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point to a specific traumatic event in their childhood that might have provoked the phobia. They understand that their fears are completely inappropriate, but they are unable to control their illogical and perplexing feelings. Abductees may be extremely afraid of being alone. They find that they must be with someone at all times and particularly at night. This is not because of loneliness, but because they are scared that “something will happen” if they are alone, although they are not overly frightened of burglars. Some abductees suddenly develop seemingly irrational fears of stretches of road or of fields. They may have traveled the same route for years without giving it a thought, but one day they become inordinately afraid of it. They stop traveling on that stretch of road, and go miles out of their way to avoid it. Child abductees who have played in a nearby park every day suddenly are afraid to go there and never want to play there again. They may have suffered strange missing-time episodes at these places, and they will agonize over what happened to them for many years. Other abductees develop strong fears of their basement, their bedroom, or their backyard. Riding on escalators or elevators can provoke anxiety. Visiting physicians can be extremely stressful. Although most women find a routine visit to the gynecologist an uncomfortable but necessary event, many abductees are seized with panic when they must go. Some women abductees never visit gynecologists. They dread the thought of a doctor performing an internal examination on them, and even though they tell themselves that their fears are silly, they become hysterical when the procedure is begun. As a result they forgo yearly checkups, which can endanger their health. One twenty-seven-year-old abductee had gone to a gynecologist only three times in her life, and the last time she cried uncontrollably throughout the examination. When anxiety becomes acute, panic can plague the victim. Abductees may be seized with a panic attack at any time with no recognizable stimulus. As fear overcomes them, their hearts “race,” they breathe rapidly, they become flushed, and they may hyperventilate. A life-threatening fear overwhelms them. These attacks may become so severe and debilitating that they can prompt agoraphobia: Abductees become so consumed with worry about suffering a panic attack that they are unable to leave their homes to carry out their daily routine. One abductee sometimes suffered attacks while she was teaching her high school class. They became so frequent that she was afraid to go to the market because she once experienced an attack there and had to abandon her cart and run home. This type of panic can interfere with work, and with social and family relationships. Panic attack victims find that they cannot drive alone or even be alone at home at night. When the attack starts, even being with someone does not diminish the fears. Abductees commonly suffer from moderate to severe depression. They may break out in tears for no apparent reason, or have episodes of withdrawal. They may even contemplate suicide to alleviate the pain. If they are unaware of the origin of their malady, the depression is usually not amenable to normal psychological treatment. Unaware abductees can have inexplicably exaggerated emotional reactions to normal activities. For instance, they might wake up in the morning with intense feelings of euphoria. They ride the crest of an emotional high that seems to have no cause and that may last for several days. One young woman woke up feeling extremely euphoric. When she rode her bicycle into town she had the inexplicable feeling that she was falling in love with every man who looked into her eyes. Conversely, abductees might feel an almost overpowering rage at someone for simply staring at them, while this might not have ever bothered them in the past. Animals with large eyes might provoke great anxiety in abductees, who sometimes inexplicably develop aversions to deer, rabbits, monkeys, cows, and even inanimate objects. Ken Rogers was a small child when his mother brought him a souvenir “tiki god” from a trip she had taken; the face and eyes of the souvenir so frightened him that he threw it out after having it for one day. One unaware abductee had several abductions from his car. After the last one, he sold his car and gave up driving for several years but did not know the reason why. Obsessions and phobias relating to “borderland science” are also a common symptom of PAS. For example, after an abduction, some unaware abductees suddenly become obsessed with unidentified flying objects. They buy every book they can get on the subject, compulsively talk about it, and seem unable to concentrate on much else. Yet a few days or weeks before, they had little or no interest in UFOs. Others go to the opposite extreme and are inordinately repelled by the subject of UFOs. They refuse to entertain the notion that there “might be something to it.” They dislike talking or even thinking about it. They become extremely angry when the topic is raised and may leave the room so that they do not have to participate in a discussion. Their attitude is so negative that it assumes the dimensions of a phobia. Some abductees experience extreme emotional reactions when they see illustrations of aliens in a book about UFOs. The pictures rivet the abductee as she stares at them in stunned horror, unable to take her eyes off them, all the while wondering why she is reacting in this manner. Others will pick up a book on abductees and have a powerful yet puzzling reaction to it, becoming extraordinarily emotionally involved with its contents. They might break into tears and sob for no apparent reason. Still others become inordinately frightened by such books and are unable to read them through to the end. Memories or dreams can become an obsession as the unaware abductee desperately tries to understand their meaning. It is common for abductees to feel that in some way they left their bodies, usually during the night. When they floated out of bed they were often accompanied by someone they believe to be a deceased relative or an angel. A few unaware abductees claim not only that they have had out-of-body experiences but that they have also experienced what they call astral travel. They know that they have in some mysterious way experienced a strange displacement in location. One minute they were in one spot and then seemingly the next instant they found themselves in another place. They might be aware of this occurring several times during their lives. The only way that they can reconcile what has happened to them is through the only available cultural explanation—astral travel—no matter how ill-defined that might be. Other PAS anxieties are related to babies. Some women develop “avoidance” postures toward

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David jacobs secret life firsthand accounts of ufo abductions  
David jacobs secret life firsthand accounts of ufo abductions  
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