Page 1

FALL 2017

Help for MIGRAINES Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital Update

CELEBRATING PATIENTS Real People Share their Stories

HEALTH TIME

• FALL 2017

1


Experience Amazing

Introducing the first-ever

2018 Lexus LC-LCh Experience a new world of performance now available at Lexus of Richmond Hill

Introducing the all-new

2018 Lexus LS-LSh Luxury reimagined from the ground up arriving Spring 2018

2

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME


Fall 2017

MACKENZIE HEALTH HEALTH TIME EDITORIAL CONSULTANTS Debora Kelly, Stefanie Kreibe

METROLAND MEDIA PUBLISHER Dana Robbins REGIONAL GENERAL MANAGER Shaun Sauve ASSOCIATE PUBLICATION MANAGER Jacqueline Kovacs CONTRIBUTORS Liz Bruckner, Jim Craigmyle, Sue Kanhai, Joann MacDonald, Christine Morrison DIRECTOR OF ADVERTISING Amanda Smug ADVERTISING MANAGER Mara Sepe DIRECTOR OF CREATIVE SERVICES Katherine Porcheron GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Emily Ayranto Brenda Boon Jennifer Dallman Luanne Turner

16

CONTENTS 2 Health news, facts and fun

4

Our People

Anne Li: Providing Support Mihai Borcan: Forward Thinking Nancy Coxford: Tradition of Caring Dr. Nick Voudouris: Serving the Community

10

Cover Story

Hospital News

Transforming Medical Care Mackenzie Health’s new electronic medical record sytem makes health care better — and easier — for everyone

14

Hospital News

Progress Report An update on the new Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital

16

Celebrating Patients Recognizing the strength and perseverance of patients and their families

Foundation News

The Longo Legacy The family-owned grocery chain continues its long-standing tradition of philanthropy through a $1-million gift to Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital

20

Health Time is published two times a year by Metroland Media,York Region in partnership with Mackenzie Health. Copyright 2017. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher

Your Stories

Turning the Page May Loo overcame a devastating diagnosis to reclaim her health and a positive outlook on life

The material in this publication is intended for general information purposes only and, while every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the material, it does not constitute advice or carry the specific endorsement of either Metroland Media or Mackenzie Health. Readers are encouraged to consult their doctor to discuss health concerns.

MACKENZIE HEALTH 10 Trench St. Richmond Hill, ON L4C 4Z3 (905) 883-1212 (905) 832-4554

Did You Know

13

22

Your Health

Brain Storm Whether you suffer from migraines or headaches, here are tactics for treating and preventing them

ON OUR COVER

Angie Ferraro, David Cheung and Sabrina Cannella share their health care stories as part of the annual Celebrating Patients event at Mackenzie Health. Cover photo by Jim Craigmyle HEALTH TIME

• FALL 2017

1


?

DIDYOU

KNOW Flu Fighters

This flu season, protect yourself and others by: • Getting your annual flu shot as early as possible. The flu shot takes 14 days to become fully effective. The sooner you get it, the sooner you are better protected. Visit ontario.ca/page/get-flu-shot to find a free flu shot clinic in your area. •

Clean your hands correctly and often. Use hand sanitizer; it’s fast, readily available and an efficient way to eliminate germs from your hands.

Cleaning and disinfecting surfaces. Most household cleaning products will kill the flu virus, so keep common surfaces and items clean and disinfected.

Covering up. Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. No tissue? Cough into your elbow, not your hand.

Keeping away. Stay home if you are ill.

2

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME

Brush Off Dementia

If you need a little incentive to keep your pearly whites clean, consider this: A study from the University of California found that elderly people who didn’t brush their teeth had a 22 to 65 per cent greater risk of dementia than those who brushed three times a day. What’s the connection? When harmful bacteria colonize your gums, their inflammatory by-products seep through your gums and into your body — that’s when the inflammation can lead to heart disease and dementia. So brush up!


to ou have y , y d o b ong ems the althy, str e e s h it a d r o n F .A to a yourself cording e c g a n , e in ll a a r b ch e es to the ology. Th li r p u p e a N e A d sam JAM ed 70 an shed in g li a b u s p lt u y g t ad stud timulatin icate tha s d y in ll s a t g n me findin gage in of n e o h w sed risk a e r older c e t, d have a pairmen s im ie it e iv iv t it in n ac mild cog en a healthy bra g in p lo e e tw dev stage be you challenge le d id m w do the ing a ne tia. How n r n a e le m e s d ya and ’s as eas aying socially It ? in a r st your b t, and by r community. f a r c r o you activity aged in g n e d n active a

The Truth

About Hats

HEALTHY FACT Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital is now under construction at Major Mackenzie Drive and Jane Street in Vaughan. It will be the first new hospital in York Region in more than 30 years and is expected to be completed in 2020.

2,613 babies were born at Mackenzie Richmond Hill Hospital in the last year. To register for prenatal/postpartum classes, visit mackenziehealth.ca/preandpostnatalclasses.

Remember how Mom used to warn you to wear your toque or you would lose 45 per cent of your body heat? It turns out that chilly assumption was based on U.S. Military experiments in the 1950s when volunteers wearing Arctic survival suits were exposed to bitterly cold conditions — with their heads uncovered. Because their noggins were the only body parts exposed, that’s how most of their heat was lost. And though a more accurate measure of head heat loss would be 10 per cent or less, a cosy hat still takes the edge off frosty days.

Drink Up?

The next time you’re jonesing for a caffeine-laced energy drink, think twice. A recent study found that participants who drank four cans of a popular energy drink experienced abnormal changes in their blood pressure and heart’s electrical activity compared with participants who drank a control beverage with the same amount of caffeine. Studies are still ongoing, but the takeaway? Avoid or limit energy drinks if high blood pressure or cardiac conditions are a health concern for you. HEALTH TIME

• FALL 2017

3


Our People

Anne Li

PROVIDING SUPPORT

A

rriving at the Emergency Department (ED) can be overwhelming for both patients and their families. Fortunately at Mackenzie Health, social worker Anne Li is ready to help. “There is always someone who can use my support,” she says. Anne’s primary focus is the families of patients who come to the ED with traumatic injuries or critical illness, such as heart attack or stroke. When a patient arrives by ambulance, Anne joins the health care team to gather information and prepares to assist the family. “Families desperately want to know what has happened to their loved ones and how they are doing,” she says. “I try to meet the families as soon as they step into the Emergency Department. They often have mixed emotions: most are distraught, experiencing shock; some are anxious, or feeling guilt or denial. It is important to empathize with their emotions.” Her varied experiences include helping a husband following the sudden passing of his young wife, and supporting a mother following the loss of her child. In each case, Anne feels privileged to help care for those who are grieving. She carries that feeling of gratitude across her role. “It doesn’t take much to help people feel better in the ED,” she says. “I remember once, we had an elderly patient who was quite frail and unable to speak. I went over to offer my help. She held my hand and kissed it. Her response touched me.” A recent recipient of a Kudos Award, which is presented to staff, physicians or volunteers for their exceptional efforts, Anne continues to have a passion for social work. She advanced her social work education in Montreal after coming to Canada, and started her career in Toronto. She is happy to work at the community hospital where her own family receives care. The difference Anne makes in the lives of patients and families is all part of the exceptional care provided by the team in the ED. “When I see how hard the health care team works to save the life of a patient, it inspires me to do my best.” —Christine Morrison

4

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME


Our People

Mihai Borcan

FORWARD THINKING

M

ihai Borcan, a Registered Nurse at Mackenzie Health, is excited to be part of a community hospital that is thinking

big. “The new electronic medical record system that launched in July of this year gives our team a clear picture of the patient’s health with just a click,” Mihai says. “It was a huge project for a hospital the size of Mackenzie Health.” Before the system was launched, much of the charting within the hospital was paper-based. The new system means there is one record that follows a patient along their care journey. “We are now able to contact the right care provider — right from the patient’s bedside.” As a relatively new graduate, having finished his studies in 2014, Mihai is enthusiastic about how technology is changing and improving patient care — and that landed him the position of unit council chair for the cardiology unit. “The cardiology unit council brings together a complete team,” he explains, “including pharmacy, occupational therapy, physical therapy and nursing, to bring new ideas to the table for delivering exceptional care.” The unit council tracks and monitors the impact of grassroots initiatives to improve patient care. “We see the improvements in our patients,” Mihai says. Within the cardiology unit are patients ranging from relatively mobile to those who are unable to move independently, so care needs may differ. Those with mobility issues, for example, may suffer from pressure ulcers. To address this, “We implemented a Feet Clock Turning program,” Mihai says. “Since we started using the program, we’ve had no ulcers develop in patients in our unit.” The care Mihai and the cardiology unit team provide does not go unnoticed. “We are very lucky,” he says. “We almost always have homemade food and cards from grateful patients and their families.” —Christine Morrison

HEALTH TIME

• FALL 2017

5


Our People

Nancy Coxford

TRADITION OF CARING

G

rowing up, Nancy Coxford remembers Mackenzie Health, then York Central Hospital, as being a part of family life. In 1962, five years after moving to Richmond Hill, Nancy’s mother, Ruth, attended a meeting to help establish the women’s auxiliary for the new hospital. “Immediately, my mother was involved in fundraising for the hospital,” Nancy says, “and, after it opened in 1963, she volunteered one day a week.” Stewart, Nancy’s father, was also involved with Mackenzie Health. Starting in the 1970s, he helped fundraise for what is now known as C-Wing. He went on to serve on the boards of directors for the hospital and its foundation over the years. Her parents passed on their commitment to the hospital to their children, and Nancy fondly remembers she and her brother and sister preparing food for hospital bake sales and helping out backstage at fundraising fashion shows. As an adult, Nancy has continued her family’s tradition. In 2000, a friend at the foundation approached her to join the board of directors — a role she served in for 13 years, including two years as board chair. “I can’t think of an organization that serves the community better than our local hospital,” Nancy says. “We are all impacted by what happens at Mackenzie Health. They are providing quality care to our friends, family members and neighbours.” While the rapidly growing community has been a challenge, Nancy points to Mackenzie Health’s commitment to delivering progressive solutions and identifying best practices. Nancy’s philanthropic interests have grown over the years, including establishing the Grey Birch Foundation, which is dedicated to empowering women and girls across Canada, but she continues to support Mackenzie Health. “Philanthropy is a journey,” Nancy says. “Although my interests continue to grow, I still come back to my desire to support our community hospital.” —Christine Morrison

6

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME


Our People

Dr. Nick Voudouris

SERVING THE COMMUNITY

F

or family physician Dr. Nick Voudouris, supporting his community hospital is a critical part of providing exceptional care. “Making the hospital better helps my patients and everyone in our community,” he says. Nick’s passion for community service spurred him to become involved with his local community hospital in 1990, when he joined a family practice in Thornhill. “I started my medical career as a flying doctor in northern Ontario and the Northwest Territories,” he says. “I did a lot of travelling, but in the end, I settled down only a few kilometres away from where I grew up.” A series of leadership roles within the hospital eventually led him to the board of directors of Mackenzie Health Foundation. For Nick, becoming involved in fundraising was a natural extension of the care he provides his patients. “My involvement with Mackenzie Health allows me to serve the community in three different ways: through my office, through the hospital and through the foundation.” At the hospital, Nick is actively involved in developing innovative and collaborative approaches to create seamless transitions in patient care between community-based physicians and the hospital. As a practising physician, Nick sees first-hand how patients benefit from community investment. “Community support through the foundation allows Mackenzie Health to invest in the equipment that best serves our patients.” Last October, Nick was among the first 25 inductees to the Order of Vaughan, in recognition for both his medical leadership and fundraising support for the Mackenzie Health Foundation. “It was a tremendous honour,” Nick says. “I have done well in my life and I truly believe in giving back. Like the saying goes, ‘Do well by doing good.’ I appreciate the recognition, but that’s not why I try to help.” —Christine Morrison

HEALTH TIME

• FALL 2017

7


Sponsored Content

Meet the Wills Lawyers Protecting Families

S

ome of the most important decisions you make in life are, ironically, regarding your death. Writing a will is often put off because death isn’t something most people want to talk about. But what you do - or don’t do - to plan for it can mean the difference between having your loved ones taken care of when you are gone, or a possible family nightmare. Fish & Associates law firm, located in the warm, relaxed atmosphere of a turn of the century home in the heart of Thornhill, has been providing wills, estate, and probate services for over 40 years. The firm consists of Barry Fish, who established the practice in 1973, Les Kotzer, who joined Barry in 1989 after graduating on the Dean’s List from the University of Windsor Law School in 1987, and his daughter, Michelle Kotzer, also a University of Windsor Law graduate with a certificate in Elder Law from Osgoode Hall Law School, who came on board as a junior lawyer in 2015. Fish & Associates is well known in the area of wills, estates, and probate law. Les and Michelle take care of drafting and preparing wills and powers of attorney, while Barry is responsible for estate administration, working with families after someone has died. Before pursuing his dream of becoming a lawyer, Les ran Eglinton Paint and Hardware with his brother for five years. He believes his time managing a store benefited him when he began practicing law. “It taught me how to deal with people,” he says. “People often say they don’t understand complex legal language and that can keep them from taking care of things they really need to do, like wills. I speak in plain language so clients can understand information which can take the fear out of will planning and help clients better understand the process.” His personable approach to wills and estate law and his focus on saving families garnered Les a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal and has made him one of the most media sought after wills lawyers in North America. He has appeared on CNN, CITY TV, and as a Canadian success story on CTV National news (watch his appearances on www.leskotzer.com). He has been a guest on a variety of radio shows, and currently is a regular call-in guest on Newstalk 1010. He has been featured in a number of print publications such as The National Post, The Toronto Star, The New York Times, Time, Newsweek, and Fortune. When he isn’t practicing law, Les is also a professional songwriter. “These Are Our Heroes” was part of a documentary that won the gold medal at the Houston Film Festival. You can hear some of his songs at www.touchyourheartsongs.com. Les and Barry have co-authored four books from their experiences in wills, estate, and probate law, entitled “The Family Fight”, “The Family War”, “Where There’s An Inheritance”, and “The Wills Lawyers… Their Stories Of Money, Inheritance, Family, Greed, and Betrayal.” (See www.thewillslawyers.com for book information and to watch Les and Barry read stories.) “Many people don’t realize the harsh realities of what can happen if you die without a will. Basically, the government will write one for you,” Les explains. “There is no executor to take care of your estate, no guardian to take your children and beneficiaries are determined by the law not by you.”

8

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME

FACTORS TO CONSIDER It is important that your will be tailored to reflect your current life situation. There are many factors to take into consideration. • Do you own shares in a private corporation such as a family business, medical or dental corporation etc.? Many people don’t realize you can save probate tax by making a second will to cover your shares in a private corporation. If your corporation is worth one million dollars, having a secondary will can save approximately $15,000 in probate tax . If it is worth more there will be more probate tax saved. • Do you have a will but were recently married? Under Ontario law, marriage revokes your will. • Do you have powers of attorney for health and property? Your will comes into effect when you die, but a proper power of attorney for property protects you while you are alive and keeps the government out of your financial affairs if you are unable to act for yourself due to illness or accident. (For more information go to www.powerofattorneyinfo.com) • Are any of your beneficiaries collecting Ontario disability support from the government? Special provisions need to be made in your will setting up a proper trust or they could lose their government benefits when you die.


Les Kotzer, Barry Fish & Michelle Kotzer If you have put off getting a will, Michelle stresses the importance of not holding out any longer especially if you have children. “If you and your spouse die together suddenly, who will raise your children? There could be a battle between both sets of grandparents,” she says. “I don’t understand how parents can sleep at night knowing that.” Having begun her legal career in estate litigation, Michelle witnessed

firsthand the intense battles that can ensue between family members when proper wills are not in place. Death is something many people aren’t comfortable facing, but planning for it now is the best way to ensure your wishes are fulfilled. After all, you should be the one to decide where your assets go. Les recalls one story about a man who definitely made sure his assets were divided how he intended. “A woman called into one of my radio shows and explained how she and her cousins used to visit their 89 year old uncle who didn’t have any children of his own. At the age of 90 he suddenly became deaf and some of her cousins wondered why they would continue to visit and talk to him when he couldn’t hear them. They would joke in front of him about what they would take from his apartment when he died. Eventually, the elderly man announced that he was not, and never was, deaf, that he had just let them believe he was so he could hear their unguarded dialogue. Needless to say he changed his will after some of the things he heard!” To help you and your family, Fish & Associates offers a free will consultation (if you don’t have one and aren’t sure where to start) or a free review of your existing will to make sure it is up to date and not a recipe for a family nightmare.

To contact Les Kotzer or Michelle Kotzer To book a free will and power of attorney consultation appointment or To have your existing will reviewed at no cost Call 905.881.1500 or email Michelle Kotzer at mkotzer@fishlaw.ca Les Kotzer at les@leskotzer.com Fish & Associates is located at 7951 Yonge St (Yonge below Highway 7) Visit willappointment.com or leskotzer.com for more information HEALTH TIME

• FALL 2017

9


10

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME


Celebrating Patients Recognizing the strength and perseverance of patients and their families By Sue Kanhai | Photo by Jim Craigmyle

S

abrina Cannella’s journey has been difficult. Just 23, she has had frequent hospital stays over the last decade. It began with a case of appendicitis at 14, though she has since been diagnosed with a number of rare and complex chronic illnesses, including Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome and mast cell activation syndrome. She also has anxiety and depression. “All of the conditions I have are rare in occurrence and in combination,” Sabrina says. “There is so much that is unknown about them that when I go for treatments or appointments, a lot of doctors say, ‘I’ve never seen a case like yours in real life.’ It’s stuff they learn about in medical textbooks.” Sabrina is in and out of the Emergency Department (ED) on at least a monthly basis. The staff is very good at keeping on top of her medical history, and she feels well cared for. While she once had dreams of being a professional dancer, Sabrina would like to be a pediatric oncology nurse. She hopes that by telling her story, it might reach someone who is recently diagnosed and feels scared and alone. “Nobody should ever feel like a lost cause,” she says, “feel too complex or too sick to be helped.” Sabrina believes in surrounding yourself with people who lift you up. “They help remind you of the good things, help you appreciate the small things and find meaning in the littlest joy,” she says. “It can be your saving grace on the difficult days.”

Sabrina’s story is just one of the many that inspire the staff, physicians and volunteers at Mackenzie Health. These individual stories are the driving force behind the hospital’s annual Celebrating Patients event. In its second year, the June 2017 celebration, Celebrating Patients: More Than a Patient, recognized the strength and perseverance of patients and their families. Dale Curd, host of the popular CBC TV show Hello Goodbye, facilitated a live discussion with patients who generously shared their personal stories. “Every day our staff, physicians and volunteers work with and meet patients who inspire us as they fight to overcome illness and injury,” says Susan Kwolek, executive vicepresident, chief operating officer and chief nursing executive at Mackenzie Health. “Every patient has their own unique story, and through storytelling and sharing, others can often find a source of encouragement and motivation.” Several calendar days celebrate health care professionals, but none focuses on patients, Susan notes. Mackenzie Health decided to create an annual day to celebrate the patients who come through its organization. Hospital stays are episodic, she says. After an injury, serious illness, life-threatening event or loss, it takes courage and resilience to get back to your life. This event celebrates those who do that hard work, and helps staff see them in the context of their whole lives. “It’s a reminder for our team that people who come

HEALTH TIME

• FALL 2017

11


“Every day may not be good, but there’s something good in every day” — Sabrina Cannella

Angie felt understood and truly cared about.

Patients are celebrated for sharing their stories.

Sabrina reflects on her own health journey.

SHARE Your Story 12

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME

to us have a life before and after needing care.” The stories are inspirational, full of hope and possibility. “For people at a different stage in their illness or health journey, it gives them that sense of a light at the end of the tunnel,” Susan says. “Courage is kind of infectious.” The stories shared to date resonated with so many that they’re now part of new staff orientation. David Cheng’s first-ever hospital stay came without warning. Last spring, he felt unwell and had abdominal pain, but had no idea what was wrong. Sudden severe bleeding brought him to Mackenzie Health by ambulance. His stay lasted 11 days and included time in the ED and the ICU, and required a massive blood transfusion. Doctors discovered he had diverticulitis. If he were 10 or 15 years older, or had any other medical complication, he might not have survived, they told him. He is grateful to have returned to good health. Throughout his stay, the toughest part was the impact on his family. “At the time, you know little about what’s going on, you’re just lying in the bed,” he says, “but your family is around you and they’re worrying.” His advice to other patients and families is to try to stay calm and focus on establishing good communication with the medical team. Trust the specialists and remember there’s only so much you can control; everyone responds differently to treatments. Angie Ferraro has had up-close experience with that. Her mother was diagnosed with metastatic colon cancer in October 2015. She had been treated at other area hospitals for about 15 months before she was seen at Mackenzie Health. She’d already undergone surgery, radiation and 12 rounds of chemotherapy. “From the get-go, nothing was easy with her,” Angie says. “Every corner we turned, she had a complication. Everything that was supposed to be tolerated well was not.” Angie’s mother suffered a very serious

gastric bleed, but through it all she was a fighter. Her attitude: “As long as I’m still living, I want to keep trying.” They embarked upon immune therapy and the prognosis, Angie says, was fair. If they could treat her mother and she responded well — as many patients do — there was still hope. Then her mother suffered a broken hip and was brought to Mackenzie Health. Angie found the staff was helpful and supportive, right from their first interactions in the ED. They were very sympathetic: they found a private space for her mother and the orthopedic surgeon spoke to her mother in Italian, making her feel comfortable. Two days after surgery, she was moved to the surgical rehab floor. The nurses and personal support workers (PSWs) were responsive and friendly. Angie was happy with the communication and support. The expectation was they could manage her mother’s pain, start her rehabilitation and eventually have her return home. But whenever she was weakened, as she was now, the cancer grew stronger. Suddenly it was time to face difficult end-of-life decisions. Palliative care was full, but staff found Angie’s mother a room close by and a nurse with palliative experience. The hospital’s multi-faith chaplain sat with Angie often during what would be the last week of her mother’s life. “She was unresponsive. My sister, my father and I were there 24/7, and he sat with us, just to keep us company,” she recalls. It was a very emotional time, the most difficult thing Angie had ever experienced. “There’s not one person I can say who didn’t treat her well and didn’t understand us as a family. And it was Christmas,” Angie says, her voice breaking. “Everything I saw of the volunteers, nurses and doctors, I need to give back. I don’t think Mackenzie Health is lacking anything — not compassion, not specialists. There was nothing they missed. They really care, and people who care, you can’t replace.”

Every story is important. Share yours to give hope and encouragement to others: mackenziehealth.ca/stories


TRANSFORMING PATIENT CARE

Mackenzie Health’s new electronic medical record makes health care better — and easier — for everyone By Sue Kanhai

I

magine a straightforward, easy-to-use tool that actually both improves and simplifies health care. This summer, Mackenzie Health launched a new electronic medical record (EMR) that makes it possible for the care team to spend more time with patients, provides physicians with exactly what they need to make important health care decisions more quickly and empowers patients with easy access to their health records. The system makes patient information

MyChart Patient Portal Access your Mackenzie Health records at your convenience. MyChart is available on mobile devices and from both the App Store and Google Play. Sign up now at: mackenziehealth.ca/mychart

available securely and from anywhere across the organization, so your care providers don’t need to search for test results or specific orders. It also means you don’t have to repeat your information over and over. To make your information immediately available to those who need it, staff can now document any care you receive right from your bedside. Part of the EMR implementation included computers being installed for nurses and physicians to document care in real time, as well as send orders directly to the lab and pharmacy. The new EMR also increases medication safety and reduces the chance for errors with closed-loop medication administration and bar code scanning at your bedside. For patients, the new EMR brings a number of benefits, including a faster and more efficient registration process. Similar to checking in at an airport, if you have a scheduled appointment at Mackenzie Richmond Hill Hospital, you can now enter your health card number on a self-serve registration kiosk, follow the simple instructions on screen, get an armband from a patient assistance representative and proceed to your appointment. You can also access your health records from Mackenzie Health and better manage your health information using an online tool called MyChart. With MyChart, you can view your lab and test results as well as diagnostic imaging results (though no images). In time, additional features will also be available, such as the list of conditions or medical concerns diagnosed at Mackenzie Health, as well as any prescribed medications and known allergies. “I think giving patients access to their health

information is very empowering,” says Susan Kwolek, executive vice-president, chief operating officer and chief nursing executive at Mackenzie Health. “It opens up the conversation with their physician in a way that didn’t happen before.” Registering for an appointment is even faster if you use MyChart to complete a new process called E-Check In. MyChart makes it possible for you to register for your appointment up to seven days prior from home or from any other convenient location and receive a barcode that you can scan at the hospital to indicate you have arrived, get an armband and proceed to your appointment. MyChart is available at mackenziehealth.ca/mychart and as an app. Implemented in collaboration with software developer Epic Systems Co., the new EMR is the first full-suite Epic EMR to be installed in a Canadian hospital. Epic is recognized as a world leader in medical records and information technology and has implemented its systems in thousands of hospitals worldwide and will be implementing them in several Canadian hospitals over the next few years. The new EMR at Mackenzie Health has earned the organization EMRAM Stage 6 recognition from HIMSS Analytics. This designation confirms Mackenzie Health is among only one per cent of hospitals in Canada to reach this goal in EMR adoption. It is the second highest level on the international benchmark for this type of medical technical advancement. The new state-of-the art system is already helping patients, visitors and care providers alike and ongoing refinements will continue to make the system better each day. It’s health care made simple, with benefits for all.

For patients, the new EMR also brings a number of benefits, including a faster and more efficient registration process HEALTH TIME

• FALL 2017

13


Progress Report AN UPDATE ON THE NEW MACKENZIE VAUGHAN HOSPITAL

U

pon completion in 2020, the new Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital will deliver on our commitment to provide an excellent patient experience and deliver quality, safe care. Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital will be connected to nature, enabled by smart technology, and filled with daylight and warm, natural materials to optimize the patient, family and staff experience. This past summer, construction on the site has moved forward at full speed. The crews completed bulk excavation for the main building, started pouring the concrete for the foundation and installed the four tower cranes. This is an exciting time in the creation of the new hospital! To track our progress and see up to the minute construction photos, visit mackenziehealth.ca/mvh. Recently, we installed signage on the protective hoarding surrounding the construction site which highlights details about the new hospital and recognition of key contributors to-date.

MACKENZIE VAUGHAN HOSPITAL BY THE NUMBERS 1.2 million square feet $1.6 billion – total project cost 1,000+ construction jobs $1.3 billion – government grant 350 beds, capacity to expand to 550 Projected Hospital Jobs With the addition of a second hospital, Mackenzie Health will increase its team and add: 100+ physicians 2,000+ staff 700+ volunteers Key Milestones Construction completion: 2020 Concrete pouring and crane installation: Summer 2017 Groundbreaking: October 2016 Services to Be Offered at Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital Birthing (obstetrics) Emergency Pediatrics Intensive Care Mental Health Medical Imaging (X-ray) Laboratory Surgery Medical and Surgical Inpatient Care District Stroke Centre

CREATING A WORLD-CLASS HEALTH EXPERIENCE FOR YOU Stay tuned for opportunities to tour mock patient rooms being developed for the future Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital! Come learn how we are designing our second hospital to provide state-of-the-art care and keep up with our rapidly expanding communities. Our clinical teams, volunteer patients and family advisors have tested real patient care scenarios in these mock rooms to make sure our room designs will help us provide high quality and safe care in the new building. More to come later this fall at mackenziehealth.ca/mvh. 14

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME


CONNECT WITH US Richmond Hill Line 905-883-1212 Vaughan Line 905-832-4554 mackenziehealth.ca mackenziehealth.ca/foundation @MackenzieHealth @MHFoundation1 facebook.com/MackenzieHealth facebook.com/MackenzieHealthFoundation youtube.com/user/MackenzieHealthVideo

linkedin.com/company/mackenzie-health

We can help your loved one remain independent in the comfort of their own home.

Call us for a FREE assessment

905.918.0103 www.LAServices.ca

pinterest.com/mackenziehealth pinterest.com/mackenziehealth/ foundation COMMENT If you have feedback regarding care received at Mackenzie Health, contact our Patient Relations office at patientrelations@mackenziehealth.ca or 905-883-1212, ext. 7494 or 905-832-4554 ext. 7494 SHARE YOUR STORY If you have a care story to share with Health Time readers, contact our Public Affairs office at publicaffairs@mackenziehealth.ca.

Serving seniors since 2000

NEWS For the latest news from Mackenzie Health, visit mackenziehealth.ca. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES To view current opportunities at Mackenzie Health, visit the Careers section of our website or email your resume quoting the competition number in the subject line of your email to: careers@mackenziehealth.ca. VOLUNTEER If you are interested in volunteering at Mackenzie Health, visit the Volunteer section of our website for application details or contact us at volunteers@mackenziehealth.ca or 905-883-2057. GIVE To support your hospital, call Mackenzie Health Foundation at 905-883-2032 or visit mackenziehealthfoundation.ca/ways-to-give FIND A CARE PROVIDER Visit ontario.ca/healthcareconnect or call 1-800-445-1822 for a local family doctor or nurse practitioner accepting new patients. You will need a pen, paper and your OHIP card when you call.

FREE Vaccinations with paid examination for new puppies and kittens Valid until Nov. 30, 2017

COMPLETE ANIMAL CARE • Wellness & Vaccination Program • Complete Medical Services • Nutritional Counseling • Health Care Library • Anesthesia & Patient Monitoring • Surgical Services WALK IN’S AND • Microchip Pet Identification NEW PATIENTS WELCOME • Emergency/Extended Care • Boarding

OPEN 7 DAYS

905.879.1616 • 416.237.0400 14-3120 Rutherford Rd. Vaughan, ON • www.rutherford400vets.com HEALTH TIME

• FALL 2017

15


Foundation News

THE LONGO LEGACY The family-owned grocery chain continues its long-standing tradition of philanthropy through a $1-million gift to Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital By Debora Kelly

16

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME


D

Choosing to make a transformational investment in Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital — and the region’s families — carries on a family legacy of giving back for the Family Charitable Foundation, whose members are (from left, back row) Rose, Rob, Carolyn, Anthony, Rosanne, Joey; (middle row) Jackie, Rosie, Mitch, Mike, Marie, Gus, Danny, Jenny; (front) Jesse, Joseph, Frank, Thomas and Nick.

oing the right thing exactly when it’s needed is at the heart of a long and meaningful friendship between Mackenzie Health and Longo’s, a family-owned grocery chain with locations in York Region and the greater Toronto area. The perfect example? When Longo’s stepped up to the plate during the SARS outbreak in 2003. Hospitals across the GTA were closing their doors in a bid to contain the life-threatening pneumonia-like illness from spreading further. With many vendors unable to come on hospital grounds during the outbreak, Mackenzie Health reached out to Longo’s in the hope they would consider delivering 100 much-needed cases of water for physicians and staff at the hospital, Longo’s spokesperson Rosanne Longo recalls. Joey Longo took the call and, without hesitation, reached out to his GroceryGateway. com drivers, who quickly agreed to do whatever they could to help their community hospital physicians, staff and volunteers during this crisis. After ensuring 400 donated cases were delivered, Joey brushed aside the thank you by expressing his appreciation to the hospital team, saying, “It’s the least we can do. You are in the trenches for us. It’s the right thing to do.” Now, 14 years later, the Longo’s Family Charitable Foundation (LFCF) has stepped up to support the Exceptional Care Belongs Here campaign for Mackenzie Health, with a leadership gift of $1 million to help build and equip Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital. With shared corporate and philanthropic missions to strengthen and empower families through initiatives that will improve their quality of life and well-being, this investment makes perfect sense, Rosanne says, who is chair of the LFCF. “Our mission to invest in health care that is family-centred, in an environment that is innovative and leading edge, aligns completely with Mackenzie Health’s two-site hospital model that will provide state-of-the-art care close to home for the residents of York Region,” Rosanne says. The generous donation will be recognized with the naming of one prenatal/postpartum pod, including eight rooms and an isolation unit, designed with the patient and family in mind, within the Woman and Child program at Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital when construction is completed in 2020. “All of us at Mackenzie Health are grateful to the Longo’s Family Charitable Foundation for this inspirational gift toward the future of health care in our community,” Mackenzie Health president and CEO Altaf Stationwala says. “Your leadership is remarkable and will help us create the best health care possible, close to home.”

The largest single pledge the family has made to date, this transformational gift carries on a tradition begun by the three Longo brothers, Tommy, Joey and Gus, with the founding of the company in 1956 as a small fruit market in Toronto. “[The brothers] believed in giving something, even when they had nothing to give,” Rosanne says. “As our business has grown and we focus on the vision and mission of our foundation, we are able to give in ways that are most meaningful and impactful to our team members and customers.” She adds that an investment of this size in a hospital that will serve the growing population made sense. “For us, it’s simply about doing the right thing and helping families where we can.” In the last decade alone, Longo’s and the LFCF, created by the family in 1998, have donated more than $13 million to community organizations, local hospitals, children’s camps and charitable event sponsorship. Through its corporate giving program, Longo’s gives back to programs and initiatives that support and inspire healthy families, lifelong learning and the benefits of a healthy lifestyle. “Family values are essential to community growth, and by investing in and maintaining a leadership position of community involvement, we will help ensure that the health and wellbeing of our communities will be sustained for years to come,” Rosanne says. Longo’s and the LFCF have supported many of the hospital’s fundraising initiatives, including two additional leadership gifts in the areas of neonatal care and the Lifelong Learning Centre. “Longo’s and the Longo family have been loyal friends of Mackenzie Health, and their generosity has had meaningful impact in our community for decades,” Mackenzie Health Foundation president and CEO Ingrid Perry says. “We’re grateful for their continued leadership and inspiration with this transformational gift of $1-million at an important chapter in the history of our hospital.” The Longo family and Longo’s employees — more than 6,000 team members at 31 grocery stores across the GTA, as well asGroceryGateway. com — share a proud and decades-long tradition of giving back to their community. “Our stores’ teams are involved in numerous community-based initiatives, from sponsorship to participation in events such as the Big Red Bike, local food banks and, of course, events organized by our community hospitals,” Rosanne says. Longo’s stores are found in eight locations in York Region, including Markham, Aurora, Richmond Hill and Woodbridge, with corporate offices based in Vaughan. 17


Recreation Vaughan vaughan.ca/recreation 905.832.8500 6 Fitness Centres weights + classes memberships & drop-in • indoor track • pools & saunas • squash courts • •

10 Pools learn to swim aquafitness • rec & length swim • pool parties • •

60+ Summer Camps swimming & trips extended day camp • busing • •

10 Community Centres close & convenient accessible • wifi •

5 Arenas

learn to skate recreational skating • shinny hockey • •

FREE Community Events Winterfest Canada Day • Concerts in the Park •

Recreational Programs

registered programs drop-in • inclusion support •

City Playhouse Theatre registered programs • productions • rentals •

Advertise with us!

Partner with us!

Work with us!

Recreation Vaughan Guide • 89,000 print copies (biannual) • digital edition: 60,000+ visits per issue Download the ad package at vaughan.ca/RecAds

Have a cool program idea? Run a recreation program at Vaughan community centres in partnership with Recreation Services. To pitch an idea email communityprograms@vaughan.ca

Part-time + seasonal jobs at Vaughan community centres View job postings at vaughan.ca/RecJobs


Foundation News

Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama’at Canada Makes a Generous Pledge By Debora Kelly

Ingrid Perry, president and CEO of Mackenzie Health Foundation; Altaf Stationwala, president and CEO of Mackenzie Health; Lal Khan Malik, national president of AMJ Canada; Greg Sorbara, co-chair, Campaign Cabinet of Mackenzie Health Foundation; Kashif Danish, national president, Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association of Canada; Asif Khan, national public relations director, AMJ Canada; and local dignitaries celebrate AMJ Canada’s $2-million gift to Mackenzie Health Foundation’s Exceptional Care Belongs Here campaign with thousands of members of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community.

G

iving charity, or zakat, is a basic tenet of the Islamic faith, a principle that is exemplified in a most exceptional way by Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama’at (AMJ) Canada. The Ahmadiyya Muslim community has pledged a $2-million gift to Mackenzie Health Foundation’s $250-million Exceptional Care Belongs Here campaign to help build and equip Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital. Headquartered in Vaughan, AMJ Canada has been a strong and dedicated supporter of bringing a world-class hospital to its community. Since 2003, AMJ Canada has organized the annual Run for Vaughan — an event that has successfully raised more than $600,000 to date for the future Mackenzie

Vaughan Hospital. “The building of this hospital is something very important to us, because not only have we been a part of the Vaughan community for over 25 years, but also the core of the Islamic faith is to serve humanity and give back to society,” says Lal Khan Malik, national president of AMJ Canada. “So, we are very passionate about making a significant contribution to this much-needed hospital.” The Caliph, His Holiness, Hazrat Mirza Masroor Ahmad, the World Head of the AMJ, has also emphasized to the Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association the need to focus on giving back to society through humanitarian fundraising initiatives, such

as the Exceptional Care Belongs Here campaign, according to Kashif Danish, national president, Ahmadiyya Muslim Youth Association of Canada. Two significant areas of the future Mackenzie Vaughan Hospital will be named in recognition of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community’s generous gift: • the Ahmadiyya Muslim Jama’at Canada Lower Main Street, the lower-level internal avenue that will connect the west public entrance to the atrium, grand staircase and patient tower elevators; • one medical/surgical inpatient unit, featuring natural light, privacy and space for patients, families and visitors. 19


Your Stories

20

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME


TURNING THE PAGE

May Loo overcame a devasting diagnosis to reclaim her health and a positive outlook on life By Joann MacDonald | Photo by Jim Craigmyle

A “My experience with the health care professionals was extremely positive. They truly demonstrated their compassion, professionalism and kindness” —May Loo

t a routine checkup, May Loo was discussing the results of her mammogram with her family doctor. It looked as if there might be a cyst in her breast, so her doctor advised an ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy to be safe. May, who was post-menopausal, also mentioned that she had recently experienced spotting. Her doctor suggested a pelvic ultrasound, followed by a hydro sonogram. Two months later, on Friday, July 13, 2012, May found out the biopsy confirmed she had a cancerous tumour in her breast and the sonogram showed possible abnormal cells. It was an unexpected double whammy. “My mind just went blank,” she says. “I couldn’t think, and felt like someone just handed me a death sentence. Immediately, I started crying. I was overcome by emotions. I was petrified.” She broke the news to her husband, Jim Lyle. “We held each other tightly and we both cried,” she says. “I kept saying, ‘What are we going to do?’ and ‘I don’t want to die.’ Jim just held me close and he assured me that we would fight this and we would beat this, whatever the future might be, we would face it together.” May struggled with the why of it all. “I am considered a good person. I always do good deeds and never cause any harm to anybody,” she remembers thinking. She doesn’t smoke, doesn’t drink alcohol and has a healthy diet, although she admits she could use more exercise. Her doctor referred her to a breast cancer specialist and a gynecologist for a colposcopy. May underwent two lumpectomies. In the meantime,

colposcopy results confirmed endometrial cancer and a laparoscopic hysterectomy was scheduled. The treatment plan continued with 16 sessions of radiation treatment for the breast cancer and three sessions of internal radiation for the uterine cancer. Throughout her cancer journey, May was grateful for the support of those around her. “My experience with the health care professionals was extremely positive,” she says. “They truly demonstrated their compassion, professionalism and kindness through it all.” Jim was her rock. “Without him, I might not have recovered so quickly and had the strength and courage to face this unforgettable ordeal.” The experience has changed May’s outlook on life. “Don’t fret about little things, focus on making people around you happy and yourself being happy.” The Richmond Hill resident makes a point of enjoying her life. She retired early from LoyaltyOne, an IT organization, in 2014, and spends her leisure time watching baseball and curling, reading mystery novels and solving Sudoku puzzles. She gives back by volunteering at Mackenzie Richmond Hill Hospital two days a week. She also sells daffodils during the Canadian Cancer Society’s Daffodil Month and donates to cancer research. “My life is now filled with so much happiness, love and peace,” she says. May is keen to share a message with others: “Know your body and do not hesitate to visit a doctor if you feel or see changes,” she says. “Early detection is the key in my story.” And, she adds, don’t fear Friday the 13th. “Even after all we have been through on that day, I am still not convinced Friday the 13th is bad luck.”

HEALTH TIME

• FALL 2017

21


Your Health

BRAIN STORM Whether you suffer from migraines or headaches, here are smart tactics for treating and preventing them By Liz Bruckner

22

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME


For many Canadians, throbbing headaches are just an uncomfortable reality of everyday life. In fact, 2.7 million of us suffer from chronic migraines, according to MigraineCanada.org, with women accounting for 75 per cent of those sufferers. Thankfully, there are plenty of prevention and treatment options for these painful episodes. The difference between a headache and a migraine Simply put, headaches cause pain, pressure and discomfort, but they aren’t debilitating, says Brent Lucas, executive director of Help for Headaches (headache-help.org), a charity providing research and support for headache sufferers in Ontario. Symptoms may include an aching, dull pain and sensation of tightness or pressure on the sides and/or back of the head or forehead. There may also be tenderness in the shoulder area, neck and scalp. While headaches can be mildly painful and will interrupt daily life to a degree, people are often able to continue with their day and function somewhat normally. In the realm of migraines, the main difference is pain. “Migraines are often one-sided, but can be two-sided and often cause moderate to severe throbbing pain that is typically associated with nausea, sometimes vomiting, intolerance to light or sound, and even temporary vision loss,” Lucas says. Symptoms can include pulsing pain, an aura that presents in the form of blind spots, a flashing light, or pins and needles in extremities or the face.

Who’s most likely to get them Though migraines tend to be hereditary, Lucas says some sufferers have them for no apparent reason. “I generally refer to this as being ‘migraine-prone,’ just as someone can be diabetic-prone. Some researchers believe some people are born with a faulty gene, but more research needs to be done in this area.”

How to treat and prevent them The best way to treat your pain depends on the degree of severity, Lucas says. Often, sufferers will seek a dark, quiet room and lie down to cope. Anti-inflammatory medications, like ibuprofen, can also be helpful, as are hot or cold compresses, small amounts of caffeine and light massage. Those with recurrent

Did You Know? Though the most common type of headache is a tension headache, classic headaches can be divided into two categories: chronic and episodic. Chronic versions last for hours and occur 15 days a month for at least three consecutive months. Episodic headaches can last anywhere from 30 minutes to seven days, and typically last less than 15 days a month for at least three months.

WE DO WHAT OUR LOGO SAYS! BE SAFE! TIRE AND AUTO SERVICE Every business claims to be the best. We just are the best. Our satisfied customers speak for themselves; in saying we have exceeded their expectations. From our team to you, Be Safe this Winter 1000 ROWNTREE DAIRY RD. UNIT #12 WOODBRIDGE

905-856-9978

Reza Moridi, MPP Richmond Hill Serving the riding of

Richmond Hill We are proudly here to assist you in accessing the programs and services offered by the Government of Ontario. 9555 Yonge Street, Suite 311 Richmond Hill, ON L4C 9M5 T: 905.884.8080 F: 905.884.1040

rmoridi.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org www.rezamoridi.onmpp.ca facebook.com/rmoridi @rezamoridi 23


Mackenzie Health’s Urgent Care Centre Mon to Fri: 4pm - 10pm Weekends & Holidays: 10am - 4pm Staffed by Emergency Department doctors and nurses

bouts may benefit from doctor-prescribed medications to ease their pain. In terms of prevention, listening to your body is key. Some migraine sufferers experience symptoms a day or two before the pain arrives — displays of irritability, constipation, depression, unusual food cravings and neck stiffness are common — which opens the door to preventive measures. Eliminating trigger drinks like alcohol and caffeine can help, as can taking steps to reduce stress. Doing your best to avoid or minimize dehydration, muscle strain, anxiety, severe heat, stress, the ingredient MSG, missed meals and sleep-pattern changes can also limit a migraine’s effects. “Record-keeping is another great way to keep sufferers and their doctors informed about the patterns or clues that may end up being responsible for triggering a migraine,” Lucas says. “Trigger-avoidance is always the easiest solution, and it’s one that patients have 100 per cent control over.”

When to seek professional help “When you suspect it’s migraines you’re experiencing, your physician will have suggestions on how to treat them — whether with medicine or a non-drug therapy,” Lucas says, adding that, occasionally, doctors will refer cases to a headache neurologist for a more intense discussion. “What’s important to remember is not to self-diagnose. Patients can get into trouble by trying to treat themselves at home with over-the-counter medicines, and especially when these medicines are taken too frequently.”

When It’s More Than a Migraine

9401 JANE ST. ACROSS FROM AUTOMALL 24

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME

Often described by sufferers as the “worst headache of their life,” a brain aneurysm is an extremely severe headache brought about by weakness in a blood vessel in the brain that bulges and fills with blood. Unruptured, the aneurysm is symptom-free, but a ruptured aneurysm necessitates emergency medical intervention and is identified by a sudden and incredibly painful headache. While symptoms of a migraine and brain aneurysm can be similar, their severity differs, and intense pain comes on more quickly with the latter. Other symptoms can include a stiff neck, nausea, vomiting and pain when looking at light. While experts say there aren’t always triggers for an aneurysm, if you develop a very painful headache after coughing, sneezing or something similar, it could be a sign of trouble that should be checked by medical professionals right away.


Proudly serving York Region & the GTA since 2005

CPAP Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Oxygen. Anytime. Anywhere.

New to treatment? We’ll help to explain your OSA diagnosis and the best treatment options for you.

Experience the freedom of lightweight Portable Oxygen systems.

Our experienced Respiratory Therapists will help you find the best solution for restful nights and productive days.

We have the latest easy-to-use products with the expertise to recommend a system that will give your mobility back.

You have the right to choose any Respiratory Homecare provider. InspiAIR is a registered Vendor of Record with the Assistive Devices Program from the Ministry of Health & Long-term Care.

Call us today and explore your options!

905-895-1188 | 1-866-626-8697 | www.inspiair.ca

FALL 2017 •

HEALTH TIME

Health Time Fall 2017  
Health Time Fall 2017  
Advertisement