__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

Proposals for the Ailsa Course at

TRUMP TURNBERRY


I am extremely proud to be the owner of Trump Turnberry, one of the greatest and most iconic resorts and places anywhere in the world. Over the next several months, I will be spending many millions of pounds in order to bring this property up to the highest standards of luxury. We will be making certain changes to both the hotel and golf courses that have been sought for many years. All of this work will be carefully and studiously crafted, bringing this already great masterpiece to a level that even it has never attained. There will be nothing better or more magnificent anywhere or anytime. I would like to thank all of the representatives from the Royal & Ancient for the time, eort and energy that they have devoted to the delicate planning of the renovation on the great Ailsa Championship course. When complete, Trump Turnberry and its 800 incredible acres of coastal land will be part of what will soon be the finest golf resort of its kind anywhere in the world. With Best Wishes,

Donald J. Trump


“Turnberry sits alone amongst all ten courses on the Open rota in having a coastline and beachscape which actually provide a hazard to the play of the course.�


Turnberry has long been regarded as a ‘Jewel in the Crown’ of Ayrshire, Scottish and British golf - in fact, world golf - given the Ailsa’s consistently high position in worldwide ranking lists --- and it has always been a players’ favourite. That owes much to the stunning coastal setting of the links but also to the partnership between the Ailsa Course and the Turnberry Hotel which has always set the highest levels of luxury. It is worth dwelling on the coastal setting with which the course has been blessed. Turnberry sits alone amongst all ten courses on the Open Championship rota in having a coastline and beachscape which actually provide a hazard to the play of the course. It might be possible to find the beach at Royal Troon on the early holes but that would not be expected by the best players. However, the 10th hole on the Ailsa Course definitely brings the ocean into play as the ultimate water hazard, especially since the championship tee and fairway were taken as close as possible to Castle Port Bay for the last Open in 2009. The arrival of Mr Donald Trump to the history of Turnberry has opened up an exciting new chapter of opportunity for the Ailsa Course, the Hotel and the Resort as a whole. His energy, ideas and commitment to taking Turnberry to new levels of luxury have resulted in a fresh look being taken at all aspects of the facilities on offer. In terms of the Ailsa Course, an essential part of the review exercise has been to study and respect the incredible work which Philip Mackenzie Ross and his team carried out to restore the layout after the Second World War. During both World Wars, Turnberry was used as a training airfield for so

many valiant pilots, many of whom lost their lives during that training. When the old aerial photograph showing the extent of the runways, taxiways and hangers are viewed, the achievement of the restoration is even more remarkable to imagine. Even with today’s construction equipment, it would have been a mammoth task. Coupled with the respect for, and study of, the evolution of the Ailsa Course has been the presence of an open mind to consider how the golfing experience can be improved beyond the current delights on offer. That must apply for the elite players competing in The Open Championship but it must also remain a perfectly playable course for the members of Turnberry Golf Club and the many visitors to the links. The proposals illustrated in this booklet may raise some eyebrows in terms of the extent of the changes but the reasoning presented will hopefully convince the golfing world of their merit. This is not change for the sake of change. The potential to take the Ailsa to a new level is unexpectedly significant --- but the result will be a course where not only the views take the breath away but also the shots which everyone will enjoy playing to a level as never before.


1271

Bruce’s Castle was built in the 13th Century. The castle was owned by the father of Robert the Bruce in 1271.

1306

Robert the Bruce crowned King of Scotland. He was possibly born in Turnberry Castle.

1307

Robert the Bruce launched the fight to rid Scotland of the English from nearby Arran by retaking Turnberry Castle and the overall goal was achieved 7 years later at Bannockburn.

1873

Thomas and David Stevenson, father and son of the famous writer Robert Louis Stevenson, recommended that the lighthouse be built at Turnberry Point. It was built in 1873.

1899

The Glasgow and South Western Railway Company applied to build a line from Ayr to Girvan in 1899 - which included the construction of a luxury hotel and golf course at Turnberry.

1900

In December 1900, Lord Ailsa commissioned Willie Fernie, professional at Troon and the Open Champion of 1883, to design and oversee the construction of the course.

1901

The course opened 8 months later on 6th July 1901.

1903

Clubhouse opened on 17th October 1903 and stayed virtually the same until just prior to The Open of 1977.

1906

In May 1906, the hotel, designed by James Miller, and railway line were opened. At that point the Railway Company took over the sole right to manage and maintain the golf courses.

1916

War Office took over Turnberry for training pilots in December 1916. 60 pilots died during training and are commemorated with the memorial to the right of the 12th green.

1919

No.1 Course reopened.

1923

No.2 Course reopened but redesigned by James Braid.

1938

Major Cecil Hutchison redesigned the Ailsa Course but it only hosted the 1939 Scottish Ladies Championship before the Second World War broke out.

1942

Turnberry was taken over by the Air Ministry and converted into a training airfield to teach air crews in torpedo bombing.

1949/50

Philip Mackenzie Ross was invited to restore and redesign the Ailsa Course. The hotel re-opened.

1954

The new Arran Course opened, designed by Jimmy Alexander who was also responsible for the back tee on the 9th hole of the Ailsa Course.

1961

The Amateur Championship was won by Michael Bonallack.

1963

The Walker Cup was won by the United States 12 - 8.

1975

The Senior Open Amateur Championship was won by Harley Roberts.

1977

The Open Championship was played at Turnberry, ‘The Duel in the Sun’, and was won by Tom Watson after his great battle with Jack Nicklaus.

1983

The Amateur Championship was won by Philip Parkin.

1986

The Open Championship was played at Turnberry and was won by Greg Norman.

1987-90

The Senior Open Championships were held at Turnberry & won by Neil Coles (1987), Gary Player (1988 & 1990) and Bob Charles (1989).

1993

The new clubhouse was opened by the Duke of York.

1994

The Open Championship was played at Turnberry and was won by Nick Price.

1996

The Amateur Championship was won by Warren Bladon.

1998

Starwood Hotels buy Turnberry and build the driving range complex, extend the Arran Course onto Bains Hill and call it the Kintyre Course and produce a new 9 hole Arran Course.

2001

The new Kintyre Course opened, designed by Donald Steel & Company.

2002

The Women’s British Open was won by Karrie Webb.

2003

The Senior Open Championship was held at Turnberry and won by Tom Watson.

2006

The Senior Open Championship was held at Turnberry and won by Loren Roberts.

2006/7

Golf Course Architects Mackenzie & Ebert upgrade the Ailsa Course in preparation for the 2009 Open Championship. Major changes made to the 10th & 16th holes.

2008

The Amateur Championship was won by Reinier Saxton.

2009

The Open Championship was played at Turnberry and was won by Stewart Cink.

2012

The Senior Open Championship was held at Turnberry and was won by Fred Couples.

2014

Donald Trump purchases the Turnberry Resort, renames it Trump Turnberry and develops exciting plans for the hotel and golf courses.


With courses enjoying great heritage such as the Ailsa, an important first step is to assess the evolution of the layout to help inform the review of the existing course and to assess how certain elements of its layout and design detail have changed over the years. That has proved to be a fascinating exercise at Turnberry. There were considerable changes of layout from Willie Fernie’s original design leading up to the Second World War, advised upon by various golf course architects and players of the day. Philip Mackenzie Ross

is rightly given credit for the resurrection of the Ailsa Course after the Second World War but Major Cecil Hutchison’s layout redesign in 1938 produced the bones of the course which is enjoyed today. Of the Major’s work, Bernard Darwin wrote ‘Hutchison left it as pretty and charming as he found it but in a different class as a test of golf’. The only layout changes which Mackenzie Ross introduced in 1949/50 were to split one hole into the current 4th and 5th and to remove Hutchison’s short 12th hole and change the drive line for

the 13th. However, there was, no doubt, adjustment made to the detail of the design in terms of the green shapes, fairway shaping and bunker strategy and style. After all, there was not much left following the impact of the Second World War. After the restoration of the course in 1949 / 50, the layout changes have remained minor with the rerouting of the 16th fairway, allowing the lengthening of the par 5 17th hole, being the most notable alteration immediately prior to the 2009 Open Championship.


The original 18 hole course, laid out by Willie Fernie of Troon for the Marquess of Ailsa. Opened in July 1901 by Girvan Golf Club.

HOLE

YARDS

HOLE

YARDS

1

300

10

450

2

350

11

500

3

370

12

360

4

280

13

280

5

400

14

260

6

200

15

370

7

160

16

240

8

290

17

570

9

360

18

300

OUT

2710

IN

3330

TOTAL

6040


Ladies course and improved 18 hole course laid out by A.N.Weir for the Glasgow & South Western Railway Company in 1906 (as shown on plan dated March 1908).

HOLE

YARDS

HOLE

YARDS

1

301

10

363

2

410

11

458

3

132

12

327

4

203

13

501

5

367

14

374

6

271

15

357

7

232

16

294

8

330

17

370

9

257

18

303

OUT

2503

IN

3346

TOTAL

5849


Re-designed No.1 Course laid out by A.N. Weir in 1909 (at the same time as a No.2 Course of 18 holes was laid out for the first time). Note how the course has moved towards the sea.

HOLE

YARDS

HOLE

YARDS

1

350

10

255

2

305

11

330

3

385

12

420

4

395

13

160

5

415

14

370

6

160

15

450

7

220

16

415

8

390

17

450

9

280

18

365

OUT

2900

IN

3215

TOTAL

6115


Ailsa Course (known as No.1 Course until 1926) as re-designed by Major Cecil Hutchison and completed in 1938.

HOLE

YARDS

HOLE

YARDS

1

360

10

135

2

385

11

440

3

405

12

170

4

500

13

425

5

230

14

460

6

415

15

160

7

425

16

400

8

405

17

470

9

465

18

365

OUT

3590

IN

3025

TOTAL

6615


Ailsa Course as re-designed in 1949 by Mr. Mackenzie Ross opened for play 1951.


Aerial photography taken by the Royal Air Force has provided a valuable insight into the extent that the incursion of the airfield facilities made into the course. Not only did the runways dominate Turnberry but the myriad of taxiways and hangers strewn across the links devastated the layout. The aerial photograph from 1946 shows the extent of the disruption to the Ailsa. There was really no discernible course left at all. Martin Sutton, of Messrs. Sutton Seeds from Reading, the company employed to rebuild the course, provides a fascinating description of the restoration process. Work actually commenced towards the end of August, 1949, and the first operation was the breaking up, excavation and removal of concrete and tarmacadam runway, and the demolition of the many buildings erected during the period of war-time occupation. The magnitude of the task can be judged from the fact that some of the runway foundations were as much as 4 feet in depth, including a 6 inch thickness of concrete. The runways were broken up by means of concrete breakers, bulldozers, compressors, scrapers, etc. Thousands of tons of the excavated material were used to fill in large holes on various portions of the course and for the foundation of fairway hillwork, but, in addition, many thousands of tons had to be carted away by means of a fleet of lorries. It was taken to the neighbouring village of Maidens where it could be utilised to good advantage in building a new sea wall.

The removal of runways and buildings naturally left large stretches of fairway and even putting green areas utterly devoid of any trace of top soil. On the raw subsoil exposed nothing could possibly grow; and all such scars had to be made good by spreading new top soil. In the case of important areas a thickness of 9 inches to 1 foot of new soil had to be provided. It was estimated that some 30,000 yards of top soil would be required to make good areas of demolition and to reinstate fairways from which the soil and turf had been removed. Normally the provision of such an enormous quantity of fresh soil would have been a task of some magnitude and most costly item, but it was fortunate that what we hoped would be a sufficient amount of new soil was a light sandy loam deficient in organic matter, and judged by ordinary horticultural standards, it would be considered distinctly impoverished. It was, however, of the correct type for use in establishing a seaside golf course, and its impoverished character was ameliorated by the use of granulated peat and fertiliser. The soil varied greatly in depth and in places only an inch or two could be found. It had, therefore, to be dug out somewhat laboriously by hand, as the use of a mechanical digger would have resulted in an irretrievable mixture of soil and subsoil with disappointing results when grass seeds were sown or turf laid. Immediately the clearance work was sufficiently under way, a commencement was made with the construction of putting greens and the preparation of fairway areas. In the construction

of the greens, every possible care was devoted to making their conformation blend with that of the surrounding land. This work entailed the moving of many thousands of tons of soil sometimes as much as 4,000 cubic yards for a single green and approach. Such work was in the main carried out by caterpillar tractors and rotary scoops. The scoops were only of about 1 cubic yard capacity, as experience had shown that this size is best to deposit soil exactly where desired and to create the natural effect required. Many fairway and approach areas were completely flat and devoid of movement, and had to be specially dealt with in order to create the beautifully undulating surface usually associated with a firstclass seaside golf links. The result was obtained chiefly by use of tractors and scoops and with the occasional employment of the bulldozer. By the end of October 1949 such marked progress had been made that serious consideration was given to the possibility of getting nine holes ready for play by early summer of 1950. It was realised that, if this could be successfully accomplished, it would prove a tremendous asset to the famous Turnberry Hotel due to be reopened at Easter, 1950. The work would involve the turfing of some 30 acres of ground and the cutting, transportation and laying of over 290,000 turves. This immense task, was successfully completed by the closing days of the old year; with every prospect that nine holes would be in a sufficiently advanced condition for play by June of 1950.


The quality of the contouring of the greens and their surrounds is often a mark of greatness of a course or, alternatively, can let the course down. The greens at Turnberry have some extremely attractive shapes and the old photos of some of the greens shows that this was the case even before the Second World War. The surfaces generally conform to a distinctive style of contouring in that a ball played within the green boundary will take the contours to run towards the middle of the surface, with the raised plateau of the 13th being an exception. That same characteristic inevitably makes recovery shots from around the greens more diďŹƒcult but the strength of the gathering slopes also causes problems for the location of suďŹƒcient and varied flag positions on some of the surfaces. As with all courses, the faster green speeds which are the norm today result in the flag locations being restricted even more.


One aspect of Philip Mackenzie Ross’s work which has been revealed during the historic research undertaken is in relation to the bunker style which he adopted. The aerial photograph of 1952 reveals some incredible bunker shapes, far removed from the formal and regular shapes now evident around the course. For instance, the famous doughnut bunker in the approach of the 10th hole used to be a much larger and more irregularly shaped feature and cut diagonally up towards the green, oering a much more strategic hazard than it does today.

The 13th hole had a huge sand crater bunker to the right of the fairway which must have been a fearsome place to end up in. Even the smaller bunkers had more intricate shapes than today’s hazards. More recent photography of the course, taken from the early 1980s, shows that the bunkers continued to have a more natural form similar to the marram fringed bunkers found at Royal County Down. However, these were changed to the current revetted style prior to the 1986 Open.

Numerous examples of courses where the bunkers were changed in style over the years can be quoted. Reasons for the change would include the problem of sand blow from larger bunker areas, crumbling edges being in need of repair and a general move to more manicured golf courses. The findings of the research in relation to the bunkering certainly asks the question about whether some form of return to the natural edged bunkers should be taken.

10th Hole Approach Bunker Comparison The Green

The Green

1952

2014

13th Hole Fairway Crater Bunker Comparison The Green

The Green

1952

2014


The Duel In The Sun One of the most memorable sporting contests of modern times, the 1977 Open Championship, saw Tom Watson and Jack Nicklaus, by many considered two of the best players in the history of golf, battle for the title in front of record-breaking crowds. The tournament that truly set Turnberry on the road to greatness was the John Player Classic of 1972, attracting a field of the world’s leading players, including Arnold Palmer, Tom Weiskopf, Peter Thomson, Gary Player, Tony Jacklin and Peter Oosterhuis. But the winner, with a combined score of 285, was New Zealand’s Bob Charles. Despite some rather poor weather conditions, the John Player Classic proved that Turnberry could play host to a major tournament, attract big names and cope admirably with a large crowd. Tournaments come no bigger, of course, than The Open Championship. Even so, when the R&A announced that Turnberry would host its first Open in 1977, the choice was seen as something of a risk, with concerns over accommodation (the grand Turnberry hotel aside) and access. As history shows us, however, the reticence was to prove misplaced as Turnberry played host to record crowds and the most thrilling finish in Open history. Esteemed golfing writer Donald Steel takes up the story: ‘The weather was on its best behaviour and the two finest players in the world at the time, Tom Watson and Jack Nicklaus fought out the most brilliant and dramatic head to head confrontation imaginable...’

“One of the most memorable sporting contests of modern times”


It was Turnberry’s greatest hour with the excitement exceeding any script that could have been written. There was an almost fictional touch about the climax as Watson came to the final hole one stroke ahead of Nicklaus. He hit the ideal iron to the corner of the dog-leg whereas Nicklaus’ tee shot drifted towards the gorse. On first inspection, it didn’t seem possible that Nicklaus could manufacture any kind of shot. When Watson, playing his second, hit a seven iron which sat down two feet from the hole, it seemed to be that. However, Nicklaus, somehow, managed to catch an eight iron squarely enough to get his ball to the edge of the green - whereupon he holed it for a three.

Watson’s putt, which minutes before had looked no more than a formality, suddenly took on a new dimension but it really was short and, in order to maintain the pattern of perfection, it was right that Watson knocked it firmly home. What happened in that Open took a long time to sink in and the superlatives about it have continued to flow. The filmed version has been shown more times than Gone With the Wind. As an exhibition of superb strokeplay, courage and character, it may never be equalled. As an example of all that is good in the game it was a lesson to other sports.

Although the golfing merits of Turnberry had been known to a national audience for many years, the Open of 1977 took the links onto the global stage. Hours of television coverage and acres of newsprint put Turnberry firmly on the itinerary of any golfer worth his or her salt. After all, who wouldn’t want to play the course that had so enthralled the world and brought the very best out of two legends in the game.


At The Mercy Of The Elements The triumph of 1977 meant that it wasn’t a question of if but when The Open would return to Turnberry. Fond memories of hot sun, blue skies and tame breezes gave way to the harsh realities of thirtymile-an-hour winds, driving rain and vicious rough in 1986. The successes of 1977 ensured that only minimal changes were required to The Ailsa for 1986. But with memories of hot sun and benign conditions fresh in the mind, competitors and spectators alike could be forgiven for anticipating another low scoring feast. On the eve of the championship, a near gale sprang up from the south, convincing many players not to go out at all. For those who did play - including defending champion Sandy Lyle, favourite Seve Ballesteros and the talented Australian, Greg

Norman - the unforgiving course was the site of many disheartening and even humiliating shots. Conditions remained tough during the Championship itself. Although the weather abated slightly for Friday’s second round it was still testing and Norman’s 63 must surely go down as one of the best rounds ever recorded in The Open Championship. By the time the sun finally graced the players with its presence on the final day of the tournament, Norman’s score had taken a beating, at a full 12 strokes higher than Watson’s in 1977. But after the frustrations of so many near-misses in the U.S. Open and the Masters, The Shark had finally won a major. One of the two Open Championships Norman was to win, the 1986 Open is still one of the most crucial victories of his career.

“Norman’s 63 must surely go down as one of the best rounds ever recorded in The Open Championship.”


Perseverance’s Reward “At Turnberry, Price grasped the prize by a single stroke ...... reaching the pinnacle of his career.”

Both the 1977 and 1986 Opens were won by, arguably, the greatest players in the world at that time. When the championship was to return to Turnberry for a third time, in 1994, could history repeat itself? The man who has written “Persistence! Persistence! Persistence!” in every diary he has ever owned had that fortitude bear fruit in the 123rd Open Championship. After a promising early career, Zimbabwean Nick Price had faded from the headlines before mounting an impressive comeback in the early nineties voted Player of the Year in 1993. At Turnberry, Price grasped the prize by a single stroke with a score of twelve under par, simultaneously tying The Ailsa course record of 268 set by Watson in 1977 and reaching the pinnacle of his career.


The Playoff Almost as thrilled to see his nameplate screwed onto the door of one of the four luxury suites at the Turnberry Resort as he was to have his name engraved on the Claret Jug, Stewart Cink remembers his victory over Tom Watson in the 2009 staging of The Open Championship over The Ailsa links as the ultimate destination on a lifelong journey to glory. A modest, towering American - this gentle giant from Georgia tips 6ft 4ins - with a competitive streak honed by five appearances in the Ryder Cup, Cink threw a combination of punches at Watson during the final round of the game’s most revered championship which eventually forced the old heavyweight of the British linksland onto the ropes. Out in 35 blows, the 36-year-old made four birdies on the inward half, including a 16 foot putt for 3 on the last, to sign off with an impressive score of 69. After Watson missed an eight foot putt for par on the 72nd hole needed to collect his sixth Open title - both players had posted totals of 278 strokes - Cink dominated the four hole play-off. By that stage of what had been an astonishing tournament it seemed as if the air had finally expired from the veteran’s lungs as he shot bogey, par, double bogey and bogey. Cink, with youth on his side and a calm intake of breath, made par, par, birdie and birdie to win the showdown by six strokes.


Perhaps the 2009 staging of the championship would have been another Open for the ages if only Watson had made par at the last and emerged as not only the oldest winner in major history but also the most romantic champion in any sport. Yet, as is so often the case on the linksland, fate was dictated by the fickle bounce of the ancient turf. While there hadn’t been a hint of tightness on the 18th tee as Watson located another fairway, the veteran chose to strike an 8 iron rather than a 9 for the approach and the shot ran through the back of the green. “That 8 iron will always live with me,” he rued. Watson duly chose to putt from the fringe and knocked the ball eight feet past the cup before coming up shy with the second. The outcome was sealed by that cruel bogey.

“...... fate was dictated by the fickle bounce of the ancient turf.”


The proposals which have been drawn up do not affect the general routing of the course such as extending it to the south or the north but there are far reaching changes to individual holes. In all cases, the focus of the changes has been to make more playing and visual use of the wonderful coastline. At the same time, the suitability of the changes to improve the course from the point of view of staging The Open Championship has been at the forefront of considerations. The R&A have been fully involved in the design process with the result that the playing, spectator and television experience has been judged as being improved significantly.

although there are some adjustments planned for the other individual holes.

Some of the changes to specific holes have an impact on other holes so they can really be viewed as two main packages of proposals

Now the situation is different. Asking Open competitors to carry the ball 200 yards plus in all but the strongest wind against is entirely

The initial set of proposals, long talked about, is taking the 9th, 10th and 11th holes much closer to the coastline. When the course was being restored in 1949, the blueprint was Major Hutchison’s layout in this area of the course and any thoughts of the holes now being proposed would have been considered impossible due to the shorter distance the ball was being hit and the fact that the land for the proposed 11th hole was not within Turnberry’s ownership.

reasonable and the acquisition of Bains Hill, beyond the existing 11th hole, offers opportunities for the Ailsa after allowing the Kintyre Course to avail itself of its own coastal stretch. Hence the proposals include a new 9th hole played from the existing tees to a green across the bay at Turnberry Point with the Lighthouse standing sentinel nearby. It will arguably become the most exhilarating par 3 in the world of golf and replaces the slightly unsatisfactory hogs back par 4 hole where only a fraction of balls finish on the fairway turf. The championship tee remains in its current, iconic location, perched on its precarious rocky outcrop, but now all golfers will enjoy the same experience of a shot across the bay.


The proposed par 5 10th hole makes up for the loss of a shot to par, caused by the new 9th hole being reduced to a par 3, by extending the existing hole at both tee and green. The championship tee is to be taken back close to the remaining walls of Turnberry Castle and will produce a drive which can take a number of lines, the boldest of which will require a carry of 280 yards over the bay! The proposals for the green are no less exciting with it being pushed back to the site of the existing 11th tee. Will there be any finer and more exciting par 5 anywhere, arcing as it will around Castle Port Bay? Once again, the lesser mortals will also enjoy a more exhilarating hole with a new tee built on the site of the existing halfway hut which will bring the ocean into full view.

Will there be any finer and more exciting par 5 anywhere, arcing as it will around Castle Port Bay?


Turnberry marks a particularly dangerous part of the Ayrshire coast. 1km offshore to the south of Turnberry Point is the Brest or Bristo Rock - a treacherous reef which was responsible for many wrecks including the Dundas (1822) and Queen (1861) - whilst further south is Balkenna Isle which, despite its name, is another rocky reef some 100m from the beach. No one was more aware of the toll than the Receiver of Wreck, Ayr and it was he who, in 1869, suggested to the Board of Trade that a light should be erected on Brest Rock. The matter was referred to the Commissioners of the Northern Lighthouse Board. David and Thomas Stevenson subsequently

examined the rock and reported on 18th May 1869 that it was inadvisable to erect a lighthouse on the rock itself but suggested that the best place would be on Turnberry Point, within the ruins of medieval Turnberry Castle – a stronghold of Robert the Bruce’s family.

As part of the overall upgrading of the Resort and the Ailsa Course, a need for improved halfway house facilities was identified. Recognising that the unused listed property represented a tremendous opportunity, a decision was taken to relocate the facilities to the ground floor of the property.

The Lighthouse keepers’ houses have lain vacant since the automation of the light in 1986, with the exception of the northern single storey wing and the separate utility shed which were retained as operational/staff areas for use during maintenance operations.

The Lighthouse, which provides one of the most photographed backdrops in all of golf, will be fitted out to the highest standard to provide the most stylish and impressive halfway house anyone could imagine and is perfectly located between the new 9th green and 10th tees. Even with the exhilarating 10th hole to play, it will be difficult for golfers to tear themselves away from the Lighthouse!


The proposed works comprise: Conservation and repair of the dilapidated external fabric which has reached the end of its life. Conservation and repair of the excessively weathered boundary wall and railings in conjunction with upgrading of surrounding ground surfaces using sympathetic natural stone paving and grassed areas. A new terrace formed on the western lawn, allowing golfers to look over the Firth of Clyde, Arran, and Kintyre as they prepare for the final nine holes. Formation of new golfers’ toilets in the east wing, including facilities for those with mobility problems. Formation of the new halfway house grill and refreshment areas in the western wing, with direct access on to the new terrace. The existing pitched roof will be replaced with a flat roof and parapets matching the east wing.

Formation of a new Presidential suite with luxurious bathrooms and expansive terraces over each of the side wings, with a ground floor lounge/living room area. This will provide the highest standard in luxury, fully serviced suite which will boast unrivalled and magnificent views across the Championship course to Ailsa Craig and beyond. Removal of the transformer in the forecourt of the medieval castle and relocating it to the storage building beside the main lighthouse in order to improve the views to and from this important historic site and a complete upgrade of all services to the building including electrical, water and state of the art fibre optics. A programme of archaeological investigation and monitoring during ground-breaking works bearing in mind the sensitivity of the Turnberry Castle surroundings.


To complete what will be one of the most famous golfing coastal stretches, the 11th hole will play across beautiful rocky inlets to a perfect green site. Any thoughts that it will be too much of a replica of the new 9th hole are dispelled by the greater sense of intimacy which the setting of this hole will enjoy.


The second major set of proposals relates to the 18th hole. For such a great course, it is somewhat disappointing that the championship layout finishes with an awkward dogleg and internal out of bounds to the left. Furthermore, the championship hole is completely dierent in nature to the straight hole played at all other times.

The proposal is, therefore, to add two tees on the flat topped dune behind the main tees and to play the hole straight for all events. Not only is the straight hole far superior to the existing dogleg but taking golfers up onto the dune for a final visit to the beach, the ocean and Ailsa Craig will be a fitting way to end the round.

Given the wonderful coastal stretch that the 4th to the 11th holes enjoys, it seems only right to take the golfers up to the dune for one last look out to sea. The thought of the final group on the final day of The Open being silhouetted on the skyline, in view of all of the spectators in the 18th grandstand, is a mouth watering prospect.


An additional proposal to make the straight 18th hole concept work is the creation of a nerve wracking short par 3 6th hole in place of the existing long one shotter with its steep approach.

The steep dune bank to the right and rear of the new green will be a real hazard as will the deep front and side bunkers. The golfer will not be sure the ball is safe until it lands and stops on the surface.

The addition of this shorter par 3 into the layout will provide good balance, with the other four par 3s being longer and the new 9th hole replacing the 6th as the real test of short hole length.


The knock on eect of the 9th and 18th hole proposals also includes the 14th and 17th holes swapping their pars. The 14th will be extended into a tough par 5, freeing much needed space around the 16th tees. Its green will be taken up onto the existing 9th fairway giving a 180 degree view of the sea.

The 17th hole is shortened to a par 4 which will provide much better spectator access to the left of the new, straightened 18th hole and room for a grandstand directly behind the green. From a staging point of view, the spectator flow down both the 17th and 18th holes is vastly improved.

The other benefit to these proposals is that the play o sequence for The Open would naturally become the 3rd, 4th, 5th and 18th holes compared to the 5th, 6th, 17th and 18th holes used in 2009. That would allow the spectators to get to the start of the play o far more easily from the 72nd hole.


The remaining proposals of a significant nature relate to the 1st, 4th and 5th holes. The 1st hole will be extended at the tee and the green. This will make it more likely that players will hit a longer club than a mid iron from the tee. The fairway bunkering will also be adjusted to encourage the players to take a more aggressive approach from the tee.

The 4th green will be pushed further back and slightly closer to the coast. The present green surface is very bowl shaped which collects balls to its centre too much. The carry for this hole will be restored to take more of the beach side character which it used to have.

The 5th hole will be extended at the tee and the green will be edged further up into the valley resulting in a more playable par 5 for general play although it will remain a par 4 for The Open. The green setting will become even more of a natural amphitheatre. Additional or repositioned back tees will be constructed at the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 7th, 8th, 12th, 15th and 16th holes.


The opportunity will be taken to rebuild all of the greens to improve their drainage characteristics and to ensure uniformity throughout all of the 18 surfaces. The root zone of the green surfaces and

surrounds will be made sandier than it is at the moment. This will allow the greensta to improve the existing green surface turf when it is replaced. This reconstruction will also allow minor

adjustment of contouring to some of the existing greens which are to be retained to produce a few more flag positions. However, care will be taken not to lose the Turnberry style of contouring.


The historic review exercise has clearly shown more intricate shapes for the bunkering and a natural style to the bunker edges after the restoration of Philip Mackenzie Ross was carried out. The bunker style was clearly a real feature of the course and, as stated earlier, the natural looking edges remained in place up until the 1980s.

The proposal is to restore the character to many of the fairway bunkers in terms of size and a natural style although a balance needs to be struck between bunker appearance and bunker challenge. The fairway bunkers will be less penal than they are at the moment but there will be danger associated with attempting too ambitious a recovery shot.

With the greenside bunkers, the existing revetted style will be maintained to ensure an appropriate penalty for a missed approach but some of the old plan shapes will be restored to avoid them all being perfectly round or oval in form. The revetment will use thick cut turves which will be laid upside down to produce a clean revetted appearance with each layer clearly visible.


Card of the Course Hole

Maximum

Open Championship

Open Par

Tournament

Trophy

Par

Ladies’

Ladies’ Par

1

426

404

4

390

385

4

370

4

2

428

428

4

379

368

4

358

4

3

497

497

4

393

386

4

380

5

4

196

196

3

185

150

3

145

3

5

526

498

4

526

500

5

405

5

6

172

155

3

150

145

3

110

3 5

7

569

569

5

500

490

5

417

8

471

471

4

432

365

4

391

5

9

235

235

3

205

170

3

160

3

Out

3520

3453

34

3160

2959

35

2736

37

10

562

562

5

495

490

5

435

5

11

215

192

3

180

175

3

135

3

12

484

484

4

388

377

4

354

4

13

410

410

4

380

344

4

330

4

14

565

565

5

520

510

5

475

5

15

233

233

3

183

170

3

162

3

16

476

476

4

422

385

4

377

4

17

505

499

4

475

435

4

395

5

18

483

483

4

460

405

4

370

4

In

3933

3904

36

3503

3291

36

3033

37

Out

3520

3453

34

3160

2959

35

2736

37

Total

7453

7357

70

6663

6250

71

5769

74

7204

70

6493

6100

69

5802

75

Existing

9 8 15 14 7

6 4

5

The Ailsa 13

10 12 11

3 2 1

17

16

18


Tom Mackenzie & Martin Ebert have been designing and redesigning golf courses since 1989, first with Donald Steel & Company and then, from 2005, as Mackenzie & Ebert Ltd. Martin Ebert has provided golf course architectural advice to Turnberry on The Ailsa, The Kintyre and The Arran Courses throughout his career.

with both championship tee and fairway and the movement of the 16th fairway to the left of its old line to allow the par 5 17th hole to be lengthened. Over the past year, advice has been provided and plans drawn up regarding all of the changes contained in this presentation.

and St Annes, Royal Troon, Carnoustie and now Royal Portrush have to present an enjoyable experience for members and visitors as well as a supreme test of the world’s best players. Striking the right balance of challenge is the key as well as paying due respect to the wonderful heritage of these courses.

In that time the projects which have been undertaken at Turnberry have included the reconfiguration of the old Arran Course to produce The Kintyre and Arran Courses and also the changes which were made to The Ailsa Course prior to the 2009 Open. The major projects included taking the 10th hole much closer to the coastline

Mackenzie & Ebert currently advise 6 of the 10 current Open Championship venues, the feted Royal Dornoch, Cruden Bay and Askernish in Scotland, Royal Porthcawl in Wales, Royal County Down in Northern Ireland and Portmarnock in Ireland. The Open Championship links of Turnberry, Royal St. George’s, Royal Lytham a

The skills learned from working on so many classic championship courses have been brought to bear on the planning for these adjustments to The Ailsa Course. This has involved working with The Trump Organization, The R&A and Turnberry Golf Club and studying the evolution of the Ailsa Course through the years.

Goodwood - Photograph Courtesy of Clive Barber


Royal St. George’s

Royal Troon

Royal Portrush

Royal Lytham and St. Annes


370 PAR 4

YARDS

385

YARDS

YARDS

390

330 PAR 4

YARDS

404

340

YARDS

426

YARDS

350

YARDS

MAX

YARDS

PROPOSED

354

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description The existing 1st hole offers perhaps the softest starts to a course on the Open rota although it did average just over its par of 4 in the 2009 Open. Despite that, the hole was too easily played with a mid iron off the tee, so the proposal is aimed at promoting more variety to the playing strategy by widening the landing area but also lengthening the hole at the tee and the green. There will be a great advantage to playing a wedge for the approach to a green which will take its inspiration from the existing green, protected as it is by the severe front right hand bunker.

Hole Changes

1. New championship tees. 2. Existing tee made smaller. 3. Gorse cleared in carry. 4. Fairway landing area widened to encourage more attacking play. 5. New fairway bunker. 6. Green moved back.

5 4 2 3

1

6


358 PAR 4 YARDS

368

YARDS

379

YARDS

YARDS

428

Hole Description The change to the green position at the 1st hole requires the movement of the tees for the 2nd hole further to the left, providing an attractive angle for the tee shot. The bunkering layout for the hole remains the same although the left hand fairway bunker will be deepened and the old shape of the large greenside bunker will be restored. The green surface is perhaps the flattest on the course at the moment so a little soft undulation will be added. Interestingly the 2nd was the equal of the 6th hole in terms of being the toughest to birdie in the 2009 Open.

Hole Changes

1. Tees moved to the left to make room for the new 1st green. 2. Existing fairway bunker deepened and reshaped. 3. Existing greenside bunker shape restored. 4. Green rebuilt with a little more contour added.

4

1 2 3


380 PAR 5 YARDS

YARDS

386

YARDS

393

YARDS

497

380 PAR 5

YARDS

PROPOSED

386

YARDS

393

YARDS

489

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description The championship tee for the 3rd hole will be edged back and moved to the other side of the pathway which forms such an important spectator route for the 18th hole during The Open. The adjusted line from the tee works well. The rest of the hole remains the same, apart from restoring the greenside bunker shapes to their original forms and adjusting the green contours very slightly to ensure surface flow to its rear and to provide a few more flag positions.

Hole Changes

1. Championship tee moved to the other side of the pathway. 2. Main tee lowered. 3. New forward tee. 4. Existing greenside bunker shapes restored. 5. Green contours adjusted slightly to achieve surface flow to the rear.

2 1

5

3 4


145 PAR 3 YARDS

YARDS

150

YARDS

185

YARDS

196

114 PAR 3

YARDS

PROPOSED

157

YARDS

165

YARDS

168

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description The 4th hole sees the first of the proposals to take the course closer to the coast. First of all, a new back tee is set to the left of the main teeing ground. The green is edged slightly closer to the ocean as well after being pushed back to add another 28 yards to its length. The hole will retain its fundamental character but the bowled nature of the existing green makes it a little too easy for the top players in anything but the strongest wind conditions at just 168 yards. In terms of appearance, the sandy nature of the carry will be restored to make it feel as though the beach is closer to the hole again.

Hole Changes

1. New championship tee. 2. Main tee squared up. 3. Forward tee enlarged. 4. Carry to be restored to sand and marram grass. 5. Artificial dune to right of existing green moved towards the coast. 6. New green pushed back.

1 4 2

6

3 5


405 PAR 4/5

YARDS

500

YARDS

YARDS

526

386 PAR 4/5

YARDS

498

392

YARDS

526

YARDS

413

YARDS

MAX

YARDS

PROPOSED

479

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description The green of the 5th hole will be moved back into the valley between the dunes. This allows the hole to be played as a par 5 for general play which should be welcomed by most golfers as it currently plays more like a three shot hole for the vast majority. The R&A prefer to retain the hole as a par 4 so the back tee will not be used for The Open. A tee will be pushed further back using material taken from the lowering of the carry of the hole which will improve the view from all of the tees.

Hole Changes

1. New back tee for par 5 general play. 2. Carry lowered to improve the view from the tees. 3. Fairway extended towards the tees. 4. Existing bunkers reshaped. 5. Green edged back into valley.

5 3 1

4 2 4


110 PAR 3

YARDS

145

YARDS

YARDS

150

216 PAR 3/4

YARDS

155

187

YARDS

172

YARDS

222

YARDS

MAX

YARDS

PROPOSED

231

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description The golfers will really notice a change to the Ailsa Course experience as they walk from the 5th green to the 6th tee. The left hand tee and centre tee will be accessed by a new pathway which will lead along the coastline with stunning views down onto the pristine beach of Turnberry Bay. The new hole will be the polar opposite to the existing long par 3. Its length is to be dramatically reduced and the green edged back and right to make the most of the natural hazard of the dune peak. It will become one of the classic short par 3s of links golf where the golfer will not know the fate of the tee shot until it comes down to earth. The shortening of the hole allows room for the new 18th tees on the dune bank.

Hole Changes 1. New tees with a variety of playing lines. 2. New green created to the right of the existing green with danger all around.

1

2


417 PAR 5 YARDS

YARDS

490

YARDS

500

YARDS

569

417 PAR 4/5

YARDS

PROPOSED

463

YARDS

469

YARDS

538

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description The 7th hole currently plays as a par 4 for the majority of golfers which seems strange given the nature of the hole. The carry over the burn is largely responsible for this so the water course will be piped and the fairway extended back towards the tees so that everyone can play the hole as a par 5. Two new back tees will be added although the carry over the dominant left hand bunker should remain just in reach of the longest hitters in the right conditions. The severe contouring of the green restricts flag positions so these will be softened in its rear half to add some exciting opportunities. Only one flag could be positioned towards the rear of the green in the 2009 Open and that led to a significant increase in the scoring average of the hole. Hole Changes 1. New championship tees. 2. Existing tees reconfigured. 3. Fairway extended back by piping the burn. 4. Existing bunkers restored in shape. 5. Green enlarged at rear and contours softened to provide more flag positions.

1

2 3

4

5 4


391 PAR 4/5 YARDS

YARDS

365

YARDS

432

YARDS

471

391 PAR 4/5

YARDS

PROPOSED

365

YARDS

432

YARDS

454

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description The 8th hole is regarded as one of the best and most challenging on the course. It had the second highest scoring average relative to par in 2009. The championship tee will be edged back and off the horizon line as viewed from the 7th fairway and the steeply sloping first part of the fairway on the left will be graded back so that balls do not kick off the contours so strongly. The historic research showed a much more intricately shaped set of greenside bunkers, especially the large one to the left, so these shapes will be restored. The green will retain its two level shape.

Hole Changes 1. Championship tee moved back and left. 2. Fairway extended back and slope softened. 3. Greenside bunkers restored to former shape. 4. Green contours retained as they are.

1

4

3 2 3


160 PAR 3 YARDS

YARDS

170

YARDS

205

YARDS

235

376 PAR 4

YARDS

PROPOSED

388

YARDS

412

YARDS

452

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description The new 9th hole will certainly capture the imagination of everyone and will really take the breath away in terms of the vista from the tee and the challenge of the carry across the bay. The great aspect to the change is that everyone will have the experience of playing across the bay and the view from the main tees will be extremely attractive, looking down onto the green site from on high. The tee shot from the main tees will be very playable but the test from the championship tee will be to carry a minimum of 200 yards and to control the run out to the green. This will require perfect ball flight in downwind conditions on an approach which will slope gently towards the green. The green surrounds will consist of large areas of tightly mown run offs.

Hole Changes 1. Championship tee enlarged. 2. Main tees realigned. 3. New green.

3

1 2


435 PAR 5 YARDS

YARDS

490

YARDS

495

YARDS

562

337 PAR 4

YARDS

PROPOSED

415

YARDS

447

YARDS

457

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description Following a visit to what will become the best halfway house in the world at the Lighthouse, the golfers will be ready to take on another new and classic Turnberry hole. The hole becomes a par 5 with a new championship tee offering a range of lines for the tee shot and a new main tee on the site of the existing halfway hut bringing the coast into view. The fairway will be extended back towards the tees and the green pushed onto the site of the main 11th tee with the rocky shoreline waiting just behind it. The hole will pose so many questions in the golfers’ minds after which precise shotmaking will be required. The famous doughnut bunker will be restored to its former glory but will be moved up the hole to play a real threat to anyone taking it on in two shots. At the moment the bunker is more ceremonial than relevant. Hole Changes 1. New championship tee added. 2. New tee for general play on the site of the existing halfway hut. 3. New fairway bunker. 4. First bunker filled and second bunker reshaped. 5. Doughnut bunker moved up the hole and restored in shape and character. 6. New green in an incredible location.

6 1 5

2 4 3


175 PAR 3 YARDS

YARDS

180

YARDS

192

YARDS

215

131 PAR 3

YARDS

PROPOSED

146

YARDS

160

YARDS

175

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description Another outstanding coastal par 3 is added at the 11th. While the existing 11th is photogenic, it is not particularly testing and the new hole will be even more stunning in terms of its setting. There will be a range of teeing options and the greensite is just waiting to be occupied. The feel of the hole will be completely different to the 9th despite it also playing across the rocky shoreline. The 9th has the big bay in between tee and green whereas the 11th has the series of smaller rocky inlets leading to a very different playing and visual experience.

Hole Changes 1. Range of new tees. 2. New green requiring dramatic shot across the bay.

2 1


354 PAR 4 YARDS

YARDS

377

YARDS

388

YARDS

484

354 PAR 4

YARDS

PROPOSED

377

YARDS

388

YARDS

447

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description The new 11th green leads perfectly to the proposed championship tee for the 12th hole which enjoys attractive elevation compared with the existing tee. The added length will make a tough hole even more of a test. The green contouring is very restrictive for flag positions so the slopes will be eased to allow more variety.

Hole Changes 1. New championship tee. 2. Fairway extended towards tees. 3. Existing bunkers reshaped. 4. Green contours softened to provide more flag positions.

3

1

2

3

4

3

3


330 PAR 4 YARDS

344

YARDS

380

YARDS

YARDS

410

Hole Description The main proposal for the 13th hole is the reinstatement of the huge sand crater which Mackenzie Ross added to the right of the hole. In fact, a second such feature will be formed, set into the ridge beyond this which was added before the 2009 Open. The distinctive and unusual green will be retained exactly as it is.

Hole Changes 1. Bunker removed. 2. Huge old crater bunker restored and second one added. 3. Existing bunkers reshaped. 4. Green contours retained as they are.

1 3 2

4


475 PAR 5 YARDS

YARDS

510

YARDS

520

YARDS

565

385 PAR 4/5

YARDS

PROPOSED

390

YARDS

402

YARDS

449

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description Only the merest glimpse of the sea is available from the very rear part of the existing 14th green. That will all change with the extension of the hole into a par 5. This is made possible by the existing 9th hole vacating its ridge top position. That allows the green to take an elevated location affording it a 180 degree view of the ocean and the Lighthouse becomes a real focal point for the hole. The new 14th replaces the 17th hole as the last par 5 on the course. The 17th played the easiest hole relative to par in the 2009 Open but the new 14th is likely to provide a sterner test as it will most often be played into the wind.

Hole Changes 1. Back tee reconfigured. 2. Ridge lowered to improve the view to the fairway. 3. Fairway realigned to the new green. 4. New elevated green created with panoramic sea views.

1

2

3

4


162 PAR 3 YARDS

YARDS

170

YARDS

183

YARDS

233

162 PAR 3

YARDS

PROPOSED

170

YARDS

183

YARDS

206

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description Despite the 15th hole measuring 206 yards, Stewart Cink made a birdie in his last round of 2009 after hitting an 8 iron into the green! The addition of a new back tee will allow flexibility with the length of a hole which should demand at least a mid iron in still or downwind conditions. The new tee position is further to the right which will make the most of the view of the wonderful rough terrain to the right of the hole. The green will be softened in contour slightly to add more flag positions as it currently has very limited scope.

Hole Changes 1. New championship tee. 2. Approach extended. 3. Shapes of first two greenside bunkers restored. 4. Green contours softened for more flag positions.

3 2 1

4


377 PAR 4 YARDS

YARDS

385

YARDS

422

YARDS

476

377 PAR 4

YARDS

PROPOSED

385

YARDS

422

YARDS

455

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description The changes to the 16th hole for the 2009 Open turned the hole from an easy drive and pitch hole over the Wee Burn to the 5th most difficult hole relative to par in that Open. It also proved to be a very dangerous hole producing 50% more double bogeys than the next most dangerous hole on The Ailsa! The analysis of the old aerial photography revealed a more intricately shaped fairway bunker which will be restored. The movement of the 14th fairway away from the 16th tees allows a new championship tee to be added. The only other change to the hole is cosmetic, with a beautiful stone bridge replacing the existing wooden structure to the right of the green.

Hole Changes 1. New championship tee. 2. Right hand fairway bunker restored to its old shape. 3. Left hand bunker enlarged. 4. Green contours retained. 5. Stone bridge replaces the existing wooden bridge.

3

4 2 1

5


395 PAR 4/5

YARDS

435

YARDS

YARDS

475

399 PAR 5

YARDS

499

457

YARDS

505

YARDS

498

YARDS

MAX

YARDS

PROPOSED

558

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description The 17th hole will be shortened to become a par 4 which will stiffen the finish of the course. It was the easiest hole in the 2009 Open. The green will still lie on the higher ground of the existing approach so a well struck second shot will be required. The fairway bunker will be edged to the right as it currently collects too many balls running off the strong slope to its left. With the removal of the 18th tee to the left of the 17th hole, the spectators will now be able to view from both sides of the 17th green and there is much more room for the grandstand behind the green in its shortened position.

Hole Changes 1. Dune lowered to improve the view to the fairway. 2. Fairway bunker moved to the right. 3. New green.

3

1 2


370 PAR 4 YARDS

YARDS

405

YARDS

460

YARDS

483

359 PAR 4

YARDS

PROPOSED

370

YARDS

378

YARDS

461

YARDS

EXISTING

Hole Description While the changes required to produce a straightened 18th hole are significant, the prize will be a fitting finishing hole for The Ailsa and The Open. Two tees are planned for the flat topped dune so that even some of the general play might take place from what will surely become an iconic location in the world of golf. The golfers will have a full view of the hole with the hotel sitting on the hill in the background. The spectators and television viewers will have the sight of the golfers silhouetted on the tee and will be able to follow their progress from tee to green with the glimmering sea in the background. The fairway will be extended back towards the tees and will be rebunkered to demand a positive decision about what club the golfers want to play from the tee. A brave drive could leave a short iron into the green but many might be tempted by the safety of laying up. The distinctive green will remain exactly as it is. Hole Changes 1. New tees on the dune. 2. Fairway extended back towards tees and artificial dune obscuring view of fairway removed. 3. Fairway bunkering reconfigured to pose a question for the tee shot. 4. Green contours left as they are.

1

3

2 3

4

3


Hole

Maximum

Open Championship

Open Par

Tournament

Trophy

Par

Ladies’

Ladies’ Par

Comments

1

426

404

4

390

385

4

370

4

Existing 1st Hole With New Tees, Revised Fairway Alignment & New Green

2

428

428

4

379

368

4

358

4

Existing 2nd Hole With New Tees

3

497

497

4

393

386

4

380

5

Existing 3rd Hole With Back Tee Realigned

4

196

196

3

185

150

3

145

3

Existing 4th Hole With New Back Tee & New Green

5

526

498

4

526

500

5

405

5

Existing 5th Hole With New Back Tee For Par 5 General Play & Green Edged Back Into Valley

6

172

155

3

150

145

3

110

3

New Par 3 6th Hole To New Green To The Right Of The Existing Green

7

569

569

5

500

490

5

417

5

Existing 7th Hole With New Back Tees

8

471

471

4

432

365

4

391

5

Existing 8th Hole With New Back Tee

9

235

235

3

205

170

3

160

3

New Par 3 From Existing 9th Tees

Out

3520

3453

34

3160

2959

35

2736

37

Card of the Course

10

562

562

5

495

490

5

435

5

Existing 10th Hole Extended To Par 5 With New Tees & Green & Restored Doughnut Bunker

11

215

192

3

180

175

3

135

3

New Par 3 Left Of Existing 11th

12

484

484

4

388

377

4

354

4

Existing 12th Hole With New Back Tee

13

410

410

4

380

344

4

330

4

Existing 13th Hole With Old Crater Bunker Restored

14

565

565

5

520

510

5

475

5

New Hole Extended To A Par 5 With New Green

15

233

233

3

183

170

3

162

3

Existing 15th Hole With New Back Tee

16

476

476

4

422

385

4

377

4

Existing 16th Hole With New Back Tee & New Bridge

17

505

499

4

475

435

4

395

5

Existing 17th Hole Reduced To A Par 4 To New Green

18

483

483

4

460

405

4

370

4

Existing 18th Hole With New Tees On The Dune Allowing Hole To Be Played Straight For The Open

In

3933

3904

36

3503

3291

36

3033

37

Out

3520

3453

34

3160

2959

35

2736

37

Total

7453

7357

70

6663

6250

71

5769

74

7204

70

6493

6100

69

5802

75

Existing


This presentation clearly defines the aims and objectives of this ambitious project. It shows that this will be a watershed moment in the evolution of The Ailsa Course and the history of Turnberry. There is no doubt that the extent of the changes will promote great debate in the golfing world, such is the respect that the existing course generates. It is hoped that an objective assessment of the past evolution of the course and the detail of these proposals will convince even the fiercest defender of the existing course that the reborn Ailsa will make even more use of its spectacular coastal landscape. That, in turn, will lead to even more enjoyable golf for everyone and further dramatic championships at Turnberry.


Trump Turnberry, arguably the greatest golf resort ever built, will soon have a world-class hotel and all related five-star amenities, befitting of such an important and iconic property. Many millions of pounds will be spent and when complete, there will be nothing like it anywhere in the world. An extensive 18 month refurbishment programme is now underway and a brand new and spectacular hotel will be unveiled in June 2016 --- also when the redesigned Open Championship Ailsa Course will be available for play for the first time. The detailed and sensitive project requires a partial closure commencing 27th September 2015 when improvements to the hotel and Ailsa Course will be carried out. During this time, the new

clubhouse, the villas and golf academy will be open with tee times available to members and guests on the Kintyre Course. The upgrades to the conference and banquet facilities are already complete and the property has recently unveiled the brand new Caledonia Ballroom which is located in the main hotel building. This spacious and airy room is flooded with natural light and features exquisite sparkling chandeliers. Additionally, as part of the renovation, a truly exceptional ballroom will be built. The Donald J. Trump Ballroom will be situated at the North elevation of the hotel. The magnificent space with panoramic sea views will have a capacity for over 500 guests and will be ideal for weddings, galas and special events --- nothing will compare. Trump Turnberry will also be unveiling yet another incredible function space, The

Crystal Ballroom, named in recognition of the six original crystal chandeliers which are a historic feature of the room. The Old Tom Morris Suite, Ailsa Craig Suite and three new additional meeting rooms along with a fully equipped business centre are also now available for guest use. At the conclusion of the hotel rebuilding, Trump Turnberry will have all new magnificent suites designed to the highest standards. The iconic Turnberry Lighthouse, which will continue to operate, will also host an incredible new Presidential suite which will have the most spectacular views in all of Scotland. The Lighthouse will also serve as the halfway house for the Ailsa Course --- creating yet another truly unique and exciting feature to the property oerings. The Trump Turnberry Clubhouse will debut this summer with a new restaurant, The Duel in the Sun, which will have an expansive viewing balcony. Additionally, Trump Turnberry will soon have an all new and much larger professional shop with expanded retail oerings that will have the newest merchandise and equipment. Other notable changes to the resort include the transformation of the Pitch and Putt course to an 18 hole links experience in front of the hotel, the repositioning of the 1906 restaurant to its original location, the development of a luxurious and sprawling Spa and a brand new lobby bar featuring over 250 whiskies. Lastly, Trump Turnberry will embark on a massive renovation of the villas and the creation of a new family centre. Work will commence in the winter of 2016 with an anticipated completion date of spring 2017. This will mark the completion of the Resort.


Mackenzie & Ebert International Golf Course Architects

Profile for Mackenzie and Ebert

Proposals for the Ailsa Course at Trump Turnberry 2015  

Proposals for the Ailsa Course at Trump Turnberry 2015  

Advertisement