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madelyn hoagland-hanson |

University of Virginia School of Architecture Master of Landscape Architecture Candidate, 2019

|

Selected Recent Work, January 2018


madelyn hoagland-hanson |

(c) 215.498.1593 | maddiehh@virginia.edu

education Haverford, PA 2011 Edinburgh, Scotland 2010 Charlottesville, VA 2019 (expected)

design + research experience Baltimore, MD June - Aug. 2017

Haverford College, Bachelor of Arts English Major with Departmental Honors University of Edinburgh Study Abroad Program in English Literature

Charlottesville, VA Aug. 2017 - present

University of Virginia School of Architecture Teaching Assistant, Planted Form + Function I

University of Virginia Master of Landscape Architecture

Charlottesville, VA Aug. 2017 - present

University of Virginia School of Architecture Research Assistant, Arctic Design Group

Charlottesville, VA Sept. 2016 - May 2017

University of Virginia School of Architecture Research Assistant to Julie Bargmann, ASLA

writing + publications experience Charlottesville, VA May 2017 - present Haverford, PA Jan. 2009 - May 2011

lunch | UVa student-run design journal Editor, lunch13: Mischief

Philadelphia, PA Jan. 2016

The Bi-College News Writer + Editor

New York, NY Mar. 2015 - June 2016

high proficiency

Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, + InDesign; AutoCAD; Rhinocerous 3D; ArcGIS; Microsoft Office

some proficiency

Autodesk Revit; Google Sketchup; VRay; Grasshopper model building lasercutter, basic woodworking, CNC router, 3D printing, and concrete/plaster casting techniques

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Leena Cho Professor of Landscape Architecture, UVA lsc7t@virginia.edu | 434.243.4322

OLIN Studio Extern environmental + non-profit experience

software skills

references

Mahan Rykiel Associates Summer Design Research Intern

The Horticultural Society of New York Executive Assistant

Seattle, WA Jan. - Dec. 2013

EarthCorps Corps Member

Logan, UT June - Nov. 2012

Utah Conservation Corps Crew Leader

Austin, TX Jan. - June 2012

Texas Conservation Corps Crew Member

languages

Julie Bargmann Professor of Landscape Architecture, UVA jlb6t@virginia.edu | 434.243.2014

Conversational + written French Isaac Hametz Director of Research, Mahan Rykiel ihametz@mahanrykiel.com | 410.900.1632


cover image: Analytical model of Richard Dattner’s Adventure Playground in Central Park (Spring 2017)

table of contents studio projects The Flood Re-seeds: The Memory of Water ...................................................................................................................................... 4 Re-contouring Collapse: Rain & Ruin in Havana, Cuba ................................................................................................................. 16 Break-Line Pavilion..........................................................................................................................................................................22 planting design Garden of Earthly Detritus................................................................................................................................................................32 miscellany Analytical Model: Adventure Playground........................................................................................................................................40 Mountain & Valley............................................................................................................................................................................42 Assisi................................................................................................................................................................................................44 Domesticating Dredge......................................................................................................................................................................46

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THE FLOOD RE-SEEDS

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{the memory of water}


facing: Photoshop concept collage; underlay image of flooding in downtown Richmond after Hurricane Agnes in 2012

LAR6020 Foundation Studio - Final Project with Missy Velez Critics: Montserrat Bonvehi-Rosich & Alex Wall

Spring 2017

This project reimagines the urban hydrology of the city of Richmond, VA as a de facto irrigation system for a massively distributed public garden that begins at the primary drainage corridor for Richmond’s largest watershed - the Shockoe Creek Watershed - and spreads fractally throughout the city via the successive colonization of stream orders. The “flood” begins as a line of red field poppies planted along the watershed’s ninth stream order, and expands and contracts according to both human and non-human agency - floods, wind, the movement of animals, and so on. Part garden, part land art, and part (ephemeral / cyclical) memorial, it attempts to make visible the legacy of human and ecological violence that gave rise to Richmond’s historic economic prosperity while also reveling in the wonder, strangeness, and exuberance of an imagined “super bloom.” “‘Floods’ is the word they use, but in fact it is not flooding; it is remembering. remembering where it used to be. All water has a perfect memory and is forever trying to get back to where it was.” - toni morrison

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burial ground(s)

Shockoe Creek Watershed | Richmond,

former locus of richmond slave trade former bed of shockoe creek, piped and filled by mid-1920s former negro burial ground (filled 19th cent., paved 20th-cent.) former site of navy hill (destroyed by construction of I-95, mid 1950s) former site of jackson ward (destroyed by construction of I-95) james river

where the water was | where the people were Founded at the fall line of the James River where the flat Virginia tidewater meets the rocky hills of the Piedmont, the city of Richmond has always fed on the bustling reciprocity between land and water. Although the James was the city’s primary engine of shipping and trade, the fast-flowing waters of Shockoe Creek cutting southeast through the city’s modern-day core were no less a driver of its development pattern. The east-facing slopes leading down to the area now known as Shockoe Bottom became home to one of the most notorious slave trading operations in the early U.S., as slaves arriving on Richmond’s southern shore were marched across Mayo Bridge to be auctioned or transported by rail to other trading hubs. The western bed of Shockoe Creek meanwhile became home to Lumpkin’s infamous slave jail (“the Devil’s Half-Acre”) and the Negro burial ground from which periodic floods would exhume bodies of the dead, to the horror of those who bore witness. Today this flood-prone, low-lying region bears the comparatively new scars of urban renewal, as the construction of I-95 in the 1950s led to the near-wholesale demolishment of long-established black neighborhoods such as Navy Hill and Jackson Ward that rose up in this area in the wake of abolition. Buried under hundreds of cubic yards of hydraulic fill, paralleled by the railroad, and criss-crossed by elevated highways, what was once the bed of Shockoe Creek is now home to Richmond’s industrial districts.

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VA | 37.5407° N, 77.4360° W


former hydrology

KEY:

Recollecting Water

recollecting water

fill

SCALE OF DRAWING: 1” =& 150’ A sectional history of filling flooding in the Shockoe Creek Valley. 1” = 25 yrs.

A SECTIONAL HISTORY OF FILLING & FLOODING IN SHOCKOE CREEK VALLEY

100-year flood plain railroad track low point shockoe creek

to: gilpin houses n 1st st

2017 1995

present-day flood wall constructed

urbanized hydrology

1950s

I-95 constructed

flood

to: barton heights n 1st st

1996

blizzard of ‘96

1987 1985

election day flood hurricane juan

1972 1969

hurricane agnes hurricane camille

1944

‘the great hurricane’

1940 1937 1936

st. patrick’s day flood

1920s

remaining portion of shockoe creek piped

1913 main street station built

1901

flood control berms installed

1900

100-year flood plain railroad track shockoe creek

to: jackson ward n 1st st

to: barton heights

railroad track n 1st st

C. 1900 1877

extent of urban fill (overlaid on topography) richmond and danville railroad constructed chesapeake and ohio railroad constructed first sewage system constructed

1870

‘the valley of virginia flood’

1771

largest flood on record

1860 1851 1850s

broad street extended into the valley

1845

tredeger iron works established

1837

first turnpike built

1826

richmond dock construction canalizes creek

1816

to: jackson ward n 1st st

100-year flood plain railroad track shockoe creek

railroad track

C. 1865

extent of 100-yr floodplain (overlaid on topography)

market square laid out in present-day shockoe bottom

street grid laid out

1793

1737

100-year flood plain shockoe creek

C. 1600

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intervention 1. Locate the final stream order.

why poppies?

Field poppies are a well-known symbol of remembrance, but they are also an early-successional weed that thrives on disturbance and will grow nearly anywhere, with a particular preference for fallow agricultural fields (hence the secondary nickname “corn poppy”). An explosion of poppies in Richmond’s post-industrial flood plain is a reminder of this region’s forgotten fertility: extreme, otherworldly, ephemeral, beguiling.

Papaver rhoeas COMMON NAMES: Corn Poppy, Flanders

SCALE OF DRAWING: approx. 1” = 1”

Poppy, Field Poppy, Common Poppy

NATIVE RANGE: West Asia, North Africa,

Europe

NATURALIZED RANGE: Worldwide

MEDICINAL USE: Narcotic, sedative,

analgesic

2. Paint Plant it red. CULTURAL SYMBOLISM: War, remembrance, death, sleep, fertility

FLOWER: Showy, scarlet blooms on slender, hairy stalks

LEAF: Once or twice pinnately lobed, toothed + stiffly hairy

FRUIT: Round, hairless dry capsule SEEDS: Small, wind-borne, profuse. Can remain dormant in soil for >80 years.

ROOT: Slender, fibrous tap root

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installation & expansion RULES FOR INSTALLATION

1. start at the ninth stream order.

SCALE OF DRAWING: 1” = 400’

2c. prefer parking lot to street.

2a. follow the path of least resistance.

2d. prefer street to structure.

2b. prefer open ground to parking lot.

3. where necessary, break the line.

initial installation: “the line” The ninth stream order traverses Richmond’s industrial district and runs through three primary material conditions: grass, packed dirt and/or gravel, and asphalt. Here the geometry of the stream order is simplified and altered to fit the path of least resistance: i.e., where possible, it runs through the material that will be easiest to transform into a medium for growth.

richmond henrico turnpike

four-season recycling

matthews st.

x

st. james st. valley road

n. 2nd st.

projected expansion: “the flood” gis analysis of potential areas of colonization, including residential backyards, highway medians, public greenspaces, bare ground, and parking lots. Seed movement is chaotic - transported by wind, people, animals, and water - but here is mapped according to stream orders as seeds may be carried and deposited somewhat predictably by urban drainage corridors.

reco biotechnology hospital st.

x

LOCATION WITHIN WATERSHED

KEY:

structure open ground

street parking lot

line break x 9th stream order

x

16th st.

lovings produce marshall st.

broad st. ambler st. grace st. richmond farmers market franklin st.

main st. realty

main st. 17th st. cary st.

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breaking ground february

Installation & maintenance timelines are based on the life cycle and growing requirements of the field poppy as well as the materials that underlie the line’s imposition. march

material: grass or packed dirt

installation: where the line runs through grass or packed dirt, rotary till, amend, & plant.

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m

material: asphalt parking lot

maintenance: till & re-seed in fall

installation: where the line runs through a parking lot, remove a 6-foot swathe of pavement along an existing edge. rotary till, amend, & plant.


may

september

january

material: asphalt street

maintenance: till & re-seed in fall

installation: where the line runs parallel to the street, till & plant the soft edge. where the line runs perpendicular through a street, paint a 6-foot red crossing mark.

maintenance: till, re-seed, & paint in fall

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year 2: “the line”

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13


year 25: “the flood”

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“Long live the weeds and the wilderness yet.� - gerard manley hopkins

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RE-CONTOURING COLLAPSE

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{rain and ruin in havana, cuba}


facing: Map of land and seafloor elevation at the nexus of the Caribbean tectonic plate, overlaid with ocean currents

LAR6020 Foundation Studio Critics: Montserrat Bonvehi-Rosich & Alex Wall

Spring 2017

The following project proposes an interconnected network of stormwater infiltration basins & public playgrounds in Old Havana, Cuba, where the importation of Spanish colonial architecture (adapted to a hot, dry climate) into the humid climate of the tropics has led, over decades of economic neglect, to chronic problems with building collapse (derrumbes). According to some estimates, up to three buildings per day collapse in Old Havana. This proposal seeks to take advantage of urban topography & the gridded flow of stormwater through Havana’s cobblestone streets to predict which collapse sites will tend to collect and disperse stormwater. This information is used to guide cut & fill operations in sites of collapse so that material from collection sites (stormwater basins) can be repurposed to augment the condition of dispersal sites (playgrounds).

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anatomy of habana vieja neighborhood scale

15th

direction of water flow

- early 16th century

pattern of building decay

late 16th - early 17th century

mass / void

buildling typology

massing pattern

block scale

block section showing stormwater flows, moisture gradients, humidity + infiltration

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massing pattern

direction of water flow

late 17th - 18th century

pattern of building decay

19th

- 20th century


constructing a typical block

informal rooftop shacks

roof overhangs

balconies (private + shared)

buildings with sloped roofs

rooftop walls

narrow paved streets

buildings with flat roofs

porticoes

derrumbes (collapses)

final rhino model

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predicting flow

Functional opposition between two types of collapse site - one that “catches” and one that “throws” water - hints at a possible collaboration.

simplified diagram of havana’s topography

arrows showing direction of stormwater flow

location of grasshopper model

building lots in “poor” condition

sites that tend to “throw” water

sites that tend to “catch” water

grasshopper operations showing collapse sites + tendency to collect and/or disperse water based on orientation to overall city grid + topography

n-s orientation on southern edge: disperse

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e-w orientation on east edge: disperse

e-w orientation on west edge: collect

n-s orientation on north edge: collect


recontouring collapse

If the condition of a “catch” site is exaggerated - by digging a hole to temporarily hold stormwater, for example - that material can be moved to a “throw” site and used to heighten (and in a sense, commemorate) the pre-existing topography of collapse. Such an unruly space - halfwild, half-urban - suggests a playscape, a place where decay might give way to growth.

collapse site i: cut / collect rainy season

dry season

excavate / aerate / add layer of crushed stone / plant with flood, disturbance, + salt tolerant species

streets serve as channels, funneling stormwater into excavated basin

in dry season, space can be mown + used as playing field

buffer zone between site + surrounding foundations offers impromptu gardening space for neighbors

collapse site ii: fill / fun

sort demolition remains for salvageable material / dump excavated material from cut site / shape new topography / cover with permeable fabric

add topsoil / plant with disturbance tolerant grasses + low groundcover / allow spontaneous vegetation to fill in over time

use salvaged materials to fabricate playground structures

constructed topography will settle + change over time as materials degrade

“In part, ruin memory is about what no longer exists. In particular, it forces us to think about the ruins and those living in them in terms of present and evacuated subsistence. This, in the end, is more than a depiction of the past or what has been lost... [At] issue is an urgent present in which all are struggling to not just live, but to live a better life.” 21 - lucía m. suárez, “ruin memory: havana beyond the revolution”


BREAK-LINE PAVILION

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{building tolerance}


facing: Detail photograph of pavilion interior facing southeast

ALAR7010 Research Studio Critics: Seth McDowell, Sami Rintala, Dagur Eggertsson

Fall 2017

The following sketches, photographs, and drawings were produced as part of a design-build studio whose focus was the concept of “tolerance,” broadly conceived, both as a material property and social practice. As part of a three-week workshop led by Visiting Professors Sami Rintala and Dagur Eggertsson, our class of thirteen students collectively designed and constructed a temporary pavilion on the North Terrace of UVA’s Architecture School Grounds out of reclaimed wood from a demolished Virginia farmhouse. The resulting structure cuts across a set of concrete stairs, reflecting them into a sequence of wooden steps that face a central gathering point. Afterwards, to document the build, we meticulously measured each component of the as-built structure and modeled it in Revit, attempting to capture material defects, construction errors, and imperfections as an exercise in probing the limitations of architectural representation.

23


design

selected process sketches (1 week)

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studio members: Esteban Chavez, Andrea Gomez, Leah Grossman, Calvin Heimberg, Yudou Huang, Hutch Landfair, Cong Nie, Sarah Pate, Frank Peng, Kira Rosenbaum, Jingyi Shen, Todd Stoval


build

Over a two-week period, the below structure emerged as the result of collective design decisions such as the use of a horizontal stacking system and the desire to echo the rhythm of the existing steps.

building (2 weeks)

final structure

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documentation

group members: Esteban Chavez, Leah Grossman, Sarah Pate

To produce the following as-built drawings, we spent 33 hours post-construction measuring the proportion and placement of each pavilion block, beam, and runner, including joints. In order to reproduce the irregularity of reclaimed material, we took photographs of the profiles of each unique block (216 photographs in total), noted the location and dimension of major defects in runners and beams, and recorded the species (oak, pine, or poplar) for each discrete piece of wood. All in all, we took measurements for 615 individual blocks, 85 runners, 73 scarf joints, 42 wall beams, 39 stair beams, 33 defects, 18 floor beams, 15 roof beams, 14 door beams, and four foundation pieces, for a total of roughly 3,866 individual measurements.

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“No architecture can be truly noble which is not imperfect.” - john ruskin We then modeled each piece in Revit (1,065 components in total) and re-built the structure in digital space, which took approximately the same amount of time – two weeks – that it took to design and build it in real life. Yet for all our exacting measurements and modeling, the precision of our imprecision is still massively imprecise; it’s impossible to capture, accurately, our own inaccuracies. We are thus forced to double our tolerance for error: first in the vagaries of the structure itself, and then once more in our attempts to represent it.

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longitudinal section

east elevation 28

south elevation


west elevation

north elevation 29


overall site plan

as-built details 7/8”

1d

7/8”

1 Runner

A +⁄- 1-7/8”

1c

5

(a) 2_F_K1a, (b) 2_F_K1b, (c) 2_F_K2, (d) 3_F_K1a, (e) 3_F_K1b, (f) 3_F_K2, (g) 4_F_K1a, (h) 4_F_K1a, (i) 4_F_K2

4-3/8”

2h 2g

2i

(a) 2_F_R1, (b) 3_F_R1, (c) 4_F_R1

2 Block

3 Panel 4 3-5/8” Brass Screw 5 Finishing Nail

3 +⁄- 1-7/8” 4-1/8”

2e 2d

2f 1b

4

1-3/4” 4-1/8”

2b 2a

2c 1a

1-7/8”

A Varies

Elevation Detail

1-A

Section A-A

Axonometric Detail

WALL BLOCKS AND PANELS Scale: 3” = 1’-0”

1 Concrete Stair 2 Runner 3_F_R1

3 Floor Runner 4 Floor Beam

1

A

3_F_R1

A 4 3-5/8”

3

3-13/16”

1-7/8”

2

roof plan

Plan Detail

1-B

Section A-A

Axonometric Detail

CONCRETE STAIR EXTENSION Scale: 3” = 1’-0” +⁄- 3-5/8”

1 Runner

(a) 3_C_R1, (b) 4_C_R1, (c) 5_C_R1, (d) 6_C_R1

2-1/4”

1d

2 Stair Beams

4-1/4”

(a) 4_CE_S1, (b) 4_CE_S2, (c) 4_CE_S3, (d) 4_CE_S4, (e) 4_CE_S5, (f) 4_CE_S6, (g) 4_CE_S7, (h) 5_CE_S1, (i) 6_CE_S1, (j) 6_CE_S2

2j

3 Panel 4 3-5/8” Brass Screw 5 Finishing Nail

3

2i

1c

1-1/4”

1c

+⁄- 3-5/8”

4 2h 1b

5

2g

2f

2e

2d

2c

2a

2b

4-0”

1-7/8”

1a

axon

1b

Elevation Detail

1-C

1-3/4”

Plan Detail

Axonometric Detail

SCARF JOINT Scale: 3” = 1’-0”

1 Runner

(a) 9_E_R1, (b) 10_E_R1

2 Stair Beams

(a) 10_CE_S1, (b) 10_CE_S2, (c) 10_CE_S3, (d) 10_CE_S4, (e) 10_CE_S5, (f) 10_CE_S6 (g) 10_CE_S7

3 Beam

10_D_B1

4 3-5/8” Brass Screw

1-13/16” 1-1/2”

2-0”

1-5/16” 2-1/8” 1-3/8”

2-0”

1-7/8”

2-0”

1-3/4”

1-7/8” 1-7/16” 1-7/8”

1-7/8”

1b 4

2a

2b

2c

2d

2e

2f

2g 3 1a

Plan and Elevation Detail

30

1-D

ANGLED BEAMS AND BLOCKS Scale: 3” = 1’-0”

Axonometric Detail


catalog of components 18_C_K4

18_C_K5

16_E_K7

18_E_K1b 18_E_K8

16_F_K1b

14_E_K5

12_C_K2 12_C_K3 12_C_K4

8_F_K3

8_F_K4

8_F_K6

9_B_K1a 9_B_K1b 9_B_K3 9_B_K4 9_B_K6 9_B_K9

9_B_K2

4_C_R1

13_F_R1

12_E_R1

5_C_K1a 5_C_K1b

1_C_K1a 1_C_K1b 1_C_K2 1_C_K3 1_C_K4 1_C_K5 1_C_K6

17_EF_DB1

18_EF_DB1

10_CE_S6

5_C_K2 5_C_K3

1_E_K1a 1_E_K1b 1_E_K2 1_E_K3 1_E_K4 1_E_K5 1_E_K6 1_E_K7

19_EF_DB1

17_A_B1

4_CE_S7

5_CE_S1

20_RB_12

4_CE_S6

9_FB1

8_FB1

2_F_R1

7_FB1

6_C_R1

14_F_R1

13_E_R1

1_C_R1

15_F_R1

14_E_R1

5_C_R1

16_F_R1

15_E_R1

14_EF_DB1

12_A_B1

2_C_R1

17_F_R1

16_E_R1

9_C_K1b 9_C_K4

5_F_K2 5_F_K3

5_F_K4

2_C_K1a 2_C_K1b

19_BC_DB1

15_A_B1

9_C_K1a

5_F_K1a 5_F_K1b

2_B_K1a 2_B_K1b 2_B_K2 2_B_K3 2_B_K4 2_B_K5

1_F_K2

15_BC_DB1

10_A_B1

9_B_K5 9_B_K7 9_B_K8 9_B_K10

2_C_K2 2_C_K3 2_C_K4

16_BC_DB1

5_D_B1

18_BC_DB1

21_A_B1

17_BC_DB1

10_CE_S7

10_C_K4

10_E_K1a 10_E_K1b 10_E_K3 10_E_K5

6_E_K2 6_E_K3 6_E_K4

6_E_K5

6_F_K1a 6_F_K1b

6_F_K2

6_F_K3 6_F_K4 6_F_K5

4_CE_S4

4_CE_S3

4_CE_S2

4_CE_S1

3_CE_S1

2_CE_S7

20_RB11

2_CE_S6

2_CE_S5

6_FB1

5_FB1

3_F_R1

4_FB1

3_FB1

2_FB1

4_F_R1

1_FB1

1_B_R1

5_F_R1

2_B_R1

18_F_R1

17_E_R1

19_F_R1

18_E_R1

10_C_R1

21_F_R1

19_E_R1

3_B_K6

11_A_B1

12_D_B1

8_D_B1

4_CE_S5

5_C_R1

3_B_K3 3_B_K4 3_B_K5

7_D_B1

20_RB_4

5_B_R1

6_F_R1

13_D_B1

15_D_B1

18_D_B1

11_D_B1

20_RB15

13_A_B1

17_D_B1

20_RB3

20_RB6

20_RB9

20_RB8

3_B_R1

7_F_R1

4_B_R1

8_F_R1

13_C_R1

7_C_R1

9_C_R1

8_C_R1

19_C_R1

7_B_R1

8_B_R1

9_B_R1

1_E_R1

2_E_R1

3_E_R1

4_E_R1

5_E_R1

6_E_R1

7_E_R1

18_B_R1

9_F_R1

8_E_R1

19_B_R1

6_B_R1

9_E_R1

20_B_R1

10_F_R1

10_E_R1

21_B_R1

11_F_R1

20_F_R1

3_F_K1a 3_F_K1b

20_A_B1

6_CE_S5

20_RB10

20_C_R1

17_B_R1

3_D_B1

6_CE_S6

2_CE_S1

18_C_R1

16_B_R1

20_RB13

3_E_K7

2_CE_S2

21_C_R1

15_B_R1

6_CE_S7

7_E_K1a 7_E_K1b

7_C_K1a 7_C_K1b 7_C_K2 7_C_K3 7_C_K4 7_C_K5

3_E_K6

2_CE_S3

17_C_R1

14_B_R1

7_CE_S1

7_B_K3 7_B_K4 7_B_K5 7_B_K6 7_B_K7

14_B_K7 14_B_K8 14_B_K9

11_B_K2

11_B_K1a 11_B_K1b 11_B_K3 11_B_K4 11_B_K5 11_B_K6 11_B_K7 11_B_K8 11_B_K9 11_B_K10 11_B_K11

2_CE_S4

16_C_R1

13_B_R1

7_B_K2

3_E_K2 3_E_K3 3_E_K4 3_E_K5 3_E_K8

15_C_R1

12_B_R1

7_B_K1a 7_B_K1b 7_B_K8

10_F_K9

21_F_K1b 21_F_K2 21_F_K3 21_F_K4 21_F_K6 21_F_K7

18_B_K2 18_B_K3 18_B_K4

18_B_K5

16_B_K6 16_B_K8

16_B_K10

14_B_K10

14_B_K11

11_C_K1a 11_C_K1b 11_C_K2 11_C_K3 11_C_K4 11_C_K5

11_E_K1a 11_E_K5 11_E_K6

11_E_K1b 11_E_K2 11_E_K3 11_E_K4 11_E_K7

7_E_K2 7_E_K3 7_E_K4

7_E_K5 7_E_K6 7_E_K7

7_F_K1a 7_F_K1b 7_F_K2 7_F_K3 7_F_K4 7_F_K5 7_F_K6

3_F_K2

20_A_B2

6_CE_S4

21_E_K1b 21_E_K2 21_E_K3 21_E_K4 21_E_K5 21_E_K6 21_E_K7 21_E_K8 21_E_K9

18_B_K1b

16_B_K5 16_B_K11

14_B_K3 14_B_K4

14_B_K1b 14_B_K2 14_B_K5 14_B_K6

21_C_K2 21_C_K3 21_C_K4 21_C_K5 21_C_K6 21_C_K7

17_F_K6

16_B_K4 16_B_K7

16_B_K3 16_B_K9

13_F_K3 13_F_K4 13_F_K5 13_F_K6 13_F_K7 13_F_K8 13_F_K9

10_F_K1a 10_F_K1b 10_F_K2 10_F_K3 10_F_K4 10_F_K5 10_F_K6 10_F_K7 10_F_K8

3_E_K1a 3_E_K1b

14_C_R1

10_B_R1

10_E_K2 10_E_K4

3_C_K2 3_C_K4

12_C_R1

21_E_R1

13_F_K1a 13_F_K1b 13_F_K2

3_C_K1b 3_C_K4

19_D_B1

20_RB5

13_E_K3 13_E_K4 13_E_K5 13_E_K6 13_E_K7 13_E_K8

21_B_K7 21_B_K8 21_B_K9

17_F_K2 17_F_K4

17_F_K1b 17_F_K3 17_F_K5 17_F_K8

16_B_K2

3_C_K1a

11_C_R1

20_E_R1

13_E_K1b 13_E_K2

17_E_K8

16_B_K1b

21_B_K1b 21_B_K2 21_B_K3 21_B_K4 21_B_K5 21_B_K6

19_F_K5 19_F_K6 19_F_K7

19_F_K4 19_F_K8 19_F_K9

17_E_K6

15_F_K7

10_C_K1a 10_C_K1b 10_C_K2 10_C_3

16_D_B1

6_D_B1

13_E_K1a

19_F_K1b 19_F_K2 19_F_K3

17_E_K5

15_F_K6 15_F_K8

10_B_K9 10_B_K10 10_B_K11

3_B_K2

18_A_B1

19_A_B1

17_E_K3 17_E_K4

15_F_K4

13_C_K1a 13_C_K1b 13_C_K2 13_C_K3 13_C_K4 13_C_K5 13_C_K6

19_E_K8

10_B_K1a 10_B_K1b 10_B_K2 10_B_K3 10_B_K4 10_B_K5 10_B_K6 10_B_K7 10_B_K8

6_E_K1a 6_E_K1b

3_B_K1a 3_B_K1b

10_D_B1

4_D_B1

9_F_K1b 9_F_K2 9_F_K5 9_F_K6 9_F_K7`

6_C_K1b

2_F_K2

16_EF_DB1

14_A_B1

9_F_K1a 9_F_K3 9_F_K4

6_C_K4

2_F_K1a 2_F_K1b

2_E_K2 2_E_K3 2_E_K4 2_E_K5 2_E_K6

14_BC_DB1

16_A_B1

6_C_K1a 6_C_K2 6_C_K3

6_B_K1a 6_B_K1b 6_B_K2 6_B_K3 6_B_K4 6_B_K5 6_B_K6 6_B_K7 6_B_K8

2_E_K1a 2_E_K1b

9_E_K2

17_E_K2

15_F_K3 15_F_K5

13_B_K3 13_B_K4 13_B_K5 13_B_K6 13_B_K7 13_B_K8 13_B_K9 13_B_K10 13_B_K11

13_B_K2

19_E_K1b 19_E_K2 19_E_K3 19_E_K4 19_E_K5 19_E_K6 19_E_K7

19_C_K6

17_E_K1b

15_F_K1b 15_F_K2

15_E_K7

13_B_K1a 13_B_K1b

19_C_K1b 19_C_K2 19_C_K3 19_C_K4 19_C_K5

17_C_K3

17_C_K2

15_E_K2 15_E_K3 15_E_K4 15_E_K5

12_F_K5 12_F_K6 12_F_K8

19_B_K11

19_B_K6 19_B_K7

17_C_K1b 17_C_K4 17_C_K5

15_E_K1b 15_E_K6

12_F_K1b 12_F_K2

9_E_K1a 9_E_K1b 9_E_K3 9_E_K4 9_E_K5 9_E_K6

9_C_K2 9_C_K3

19_B_K2

17_B_K11

15_C_K5

12_F_K1a 12_F_K3 12_F_K4

12_E_K4 12_E_K6

19_B_K1b 19_B_K3 19_B_K4 19_B_K5 19_B_K8 19_B_K9 19_B_K10

17_B_K10

15_C_K4

15_C_K2 15_C_K3

12_E_K3 12_E_K7

18_F_K9

17_B_K9

17_B_K7 17_B_K8

15_C_K1b

12_E_K1a 12_E_K1b 12_E_K5 12_E_K8

18_F_K8

18_F_K3 18_F_K5 18_F_K6 18_F_K7

17_B_K4 17_B_K5 17_B_K6

15_B_K11

12_C_K5

5_E_K1a 5_E_K1b 5_E_K2 5_E_K3 5_E_K4 5_E_K5 5_E_K6

5_C_K4

1_F_K1a 1_F_K1b

18_F_K2

17_B_K2 17_B_K3

15_B_K5 15_B_K6

12_C_K1a 12_C_K1b

5_B_K1a 5_B_K1b 5_B_K2 5_B_K3 5_B_K4 5_B_K5 5_B_K6 5_B_K7

18_F_K1b 18_F_K4

17_B_K1b

15_B_K4 15_B_K7 15_B_K8

15_B_K1b 15_B_K2 15_B_K3 15_B_K9 15_B_K10 15_B_K12

12_B_K11

1_B_K1a 1_B_K1b 1_B_K2 1_B_K3 1_B_K4 1_B_K5

1_F_R1

16_F_K9

16_F_K4 16_F_K5 16_F_K6 16_F_K7

14_F_K6

18_E_K7

12_B_K10

4_F_K2

2_D_B1

16_F_K3

14_F_K1b 14_F_K2 14_F_K3 14_F_K4 14_F_K5 14_F_K7 14_F_K8

18_E_K6

18_E_K5

12_B_K9

8_F_K1a 8_F_K1b 8_F_K2 8_F_K5

15_EF_DB1

16_F_K2 16_F_K8

14_E_K6 14_E_K7

12_B_K2

18_E_K2 18_E_K3 18_E_K4

6_CE_S3

3_F_K3

9_D_B1

6_CE_S2

4_B_K1a 4_B_K1b 4_B_K2 4_B_K3 4_B_K4 4_B_K5 4_B_K6

21_D_B1

21_F_K5

21_E_K1b

18_B_K6 18_B_K7 18_B_K8 18_B_K9 18_B_K10 18_B_K11

16_C_K1b 16_C_K2 16_C_K3

14_C_K1b 14_C_K2

11_F_K1a 11_F_K4 11_F_K6 11_F_K8

8_B_K1a 8_B_K1b 8_B_K6 8_B_K7 8_B_K8 8_B_K9

4_C_K1a 4_C_K1b 4_C_K2 4_C_K3 4_C_K4

20_RB1

16_C_K4 16_C_K5 16_C_K6

14_C_K3 14_C_K4

11_F_K1b 11_F_K5

8_B_K2

4_C_K5

21_F_K1b

18_B_K12

16_E_K1b

14_C_K5

11_F_K2 11_F_K3

8_B_K3 8_B_K4 8_B_K5

4_E_K1a 4_E_K2 4_E_K4 4_E_K5

exploded axon

21_F_K5

18_E_K1b 18_E_K8

16_E_K2 16_E_K3

14_E_K1b 14_E_K3 14_E_K4

11_F_K7

8_C_K1a 8_C_K1b 8_C_K2 8_C_K3 8_C_K4

4_E_K1b 4_E_K3

18_C_K3

16_E_K4 16_E_K5 16_E_K6

14_E_K2

12_B_K1a 12_B_K1b 12_B_K3 12_B_K4 12_B_K5 12_B_K6 12_B_K7 12_B_K8

8_E_K1a 8_E_K1b 8_E_K2 8_E_K3 8_E_K4 8_E_K5 8_E_K6

4_F_K1a 4_F_K1b 4_F_K3 4_F_K4

14_D_B1

6_CE_S1

20_RB7

12_F_R1

11_E_R1

11_B_R1

31


GARDEN OF EARTHLY DETRITUS

{planted form & function}


facing: concept collage for a “crespuscular garden,” 2017

LAR6221 Planted Form & Function II - Garden Experiment Professor Julie Bargmann

Fall 2017

The following “garden experiment” emerged from a semester-long exploration of the power of planted form to create and narrate space. An imaginary site consisting of three distinct habitat types – an old field, a wet meadow, and a forest dominated by tulip poplars – offered the opportunity to delve into a wide variety of possible palettes. This garden – “The Garden of Earthly Detritus” – delights in the earthly and the underfoot: seasonal carpets and coverings of fallen fruit, ephemeral flowers, choppeddown trees, and thickened thresholds of aromatic groundcovers that guide visitors through field, meadow, and forest. Inspired partially by Thoreau’s famous essay on wild apples, it plays on the magic of unexpected “wild” gifts.

“This is one, and the most remarkable way, in which the wild apple is propagated; but commonly it springs up at wide intervals in woods and swamps, and by the sides of roads, as the soil may suit it, and grows with comparative rapidity. Those which grow in dense woods are very tall and slender. I frequently pluck from these trees a perfectly mild and tamed fruit. As Palladius says, ‘Et injussu consternitur ubere mali’ : And the ground is strewn with the fruit of an unbidden apple-tree.” - henry david thoreau, “wild apples”


planting plan old field

wet meadow

tulip poplar forest

7

2

1

8 6 5

3

9

10

12

4

1

13

1 11

14

15

1: incense hedges (bayberry/sweetfern)

6: variegated orchard

11: bald cypress allee

2: scrub oak / pine scrub border

7: winter grove (persimmon/hickory)

12: wild apple walkway

3: lowbush blueberry thickets

8: sweetgrass swathes

13: gathering dark (hemlock grove)

4: anise goldenrod field

9: white cedar spire

14: secret orchard (“box of apples�)

5: black poplar shelterbreak

10: magnolia mandala

15: golden gate (cinnamon fern)

groundcover

shrub

understory

canopy


broomsedge field

Andropogon virginicus Broomsedge [existing]

Comptonia peregrina Sweetfern

Cydonia oblonga ‘Aromatnaya’ Quince

Populus nigra Black Poplar

Solidago odora Anise-scented Goldenrod

Myrica pensylvanica Bayberry

Pyrus communis ‘Seckel’ Seckel Pear

Diospyros virginiana Common Persimmon

Vaccinium angustifolium Lowbush Blueberry

Prunus armeniaca ‘Harglow’ Apricot

Carya ovata Shagbark Hickory

Hepatica nobilis var. obtusa Round-lobed Hepatica

Quercus illicifolia Bear Oak Pinus rigida Pitch Pine

late winter / early spring

35


wet sedge meadow

Carex spp. Mixed Sedges [existing]

Hierochloe odorata Sweetgrass

Spiraea alba White Meadowsweet

Taxodium distichum Bald Cypress

Iris versicolor Blue Flag Iris

Magnolia virginiana Sweetbay Magnolia

Chamaecyparis thyoides Atlantic White Cedar

Iris cristata Crested Iris Acorus americanus Sweet Flag

late spring / early summer

36


tulip poplar forest

Liriodendron tulipifera Tulip Poplar [existing]

Iris cristata Crested Iris

Malus x domestica Semi-Dwarf Orchard Apple

Claytonia virginica Spring Beauty, Fairy Spud

Malus coronaria Wild Crabapple

Tsuga canadensis Eastern Hemlock

Osmunda cinnamonea Cinnamon Fern Podophyllum peltatum Mayapple

autumn

37


MISCELLANY


this spread: graphite drawing of a leaf, 2015

{models, drawings, & photographs}


analytical model LAR5130 History of Landscape Architecture Professor Michael Lee

Spring 2017

This model explores the kinetic potentialities of Richard Dattner’s 1966 Adventure Playground located near the West 67th Street entrance to Central Park in New York City. It uses simple geometric forms and colors to show varieties of movement – such as running, jumping, sliding, splashing, and climbing – that are encouraged by Dattner’s arrangement of designed structures within the playground. By laying a (city-like) grid atop Dattner’s original rounded plan, these forms are organized to form a legible “motion-scape” through which we are able to read, in plan and section, how movement plays out throughout the space. True to Dattner’s interest in modular forms, these pieces are not fixed but can be rearranged depending on an individual viewer’s “reading” of the space.

original plan by richard dattner

model key

off the ground

on the ground

active (i.e. playing child)

section view

40

sitting

sitting

splashing

walking

walking

jumping

sliding

tree

running

crawling

digging

climbing higher energy

passive (i.e. parent)

lower energy


plan view

41


> Mountain High Uintas Range, Utah, 2012

42


> Valley Grand Staircase-Escalante, Utah, 2012

43


44


> Assisi Pen & ink wash on paper, 2015

45


domesticating dredge

These are selected photos from a series taken during a nine-week summer internship with Mahan Rykiel in Baltimore. Inspired by hometown hero John Waters’ cult classic of the same name, pink flamingos are a Baltimore icon, peppering lawns from Hampden to Hopkins with their tacky-yet-cheerful charm. During site visits to dredge containment facilities (far less visible, though no less important, “Baltimore icons”), I planted flamingos, flag-like, in piles of wayward sediment, as if to say: “Yes, in my backyard.”

Summer 2017

46


location: poplar island restoration project

location: cox creek DMCF

location: cox creek DMCF

location: hart miller island DMCF

47

Portfolio - Winter 2018  
Portfolio - Winter 2018  
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