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short­ ‑lived. He closed his practice in Macao in September 1893 having decided that his mission in life was not to treat the sick but lead a revolution. Even while he was a practicising doctor, he would meet with his associates in Macao and Guangdong to plan the revolution. This finally brought him to the attention of the Qing government which began putting pressure on Macao authorities. This pressure became intolerable after an uprising incited by Sun and his compatriots in Guangzhou in October 1895; the rebellion ultimately failed having been leaked beforehand to the government. However, it put Sun on a wanted list, and the Hong Kong government banned him from entering the city. It was at that moment that Fernandes did him another great service. First, his newspaper Echo Macaense published an article by Sun explaining the rationale for the uprising. Then, Fernandes hid him while he was a wanted man, using friends and connections to smuggle him out of Macao by boat, first to Hong Kong and then Japan. As a token of gratitude for saving his life, Sun later gave his friend his medical equipment and daily items, now on display at the Dr. Sun Yat­ ‑sen Memorial House in Macao. His dear friend Fernandes is buried in the local St. Miguel Arcanjo Cemetery.

THE AFTERMATH OF A SUCCESSFUL REVOLUTION

After numerous failed uprisings, the revolutionaries finally succeeded when a Qing army rebelled in Wuhan on 10 October 1911, leading to the overthrow of the government. On 19th of December, representatives from 17 provinces elected Sun to act as provisional president of the Republic of China. He held the post for only three months before being forced to give up the position to Yuan Shi­‑kai, the most powerful warlord in China. In May 1912, at the invitation of some local Chinese businessmen, Sun made his first visit to Macao since being forced out in 1895. It would also be his last. On 29th of March 1925, 20,000 people in Macao – one fifth of its population – attended a memorial service for Sun at Kiang Wu hospital where a statue of him now stands in his honour. NOVEMBER 2016

On 19th of December, representatives from 17 provinces elected Sun to act as provisional president of the Republic of China. He held the post for only three months before being forced to give up the position to Yuan Shi­ ‑kai, the most powerful warlord in China By then, several members of his family were living permanently in Macao. In 1913, his wife Lu Mu­‑zhen had moved there with their son, two daughters and his brother Sun Mei who became a local businessman. He died in Macao in 1915, at the age of 61. Lu continued to live with her family at their home in Macao with her three children and grandchildren. In 1930, an explosion at a nearby army munitions warehouse destroyed the house. Deeply embarrassed, the government provided funds, supplemented by money from her son Sun Ke. With the money, the family built a spacious three­‑storey structure that is open to visitors today. Lu was a devout Baptist and devoted much of her time to the church and charity. She died on 7th of September 1952, at the age of 85. In 1958, the building was named the Sun Yat­‑sen Memorial House. It has since become one of Macao’s most popular visitor destinations. In the courtyard stands a life­‑size bronze statue of the doctor­‑turned­‑revolutionary by his friend Umeya Shokichi. It is one of three statues of Sun in Macao. He also has a garden and two roads named after him. The newly restored pharmacy will be an important addition to this legacy: another important stop for those coming to Macao to retrace the steps of the father of the Chinese revolution.

Macao Magazine November 2016  

A bi-monthly magazine that covers a wide range of topics, including economics, culture, politics, entertainment, the arts and heritage prese...