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portfolio

MACY B. McCARTY

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Architecture

Study Abroad

Sanctuary

Field Manual

Hearth

Nolla

Knoxville Hall

Photography

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Graphic Design

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Graphite Rendering

Plane

Bloom

Thermal Baths at Vals

Prayer

Disembodied Circle

Kuuvalo

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66 68 70

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Sanctuary

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Hearth

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Knoxville Hall


Architecture

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Sanctuary Clyde M. York 4-H Lodge / Crossville, TN Programming / Professor Robert French / Fall 2015

A sanctuary of the past, present, and future. A place of renewal. Layers of preservation conserve the mind, nature, time, history, knowledge, quiet, and light. Visitors find stillness in nature; reflection on the present.

Visitors gather here in a place of sanctuary. The lodge is a destination of renewal. Seams of nature, time, history, knowledge, quiet, and light stitch together this haven for rest, both conceptually and programmatically. Guests directly participate in the program, breathing life into this place of sanctuary. Here, visitors experience an escape in a fresh, rejuvenating environment. Lodging provides quiet and relaxation, while arbor, restaurant, and reception spaces are an invitation to gather.

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The existing tree canopy along the clearing helped to inform the placement of program within the site. POW camp remains lie scattered in the central portion.

These POW remains became respectfully celebrated as Red Oak groves. The garden nature of this space is essential to the renewal concept of Sanctuary.

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Within the densely forested site of Clyde M. York 4-H Camp in Crossville, TN, the project goal is to engage a broader audience to the camp. Unused land on the property holds potential for program expansion. Lodging, restaurant, and reception spaces seek to bring revenue to the camp as well as to serve the community. The programs of arbor, restaurant, reception hall, and lodge are designed as an inviting destination for young and old alike, as well as for both celebration and quiet. The city of Crossville has a rich history in land and craft, emphasizing its people and place. However, the history of the 4-H camp is quite unique. The historic camp was once site to a POW camp during World War II. Various pieces of the camp still remain as relics of the powerful history of the site. Positioned in an existing clearing, the space is provided with natural privacy and sets itself apart from the main camp area, supporting the opportunity for program addition.

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Sanctuary hones the concept of renewal. Focusing on the lodging program, the intent is for visitors to feel removed and relaxed in nature. The grass paver entry sets the mood of the place while a glimpse of Red Oak trees indicate entrance. Native to the region, Red Oak trees are important symbolically and materially within the lodge. Red Oak groves are placed along remains of the POW camp. The groves take the history of the site and create a functional spatial element to the lodge program. The remaining pieces are repurposed as reflection pools and the rhythmic grid of the trees acts as planters for seating, scattered throughout the site. The lodge itself is tucked away, curving to the natural flow of the landscape. Red Oak wood screens line the front elevation of each lodge to provide privacy for visitors and place emphasis on the natural scenery. Each unit’s back facade is focused to the outside with a clear view of nature. Outdoor communal spaces are optimized for varied use.


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Hearth Emergency Operations Center / Clay County, KY Appalachia Studio / Professor John McRae / Spring 2016

Intended to be situated in the flooding landscape of Clay County, KY, this Emergency Operations Center, influenced by the hollow vernacular, seeks to embed with the berm landscape, while providing a community hearth. The community of Clay County, KY is the poorest county in the United States today. Rooted in a rich history of land, family, and god, the people of Clay County are bound to their deep culture in the region and their emotional ties to the place. Inadequate living conditions, poor healthcare, natural disasters, unclean water, and economic struggle are amongst the many obstacles of this resilient community. Red Bird Mission seeks to help the community by providing the services they lack and by improving their overall quality of life. The community hearth aims to unite the people together as one.

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standing seam metal roof

wood joists 2” x 12” plywood box beam

heavy timber 8” x 8”

stained wood siding

wood siding

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standing seam 1/8” vapor barrier rigid insulation 3” plywood 1/2” fascia plywood box beam

wood siding 1” vapor barrier plywood 1/2” batt insulation 5 1/2” gypsum board 1/2” dim. lumber 2” x 6” wood joists 2” x 12”

wood finish flooring concrete slab on grade 6” rigid insulation 3” concrete footing concrete pavers 3” sand 3” gravel

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Knoxville Hall Center for Sustainable Education / Knoxville, TN Integrations / Professor Robert French / Emilee Wilson / Fall 2015

Situated between Church Avenue and Walnut Street in downtown Knoxville, this site is at an important natural passageway from the Hilton Hotel and Lawson McGhee Library to Market Street and Krutch Park. The existing lot is used as a passage between these two areas, thus the proposed project seeks to further encourage the passage, though now through the Center for Sustainable Education. This project seeks to engage the community, by educating both adults and children alike on sustainable practices and research.

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Composed of a lighter piece connected to a larger denser piece, the Center for Sustainable Education is centered around the central passageway atrium space through its core. The lighter piece holds more interactive public spaces while the heavier piece holds the primary private program components. The openness and direction of the interior atrium hall provide a clear distinction between the two sides as the monumental stair ties the two together. Visible from both the interior and exterior of the building, the Knoxville Hall provides clear distinction of the building and its place in historic downtown Knoxville.

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A central atrium is the key interior piece. Reaching three stories high, the frosted skylight illuminates the central hall while the southern facing glazing uses a horizontal louver system to adjust daylight exposure throughout the year. Each main entrance aligns on axis with the atrium and frames the monumental stair. The stair climbs the three stories of the atrium, bridging across the space to each floor. The second floor library is open to the atrium to promote connectivity, bleeding the boundary between the heaviness of the private section and the lightness of the public. The space’s visibility spans outside as well. Visible from the street level and the roof terraces, the Knoxville Hall is the essential connection piece within the building and outside its walls.

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6.25” concrete roof slab rigid insulation

metal light shelf

8” thermomass concrete wall

thermomass rigid insulation

Foundation Assembly (left to right) 1. infill 2. gravel 3. 3” rigid insulation 4. 8.25” concrete wall 5. infill Foundation Assembly (top to bottom) 1. 6” concrete floor slab 2. 6” gravel 3. vapor membrane 4. infill

2’ concrete footing 29


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Field Manual

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Nolla

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Photography


Study Abroad

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Field Manual Aalto University / Helsinki, Finland FSAI / Professor Brian Ambroziak / Summer 2015

The field manual is a journal each student composed to document their Finnish experience. Compiled of thesis words paired with images, a quote, and writing, the field manual is a study into the conscious experience of the student in the realm of design and of their time abroad. Each thesis word is a study of an experience or observation that can be applied to an architectural truth. The ten words together creates a book about my personal exploration in Europe.

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FIELD MAN UAL 10 FINLAND SUMMER ARCHITECTURE INSTITUTE

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FM 10.02

MOMENTUM

“It is better to live in a state of impermanence than in one of finality.� - Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space, 1994.

A constant rhythm characterizes life. Routine. Practice. Stillness. Movement. Time passes and progression is constant. We excellerate through days while surroundings often are unnoticed, left uncaptured. Though, on occasion something may catch our eye. Something may make us stop and think. Moving objects seem still, and a memory is triggered. Momentum is how a space can make us feel different things at different times. Tempo creates pattern. Pause creates balance. Thus, momentum might be a harmony of the two.

MACY MCCARTY. As a first generation artistic thinker, the only boundaries and preconceived notions of expression were learned from academics or self discovery. Certain nostalgia influenced these thoughts, while the world shaped them. Within a suburb of Nashville, architectural expression pushed no further than the ranch house type. Dreams of travel and new perception were far outside her seemingly comfortable refuge. Drawn to clean forms and stimulated by the conceptual realm, she sought to learn an architecture as much for herself as for people. A cohesive conversation between designer and designee.

left. Window view from Italo high speed train from Venice to Rome, Italy . above. Diagram illustrating the tempo and rythmic nature of momentum.

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Nolla Aalto University / Helsinki, Finland FSAI / Professor Brian Ambroziak / Summer 2015

Light depicts the story of a Finnish year. Scarce in the winter, though abundant in the summer, an understanding and experience of light in this northern country is both what makes it beautiful and incomparable.

Omakuva: self-portrait. Immersed in this land of distinct seasons of light, Nolla: zero, illustrates the essence of light in Finland in relation to time. Each image is depicted during a certain season, on a specific date, and at a particular time of day. The absence of light in winter, the abundance of light in the summer, and the in between seasons of light are explored through composition and program. The northern orientation and composition of buildings tells the story of light throughout a Finnish day and season.

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fall Everything is black. Contours of pine trees meet the sky with a defined edge. My eye travels down and is grounded. Faint reflections of light ripple on the nearby water. I sit by a fire, my face illuminated from its glow. I turn my roasting stick ever so slightly, breathing in the smoky air. The city is quiet, though here, voices and laughter echo into the night. Our only other company the moon and stars.

09.01.15 | 12:00 am

winter Abrupt wind strikes my face with an icy bite. Never have I felt this breed of cold before. The scarce sunlight hides behind the clouds as snow crunches beneath my feet. Soft flakes rest on my eyelashes before drifting slowly towards the blanketed ground. My only motivation is the relief I will soon feel. The sauna starts to reveal itself through the pines. Clouds of steam escape its chimney and assure the promise of warmth.

12.22.15 | 3:00 pm

spring Red is abundant and green is constant. Poppies catch my attention and lead me through the landscape, framing my view to the water’s edge. Bees are lured by the sweet aroma, giving constant life to this place. My eye is drawn to the bleed of color, the layering of texture and time are legible. In this moment I am but a small spec, a visitor within a blooming realm. New life is evident, a hopeful conclusion to a harsh winter.

04.10.15 | 12:00 pm

summer Warm light peeks through the window hours before it wakes me. The sharp brightness of the morning coaxes me from my sleep. I can feel the sun’s heat. It attempts to deceive me, though I know the briskness that lies beyond these walls. Summer, here, is most evident in the morning. My room glimmers in the promise of another day in this city.

06.21.15 | 8:00 am

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fall

summer

winter

+ spring

This is an exploration in addressing the student’s self portrait, or reflection on their experience in Finland. Omakuva is a place for future Finland Summer Architecture Institute students to live during their experience abroad. As I approached the project, I reflected on my personal experience in the country, and the ever presence of light. While studying during the summer season in Finland, light is at its peak daily exposure. The sun settled at 11 pm and rose at 3 am. It was almost as if the light never left; as if light was our essential Finnish experience, whether or not habituation allowed us to fixate on its presence as regularly as time went on. I first thought of the light in the morning. There were times when the 3 am light would awake me, however, the light I arose for was always sharp. It pierced through the windows, streaming into our room. As the day would

go on, the light remained consistent, though as it moved across the sky, it would eventually lose its luster. Our nights were primarily illuminated. There was always an odd sense of not entirely knowing what time of the day it was, or when it was becoming late. These experiences are what formed my Finnish project. I organized the program to map these types of light at different times of the day. Site plan oriented North, the lodging unit is oriented east, allowing the sharp morning sun to come through angled apertures. The living space and dining hall receive the maximum light at noon, illuminating the community and conversation. The sauna is on the west, welcoming the evening light and notating the traditional time of cleansing. The site acts as a sun dial. It tells the time of the day, the activity of the program, and the story of the immeasurable Finnish light. 39


fall Everything is black. Contours of pine trees meet the sky with a defined edge. My eye travels down and is grounded. Faint reflections of light ripple on the nearby water. I sit by a fire, my face illuminated from its glow. I turn my roasting stick ever so slightly, breathing in the smoky air. The city is quiet, though here, voices and laughter echo into the night. Our only other company the moon and stars.

09.01.15 / 12:00 am

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winter Abrupt wind strikes my face with an icy bite. Never have I felt this breed of cold before. The scarce sunlight hides behind the clouds as snow crunches beneath my feet. Soft flakes rest on my eyelashes before drifting slowly towards the blanketed ground. My only motivation is the relief I will soon feel. The sauna starts to reveal itself through the pines. Clouds of steam escape its chimney and assure the promise of warmth.

12.22.15 / 3:00 pm

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spring Red is abundant and green is constant. Poppies catch my attention and lead me through the landscape, framing my view to the water’s edge. Bees are lured by the sweet aroma, giving constant life to this place. My eye is drawn to this bleed of color, the layering of texture and time are legible. In this moment I am but a small spec, a visitor to this blooming realm. New life is evident, a hopeful conclusion to a harsh winter.

04.10.15 / 12:00 pm

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summer Warm light peeks through the window hours before it wakes me. The sharp brightness of the morning coaxes me from my sleep. I can feel the sun’s heat. It attempts to deceive me, though I know the briskness that lies beyond these walls. Summer, here, is most evident in the morning. My room glimmers in the promise of another day in this city.

06.21.15 / 8:00 am

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Photography Aalto University / Helsinki, Finland FSAI / Professor Jari Jetsonen / Summer 2015

This class was designed as a way to document each student’s photographic eye. Group and individual travel was accompanied by certain pre-arranged photo subjects, which were later compiled to design a personal book for each student. Each developed their own book concept, based on a pattern of characteristics typical in their photos. My photography looked at the details of buildings and spaces, but more specifically, light. This interest in light and detail shaped my photography and ultimately, determined the focus for my Finnish studio project.

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Kiljava

North of Helsinki, Finland, Kiljava is a small lodging complex for architecture professionals. Here, we stayed for several days, immersed in the Finnish lakeside community, learning about the rustic experience of Finland outside its capital and within its summer homes. The ritual of the Finnish sauna was introduced to us, a rhythmic cycle rooted in the country’s people and history. Kiljava captured the essence of Finland without its exterior shell. Its layers of culture and nature were evident beneath the clear, open sky. 50


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Turku

West of Helsinki, the city of Turku is the second largest city in Finland. We visited here for a few nights to explore the city core and the architectural churches on its outskirts. The Chapel of the Holy Cross is made primarily of concrete, only interrupted by light wells and subtle glazing. I found these apertures mesmerizing. The directionality of their light, their positioning, and their framing purpose within the church. An honest use of materials and natural elements taught me about the pureness and organic nature of Finnish architecture. 52


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Aalto Home + Studio

Munkkiniemi, a neighborhood in Helsinki, is the location of Alvar Aalto’s personal home and studio. The home is located on a quite street, with a plot abundant with trees and luscious vegetation. Aalto’s use of varying materials and contrast in color provides the exterior with a natural, though striking presence. Within the home, the interior is warm both with light and material. The wood interior and the perforated light from interior and exterior vegetation, give the home a feeling of nature. Aalto’s presence in Finland taught me about the importance of the vernacular and the vitality of natural elements. 54


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Plane

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Double Page Spread

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Disembodied Circle


Graphic Design

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Plane Point, Line, Plane / Knoxville, TN Presentation Design 1 / Professor Diane Fox / Fall 2015

Each student received a list of sentences describing their given word: either point, line, or plane. A following exercise analyzed how the word plane could be perceived in visual image. Each student narrowed down one image to represent their sentence the best. Image in relation to composition of text explores the visual relationship between visual and textual knowledge.

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A field of text is a plane built from

I

N T S

lines of type.

O

and

P

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Thermal Baths at Vals Double Page Spread / Knoxville, TN Presentation Design I / Professor Diane Fox / Fall 2015

Peter Zumthor’s project in Vals, Switzerland is about mass and void and where darkness meets light. This double page spread is the exploration of representing an article on Zumthor’s work with its corresponding images. The intent is to explore the sense of calm and serenity of the project’s program while the layout is meant to abstract the conversation between the bath buildings and the water both within and surrounding them.

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THERMAL BATHS AT VALS

David Chipperfield

The Swiss architect, Peter Zumthor, has over the last years completed a series of built works that have captivated us with their object simplicity and their material sophistication. More than anyone he has reinforced the physical power of architecture. Avoiding rhetorical gesture he has managed to complete a series of buildings that are joyful in their manifestation of form, material and construction. The exhibition held at the AA showing Zumthor’s designs for a project under construction, the Thermal Bath at Vals, gave us a rare opportunity to understand his working method and ideas. The decision to exhibit an architect, who so thoroughly dismisses the superfluous narrative of so much contemporary architecture and design also sends a message about the direction of the school, so long absorbed in artificial and inbred language. In his lecture about the project, Peter Zumthor carefully described the overlapping ideas and determinants of the building. Avoiding formal representations, Zumthor wove an intricate explanation of process. The departures of this process are not functional or deterministic, rather they follow enthusiasms and possibilities. Through this process we start to understand a project of evolving, overlapping, supportive ideas. Each idea physically linked to the other, Zumthor works with the project, intensely trying to understand what it wants to be, making explicit and elaborating physical ideas. One idea stimulates another, each idea gradually evolving the form and nature of the building. The rules develop and physical ideas become evident. Through his description we understand a process,

desperately avoiding formal solutions, while dwelling as long as possible in the abstract. Yet this abstract seems to have body, as each drawing has physical presence. By the end of the lecture we have shared Zumthor’s route, we nearly feel his effort, he describes each process as if he were a sculptor following the grain of the material and the process of formation. For a culture that is obsessed with imagery, in an institution that has over recent years been seemingly more concerned with image than idea, how extraordinary to enjoy a lecture without images of the project, where idea was central and the purpose construction. Nor was this idea a narrative. For Zumthor, idea is not a script that must accompany the project in order to aid its legibility. Architectural idea can only be relevant in so far as it resides within architecture. Zumthor is not providing an ideology that verifies the work; his description does not demonstrate knowledge or intellect, but rather intelligence and perception. The design of and debate about buildings is primarily concerned with form. In England, this is quickly developed into a discussion of style. The work of Peter Zumthor demonstrates how form can be given purpose without borrowing meaning from preconceived solutions. What was stimulating about Zumthor’s description was his attitude to making form. Consciously avoiding formal preconceptions, he develops concepts that are rooted in ideas of making space and construction. Zumthor’s ability seems to lie

“An ambiguity exists in the project between carving and construction, between space and element, between mass and light.” Cover: Bath visitors Left: Roof Detail; Right: Exterior entry

in his openness to follow idea, and enjoy the overlapping of ideas. He builds the vision out of complex and often ambiguous links. These cues are sought at every level, metaphorical, constructional, functional and material. In defining his theory of ‘openness,’ Umberto Eco has described how the modern work of art is distinguished from traditional art by its engagement of ambiguity. Eco argues that traditional or classical works are essentially unambiguous. They worked with a preferred reading. The modern work is ‘deliberately and systematically ambiguous,’ a great variety of potential readings consist within it, and none can be said to be dominant. Traditional works of art confirm existing attitudes, stabilize cultural prejudices, institutionalize existing patterns of knowledge, and ground existing opinions. The modern works puts all these things into question by means of ambiguity. Eco claims that this places art at the center of the ‘modern questioning culture,’ and might even come to ‘represent man’s path to salvation, towards the reconquest of his lost autonomy at the level of both perception and intelligence. In the conceptual process it is clear that Zumthor integrates both perceptual and intellectual responses and stories, intertwining and reinforcing ambiguity. Zumthor relates decisions about material, light, organization and construction without preconceived hierarchical order. The power of Zumthor’s work lies in his ability to find abstraction through construction. While the modern movement often suppressed, even denied, technique, tradition, craft and material in order to attain abstraction, Zumthor dives deep into the constructive process,

coming up with solutions that are both sensual and abstract. While fashionable minimalism achieves its results by exclusion, Zumthor’s work is informed by complex understanding and the workingthrough of problems. This is a skill rarely witnessed in an age where construction solutions and techniques are seen not to be the responsibility of the architect, and where the development of products has pushed architectural construction into a process of selection, rather than invention. Zumthor possesses a craftsman’s knowledge of construction. In the project for the bath, he gives integrity to the stone facing by integrating it into the process of pouring the concrete walls. Rather than face concrete walls in stone, Zumthor’s ‘need’ to relate material, form and construction to each other has evolved a double-sided ‘rectangular wall’ construction. As part of this process another concept evolved, one of considering the roof as a series of ‘tables,’ articulating the roof (externally the most visible elevation) into a constructive idea. This constructive idea is in turn reinforced as a way of permitting light into the building. Without visiting the building, even unfinished, it is difficult to offer a critique. It is interesting, however, to consider the project in relation to the architect’s other work. While much of Zumthor’s work is constructive, modeled in wood, the bath is carved, a condition that Zumthor is not slow to exploit. While other projects depend for their abstraction on the simplicity of their form and on constructed ingenuity, the bath is formally complex, invested with complex meanings, but materially simple, obeying the notion of carving. As if the possibility of carving forces a coherent and monolithic building, the architect is free to elaborate delicate and subtle traces into its surface. Moves that may be seen as mannerist in a constructive or plastic work are possible within the discipline of the carved work. In many ways the bath seems to be much more self-conscious than the architect’s previous work. Construction plays a smaller part in the conceptual process; the making of space dominates the process, faced with a construction not dependent on assemblage, Zumthor disassembles the monolith. The building form is separated into pieces, as if to avoid it becoming only plastic. The bath seems

more theatrical than other projects, elaborating and manipulating the physical and sensual characteristics of both the building and its program. It is as if this manipulation was possible owing to the limits of carved spaces. The two aspects of carved shape are the location of edges and the working of the surface in relation to these limits. These two aspects depend on each other. The carved form encourages working and handling of the surfaces, an elaboration not found in Zumthor’s other ‘constructive’ projects, where elaboration is rejected in favor of a minimalization of function. In the bath each activity is celebrated in physical form. This is not a carved form. However, the spatial construct obeys rules which seem to be internalized. Zumthor gives construction to this ‘carved form’ by the introduction of the block structure and the ‘ceiling tables.’ The building is given integrity through this construction (the tectonic tables and the constructional ‘retaining wall’ system). Despite this ordering and its intellectual clarity, the spatial and monolithic presence of the building is inevitably dominant over the elemental construct. An ambiguity exits in the project between carving and construction, between space and element, between mass and light. Through his description we understand Zumthor’s desire (and success) in making a total work. He is concerned (as we all declare) with making buildings where each idea is supported by another, each decision determined by others, evolving a building of abstract perfection where the willful behavior of the architect is invisible. The power of Zumthor’s built work depends on this completeness. More than any other contemporary architect, Peter Zumthor has persisted in maintaining architecture as a constructive craft. Through his built work he shows us how architecture can be invested with idea, how ideas does not have to conspire with ideology. He demonstrates that through a multiple and layered process architecture can have intent without rhetoric, purpose without dogma, gravity and light.

Left: Bath stair; Right: Bath reflection

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Disembodied Circle NCBDS Submission Manual / Knoxville, TN Author / Professor Brian Ambroziak / Camille Lane / Spring 2017

‘Disembodied Circle: A Twelve Step Manual’ is a one-hundred level exercise as part of Professor Brian Ambroziak’s Visual Design Theory course. The exercise seeks to engage young designers in a process of spatial understanding. The project is part of a presentation at the ‘National Conference of the Beginning Design Student’ which is held at The University of Utah, College of Architecture + Planning. A graphic manual was created alongside existing written steps to further emphasize and illustrate the disembodied circle process. Diagrams are excerpted from the manual to highlight the graphic tone and representational quality of the project.

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Bloom

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Prayer

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Kuuvalo


Graphite Rendering

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Bloom Live[scape] / Knoxville, TN Architecture 121 / Professor Brian Ambroziak / Fall 2012

For the initial drawing class as first years in architecture, the assignment took us to the UT gardens. Exploration on the site of the varying trees and other vegetation led to a series of experimental drawings. Each drawing looked at a series of plants or textures in varying ways and scales. I experimented with bark as an abstraction of material as well as the recognizable rose, though I chose to represent it in its pure, natural form, not as how our mind associates it. The resulting composition looks at the directionality of the rose and its place in nature. Its composure and shadow aid the viewer’s contextual awareness. The rose is not simply an object but a smaller piece within a greater object.

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Prayer Sound[scape] / Knoxville, TN Architecture 121 / Professor Brian Ambroziak / Fall 2012

Sound was the subject of the second initial drawing class assignment. The project began in an explorative nature of studying hands, movement, and how that movement may or may not make a sound. A series of fifty sketches helped each student to develop their own inclination and interest. Following exercises worked to develop one motion at different stages. A final position was chosen and the hands posessed a certain meaning and sound. Mine are silent. The pair may be interpreted as a silent prayer or a silent praise. Hands extended upward, stretching towards something greater and grasping for hope.

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Kuuvalo Aalto University / Helsinki, Finland FSAI / Professor Brian Ambroziak / Summer 2015

During our group travels in Finland, we visited the small town of Nakkila. For the project in Nakkila, we measured the Nakkilan Kirkko church and produced both documentation drawings and a model of the church within its context. Students divided work between the interior and exterior of the building, documenting every detail with water levels and measuring tape. My role was to draw the front facade of the church using my teams sketched and measurements. The final group of drawings were depicted either by day or night and were named according to their essence. This facade is named Kuuvalo, or moonlight, for its night rendering technique. The final documentation work is now displayed at the Museum of Finnish Architecture in Helsinki, Finland.

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thank you

MACY B. McCARTY macy.b.mccarty@gmail.com | 615.545.9452


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