Page 1

A landscape is an artwork of an outside scene. There is a mountain at the back.

There is a lake in the middle.

AUT

LTL

ART

SOC

ICT

Listen and draw objects at the back, middle and front.

This is a landscape.

OBJECTIVES

PHW

1 Read and point.

LESSON 1

MAT

42

Landscapes

Landscapes LIN

UNIT 8

To introduce the elements of Art: background, middle ground and foreground.

There are people at the front.

MATERIALS: 2 Mount Fuji, Utagawa Hiroshige.

42

What can you see in this landscape?

1858 22

forty-two

Activity 1

23

Activity 2

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43 3

Flashcards 47, 48, 49, 50, 52 Pencil

To observe and identify background, middle ground and foreground in Art and the environment. To observe and analyse the use of depth in the woodblock print Mount Fuji by Hiroshige.

Listen and draw.

To value diversity and respect Art from different cultures. 43

Finished? Add more objects.

24

forty-three

18/12/12 10:23

Print a landscape I can print a landscape with stamps.

44

1 Make plasticine stamps and dip in paint.

2 Print mountains at the back, trees in the middle and a river at the front.

44

To draw objects in the background, middle ground and foreground of a landscape.

Activity 3

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LESSON 2 Print a landscape.

To use their hands to tear paper.

MATERIALS:

To make a coastal landscape with a background, middle ground and foreground.

Flashcards 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 91 Finished? Wash the plasticine and make a model of your landscape.

forty-four

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Plasticine

To understand the importance of respecting landscapes.

Poster paint (blue, green, yellow and brown)

To develop basic computer skills and practise Art skills on the Internet.

Trays for paint

45

Paper landscape

I can tear paper to make a landscape.

LESSON 3 Make a torn paper landscape.

45

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Tear the coloured paper.

Glue the sky and the Sun at the back.

Glue the mountains in the middle.

Glue the water at the front.

38_53_3T_102279.indd 45

To explore a variety of Art materials in a personal way. To develop autonomy and creativity in Art. To develop the foundation for an understanding of the Art process.

MATERIALS: Flashcards 47, 48, 49, 50, 94

Finished? Print shapes.

forty-five

To print objects at the back, middle and front of a landscape.

18/12/12 10:24

Half an A4 sheet of red, orange, yellow, green, blue and pink paper White paper Glue stick

BASIC COMPETENCES KEY LIN

Competence in linguistic communication

MAT Competence in mathematics PHW Competence in knowledge of and interaction with the physical world ICT

Competence in the use of new technologies

SOC Competence in social awareness and citizenship ART Competence in artistic and cultural awareness LTL

Competence in learning to learn

AUT Competence in autonomous learning and personal initiative

4 ARTS & CRAFTS PRIMARY 1

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LANGUAGE FOCUS

EVALUATION CRITERIA

• Landscape

Pupils will be able to:

• Back, middle, front

• Identify background, middle ground and foreground.

• Mountain, people, river, trees, water, sea, sky, sun • Print, stamp • Tear

KEY STRUCTURES • I can see a (mountain) at the (back). • There is a (river) at the (front).

• Draw objects in the background, middle ground and foreground. • Tear paper to make a landscape with a back, middle and front. • Express creativity. • Use a variety of Art materials correctly.

COMPLEMENTARY ACTIVITIES Art

English

Unit 8 Class worksheet – Landscape collage

Group pictures

• Cut and glue objects from a magazine at the back, middle and front to complete the landscape.

• Work in groups of three. Each pupil folds a piece of paper into three and draws objects at the top of the paper. Fold the paper over and pass it to the next pupil, who draws in the middle of the paper. Fold and pass to the next pupil, who draws at the bottom of the paper. Open the paper to see a group picture.

Torn paper collage • Make an abstract torn paper collage. Print greeting cards • Fold a sheet of paper in half. Make prints with different materials (plastic bottles and lids, string, plasticine, leaves, sponges, etc.). • Write a note inside the card to someone special. This activity can be used for a Mother’s Day card. Science Shoebox aquarium • Colour the sides and back of a shoebox blue. • Glue strips of green paper hanging from the top of the box to create seaweed in the middle. • Hang paper fish and other sea creatures at the front. Add a plasticine sandcastle or treasure chest. Drama Stage space • Create a frozen scene where children have to use the back, middle and front of the stage. The teacher names a place (a town, the zoo, etc.) and all the children get into positions either at the back, middle or front of the imaginary stage to create a frozen scene.

ICT Find out more about Utagawa Hiroshige • With an interactive whiteboard or projector go to: http://www.hiroshige.org.uk/hiroshige/36_views_ fuji_1858/fuji_1858.htm • Choose different landscapes and say what you see at the back, middle and front of each. • Create a new artwork inspired by Hiroshige. Create a landscape • With an interactive whiteboard or projector go to: http://www.schoolsliaison.org.uk/kids/ landscape.htm • Play the Create a Landscape game. Digital resources • Poster Unit 8 • Picture dictation Unit 8 • Project presentation Unit 8 • Memory games

TEACHER’S BOOK 5

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UNIT 8

LESSON 1

42

PAGE 42 Landscapes

3

Listen and draw.

Landscapes 1 Read and point.

This is a landscape.

43

A landscape is an artwork of an outside scene.

Finished? Add more objects. forty-three

24

Activity 3

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Lesson 1 continues on page 43

There is a mountain at the back.

There is a lake in the middle.

There are people at the front.

2

What can you see in this landscape?

hige. 1858 Mount Fuji, Utagawa Hiros

42

22

forty-two

Activity 1

Activity 2

To introduce the elements of Art: background, middle ground and foreground. To observe and identify background, middle ground and foreground in Art and the environment. To observe and analyse the use of depth in the woodblock print Mount Fuji by Hiroshige. To value diversity and respect Art from different cultures. To draw objects in the background, middle ground and foreground of a landscape.

AUT

LTL

ART

SOC

ICT

LIN

OBJECTIVES

PHW

18/12/12 10:23

MAT

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23

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Utagawa Hiroshige, also known as Hiroshige Ando, (1797 – 12 October 1858) was a Japanese printmaker and painter most famous for his woodblock landscape prints, many of which depict the great Mount Fuji. Woodblock printing is a technique in which the artist carves into a block of wood and covers it with ink to print images. Although the woodblock technique began in China, it became very popular in Japan in the 1760s. Mount Fuji is actually one in a series of prints called Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji (1858). Mount Fuji is Japan’s highest peak (3776 metres) and has long been a popular subject for artists, thanks to its almost-perfect conical shape and status as one of Japan’s Three Holy Mountains. Hiroshige paints it here in summertime, without any snow. Curiously, we can see that there is no reflection of the volcano in the lake below.

MATERIALS LANGUAGE FOCUS • Landscape, back, middle, front • Mountain, people, water

Flashcards: landscape (47), back (48), middle (49), front (50), beach (52) Pencil

• I can see a (mountain) at the (back).

6 ARTS & CRAFTS PRIMARY 1

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OPENING ACTIVITY • Invite three pupils to the front of the room. Have the pupils stand in a line facing their classmates, one pupil behind the other.

• How do you feel when you see this painting? Do you feel happy? Mime happy. Do you feel sad? Mime sad. Do you feel scared? Mime scared. • Do you prefer the mountains or the beach? Why? Accept a variety of responses.

• Put your hand on the last pupil’s head and say He/she is at the back.

+ Listening (optional)

• Repeat with the other two pupils.

• Say Look at the artwork and listen. Play the CD.

• Invite three new pupils to form a line at the front of the room. Ask Who is in the middle? Repeat with back and front. • Show the pupils the flashcards of back, middle and front, naming each one in turn and encouraging the pupils to repeat after you.

MAIN ACTIVITIES

PAGE 42

CD • Track 23

Girl: Look at the artwork. It’s a landscape. Boy: There are two people on a path. Girl: Where? Boy: At the front. They’ve got big hats! And there’s a big tree, too. Girl: Oh yes. And there’s a lake in the middle. Boy: And there’s an island in the lake.

• Ask the pupils to open their Pupil’s Book to page 42.

Girl: And look! A big mountain at the back.

• Say Look at the title – Landscapes.

Boy: That’s not a mountain. It’s a volcano!

• Say Look at the artwork. Ask What inspires this artist? People, water, mountains, landscapes, lines, shapes, colours, etc. • Show pupils the flashcard of a landscape. Say This is a landscape. A landscape is an artwork of an outside scene. 1 Read and point. • Ask the pupils to look at the text box and say Let’s read and listen. Play the CD and encourage the pupils to follow in their books. CD • Track 22

This is a landscape. A landscape is an artwork of an outside scene. There is a mountain at the back. There is a lake in the middle. There are people at the front.

2 Talk about Art: Read and answer the question. • Focus the pupils’ attention on the question activity. • Read What can you see in this landscape? A path, hats, trees, an island, the sky, etc. Additional questions: • What colours can you see at the back? In the middle? At the front?

TEACHER TIPS

English extension: Ask What can you see at the back? I can see a mountain. What can you see in the middle? I can see a lake. What can you see at the front? I can see two people. Ask pupils to name more objects at the back, middle and front (e.g. trees, plants, an island, the sky, etc.). Review There is/There are. Repeat the questions What can you see at the front? In the middle? At the back? Encourage pupils to use there is/there are in their responses. Science extension: • Ask Is the water a lake, a river or the sea? A lake. Ask Is this an inland or a coastal landscape? Inland. Interactive whiteboard: • Search for the print Mount Fuji (Misaka Pass in Kai Province) by Hiroshige and project it on the board. Encourage pupils to point to the objects they see at the back, middle and front.

TEACHER’S BOOK 7

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UNIT 8

LESSON 1

PAGE 43 Landscapes

Landscapes

43

1 Read and point.

This is a landscape. A landscape is an artwork of an outside scene. There is a mountain at the back.

There is a lake in the middle.

3

Listen and draw.

There are people at the front.

2 Mount Fuji, Utagawa Hiroshige.

42

What can you see in this landscape?

1858

forty-two

22

Activity 1

23

Activity 2

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Lesson 1 begins on page 42

43

Finished? Add more objects. forty-three

24

Activity 3

To introduce the elements of Art: background, middle ground and foreground. To observe and identify background, middle ground and foreground in Art and the environment. To observe and analyse the use of depth in the woodblock print Mount Fuji by Hiroshige. To value diversity and respect Art from different cultures. To draw objects in the background, middle ground and foreground of a landscape.

AUT

LTL

ART

18/12/12 10:23

SOC

ICT

PHW

LIN

OBJECTIVES

MAT

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COMPLEMENTARY ACTIVITIES (see page 119) English • Group pictures ICT • Find out more about Utagawa Hiroshige • Create a landscape • Digital resources Drama • Stage space

MATERIALS Flashcards: landscape (47), back (48), middle (49), front (50), beach (52) Pencil

LANGUAGE FOCUS • Landscape, back, middle, front • Mountain, people, water • I can see a (mountain) at the (back).

8 ARTS & CRAFTS PRIMARY 1

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MAIN ACTIVITIES

PAGE 43

Listen and draw.

3

• Say We are going to draw objects at the back, middle and front of a landscape. • Show pupils the flashcard of the landscape. Name the back, middle, front and beach and encourage the pupils to repeat after you.

• Play the CD again. • Say Now look at the landscape. Ask What’s at the back? A bird, the sky. Ask What’s in the middle? A boat, the sea. Ask What’s at the front? Some sunglasses, the sand, a boy, an umbrella. • Ask What’s the boy looking at? A bird, a boat. TEACHER TIPS

• Ask pupils to turn to page 43.

• Walk around and check for understanding.

• Say Look at the picture. What can you see? A boy, a towel, an umbrella, the beach, the sand, the sea, the sky.

• You can read the dictation aloud without the CD, reading only the phrases of the man.

• Say Listen and draw. Play the CD. CD • Track 24

• Encourage creativity when drawing the objects during the main activity and also during the fast finishers activity.

Listen and draw. One. Man: What can you see at the back of the picture? Girl: I can see the sky at the back. Man: Draw a bird at the back of the picture. Girl: Where? In the sky? Man: Yes, draw a bird at the back of the picture in the sky. Two. Man: What can you see in the middle of the picture? Girl: I can see the sea in the middle. Man: Good. Draw a boat in the middle of the picture. Girl: Sorry? Where? Man: Draw a boat in the sea in the middle of the picture.

CLOSING ACTIVITY • Provide pupils with photos of landscapes, books containing photos of landscapes (e.g. Science books) or project photos of landscapes on the board. • Ask What’s at the back? In the middle? At the front? Encourage pupils to talk about the different objects (natural and man-made) that they see in the landscapes.

FAST FINISHERS • Provide fast finishers with coloured pencils. Help them read the fast finisher activity at the bottom of page 43. Read Add more objects. Tell pupils to add more objects to the back, middle and front of their landscape, then colour.

Three. Man: What can you see at the front of the picture? Girl: I can see the sand at the front. I can see a boy and an umbrella, too. Man: Draw some sunglasses at the front. Draw the sunglasses under the umbrella. Girl: Ok. Draw sunglasses at the front under the umbrella. Man: That’s right. Well done. What an amazing picture!

TEACHER’S BOOK 9

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UNIT 8

LESSON 2

44

PAGE 44 Print a landscape

Print a landscape I can print a landscape with stamps.

1 Make plasticine stamps and dip in paint.

2 Print mountains at the back, trees in the middle and a river at the front.

44

Finished? Wash the plasticine and make a model of your landscape.

forty-four

To print objects at the back, middle and front of a landscape. To understand the importance of respecting landscapes. To explore a variety of Art materials in a personal way.

AUT

LTL

ART

SOC

ICT

LIN

OBJECTIVES

PHW

18/12/12 10:23

MAT

38_53_3T_102279.indd 44

COMPLEMENTARY ACTIVITIES (see page 119) Art • Unit 8 Class worksheet - Landscape collage • Torn paper collage • Print greeting cards Science • Shoebox aquarium

MATERIALS

LANGUAGE FOCUS

Flashcards: landscape (47), back (48), middle (49), front (50), stamp (51), print (91)

• Print, stamp

Plasticine

• Back, middle, front

Poster paint (blue, green, yellow and brown)

• River, trees, mountains

Trays (e.g. polystyrene, cardboard)

• There is a (river) at the (front).

10 ARTS & CRAFTS PRIMARY 1

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OPENING ACTIVITY • Show pupils the flashcard of a stamp. Say This is a stamp. • Say We use a stamp to print. Show the flashcard of print. • Demonstrate by placing a rubber stamp in ink (or other object in paint) and pressing it on paper to make a print. • Ask pupils to open their Pupil’s Book to page 42. Say Look at the landscape. The artist uses a wooden stamp (show pupils a block of wood or touch something in the classroom made of wood).

2 Print mountains at the back, trees in the middle and a river at the front. • Encourage the pupils to look at the example. Say Press the stamps gently on the paper. Let’s begin with the mountains at the back. • Hand out the materials: plasticine (or other materials to make stamps), poster paint, trays. TEACHER TIPS

• Walk around and check for understanding. • Plan ahead: clear a space to place the books while the paint dries at the end of the lesson.

• Say The artist prints with the stamp to create the landscape.

• Place a small amount of paint in the trays and spread it out with a paintbrush.

• Show pupils the flashcards of landscape, back, middle, front, stamp and print.

• Show pupils how to get rid of extra paint by pressing the stamp on newspaper or scrap paper before printing in the book.

• Name each one in turn, encouraging the pupils to repeat after you.

MAIN ACTIVITIES

PAGE 44

• Ask the pupils to open their Pupil’s Book to page 44. • Say Look at the title – Print a landscape. • Ask the pupils to look at the text and say Let’s read. Read the text and encourage the pupils to follow in their books.

• If printing materials are limited, pupils can use their fingers. Provide pupils with a towel to wipe the paint off their hands. • Pupils can use the triangle to make mountains (brown), the circle to make water (blue) and trees (green), the square for the ground (yellow) and the small rectangle for the tree trunks (brown). Other shapes may be used based on printing materials available.

I can print a landscape with stamps. • Read the text again, this time encouraging the pupils to read the sentence with you. • Finally, encourage pupils to run their finger under the sentence in their books and read it individually. 1 Make plasticine stamps and dip in paint. • Make four stamps. Encourage the pupils to look at the example. Ask What shapes can you see? A circle, a square, a big triangle and a small rectangle. • Put some paint in the tray and dip the stamp in the paint. Say Dip the stamp carefully.

CLOSING ACTIVITY • Pair work speaking activity. Say Look at your partner’s landscape. Ask What lines, shapes and colours can you see at the back? In the middle? At the front? • Ask How is your landscape similar to your partner’s landscape? How is it different?

FAST FINISHERS • Provide fast finishers with some clean water. Help them read the fast finisher activity at the bottom of page 44. Read Wash the plasticine and make a model of your landscape. Tell pupils to wash all the paint off the plasticine then use it to make mountains, trees, water, etc., to recreate their landscape.

TEACHER’S BOOK 11

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UNIT 8

LESSON 3

45 10

PAGE 45 Paper landscape

Paper landscape

Patterns

I can tear paper to make a landscape.

1

Read, trace and colour.

Artist∫ use line∫, shape∫, Step 1

Step 2

Tear the coloured paper.

Glue the sky and the Sun at the back.

Step 3

Step 4

Glue the mountains in the middle.

Glue the water at the front.

and colour∫

tø make a pattern. pattern 2

What line∫, shape∫ and colour∫ can you see in thi∫ painting?

ing room, Comedians in the dress

45 10

4

ten forty-five

Finished? Print shapes.

Activity 1

5

Activity 2

To use their hands to tear paper. To make a coastal landscape with a background, middle ground and foreground. To understand the importance of respecting landscapes. To explore a variety of Art materials in a personal way. To develop autonomy and creativity in Art. To develop the foundation for an understanding of the Art process.

LANGUAGE FOCUS • Tear

AUT

LTL

ART

SOC

ICT

LIN

OBJECTIVES

PHW

18/12/12 10:24

MAT

38_53_3T_102279.indd 45

EVALUATION CRITERIA Pupils can: • Identify background, middle ground and foreground. • Draw objects in the background, middle ground and foreground. • Tear paper to make a landscape with a back, middle and front. • Express creativity. • Use a variety of Art materials correctly. See Term 3 Evaluation Sheet.

MATERIALS Flashcards: landscape (47), back (48), middle (49), front (50), tear (94) Half an A4 sheet of red, orange, yellow, green, blue and pink paper for each pupil White paper Glue stick

• Back, middle, front • Sea, mountain, sun, sky • I can see a (mountain) at the (back).

12 ARTS & CRAFTS PRIMARY 1

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STEP 3

OPENING ACTIVITY • Draw a coastal landscape on the board (e.g. the Sun in the background, a mountain in the middle ground and the sea in the foreground). • Ask What can you see at the back? In the middle? At the front?

MAIN ACTIVITIES

PAGE 45

• Ask the pupils to open their Pupil’s Book to page 45. • Say Look at the title – Paper landscape. • Ask the pupils to look at the text and say Let’s read. Read the text and encourage the pupils to follow in their books. I can tear paper to make a landscape. • Read the text again, this time encouraging the pupils to read the sentence with you.

• Read Step 3: Glue the mountains in the middle. Encourage the pupils to look at the example. Say Glue the mountains on top of the sky and Sun. STEP 4 • Read Step 4: Glue the water at the front. Say Glue the water on top of the mountains. • Hand out the materials: half an A4 sheet of red, orange, yellow, green, blue and pink paper, white paper, glue stick. TEACHER TIPS

• You can have the pupils do each step with you. This will encourage slower or faster pupils to work at an appropriate pace. • Pupils can gently crumple the blue paper before gluing it to make texture for the water.

• Focus the pupils’ attention on the photo. Ask What can you see at the front? The sea. In the middle? Mountains. At the back? The Sun, the sky.

• Pupils should glue each layer on the bottom part of the previous layer (i.e. the mountains should cover part of the sky and the Sun, the water should cover the bottom part of the mountains) in order to show the background, middle ground and foreground.

• Say Today you are going to tear paper to make a landscape. Say Landscapes are places for people to share. We need to help keep landscapes clean.

• You may use this time to evaluate the pupils based on the evaluation criteria. See Term 3 Evaluation Sheet.

• Finally, encourage pupils to run their finger under the sentence in their books and read it individually.

• Focus the pupils’ attention on the materials and ask What Art materials can we use today? White paper, coloured paper, a glue stick.

CLOSING ACTIVITY

• Say There are four steps.

• Review vocabulary by playing Quick Flash.

STEP 1

• Hold the flashcards (landscape, back, middle, front and tear) facing you. Turn a flashcard over to face the pupils, then turn it back quickly to face you. The pupils say which item they saw.

• Read Step 1: Tear the coloured paper. Say We can use our hands to tear paper. Demonstrate how to tear paper slowly and carefully. Pupils should tear the paper from one side to the other side to get the longest pieces possible. Say Tear the red, orange and pink paper to make the sky. Tear the yellow paper in the shape of a circle to make the Sun. Tear the green paper to make mountains. Tear the blue paper to make water. STEP 2 • Read Step 2: Glue the sky and the Sun at the back. Say Start at the top of the paper. Glue red, orange and pink for the sky. Then glue the Sun in the middle of the paper.

• Include flashcards from this unit and previous units.

FAST FINISHERS • Provide fast finishers with printing materials, poster paint and trays. Help them read the fast finisher activity at the bottom of page 45. Read Print shapes. Tell them to make prints on the water and mountains of their landscape.

TEACHER’S BOOK 13

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Illustrators draw pictures to tell stories. These pictures are called illustrations.

10_01_102283

Illustrators draw pictures of the characters in a story. The lines in illustrations show movement.

Movement goes forwards and backwards, side to side, up and down, and around and around. Illustration by Nacho Gómez.

2012

Do you think the girl scores a goal?

24

46

Activity 1

25

Activity 2

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12/02/13 12:45

47

Illustrated children’s books Pencil Coloured pencils

3 Draw lines to show movement. Colour.

AUT

To observe and identify movement in Art and the environment.

LTL

MATERIALS:

ART

To explore the principle of design: movement.

SOC

Draw lines to show movement in illustrations.

ICT

Where can you see movement in this illustration?

2 What do illustrators do?

OBJECTIVES

PHW

1

LESSON 1

MAT

46

Illustration

Illustration LIN

UNIT 9

To observe and analyse the use of lines to show movement in the illustration by Nacho Gómez. To draw lines to show movement in illustrations. To understand that artists can tell a story and share cultural information through Art.

Finished? Draw a picture of yourself doing your favourite activity. Draw lines to show movement.

47

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Create a character Stories have different characters. Illustrators show us what a character looks like. They also show us the personality of the character.

48

1 Read the questions: • Is your character a person, an animal or a monster?

LESSON 2

To understand that illustrators create stories with different characters.

Create a character.

To create a character with personality.

MATERIALS:

To understand and respect the different physical appearance and personality traits of each individual.

• How old is your character? • What does your character look like? • What does your character wear?

2 Draw your character.

Pencil Finished? What does your character like to do? Draw.

48

38_53_3T_102283.indd 48

To understand that some illustrators draw comic strips: a short story of pictures.

12/02/13 12:45

49

Comic strip

Some illustrators create comic strips. A comic strip is a sequence of drawings that tells a story. You can use your character to create a comic strip.

LESSON 3 Draw a comic strip.

Step 1

Step 2

Step 3

Step 4

Read the sentence and draw your character.

Read the other sentences and draw more pictures.

Draw what’s in the box.

Add lines to show movement. Colour.

MATERIALS: Comic strip examples

Finished? Draw a new comic strip with your character.

49

38_53_3T_102283.indd 49

Template Pupil’s Book page 73

Template page 73

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Pencil Coloured pencils

To draw a sequence of pictures in a comic strip to show movement and tell a story. To develop basic computer skills and practise Art skills on the Internet. To explore a variety of Art materials in a personal way. To develop autonomy and creativity in Art. To reflect on their artwork and the Art process.

BASIC COMPETENCES KEY LIN

Competence in linguistic communication

SOC Competence in social awareness and citizenship

MAT Competence in mathematics

ART Competence in artistic and cultural awareness

PHW Competence in knowledge of and interaction with the physical world

LTL

ICT

Competence in the use of new technologies

Competence in learning to learn

AUT Competence in autonomous learning and personal initiative

4 ARTS & CRAFTS PRIMARY 3

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LANGUAGE FOCUS

EVALUATION CRITERIA

• Illustration, illustrator

Pupils will be able to:

• Lines, movement

• Draw lines to show movement in illustrations.

• Forwards, backwards, side to side, up, down, around

• Illustrate an imaginative character for a story.

• Character, personality, story

• Draw a sequence of pictures in a comic strip to show movement and tell a story.

• Comic strip, cartoon, setting, action

• Express creativity.

KEY STRUCTURES

• Reflect on their artwork and the Art process.

• The girl is (kicking the ball, walking, reading, etc.). • The (leaf) is (falling).

COMPLEMENTARY ACTIVITIES Art

ICT

Unit 9 Class worksheet – A cartoon character

Famous illustrators

• Learn how to draw a cartoon character and then give it a suitable name.

• With an interactive whiteboard or projector go to Google images and type Eric Carle illustrations, Quentin Blake illustrations, Dr. Seuss illustrations, etc.

Illustrate a fantasy setting • Draw a picture of a fantasy world for a new story. Then draw, cut and glue a character in your fantasy setting. Illustrate a book cover • Illustrators design book covers. A book cover makes us want to read the story. Design a new cover for your favourite book. Don’t forget to write the title! Science What do you want to be when you grow up? • Draw a picture of yourself working in the future. Where are you? What are you wearing? What are you doing? Draw lines to show movement. English

• How are the illustrations similar? How are they different? How do these illustrators show movement? • Choose an illustrator and draw a picture in a similar style. Illustrate picture books (easy) • With an interactive whiteboard or projector go to: http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbeebies/get-squiggling/ games/get-squiggling-magicpaintbox/ Write and illustrate a story online (intermediate) • With an interactive whiteboard or projector go to: http://www.clpgh.org/kids/storymaker/embed.cfm Write and illustrate a story online (advanced) • With an interactive whiteboard or projector go to: http://www.kerpoof.com/#/activity/storybook

Write a story

Digital resources

• Write the beginning of a story:

• Poster Unit 9

Where does your story take place?

• Project presentation Unit 9

Who is your character?

• Games

What is your character’s problem? How does your character resolve the problem? • Begin with Once upon a time there was a... • When you finish writing, draw pictures.

TEACHER’S BOOK 5

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UNIT 9

LESSON 1

46

PAGE 46 Illustration

3 Draw lines to show movement. Colour.

Illustration 1

Where can you see movement in this illustration? 47

2 What do illustrators do?

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Lesson 1 continues on page 47

Illustrators draw pictures to tell stories. These pictures are called illustrations.

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Finished? Draw a picture of yourself doing your favourite activity. Draw lines to show movement.

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Illustrators draw pictures of the characters in a story. The lines in illustrations show movement.

Movement goes forwards and backwards, side to side, up and down, and around and around. z. 2012 Illustration by Nacho Góme

Do you think the girl scores a goal?

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MAT

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To explore the principle of design: movement. To observe and identify movement in Art and the environment. To observe and analyse the use of lines to show movement in the illustration by Nacho Gómez. To draw lines to show movement in illustrations. To understand that artists can tell a story and share cultural information through Art.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION Nacho Gómez was born in Madrid and studied Fine Arts at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid. He has worked as a freelance illustrator since 1989, in both print and digital formats, with a variety of local, national and international companies. This illustration was commissioned especially for this Arts and Crafts Primary 3 book. Along with this picture, Nacho Gómez also drew the other illustrations in this unit, as well as those in the rest of the book.

MATERIALS Illustrated children’s books Pencil Coloured pencils

LANGUAGE FOCUS • Illustration, illustrator • Lines, movement • Forwards, backwards, side to side, up, down, around • The girl is (kicking the ball, walking, reading, etc.). • The (leaf) is (falling).

6 ARTS & CRAFTS PRIMARY 3

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CD • Track 24 (continued)

OPENING ACTIVITY • Say I have many favourite books. One of them is … Introduce the pupils to one of your favourite children’s books. Talk about why it’s your favourite and show them some of the illustrations.

Boy: So, this illustration tells us a story about a football game? Girl: That’s right. The illustration shows movement, too. Boy: But how does an illustration show movement?

• Say Artists who draw pictures for books are called illustrators and the pictures are called illustrations.

Girl: This illustrator uses lines to show movement.

• Ask What’s your favourite book? Do you like the illustrations in the book? Accept a variety of responses.

Girl: And movement lines show the ball travelling through the air.

• Ask Why do some books have illustrations? Accept a variety of responses.

MAIN ACTIVITIES

Boy: Oh, yes! Movement lines show the girl kicking the ball.

Boy: Movement lines show the boy jumping to catch the ball. Girl: I think the girl scores a goal. What do you think?

PAGE 46

• Ask the pupils to open their Pupil’s Book to page 46.

2 Read and listen. What do illustrators do?

• Say Look at the title – Illustration.

• Say Let’s listen and read about illustrations. Play the CD.

• Say Look at the artwork. Ask What inspires this artist? A person, the story it was drawn for, etc. 1 Talk about Art: Read and answer the question. • Focus pupils’ attention on the question activity. • Read Where can you see movement in this illustration? The girl kicking the ball, the boy jumping, the ball moving, etc. Additional questions: • What can we tell about the characters from looking at the illustration? They are young, they like to play football, etc. • Does this illustration make you want to see what happens next in the story? Accept a variety of responses.

+ Listening (optional) • Say Look at the artwork and listen. Play the CD. CD • Track 24

Boy: Look at the drawing of the children playing football. Girl: Yes, it’s an illustration. Boy: What’s an illustration? Girl: An illustration is a picture that tells us a story.

CD • Track 25

Illustrators draw pictures to tell stories. These pictures are called illustrations. Illustrators draw pictures of the characters in a story. The lines in illustrations show movement. Movement goes forwards and backwards, side to side, up and down, and around and around. Do you think the girl scores a goal?

TEACHER TIPS

English extension: • Encourage complete sentences to describe the actions in the illustration (e.g. The girl is kicking the ball. The boy is jumping). Science extension: • Ask Which job sector does an illustrator belong to? Secondary sector. They are craft workers whose work is usually mass-produced. Interactive whiteboard: • Search for an attractive illustration using Google images and project it on the whiteboard. Have the pupils describe what they see and what they think is happening. Try www.nachogomez.es or www.illustrationweb.com for some ideas.

TEACHER’S BOOK 7

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UNIT 9

LESSON 1

PAGE 47 Illustration

Illustration 1

47

Where can you see movement in this illustration?

2 What do illustrators do?

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Illustrators draw pictures to tell stories. These pictures are called illustrations. Illustrators draw pictures of the characters in a story. The lines in illustrations show movement.

3 Draw lines to show movement. Colour.

Movement goes forwards and backwards, side to side, up and down, and around and around. Illustration by Nacho Gómez.

2012

Do you think the girl scores a goal?

24

46

Activity 1

25

Activity 2

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12/02/13 12:45

Lesson 1 begins on page 46

Finished? Draw a picture of yourself doing your favourite activity. Draw lines to show movement.

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MAT

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To explore the principle of design: movement. To observe and identify movement in Art and the environment. To observe and analyse the use of lines to show movement in the illustration by Nacho Gómez. To draw lines to show movement in illustrations. To understand that artists can tell a story and share cultural information through Art.

COMPLEMENTARY ACTIVITIES (see page 129) Art • Illustrate a book cover Science • What do you want to be when you grow up? ICT • Famous illustrators • Digital resources

MATERIALS Illustrated children’s books Pencil Coloured pencils

LANGUAGE FOCUS • Illustration, illustrator • Lines, movement • Forwards, backwards, side to side, up, down, around • The girl is (kicking the ball, walking, reading, etc.) • The (leaf) is (falling).

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MAIN ACTIVITIES

PAGE 47

3 Draw lines to show movement. Colour. • Say Let’s practise drawing lines to show movement. • Ask pupils to turn to page 47. • Ask What lines can we see? Vertical, diagonal, horizontal, curved, wavy. • Ask What do you see in these illustrations? A boy jumping on a trampoline, a girl skateboarding, a boy diving into a swimming pool, a girl walking a dog, a girl ice skating. • Say Draw lines to show movement in these illustrations. You can create your own illustration that shows movement in the final box.

CLOSING ACTIVITY • Pair work speaking activity. Say Let’s work in pairs. Compare your lines with the lines that your partner used in each picture on page 47. • Ask Are they the same or different?

FAST FINISHERS • Provide fast finishers with half a sheet of A4 paper and coloured pencils. Help them read the fast finisher activity at the bottom of page 47. Read Draw a picture of yourself doing your favourite activity. Draw lines to show movement. Tell pupils to think about their favourite activity then decide which kind of lines they will need to use to show movement.

• Hand out the materials: pencil, coloured pencils.

TEACHER TIPS

• Walk around and check for understanding. • Encourage creativity. Pupils can draw anything they want in the final box. • Encourage pupils to draw a variety of lines to show the different movements. • Ask individual pupils to describe the movement in the illustrations (e.g. He’s jumping up. She’s going fast on a skateboard).

TEACHER’S BOOK 9

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UNIT 9

LESSON 2

48

PAGE 48 Create a character

Create a character Stories have different characters. Illustrators show us what a character looks like. They also show us the personality of the character.

1 Read the questions: • Is your character a person, an animal or a monster? • How old is your character? • What does your character look like? • What does your character wear?

2 Draw your character.

Finished? What does your character like to do? Draw.

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COMPLEMENTARY ACTIVITIES (see page 129) Art

To understand that illustrators create stories with different characters.

• Unit 9 class worksheet – A cartoon character

To create a character with personality.

English

To understand and respect the different physical appearance and personality traits of each individual. To develop autonomy and creativity in Art.

• Illustrate a fantasy setting

• Write a story ICT • Illustrate picture books

MATERIALS Pencil

LANGUAGE FOCUS • Illustration, illustrator • Character, personality, story

10 ARTS & CRAFTS PRIMARY 3

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OPENING ACTIVITY

TEACHER TIPS

• Say Let’s talk about characters. Ask volunteers to name their favourite book or television programme. Ask Who is the character? What does he/she/it look like? How old is he/she/it? What does he/ she/it usually wear? What does he/she/it like to do?

MAIN ACTIVITIES

PAGE 48

• Ask the pupils to open their Pupil’s Book to page 48. • Say Look at the title – Create a character. • Ask the pupils to look at the text and say Let’s read. Read the text and encourage the pupils to follow in their books. Stories have different characters. Illustrators show us what a character looks like. They also show us the personality of the character. • Read the text again, this time encouraging the pupils to read the sentences with you. • Finally, encourage pupils to run their finger under the sentences in their books and read them individually. 1 Read the questions. • Focus the pupils’ attention on the questions on the left of the page. Read Is your character a person, an animal or a monster? How old is your character? What does your character look like? What does your character wear? • Encourage pupils to think about the answer to each question before they start drawing their character. 2 Draw your character.

• Walk around and check for understanding. • Encourage creativity. Pupils can create any kind of character they like: a person, an animal, an alien, a monster, etc. Try to ensure that pupils do not just copy the example shown on the page, or one of the examples mentioned in the opening activity. • Encourage pupils to think about other characteristics as well (e.g. is your character funny, intelligent, adventurous, etc.?). Pupils can show a lot about a character in an illustration. • Distribute rubbers around the classroom so the pupils can correct any mistakes they make.

CLOSING ACTIVITY • Pair work speaking activity. Say Let’s work in pairs. Talk about your character with your partner. Pupils describe their character to their partner. Partners can ask questions such as those listed on the page, or they can ask other additional questions (e.g. What does your character like to do? Does you character have special powers?). • Encourage pupils to use complete sentences.

FAST FINISHERS • Help fast finishers read the fast finisher activity at the bottom of page 48. Read What does your character like to do? Draw. Brainstorm different activities with pupils before they start drawing. Encourage them to draw objects and a setting that provide more information about their character.

• Say Now draw your character. Encourage pupils to look at the example and draw the outline of their character before adding details. • Pupils should draw their character in pencil. However, if you have time at the end of the activity, you can provide them with coloured pencils for them to add colour.

TEACHER’S BOOK 11

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UNIT 9

LESSON 3

49 10

PAGE 49 Comic strip

Comic strip

Patterns

Some illustrators create comic strips. A comic strip is a sequence of drawings that tells a story. You can use your character to create a comic strip.

1

Read, trace and colour.

Artist∫ use line∫, shape∫, Step 1

Step 2

Read the sentence and draw your character.

Read the other sentences and draw more pictures.

Step 3

and colour∫ Draw what’s in the box.

Step 4 Add lines to show movement. Colour.

tø make a pattern. pattern 2

What line∫, shape∫ and colour∫ can you see in thi∫ painting?

ing room, Comedians in the dress

10 49

Finished? Draw a new comic strip with your character.

ten

4

5 Activity 1Template Activity page 73 2

To understand that some illustrators draw comic strips: a short story of pictures. To draw a sequence of pictures in a comic strip to show movement and tell a story.

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EVALUATION CRITERIA Pupils can: • Draw lines to show movement in illustrations. • Illustrate an imaginative character for a story. • Draw a sequence of pictures in a comic strip to show movement and tell a story. • Express creativity. • Reflect on their artwork and the Art process.

To explore a variety of Art materials in a personal way.

See Term 3 Evaluation Sheet.

To develop autonomy and creativity in Art.

MATERIALS

To reflect on their artwork and the Art process.

Comic strip examples (can be projected on a whiteboard) Template Pupil’s Book page 73 Pencil

LANGUAGE FOCUS

Coloured pencils

• Illustrator, lines, movement • Character, personality, story • Comic strip, cartoon, setting, action

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STEP 3

OPENING ACTIVITY • Say Some illustrators create comic strips. Show the pupils an example of a comic strip or project one on the board (you can do a Google image search for Charlie Brown comic strips, Calvin and Hobbs comic strips, Tintin comic strips, Mafalda comic strips, etc.) • Ask What is a comic strip? A short story told with pictures. • Ask Where do we usually find comic strips? In newspapers and magazines. • Ask What is your favourite comic strip? Accept a variety of responses.

MAIN ACTIVITIES

PAGE 49

• Read Step 3: Draw what’s in the box. Say Think. What will your character find in the box? Will it be something funny, scary, happy? How will the story end? STEP 4 • Read Step 4: Add lines to show movement. Colour. Say Think about how your character will move. Will you use vertical, horizontal, diagonal, curved or wavy lines to show movement? • Hand out the materials: pencil, coloured pencils. • Ask pupils to turn to the template on page 73 to begin drawing their comic strip. TEACHER TIPS

• Ask the pupils to open their Pupil’s Book to page 49.

• Walk around and check for understanding.

• Say Look at the title – Comic strip.

• Encourage creativity. Explain to pupils that comic strips are usually funny and encourage humour in their artwork.

• Focus the pupils’ attention on the text at the top of the page. Read the text and encourage the pupils to follow in their books. Some illustrators create comic strips. A comic strip is a sequence of drawings that tells a story. You can use your character to create a comic strip. • Focus the pupils’ attention on the comic strip at the top of the page. Encourage the pupils to read it and talk about what it means. • Ask How does this illustrator use lines to show movement? Accept a variety of responses. • Say Today we are going to make a comic strip. There are four steps. STEP 1 • Read Step 1: Read the sentence and draw your character. Say Be creative and create an interesting character for your comic strip. STEP 2 • Read Step 2: Read the other sentences and draw more pictures. Say Read each phrase and imagine what your character will do. Then draw a picture.

• Pupils can use the character they invented in Lesson 2 or they can invent a new character. • You may use this time to evaluate the pupils based on the evaluation criteria. See Term 3 Evaluation Sheet.

CLOSING ACTIVITY • Pair work speaking activity. Say Let’s work in pairs. Share your comic strip with your partner. Pupils describe to their partners what is happening at each stage of their comic strip. Encourage them to use complete sentences. • Ask pupils to point to and describe the lines that show movement.

FAST FINISHERS • Provide fast finishers with a sheet of A4 paper and coloured pencils. Help them read the fast finisher activity at the bottom of page 49. Read Draw a new comic strip with your character. Pupils should create a new comic strip with the same character.

TEACHER’S BOOK 13

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