm to congregate, modernized bathrooms, lighting, and heating/air conditioning, as an essential part in building a great residential community, so dorm modernization resonated with them. Madeira has meant so much to the Browns over the years, from Gregory’s introduction as an exchange student to Chapin’s experiences as a student. For them to be able to donate to a place they love, to honor someone who has meant so much to them, is extra special.

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Alumnae Events MA DE I R A M I X & M I N GL E AUGUST 3, 2017 OLD TOWN ALEXANDRIA, Hosted by Madeira Trustee, Will & Denise Dunbar P’17 1. C  urrent Board Trustees Harry Klaff P’12,’13, & ’17 & Will Dunbar P’17 & 2. Pilar Cabeza de Vaca 3. C  ourtney Roberts P’21 & Kathleen McDermott ’01

MADEIRA CELEBRATION IN THE HAMPTONS AUGUST 17, 2017 MAIDSTONE CLUB, EAST HAMPTON, NEW YORK Hosted by Madeira Board of Trustees President, Cathy Harris Shraga ’70 Front, L to R: Patti Collins, Ann ffolliott ’72, Louise Holland Peterson ’75, Cathy Harris Shraga ’70, Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, Christina Weppner ’66 Back, L to R: Kathryn (Kitty) McGraw Berry ’70, Jessica Dawson ’90, Susan Brody ’65, Connie Staudt de Ropp ’62, Nancy Cooper Coles ’87, Anne Peyton Cooper ’46 P’87

CO C K TA I L S, CO N V E R S AT I O N , & C E L E B R AT I O N ! JULY 28, 2017 JACKSON, WYOMING Hosted by Ann Frame Beddow ’72 & Emmie Hill ’70 at the home of Ann & Ed Beddow Front, L to R: Michael Minter, Emmie Hill ’70, Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, Emmy Champion Knobloch ’52, Ann Frame Beddow ’72, Addie Marshall Donnan ’42, Amy Wallop Hendrickson ’81 Back, L to R: Cornelia Carey ’76, Joan Anzelmo P’07, Emily Carey Cronin ’71, Julie Thomas Obering ’60, George & Cecilia Wallace P’17 Not pictured: Karen Terra P’90, Bob Graham, & Ed Beddow

CEL EB RATI N G S UMMER I N MAI N E AUGUST 15, 2017 ASTICOU INN, NORTHEAST HARBOR, MAINE L to R: Tony Fitch, Leslie Meek Fitch ’58, Clare Payne ’70, Gayle May Foster ‘57

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A V E RY S P E C I A L T H A N K YO U METROPOLITAN EV ENT The Alumnae Council hosted their annual reception at The Metropolitan Club on October 20 with guest speaker, set decorator Missy Parker ’89. CHARLOTTE Madeira Trustee, Gaither Smoot Deaton ’88 & her husband Robert hosted a lovely event on October 12, 2017 at the Quail Hollow Club in Charlotte! CHICAGO Keven Carney Wilder ’66 & Nicholas Wilder opened their beautiful Chicago home on November 8, 2017 to a lively group of Madeira Alumnae.


M A D E I R A VI S I TS VI RG I N I A M U S EUM O F F I N E ARTS JUNE 8, 2017 RICHMOND, VIRGINIA Hosted by Madeira Trustee Mary Frediani P’11 Front, L to R: Mary Frediani P ’11, Lexi Petronis ’19, Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, Mary McCarthy ’16, Laurie McCarthy P ’16, Ruthie Collins Cogar ’75, Lark Lovering ’64 Back, L to R: Judith Wall Guest ’83, Kathleen Flood Reid ’82, Laurie Petronis P ’19, Eileen Harkness ’05, Warren Davis, Leslie Meek Fitch ’58

MADEIRA IN LONDON NOVEMBER 28, 2017 LONDON, ENGLAND 1. Mark Johnson & Lia Choi ’00

LU N C H & TO U R AT MO UN T VERN O N JUNE 11, 2017 AT MOUNT VERNON, VIRGINIA 1. Betsy Woodhall Rackley ’58 P’86, Dorotty Nagle P’95, Nancy Maguire Pyne ’43, Lisa Moore P’87 GP’16, Randall Moore Ware ’87 P’16, Carter Ware ’16

2. D  ebby Owen Turner ’55, Pilar Cabeza de Vaca, Jenny Prey ’03, Claire McKinney ’07, & Pat Turner 3. D  avid Seward, Caroline Acheson Seward ’80, & Sophie Muir Rothschild ‘87

2. Bob & Karen Harriman P’07, Cristina Richards P’02 ’06, Carolina Richards ’06, Cri-Cri Richards Randolph ’02

M A D E I R A C E L EB RATI O N BY TH E L A K E OCTOBER 18, 2017 SEATTLE TENNIS CLUB Hosted by Madeira Trustee Page Hopkins ’81 & Kimberly Hughes-Moazed ’81 1. T  aylor Ganz ’05, Khadija Shirazy ’05, Madeira Alumnae Council Member, Lauryn Douglas ’06. 2. Anne Lipke ’92, Janelle Irick Bynum ’92

M A D E I R A C E L E B R AT E S S T E A M I N B O S TO N NOVEMBER 15, 2017 AT CAFE ARTSCIENCE IN CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 1. Nicole Williamson ’12, Christie Joyce ’12, Katie Sotos ’11, Andre Withers, Maddie Parks ’10 2. Nancy Young Gilpin ’66 & her niece, Cappy Flynn Daume ’82 3. Sraddha Karnati ’15 & Grace Huang ’16

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O C T O B E R 6 – 7, 2 0 1 7

Family Weekend

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M OT H E R / DA U G H T E R L EG AC Y FA M I L I E S L TO R: Susie Bryan Kondracki ’85, Daughter Alice Kondracki ’21 • Beth Ann Trapold Newton ’82,

Daughter Annie Newton ’20 • Ayse Uzer Crowley ’88, Daughter Holly Crowley ’20 • Danny Sheft Deane ’79, Daughter Ashby Deane ’19 • Avery Miller ’86, Daughter Aves Mocek ’19 • Diana Gilbert Sparrgroves ’86, Daughter Sophia Sparrgroves ’18 • Kelly Nance ’19 standing in for her mom Ingrid Schneider ’85 • Virginia McNeer Callaghan ’84, Daughter Addison Callaghan ’21 • Wendy Whitney Makins ’58, Great niece Jacky Lee ’20 • Brooke Stroud Carnot ’88, Daughter Olivia Carnot ’21 NOT PICTURED: Kimberly Ablard McGowan ’83, Daughter Kate McGowan ’18 • Jackie Arends ’81, Daughter Caroline Cruze ’20 • Liz Turner Rutkowsky ’83, Daughter Marrion Rutkowsky ’20 WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 31


CO-CURRICULUM

A L U M NA P L A C E M E N T S H O W S H E A R T Dr. Jenny Hoare Lindsey ’84 supervises memorable pediatric cardiology internship No one understands the power and impact of Madeira’s Co-Curriculum placements better than Madeira alumnae. Taking on a Madeira intern for a Co-Curriculum placement is a valuable way to give back to the school by enriching the lives of current students. Dr. Jenny Hoare Lindsey ’84 did just that when she supervised Kristin Joostema ’16 for an unforgettable senior internship. With five-week placements, Madeira interns are able to maximize their learning opportunity. Over the course of Kristin’s five weeks, she was able to shadow Dr. Lindsey in each of the practice’s offices, interacting with patients and observing procedures, such as stress tests and electrocardiograms. Kristin also joined Dr. Lindsey on hospital rounds. Kristin was so impressed with not only Dr. Lindsey’s incredible cardiology knowledge, but equally important, how Dr. Lindsey interacted with her patients and their families in the hospital and in her clinics. “Getting to work in a pediatric office, seeing Dr. Lindsey day Jenny Hoare Lindsey ’84 with intern Kristin Joostema ’16 to day was fantastic. She is amazing. Although hectic and crazy, my internship affirmed what I want to do, and gave me even more motivation to succeed in college so I can reach that end goal,” Kristin said. “I would encourage other alums to take a Dr. Lindsey reflected upon her Madeira girl for her Co-Curriculum project. own Co-Curriculum internships in Start with the goal of improving upon your designing Kristin’s placement. She own Co-Curriculum experience, and share was mindful of giving Kristin expothe career that you love!” sure to several aspects of her practice, while also giving her time to research what she was seeing to deepen the experience. “I would encourage other alums to take a Madeira girl for her Co-Curriculum project. Start with the goal of improving upon your own Co-Curriculum experience, and share the career that you love,” says Dr. Lindsey. Kristin reflected, “It was great to work for an alumna who understands all that can be gained from Co-Curriculum, who wanted me to get the most out of my five weeks. Dr. Lindsey didn’t just sit me in a corner; she took the time to draw diagrams of the heart and walk me through step-by-step what was happening in a case. Learning from a fellow Madeira girl was awesome!” Jenny enjoyed hosting her intern. “I had a great time supervising Kristin. I know she is well educated and knows how to think through problems, so that made it easy to include her when working through the thought process involved in patient care,” she says. Kristin, now a pre-health sophomore at University of Richmond, noted that some of the information she learned from Dr. Lindsey, like the functions of the heart and heart valves, has come in handy for her college Biology class. Do you have a potential internship Jenny and Kristin share the bond of Madeira and Co-Curriculum. for a Madeira girl? Go to Kristin summarizes the experience, “To have the opportunity to work www.madeira.org/placement with a fellow Madeira girl who started with your same high school experience and made it in the world is so inspiring. I’ll be forever grateful to Dr. Lindsey for her advice and experience.” 32

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S T U D E N T E XC E L S WO R K I NG O N C A NC E R R E S E A R C H An incredible Co-Curriculum placement at George Washington Hospital Cancer Center Diya Kallam ’18 had a unique and remarkable senior year Co-Curriculum placement. She interned with the George Washington University Hospital Cancer Center, where she was the only high school student, and, as part of her daily tasks, worked directly with ovarian cancer cells. When Diya first came to Madeira, she was not particularly interested in science. She credits Madeira’s curriculum and faculty for igniting the strong passion she has now. “Madeira is the place that sparked my interest in science and a big reason was the Madeira faculty,” Diya stated. “I love the way that they teach science and also bring current news into the classroom to relate what we are learning to issues in the real world. It’s really great.” After completing her sophomore Co-Curriculum placement at Kilmer Center, she actively sought out a member of Congress who was passionate about science and technology for her junior year placement — which is how she came to intern for Congresswoman Diana DeGette from Colorado. As a senior, she was presented with the incredible opportunity to work in an environment that researches and studies cancer cells. Entering a workplace comprised of college interns, medical students, and PhD candidates can be daunting for a high school student. But Diya credits Madeira and her previous Co-Curriculum experience for preparing her to succeed in such an environment. Diya explains: “I think Madeira prepared me very well because of my past internships. Those placements allowed me to work with a lot of other adults and children and to get the necessary experience to excel in an environment like the George Washington University Hospital.” The day-to-day tasks that Diya was given at her placement were remarkable for a high school student. During the first few weeks, she shadowed her supervisor, who taught her about how to care for ovarian cancer cells. The team grew the cells in flasks, and Diya helped split the cells and move them to other flasks to prevent them from expanding and dying. During the final few weeks, Diya was given her own project to complete, which involved treating the ovarian cancer cells with two different kinds of drugs to evaluate their effectiveness and compare results. Diya was the first Madeira student to intern at the George Washington University Hospital Cancer Center and would highly recommend it for other students. “I would definitely recommend my placement for other Madeira students. It was such an amazing experience for a high school student because you are working directly with cancer cells and are surrounded by professionals and medical students. I had so many of my colleagues at George Washington University Hospital tell me how amazing it was that a student from high school was exposed to this type of environment.” Diya plans to study medicine in college.

“I love the way that [the Madeira faculty] teach science and also bring current news into the classroom to relate what we are learning to issues in the real world.” Diya Kallam ’18

Thanks to Kimberly Russo P’20 (Gabrielle), CEO of George Washington Hospital, for helping Madeira secure this internship at GW Hospital Cancer Center. As a teaching hospital, GW is an outstanding addition to the senior year Co-Curriculum offerings.

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ALL SCHOOL MEETINGS

CAMPUS

BRE ATKINSON ’12

SANDY UNGAR

PAGE HOPKINS ’81

RESILIENCE & REDEFINITION

FREE SPEECH IN TODAY’S WORLD

A PEEK INTO THE PAST

Bre Atkinson, class of 2012, shared her personal story of resilience and redefinition of self after an athletic injury sidelined her dream to play college volleyball at Duke University. After years of injury setbacks, Atkinson graduated and became a full-time consultant at Accenture. She thought her volleyball days were over, but through hard work and perseverance, she earned a spot on the Jamaican Women’s National Volleyball Team and is now competing internationally. Atkinson encouraged the students to overcome obstacles, big or small. “When those obstacles come, if you let them, they’ll stop you. If you try to work around them, jump over them, do the best you can regardless of your circumstances, you’re going to end in a place that’s even better than where you would have been. And victory after defeat, victory after obstacles, is so much sweeter.”

Students were encouraged by Sanford Ungar, Director of the Freedom of Speech Project at Georgetown University, and Former President of Goucher College, to ponder what free speech is and what it means to them. Mr. Ungar discussed several relevant scenarios with the student body. Sanford Ungar, a journalist and author, served as the tenth president of Goucher College. Prior to that, Ungar was director of Voice of America, the US government’s principal international broadcasting agency. He is a respected educator who previously served as dean of the School of Communication at American University. Ungar also is an international journalist with extensive experience at news organizations, such as Foreign Policy, The Washington Post, and The Atlantic, and he was an award-winning co-host of All Things Considered at NPR. He is a graduate of Harvard College and the London School of Economics and the author or editor of six nonfiction books.

Page Hopkins ’81, offered a humorous look at her days as a Madeira student, and some notable differences from today. Hopkins had the audience howling as she described her student days, including having one phone for the entire dorm and smoking cigarettes on campus. Hopkins is a journalist currently appearing on MSNBC’s First Look and NBC’s Early Today. Gaining experience first as a producer, and then anchor for several local network affiliates, Hopkins joined Bloomberg Television as the morning anchor of Moneycast in 1999. In 2002 Hopkins began working at Fox News and became the co-anchor of Fox & Friends Weekend, Fox News Live and Breaking News Desk. Hopkins currently serves on the Board of Trustees at Madeira.

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SPEAKERS SUE LUANGKHOT HOPPIN ’87

MOLLY LOGAN

MISSY PARKER ’89

SUPPORTING OUR SERVICE MEN, WOMEN, & FAMILIES

INSPIRING WOMAN’S LEADERSHIP & CREATIVITY

FROM MADEIRA TO THE MOVIES

We were honored to welcome Sue Luangkhot Hoppin ’87 back to campus for our annual Veteran’s Day All School Meeting. Hoppin spoke to students and staff about her experience as a military spouse and shared advice on the best ways to support our service members and their families. Hoppin is a nationally recognized expert on military spouse and family issues, and the founder of the National Military Spouse Network, a professional development and networking membership organization supporting the professional career and entrepreneurial goals of military spouses. She is also a member of Madeira’s Alumnae Council.

Molly Logan, founder of School of Doodle, spoke at the Family Weekend All School Meeting. School of Doodle is a learning lab, by and for girls, that gives young women the tools to turn creative potential into future success. From photography and feminism to art and activism, Doodle’s content and community events provide girls with education, entertainment, and the opportunity to develop critical life skills and confidence to rule the world. Their motto is, “Tell a girl that she matters and that you will pay her for her ideas.”

What a treat it was to have Missy Parker ’89 give a sneak peek on what it takes to decorate a real Hollywood movie set like the recent blockbuster, Hidden Figures, a period drama about three African American female engineers working at NASA in the 1960s. Parker’s job as a set decorator is to design and build the worlds inhabited by the characters in the film; be it a spacecraft, a bedroom, or a pirate ship. Parker has been working in the film industry for 20 years, moving up the ranks. She has worked on large blockbuster movies like, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, The Avengers, and Pirates of the Caribbean.

HUMAN TRAFFICKING AWARENESS FORUM

S K Y E JA N N E RY- BA RNE Y ’ 1 8, CO N G R E S S WO MA N BA RBARA CO M S TO C K , A ND D RA INS VILLE D I S TR I C T S U P ERVISO R J O HN F O US T

Madeira hosted a human trafficking awareness community seminar, partnering with the Great Falls Rotary Club and Airline Ambassadors International to provide an informative and powerful discussion about human trafficking prevention. Madeira senior and 2016–17 Miss Teen Virginia, Skye JanneryBarney ’18, works closely with Airline Ambassadors International and has used her platform to work on the prevention of trafficking. US Representative Barbara Comstock and Dranesville District Supervisor John Foust were in attendance. Rep. Comstock emphasized the growing danger for young women. “Part of the psychology is how they prey upon young women at an average age of 12–13 years old,” said Rep. Comstock, “They date them, they groom them, they make them think they are a girlfriend. Before they know it, these girls are victims. Gangs like MS-13 are getting more involved in human trafficking; it is a higher money-maker than trafficking drugs.”

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FIND F E L LOW S NA I LS

WELCOME TO THE MADEIRA O N L I N E A LU M N A E D I R E C TO RY > This directory allows you to search for classmates by name, class year, city, or profession.

> Use this new tool to reconnect, network, or make new friends. > Sign up for volunteer opportunities plus update your contact and professional information.

Questions? Please contact the Alumnae Relations office at 703-556-8221 or madeiraonlinedirectory@madeira.org

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ALUMNAE

AU T HORS

AN AMERICAN AWAKENING: FROM GROUND ZERO TO KATRINA: THE PEOPLE WE ARE FREE TO BE

COU NTRY G RIT: A FARMOIR OF FIN DING PU RPOSE AN D LOVE

MY HUSBAND RAN OFF WITH THE NANNY AND GOD DO I MISS HER

SCOT TI E B ROWN J O N ES ’7 1

TRACY DAVIS ’75

COURTNEY COWART ’78

Scottie Jones lived a typical suburban life in Phoenix until her husband, Greg, got into a near-fatal car accident. While recovering, he became convinced that they needed a simpler way of life, one connected with nature and each other. Driven by a desire to cut ties with a material and convenient life that had left them feeling empty, they bought a farmhouse on 60 acres in Oregon and said goodbye to everything they knew. But though the grass may look greener, the road to pastoral bliss was fraught with financial woes, relentless rural roadblocks, and colossal failures. When it became almost too much to bear, Scottie had the idea of turning a house they initially built for their daughter into a Farm Stay, where people could visit and learn about Leaping Lamb Farm. The Farm Stay rescued them from foreclosure and the couple now has the means to sustain it. Country Grit will resonate with people itching to get back to the land.

An American Awakening spans the time from September 11, 2001, through the second anniversary of Hurricane Katrina in 2007. Beginning in New York, this account reveals Cowart’s role in the Ground Zero recovery ministry at St. Paul’s Chapel, “The Little Church That Stood,” across the street from the World Trade Center. This memoir presents the spiritual commitments made when the author’s life was spared on 9/11, which eventually led her to answer the call to serve in New Orleans. It is an engrossing account of Cowart’s experience in post-Katrina New Orleans as director of the Office of Disaster Response for the Episcopal Diocese of Louisiana. Cowart is probably the only American spiritual leader called to a sustained, front-line role in both the 9/11 and Katrina disasters, and this memoir chronicles that dual experience.

Carly Macalister intended to live the perfect life in the ideal world. When her husband, Paul, leaves his job to become an artist (with no talent whatsoever, but he loves the idea of it!), she still has Patrice, the young and lovely nanny who keeps everything and everyone together. A few days before Christmas, Paul and Patrice disappear, leaving Carly with financial problems that must be resolved, a bruised ego that must be healed, and a desperate need to be strong for her children. In Davis’s novel My Husband Ran Off with the Nanny and God Do I Miss Her, the author creates a funny, poignant, and sometimes heartbreaking story of one woman’s struggle to survive. From the first frantic scene to the surprise ending, readers will be carried along by this compelling page turner.

THE ART OF THE SPONGE: A HANDBOOK FOR HOSTS AND HOUSEGUESTS CHRISTINA O’DUNNE GRIFFIN ’62

With some careful planning and adherence to a few noteworthy rules, your travel bug and vacation plans can be satisfied with nary a dollar spent on lodging. Judicious exploitation of your friends’ and acquaintances’ first, second, even third homes will ensure you a warm welcome anytime! This tongue-in-cheek guide lays out the proper etiquette for sponging, the ancient art of getting the most out of being a guest—staying for free with almost all food and drink included. From announcing your visit in a manner that discourages the host from saying no to how to include your children and dog, these tips will equip you to enjoy your stay in that expensive locale or desirable vacation spot. Wary hosts will benefit as well from pointers on evading objectionable prospective guests and suggestions for what to say when it’s high time for them to head home. WINTER 2018 MADEIRA TODAY 37

Madeira Today Winter 2018  
Madeira Today Winter 2018  
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