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particular reason. They were not members of a flying saucer cult. In fact, until his initial sighting Barney had been hostile to the idea that UFOs existed. A crucial aspect of the Hill case was that their information was retrieved through the use of hypnosis. Benjamin Simon, the psychiatrist who administered the hypnosis, was never convinced that an abduction had actually occurred. He preferred to think that the two had experienced a “shared fantasy” or a condition known as folie à deux, even though the details of their “fantasies” were quite different because they had been put in separate rooms and had different experiences. The transcripts of the hypnosis showed that Simon spent a considerable amount of time unsuccessfully trying to get the Hills to admit that the events had never really happened, or to catch them in contradictions. After the Hill case, other reports of abductions slowly began to surface, but the number was still so small that they caused very little comment among UFO researchers. They represented an anomaly outside the more conventional sighting reports that dominated the field. Yet the abduction claims persisted. In October 1973, two residents of Pascagoula, Mississippi, said that strangelooking aliens floated them into a UFO and physically examined them. In 1975 forest worker Travis Walton claimed that he was taken aboard a UFO and, while he thought he was gone for a few hours, he appeared to be missing for five days. Inside the object he remembered lying on a table and seeing small Beings with large heads and eyes. That same year an Army sergeant saw a UFO headed for him while he sat on the hood of his car. A numbness spread over his body before the object left. He noticed that he was inexplicably missing about one and one half hours of time. The next few days brought a sore and inflamed back and a rash from his chest to his knees. He later remembered small Beings with large heads and eyes performing a medical examination on him while he lay on a table.7 In January 1976 three women in Kentucky observed a bright-red object hovering some distance from their car. The next thing they knew, they were eight miles down the road and it was an hour and a half later. They continued home and experienced burning sensations on their faces when water touched them. They then noticed that they had similar red marks on the backs of their necks. Hypnosis was administered by Leo Sprinkle, a professor of counseling psychology at the University of Wyoming and an early investigator of abductions. The three women remembered being physically examined by small, gray, humanoid figures while they lay on tables. One woman felt that they were conducting an experiment on her to learn about her emotional and intellectual processes. Another woman could see a human she didn’t know lying on a table next to hers.8 In 1977 a ten-year-old report came to light in Massachusetts. Betty Andreasson claimed that she and her family were put in a state of “suspended animation” when five small Beings entered their home by walking through a wall. She was taken to a bizarre location where, among other things, she was examined, saw strange animals on another planet, and saw a giant phoenix-like bird rising from ashes. She also reported various events that she interpreted as profoundly religious. UFO investigator Ray Fowler wrote three books on her experiences, but the events were so bizarre that UFO researchers were at a loss to separate reality from fantasy.9 By the late 1970s and early 1980s, abduction accounts began to be reported in ever-increasing numbers. Some researchers were beginning to theorize about an apparent reproductive link that recurred in these accounts. As early as 1972 researcher Marjorie Fish hypothesized that a needle inserted in Betty Hill’s navel might have been for experimentation with human eggs, and in 1977 psychiatrist Berthold E. Schwarz discussed the idea of a laparoscopy (a method of examining internal organs by using a viewing scope) being performed on Betty. Based on cases that she investigated, in 1980 researcher Ann Druffel suggested that aliens might be interested in human sexual life-styles.10 Most UFO researchers, however, still considered abduction reports to be exotic and bewildering anomalies—perhaps true and perhaps not. Although patterns were slowly emerging from the abduction stories and the people involved seemed to be credible, the specter of the contactees still intimidated most UFO researchers. In fact, some 1950s-style contactees were still around, claiming trips to the planets and gab sessions with friendly aliens. To complicate matters, some abductees who seemed to be sincere individuals and who did not fit the contactee model were reporting contactee-like abduction experiences. They claimed that they were given prophecies of death and destruction for our society, or that they had experienced Christian religious experiences. Others were enamored with kindly, handsome, space people who were here on a benevolent mission of some sort. How these reports could fit into the scheme of “legitimate” abductions was impossible to comprehend. To make matters worse, there was the increasing popularity of “channeling,” a process in which, by placing oneself in the proper mental state, a person could contact benevolent aliens at will. Prior to the 1950s, channelers, whose activities are related to automatic writing, speaking in tongues, and a number of other “psychic” phenomena, had mainly communicated with spirits. Now aliens, a phenomenon that had been known in UFO cult groups for more than thirty-five years, became the contacts of choice. In channeled messages, the Space Brothers, frequently said to be from the Pleiades or Zeta Reticuli star systems, freely discussed their reasons for visiting Earth, the propulsion systems of their vehicles, and life on the idyllic planets where they resided, and their philosophy of life. They took Earth people to task for befouling the environment, causing wars, and so forth. They expressed love for Earth and Earthlings, and gave advice on how we should be more loving to each other. Much of the channeled information was taken up with trivial matters along the lines of “pop” psychology and self-help advice—urging vegetarianism and other health measures, providing metaphysical and spiritual messages, and discussing the place of Earth and its people in the universe. Ultimately they wished to lead us through a spiritual passage into a New Age. For some UFO researchers, channeling confused the issue and made the abduction phenomenon seem all the more improbable. In 1981 UFO research was fundamentally altered by the publication of Budd Hopkins’s Missing Time. Unlike most UFO researchers, who treated abduction cases as simply another “sighting”

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David jacobs secret life firsthand accounts of ufo abductions  
David jacobs secret life firsthand accounts of ufo abductions  
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