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FROM THE F FRONT RE S E A R C H A N D ME D I AT IO N M O DELS AS AN ALTERNATIVE PRACTI CE I N CURATI NG ARCHI TECTURE

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MARYORI CASADO

MIGUEL GUZMÁN

GONZALO PARDO


«ART IS NOT WHAT YOU SEE, BUT WHAT YOU MAKE OTHER SEE» - EDGAR DEGAS


FROM THE FRONT RESEARCH AND MEDIATION MODELS AS AN ALTERNATIVE PRACTICE IN CURATING ARCHITECTURE

Author: Maryori Casado Lara Tutors: Gonzalo Pardo Miguel Guzmรกn Final masters research study Superior Technical School of Architecture of Madrid Master in Architectural Communication: MAca 2016-17 February, 2018


1. GENERAL -

ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION OBJECTIVES JUSTIFICATION

- METHODOLOGY

2. A BRIEF HISTORY ON CURATING ARCHITECTURE - THE BEGINNINGS 1851-1980 - THE IN-BETWEEN 1980-2009 - THE CURRENTS 2010-NOW

3. REPORTING FROM THE FRONT: STOREFRONT FOR ART & ARCHITECTURE - ARCHIVE - PROGRAMMING - MEDIA - PEOPLE

4. BEYOND THE FRONT - OFFICEUS AS CURATING RESEARCH

5. CONCLUSIONS 6. REFERENCES


1. OfficeUS, Storefront International series, and World wide Storefront, which addressed the creation of a global community though conversations, debates and exploring new ways of encounters.

GENERAL Projects such as The other architect illustrate “architecture’s potential to identify the urgent issues of our time” thus presenting an expansion of the frame of architecture and curating architecture, beyond the reaches of the institution, canonical methods and outside the confined space of the museum.9

INT ROD U CT IO N Architecture is a product of society1 and society is always shifting, transforming their identities, economical and political stances,2 therefore this social contexts becomes spaces of conflict inasmuch as public spaces try to represent citizens as a whole, but people are bound to disagree on certain issues. Owing to they being preconditioned by their political and ideological inclinations in different areas which shape how the matter will be perceived.3 Consequently, architecture is conflict, controversies, responsibility, associations, and concerns4 since it is “bound to all kinds of other agents5 in social contexts”.6 Therefore when we talk about curating architecture, is imperative that we understand that in order to 10

do so one must response to the preexisting context in which it operates. Hence, curating architecture shall no longer represent architecture just as a physical object, nor staging it using the same language and methods used in 1932.7 But, to be understood as ground for research and production experiments, a place for the production of content. Due to the expanded role of the curator and architect, curating architecture is a reflection on the concept of architectural and the ways it could be communicated. As you will see in Chapter I, curating architecture has evolved throughout history by architects that thought of the curating not just as a form to make expositions but as a platform of discussion, analysis and communication of architecture.8

«Can we speak of the curatorial beyond curating in the expanded field: as a multidimensional role that includes critique, editing, education, and fundraising? The curatorial can contain all these varied dimensions as a loose methodology applied by different people in various capacities.»10 Collaboration is also an important aspect in curating architecture, since it allows multiple voices to work and develop concepts together rather than an individual voice.11 Moreover, this collaborative initiative often promotes the combination of disciplinary modes and agents, and fields of operation in order to develop more critical and experimental projects and generate potential spatial practices.12 This can be exemplified with Storefront for Art and Architecture, as they work with a wide range of networks, ideas and site-specific activities, such as

Furthermore, Eva Franch i Gilabert13 believes that in order to produce relevant works, and be able to identify pressing issues in architecture, the curator must take risks14 as “taking a risk actually means assuming a certain responsibility to change something.” 15 When Eva Franch, along with the others curators in Officeus proposed for the 14th Venice Biennale of Architecture, the concept of continuous investigation as the curatorial project for the American pavilion, they did not know the what kind of results the project was going to give but they assumed the risk. In the following master’s study I will address the above mentioned matters in terms of the historical trajectory in curating architecture and Storefront for art and architecture, and finalizing in curating as a research practice with Officeus as the case study.

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In Residence: Gawie and Gwen Fagan, by: Nowness

OBJECTIVES

To study historical moments in curating architecture between the period of 1932 to 2015, with the purpose of understanding how they have transformed the contemporary curatorial architectural discourse. From among these changes of particular interest are those curatorial projects which have expanded their form of work through their methods, formats, strategies and subjects. The aim of this thesis is to analyze the expanded notion of curating architecture from an exhibitionoriented modality towards curating 12

as a research, mediation and politically based activity, where curating becomes a territory to produce ideas and debate. This analysis is to be made by means of investigating the project OfficeUS as a case study focusing on its research and mediation strategies.

This master’s research comes from a previous personal experience in Dominican Republic, where Storefront for Art & Architecture organized a series of events and talks - namely, Storefront International Series: Dominican Republic in 2013 and Tropical Ghosts in 2014. Both of these addressed the construction of urban life through site-specific interventions and meetings in different locations, exploring “issues of growth, identity and systems of sharing in the tropical communities.” 16 Subsequently, these events made me realize that architecture goes beyond the preconceived idea of a constructed form, towards the understanding that architecture can assume other forms that not necessarily mean a physical object.

Consequently, the interest to further understand curating architecture is translated onto this master’s research study with the purpose to investigate how Storefront, in collaboration with Dominican architects, artists and thinkers generated a space for a common dialogue with the attendance and participation of a diverse audience, with diverse interest and contexts. This, in particular, is very important since cultural events in Dominican Republic are only attended by a small group of people and the Storefront events made it possible to draw the attention of a larger group. Which methods, formats and communication strategies did they

use to generate such experiences? How can curating architecture serve as a incubator for the production of ideas, discussions and conversations? How do mediation and research construct different typologies to curate architecture? Such were the questions which arose throughout this investigation.

However, it was not until I joined the Masters in Architectural Communication (MACA) that I learnt the term ‘curating’ as a practice that goes beyond the exhibition format; it was then when I understood that my previous experiences during the Storefront events in Dominican Republic were a curatorial project.

JUSTIFICATION

Additionally, to demonstrate how the above-stated elements of contemporary architecture curating function within this practice, both as a tool, and as knowledge production.

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M ETHO D OLOG Y

The master’s study is structured into three chapters that address a historical, theoretical and analytical view of curating architecture. The following research methodology is based on academic bibliography directly related to the subject matter -curating and architecture-, using methods of reading, recopilation, archive investigation, and virtually revisiting past curatorial projects. Firstly, research was carried out by investigating and reading specialized academic references such as, books, publications, academic online conferences and interviews, specialized magazines such as LOG 20 and OnCurating. org, conversations, curated instagram accounts and articles, all the collected information is then registered and analyzed. The first chapter consists of a historical overview of past curatorial architecture projects which have introduced alternatives

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formats, topics, and strategies, thus transforming the practice. In order to know how certain projects contributed to the curatorial practice as a whole, a table was created with past exhibitions and events, which are organized in a chronological manner and categorized in topics, formats, innovations, images, curators, and locations. The aim of the table was to detect, and curate which exhibitions were going to be further analyzed and presented in the first chapter - A brief history on curating architecture -.17 The references used for Chapter one were mostly historical and theoretical. The second chapter - Reporting From the Front -, is about the trajectory of Storefront for Art and Architecture, with a special focus on the period of 2010 up to now. This chapter is structured as follows; the first section is a historical overview of the organization, past curators and the introduction of certain topics and events. Secondly,

I present Storefront’s current teams, programming, and social media. Chapter two is mostly based on information provided by the website of the organization, as well from articles, a master thesis that addressed the exhibition BEING, online interviews, conversation with a past collaborators from the events Storefront International Series: Dominican Republic and Tropical Ghosts. For this chapter a table of projects starting from 2010, was also made, with an emphasis on Letters to the mayor and The storefront series: the Interrogation Series, Cabaret Series, Productive Disagreement Series, Total Enthusiasm Series, Manifesto Series, Paella Series, Reading Images Series, and Definition Series.

events concerning the mediation role of curating encounters. The aim of this chapter is to analyse the selected projects by their research method, discourse, communication, format, team and space in relation to their research and mediation approach. This will be done by contrasting the information the organization provides with theoretical references in order to‌. The projects were examined Notwithstanding, it is not the intention of this thesis to indicate that the selected case studies are the only projects which framed their practice within the key elements as a guiding axis. It does, however, have the aim of presenting them as an initial case study which is but a part of a future, and larger, investigation.

Thirdly, for Chapter three I have selected two projects from Storefront for Art & Architecture - namely, OfficeUs as a research model, secondly, The international Series

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Storefront Membership Event: Tour of 16 James Turrell’s Three Saros - July 2016

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2. A BRIEF HISTORY ON CURATING ARCHITECTURE

Nowadays, the curatorial practice is continuously expanding beyond exhibition formats. Hence, playlists, festivals, clothing lines, conferences, Instagram accounts, and even nutritional bars, are being curated.18 Likewise, architecture is not constricted solely to the built environment, now the practice is quite broad in terms of what an architect is. Even when searching architect in google you will f ind system architecture and programming.19 All of the above showing that curating architecture is not a static form, thus it must be involved in continual discussion and questioning of the practice.

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Curating architecture can no longer work under the same ideas, it has to work with a different approach of what an architect is and what an architect can do. Curating architecture means to curate a laboratory, an urban educator, a workshop, a street museum, a bus tour, a lecture kit, a dialogue, a televised charrette, it means much much more than scale models, blueprints, or buildings photographs. 20 In order to comprehend this, one must understand the history of curating architecture; this means to reveal the ways in which architecture has been f ramed,

mediated and discussed, the context, and those behind the ideas. 21 However, the purpose of this chapter is not to present an exact chronological history of curating architecture, the aim is to present key moments within selected periods of time which have contributed an important part to the understanding of the contemporary architectural curatorial discourse: The beginnings 1851-1980, The Inbetween 1980-2009, and The currents 2010-Now. 22

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The beginnings 1851-1980

IMG 01: Herbert Bayer. diagram of the field of vision/ Exhibition, Deutscher Werkbund, Paris, 1930

It seems that the curating architecture practice has its beginnings with the Crystal Palace, built in London’s Hyde Park for the Great Exhibition in 1851. 20 Each participating country had the opportunity to demonstrate through their national pavilions their cultural, economical and political advances to other countries by means of cultural exchanges and competitions. 24 Architecture was a representative entity and for many years, buildings were the main attraction at architecture exhibitions. 25

However this began to change around the f irst half of the twentieth century, when architectural drawings and models where the main focus instead of constructed pavilions,. This may have been due to the formation of the Department of Architecture at the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York, being the f irst curatorial department of its kind to be founded in a museum. 26 Although, as then-director Alf red H. Barr Jr. noted, that

MOMA was not the f irst to work within this new territory. 27; for the Bauhaus architecture school in Germany in 1936 had already been experimenting with different techniques of display of architecture and design which were greatly explored by Herbert Bayer and his students. 28 Since that time architects have noticeably broadened their spectrum of the architectural practice, starting to work among other disciplines such as, graphic design, typography, furniture and so forth. These changes come with a alternative notion of the

concept of what an architecture is; and therefore, how it is communicated and displayed. 29 Since its founding in 1932, the Department of Architecture at the Museum of Modern Art has been associated with strong positions and polemical campaigns for innovation. ÂŤAs an institution, it is recognized for its innovative approach in Architecture and design, and its undeniable influence in introducing architecture in museums.Âť Owing to their trajectory the importance of its projects is strongly felt to this day. 30

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Its inaugural exhibition Modern Architecture: International Style Exhibition curated by Philip Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock in 1932, which is known as the f irst architecture exhibition inside a museum, promoted a new direction in architecture in the age of the machine. 31 They expressed such ideas in the style and materials of the selected buildings by a rational layout in order to aff irm the modern style principles to the general public. The exhibition is conceived not only as a display of ideas but as an architectural project itself. 32

1932 International Style exhibition

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Modern Architecture: International Style Exhibition was undoubtedly a very polemical exhibition which f ired up a lot of debates and discussions around it. One possible reason may be that Johnson and Hitchcock presented forward-looking European ideas at a time when they were not completely embraced in America. 33 The debates may have been due to the proposal of a new way of looking at architecture and buildings in a certain site and culture, hence people could respond to this in one way or another since the curator is

actually proposing an alternative narrative of the place, and, in consequence, how people think about living there and how people perceive the place or proposal. 34 It is important to highlight that Johnson’s inspiration for the display method was Bayer ‘s experiments and exhibitions at the Bauhaus.This was done by setting the architectural models on pedestals, displaying plans and photographs of each project as if they were paintings and clearly labelling each. 35 Indeed, Academia can act as an experimental ground influencing the architecture and curating practice. Bayer’s work was also an inspiration to the Eameses for their project Glimpses of the USA, shown later on. 36

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In 1956 the architect Theo Crosby presented the exhibition This Is Tomorrow at the Whitechapel museum in London. The exhibition addressed the intense transformations society went through after WWII in its economy, its organization and the way people started to live, with the purpose of rethinking a new way of living.43 Considered as a groundbreaking exhibition for its collaborative process, he organized 12 teams of 38 multidisciplinary participants44 to undertake the whole space of the gallery and “answered by a «programme» of their own making, offering a def initive statement of another attitude to «collaboration». 45

Two years later, in 1934, Johnson curated another important exhibition, Machine Art, which led to the estab­ lishment of the Department of Industrial Art. The exhibition presented the aesthetic quality of a machine as important as their function; for him, one cannot be appreciated without the other.37 In order to present this idea and educate the American public to appreciate the beauty in common objects,38 the curators opted to show machine parts, scientific instruments and objects useful in everyday life on pedestals to compare them to artistic objects.39 Noteworthy, the elements of this idea are still present today; one has only to see the appreciation people have for their personal machines such as laptops, iphones, kitchen gadgets.. that are bought not only for their functionality but also for their beauty. In addition to promoting the appreciation of the inherent beauty of machinery,, the curators encouraged the public to have an

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active role at the exhibition. This was done by taking part in the exhibition in several ways. Firstly, the visitors were invited to vote on the machines following Johnson’s and Hitchcock’s classif ication of beauty; Geometrical beauty, functional beauty, technical and material beauty, and visual complexity.40 Secondly, the visitors were persuaded to behave like consumers and purchase the objects for their own houses through a designed catalogue that included a price list and the manufacturers’ contact information.41 As abovementioned,, the curators worked alongside manufacturers, companies and laboratories for the selection and details of the machine parts to be displayed later on. For this reason, the exhibition is considered to have gone outside the typical networking for these events42 inasmuch as instead of mediating with artists or other architects, they opted for different agents.

The mediation role performed by Crosby was crucial to produce the exhibition, since ‘as you can imagine, the labour involved in getting any kind of agreement out of forty highly independent and f ree-standing geniuses has been quite something.’46 Moreover, the curator’s position at Architectural Design offered “the necessary contacts for materials and so on, since nobody had any money,”47 thus showing the importance of the networking abilities that a curator must possess. As in Machine Art, the 1959 The American National Exhibition in Moscow centered its discourse around the newest technological advances. The exhibition was chiefly organized due to the SovietAmerican Cultural Agreement signed in the previous year for an off icial cultural exchange , and as part of the Agreement the two countries had to present a national exhibition to their people. The United States wanted to make a clear statement to the Soviets, namely how their technological gadgets were part of the American ideology as it meant advancement, f reedom and democracy but more than anything else that the

American people were above the rest owing to the technologies they possessed. 48 The exhibition was a coldwar tactic between the two countries, in which everything was calculated, f rom the selection of the theme, under what context they would debate it, the artists, architects, and scholars that would represent the american ideology, the information that would go on the brochures and how they would answer certain topics or questions. This was the context in which the famous Kitchen Debate between Vice President Richard Nixon and President Nikita Khrushchev in an staged kitchen of an intentionally designed suburban house took place. 49 What was remarkable about this debate was the decontextualization in which it took place and how discussing political matters turned into discussing the latest domestic appliances. 50 Now curating has

to do with a political stance, and is not displaying art pieces anymore but a dialogue and an atmosphere. 51 The exhibition, in this case the debate, took place outside the gallery, the conference room, the museum. 52 Under this context the Eameses were commissioned to produce their famous f ilm Glimpses of the USA. In the eighty thousand square feet of the exhibition, more than 2,200 still and moving images in 9 minutes presented “a typical work day” and in three minutes presented “a typical weekend day’, projecting it onto seven suspended twenty-bythirty-foot screens. Each screen showed a different scene, but they were on the same general subject—housing, transportation, jazz, and so forth. 53 The Eames understood this was no regular exhibition and therefore had to be carefully produced, so they acted not just as architects but as curators, producers, mediators and communicators.54


The In-between 1980-2009 During this period of time, architecture stop being strictly bound to its traditional role 55 and the borders between f ields started to blur. 56 These changes resulted f rom the manner in which globalization constantly influenced social, economical and political grounds, ”where research and experience move transversally in different cognitive and context, and where a rapidly evolving economic order generates the same social realities in extremely diverse geographical and cultural contexts”. 57 Other methods of production of ‘work’ 58 started to develop and the architect no longer worked just with the client or the engineer but they now dealt with multiple

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agents to which they have to respond and mediate with. Similarly, such collaborations as emerged in the former were seen enacted in curatorial projects. 59 As a way to shed light on these matters, influential faces, organizations, and institutions emerged, such as: Storef ront of Art in Architecture in 1982 by Kyong Park, Anyone Corporation in 1990 by editor Cynthia Davidson, S,M,L,XL in 1996 and also AMO in 1999 by Rem Koolhaas and Dan Wood, the 2000 Venice Biennale of Architecture less aesthetic and more ethic by Massimiliano Fuksas.

Equally important faces like Barry Bergdoll, appointed as curator in 2007 at the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), well known for his strong activism and publicly stirring up particular subjects regarding migration, social and environmental dimension in contemporary architecture. At the same period of time, another important face surfaced, Henry Urbach, who became the curator of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA). Urbachs works can be summarized as promoting curating architecture as an atmosphere of relations with the senses and other visitors, displaying architecture as an experience in a particular time and space that will not be replicated elsewhere.

Henry Urbach Installation. SURF-A-BED

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Henry Urbach Installation. SURF-A-BED screen configuration diagram

Tackling the expanded notions in architecture, Anyone Corporation in collaboration with Shimizu Corporation of Japan, created, planned and executed a series of conferences distributed f rom 1991 to 2001 60 to “address the non-specif icity of the condition of architecture and its relation with other disciplines.” 61 A mixture of disciplines were selected for more diverse dialogues and ideas; architects, philosophers, economists, critics, artists, and theologians sat in a roundtable to discuss architecture conditions under the themes of mediation and undecidability (ANY).62

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As Davidson has stated, “we are moving towards a world of mediation” and not only mediating with people, but with devices, with bureaucratic systems, because to be able to create a global conference one must undertake the diverse contexts and situations that can be presented and one must manage them in the best possible conditions. 63 64 Each year the conference takes a new context where the theme undecidability, which means ANY - anyone, anywhere, anybody, anymore, anyplace, anything, anyhow, anytime, anyway, anywise - will be assigned to a specif ic year to talk about spatial-temporal issues in architecture. “Through this global wandering, the ANY conferences seek the wildest possible variety of institutional, geo-political, and intellectual contexts, drawing differences f rom all while stipulating the priority of none.” 65

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AMO was founded, in 1999 as a research observatory to respond in real time on matters of identity, culture and organization by conducting investigations and projects with a changebly mixture of individuals to evaluate society turns.66 Since cities are always shifting, transforming their identities, and their histories these changes must be examined in relation to architecture and how architecture produces appropriate suggestions. 67 The process of AMO allows them to approach architecture in other terms, not as a f inal result but as something to be constantly redef ined, a procedure of trial and error. Architecture is a thinking methodology that can be used to examine other f ields and areas, ceasing to be something merely physical to occupy space in a ‘virtual’ capacity. Their curatorial practice is f ramed on these ideas, creating projects f rom the identity of prada, to a cartography of emerging issues to anticipate possibles ‘futures’ and lines of work.69

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In a similar line of thought Massimiliano Fuksas for the 7th Venice Biennale of Architecture, named Less Aesthetic, More Ethic proposed several innovations in the strategies and the format on curating architecture and the architectural biennales. 70 Starting with the question of Urban formsa topic which not only architects could relate to but the general public as well, and this made all the difference. The strategy to communicate the biennale and architecture change largely due to the public, and it is here where the major contributions and innovation resides: Projections and a ‘Virtual World’ for transmission of ideas. 71

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This is the f irst time an architecture exhibition and biennale did not display any physical material related to the practice; neither models nor plans, just 36 simultaneous projectors to conf ront the public “with the new nomadic world system during the 90s”,72 to enable them to have a view of what was happening globally in different urban contexts. So they exhibition opted to project migrations, water shortages, problems in Rwanda, shopping centres to the biggest cities in the world, f rom Cairo to Tokyo, Mexico City to São Paulo. 73

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“The language of architecture is the same language of the world” 74 and in a changed world it was a necessity to establish a new way of transmitting the information, as it happens the ‘virtual world’ was part of the curatorial strategy at a time where is was not as appearing as it is today. 75 The internet became a new tool of communication and to reach a larger public, becoming a new forum for debates and exchange ideas with people f rom all over the world. Fuksas used

this forum by creating a website, f irstly to focus the attention on the theme of the exhibition and secondly by presenting some virtual exhibitions rather than presenting them in the physical exhibition, this way opening up the biennale to online feedback.76 Providing a much needed space outside the walls of the institution and even the physical space, a the digital museum. Providing a much needed space outside the walls of the institution and even

the physical space, a the digital museum.77 Barry Bergdoll joined MOMA at the 75th anniversary of the Department of Architecture at which time he took the opportunity to redef ine how the department of architecture and the museum approach social and environmental pressing issues through architecture. “it seems to me, that the museum should serve in a much more fast -paced, productive way, not waiting for others to take the lead but prodding and taking the risk of showing things that do not yet exist, even things that would not exist without the museum’s initiative”.79

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END, IT GETS DONE.

OTHERS THINK ONE IS DOING IT, HOW, IN THE

DO IT, WHY ONE THINKS ONE IS DOING IT, WHY

ONE DOES IT, WHY ONE IS TEMPTED NOT TO

WITH, WHO ONE ENDS UP DOING IT WITH, WHY

W H O O N E , I D E A L LY , W O U L D L I K E T O D O I T

TO DO, WHO ONE REFUSES TO DO IT WITH,

AIMS ARE AT THE OUTSET, WHAT ONE REFUSES

DONE, HOW PRECISE AND DEFINED ONE’S

ONE AIMS TO DO, WHAT ONE ALLOWS TO BE

WHAT ONE CAN DO, WHAT ONE DOES , WHAT

BARNABY DRABBLE: ON DE-ORGANISATION

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IF YOU DO A BIENNALE, IT HAS TO CHANGE SOMETHING.

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MASSIMILIANO FUKSAS

A similar strategy was used at the interdisciplinary exhibition This Is Tomorrow, Bergdoll proposed the exhibition Rising Currents: Projects for New York’s Waterf ront, where architects, landscape architects, engineers, ecologists, and artists joined together in 5 teams to propose projects for the reinvention of urban inf rastructure of Manhattan’s coastline to later on display the projects in the exhibition. 80 Rising Currents arises when Nordenson presented Bergdoll a data-study made after hurricane katrina, at f irst Bergdoll was not very sure how to present this information as architecture, but later on, 81 in collaboration with MOMA PS1, he thought of making the MOMA studio space , previously reserved for artists, available to architects and designers for the f irst time. This way the space will behave as a workshop-laboratory of

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ideas to develop urban responses with the data-study brought by Nordenson. 82 The newly available space became, for an intense eight weeks, the residence studio of the f ive teams and a design studio critic they had weekly reviews by the curator and other invited guest to discuss and help them shaped their projects. Bergdoll believed a new role for a curator emerged by this process, one with “elements of handmaiden, studio critic, and convener for both the public and political agencies. With the Rising Currents workshop, the museum served as the incubator rather than the mirror of new ideas”, 83

the curator consulted multiple experts f rom a diverse range of disciplines and geographical contexts to gain accurate and pertinent information to produce real results. Among the consulted institutions and experts were; Rockefeller Foundation for funds, with hydrologists, Delta Works in the Netherlands, Thames Barrier in London and also with the residents of the chosen areas, 84 The ideas presented at the exhibition were not taken for granted, for New York City Department of City planning in 2011 develop planning documents based on the visits and information generated by the Rising Currents.

founded in 2009 by the architect and curator Felicity Scott Brown “Masters of Science in Critical, Curatorial, and Conceptual Practices in Architecture” (CCCP) with the aim to produce a research and experimental space in the academy to shed light on the ways architecture can be published, exhibited,written about, investigated through - as the name of the masters indicates, Critical, Curatorial, and Conceptual Practices. Curating Architecture is now a practice of its own.

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Moreover, the mediation role was fundamental in the process of curating the exhibition since it was proposed as generator for future urban solutions. Therefore,

Also, in New york, at the Columbia University in the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP), the f irst master in curating architecture is

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The currents 2010-Now SENSITIVE

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Formal, academical and critical texts started to emerge, as LOG 20: Curating Architecture by Davidson. Log 20 addresses the theme when no one seems to want to seriously talk about it. Curating architecture by itself started to become a subject of interest and more universities started to open up courses and masters regarding the theme. 88

LOG 20: Curating Architecture

Curating architecture in many cases is not merely to present certain projects nor architects, but a platform for experimentation and to engage with emerging and urgent topics. Curating has to do more with collaborative work, mediation, research rather than just the single curator. For long the role of the curator had to do with a guardian, of selection and exclusion in order to decide how certains topics or objects will go in the exhibition. 86

However, the curator has different roles to play in curating architecture, as Bergdoll has said, it acts as a communicator, producer, organizer, educator, responsible for publishing, editing, public appearances, f u n d r a i s i n g , lectures, and so on. 87

The graduate School of Architecture at Harvard University created a week long workshop named Curating Architecture in 2013 lead by Gaspar Libedinsky to “study experiences, themes and mechanisms of curatorial projects for Art and Architecture Biennials worldwide”. 80 Another university that joined was MIT university with the workshop Curating Architecture: On Exhibiting, Research and Criticism of Architecture in 2015 led by the critic and curator Ana Miljacki with a different approach than Harvard university but in a more similar fashion to GSAPP. Miljacki’s workshop was oriented towards the historical, political conditions in which certain exhibitions were conceived.90 In 2012, a group of students f rom the CCCP master’s program at Columbia University, created by the second student-initiated series of conferences entitled Interpretations: Promiscuous

Promiscuous Encounters was a series of “conversations which acted as tools to illustrate and recount ideas on architecture” 93 rather than presenting an exhibition. The conference was organized by a group of curators, Francisco Díaz, Nina Valerie Kolowratnik, Marcelo LópezDinardi, Marina Otero-Verzier, who questioned how alternative encounters produce different ways of producing images, works, dialogs; how the fluidity of f ields allows new models of communication, exchanges, recepcion or perhaps interruptions in architecture. 94 “Does this promiscuity lead to the opening of a new type of discipline? Do you consider yourself to be part of a new discipline?” 95 The curators organized the daylong event in two sessions: f irstly, each guest made a 10-minute presentation and secondly a lively-open discussion was made. The discussion was f ramed in four areas, promiscuity, specialization, productivity and audience. It is important to mark the rule of the game used by the students, which consisted in the prohibition of any kind of audio-video recording of the conference but encouraging alternatives ways to record it, such as twitter with the hashtag #pe_ gsapp or drawings, notes, etc. These reflections were selected to become part of the conference book, with the intention of addressing how architecture is being published, by whom, and Encounters91 with the aime of how the book was the only vehicle interrogating the curatorial, critical of reproduction of promiscuous and conceptual practice in encounters. 96 97 architecture in relation with two main topics: The f irst, how the blurriness of disciplinary boundaries. intersect and overlap and secondly, to redef ined the terms Critical, Curatorial, and Conceptual means in relation to theory and modes of operation.92


The 14th Venice Biennale of Architecture in 2014, curated by the architect Rem Koolhaas called Fundamentals, unlike the previous editions Fundamentals attention is to architecture history by creating a genealogy to f ind key elements that have play out in how architecture has come to its actual state and then to be able to speculate on how it could be in the future. 98 Consisting of three interconnected exhibitions: Elements of Architecture in the Central Pavilion looking at the past; Monditalia in the Arsenale looking at the present in Italy; and Absorbing Modernity: 1914-2014 in the National Pavilions to look at the future.99

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Exhibition Elements of architecture

Exhibition Elements of architecture This edition set a new series of precedents in the curatorial strategies for the architecture biennales, starting with the exhibition Elements of architecture whose common language was opted so the general public could rapidly understand the exhibition; As Koolhaas stated “Architecture, not architects…” 100 Elements did not present any architecture f igures nor projects of architecture instead it decide to present the historical evolution of elements and in consequence architecture.101 Elements was a 2 year-long research with AMO and in collaboration with the students of the International studio taught by Koolhaas in Harvard Graduate School of Design, to trace the history of elements in architecture universally present and by this “fundamentals will avoid the Eurocentrism that still characterises architectural discourse.” 1

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Pavilion, Monditalia


Pavilion, Monditalia conceptual image Absorbing Modernity: 1914-2014. 44

Moreover, the second pavilion of fundamentals was, Monditalia which was dedicated to a single theme, the state of Italy. What is most remarkable about this exhibition is that for the f irst time the Biennale of Architecture collaborated with the other Venice biennales and festivals, in which the arsenal was a new stage for dance, music, theatre, and f ilm events.103 Thirdly, for the f irst time the nationals pavilions worked under a single theme proposed and guided by Koolhaas, Absorbing Modernity: 1914-2014. “Each nation will, in its own way, illustrate how their country’s architecture absorbed modernity over the last 100 years.� 104 Is in this biennale that the curators Eva Franch i Gilabert, Ashley Schafer and Ana Miljacki created a base of operations for a new architectural f irm that only existed in that time-space. For instance, the response for USA pavilion was an off ice for research, where not only the curators contribute with information, but it was an open format to anyone, anywhere that could collaborate during the time of the exhibition.105

14th Venice Biennale of Architecture Publication of the exhibition Elements of Architecture

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46 47

Photo by: Johannas Schwartz / The other architect at Canadian Centre for Architecture, MontrĂŠal, Canada


The other architect publication.

Another research-centered exhibition was, The Other Architect, curated by Giovanna Borasi in 2015 at the Canadian Center of Architecture, investigated more than 20 multidisciplinary groups and collectives that opted for new models of processes, methodologies, ways of communication outside the traditional architecture practice.106 Here architecture no longer is conceived as a result of a constructed form but as a way of thinking, “observing, and analyzing the present, asking questions while marking a new territory” which broads the architects role and therefore its contribution to society.107

The other architect exhibition website Screenshot

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The exhibition demonstrated by means of case studies that architecture is not a “static form of knowledge,” 108 but a dialogue, a

discussion, a testing of ideas, that it can take other forms as surveys, databases, publications, research reports and so on.109 For that reason, the curator decided on displaying the groups through their processes and methodology, through their conversations by showing their letters, budgets, photographs, videos, mails, drawings, books, meeting minutes, organization schemes, and so forth.110 As a research project, the contribution of the exhibition the other architect, was all the useful information they collected functions as an archive for the expanded role of the architect.111 The Other Architect is a new way of sharing knowledge, a display of ideas, an investigation of what architecture is and what it could be in the future.112

In summary, curating architecture has expanded its formats, topics and methods throughout history, showing at the same time that the concept of architecture has also undergone a transformation in order to conceive and manage each curatorial project. Since 1932 Modern Architecture: International Style Exhibition promoted how architecture should be displayed; architecture models on pedestals, plans and photographs as if they were paintings and clearly labelling each. Two years later, in 1934, the important exhibition Machine Art was held. Its importance relied on the audience’s active role at the exhibition and the collaboration with manufacturers, companies and laboratories instead of other architects and artists. Indeed, collaboration and mediation started to become a relevant part of the vocabulary and method of

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work in the architectural curating practice, with exhibitions like This is Tomorrow in 1956 in London. Henceforth/Since 1990, architecture stopped being strictly bound to its traditional role, and the production of curatorial works shifted to other formats not necessarily bound to end in exhibition making. As abovementioned, the 10 conferences by Anyone corporation addressed exactly the non-specif icity of architecture with the theme undecidability, which means ANY - anyone, anywhere, anybody, anymore, anyplace, anything, anyhow, anytime, anyway, anywise. Additionally, AMO in 1999, also approached architecture as something more than a physical object but as a virtual tool and way of thinking for the production of projects and understanding of its social contexts.

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Massimiliano Fuksas for the 7th Venice Biennale of Architecture: Less Aesthetic, More Ethic; introduced urbanism for the f irst time as discussion topic in a biennale. In his exhibition no physical materials were displayed, which was a new way of representing architecture. Equally important was his introduction of the virtual world a as a new tool of communicating with the public. Websites. 2010 was a year curating architecture became a f ield of its own and a f ield to research about. The f irst master’s program was created: Masters of Science in Critical, Curatorial, and Conceptual Practices in Architecture” (CCCP). Curating architecture,therefore, was f inally conceived as form of research and as the main “object”. It is now shaped as a flexible and hybrid practice, having research and collaboration as key elements.

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FOOTNOTE CHAPTER 2

1

Ngo, Anh-Linh. «Release Architecture: Incidental Space» Arch + : Journal for Architecture and Urbanism, no. 51. May, 2016: 13.

2

Mocadvideo. «The Architectural Imagination with Curator Cynthia Davidson.» Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit - MOCAD. March 24, 2017. Accessed January, 2018. https:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcBaFEdqZK8.

3

Lakoff, George. No pienses en un elefante: lenguaje y debate político. Madrid: Península, 2017.

4

Jaque, Andrés. «Architecture is Critically Empowered Daily Life.» In Promiscuous encounters, by Francisco Díaz, Nina Valerie Kolowratnik, Marcelo López-Dinardi, Marina

5

Otero Verzier, and Keller Easterling, 89-90. New York, NY: GSAPP BOOKS, 2014.

6

Referring to STS, Science, Technology and Society as a f ield devoted to the studies of science and society. Agents refers not just human subjects but technologies, f ictions, ideologies

7

Jaque, Andrés. «Architecture is Critically Empowered Daily Life.» In Promiscuous encounters, by Francisco Díaz, Nina Valerie Kolowratnik, Marcelo López-Dinardi, Marina

8

Otero Verzier, and Keller Easterling, 89-90. New York, NY: GSAPP BOOKS, 2014.

9

Modern Architecture: International Style Exhibition curated by Philip Johnson and Henry-Russell Hitchcock in 1932,

10

Ngo, Anh-Linh. «Release Architecture: Incidental Space» Arch + : Journal for Architecture and Urbanism, no. 51. May, 2016: 13

17

«Worldwide Storef ront .» World Wide Storef ront: Home. 2014. Accessed November 2017. http://www.wwstoref ront.org/index.html#4.

18

The titles on each chapter were selected and adapted based on curatorial books that inferred what the chapter will be about. “A brief history on curating by the art curator Hans-Ulrich Obrist, in 2008” - “Reporting From the Front, curated by Alejandro Aravena in 2016 for the 15th International Architecture Exhibition, titled, ” - “Beyond borders Storef ront for Art and Architecture 2016 spring benef it event.” «Worldwide Storef ront .» World Wide Storef ront: Home. 2014. Accessed November 2017. http://www.wwstoref ront.org/index.html#4.

19

Hugill, Alison, and Carson Chan. «Curating Architecture: The Architecture of Estrangement.» On Curating. Accessed August, 2017. http://www.on-curating.org/issue31-reader/curating-architecture-the-architecture-of-estrangement.html#.WleNTCsoEc.

20

Borasi, Giovanna. The Other Architect. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015.

21

Ibidem

22

Ryan, Zoë, and Paola Antonelli. As seen: exhibitions that made architecture and design history. Chicago, IL: The Art Institute of Chicago, 2017: 13.

23

Ibidem

24

Miljacki, Ana. «Curating Architecture: On Exhibiting, Research and Criticism of Architecture.» Mit Architecture. Accessed November, 2017. https://architecture.mit.edu/ subject/spring-2015-4s23-0.

25

Ryan, Zoë, and Paola Antonelli. As seen: exhibitions that made architecture and design history. Chicago, IL: The Art Institute of Chicago, 2017: 15.

26

Ibidem

27

Ryan, Zoë, and Paola Antonelli. As seen: exhibitions that made architecture and design history. Chicago, IL: The Art Institute of Chicago, 2017: 17.

28

Bergdoll, Barry. “In the Wake of Rising Currents: The Activist Exhibition”. Log, no. 20. New York, USA: Anyone Corporation, 2010: 160

29

Ryan, Zoë, and Paola Antonelli. As seen: exhibitions that made architecture and design history. Chicago, IL: The Art Institute of Chicago, 2017: 17.

11

Borasi, Giovanna. The Other Architect. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015.

12

Lind, Maria. Curating research. London: Open Editions, 2015: 14.

13

Kolowratnik, Nina Valerie and Miessen, Markus. «A-disciplinary Interference» In Promiscuous encounters, by Francisco Díaz, Nina Valerie Kolowratnik, Marcelo LópezDinardi, Marina Otero Verzier, and Keller Easterling, 89-90. New York, NY: GSAPP BOOKS, 2014.

30

Bergdoll, Barry. “In the Wake of Rising Currents: The Activist Exhibition”. Log, no. 20. New York, USA: Anyone Corporation, 2010: 160.

31

Ibidem

14

Tranzit.hu. “curatorial dictionary: unpacking the oxymoron.» In Curating research, by Paul O’Neill and Mick Wilson, London: Open Editions, 2015: 234-241.

32

Ryan, Zoë, and Paola Antonelli. As seen: exhibitions that made architecture and design history. Chicago, IL: The Art Institute of Chicago, 2017: 18.

15

The chief curator at Storef ront. “EVA FRANCH I GILABERT - Mentor Minds.” Mentor Minds, 18 Aug. 2015, vimeo.com/136667878.

33

Ibidem

16

Kolowratnik, Nina Valerie and Miessen, Markus. «A-disciplinary Interference» In Promiscuous encounters, by Francisco Díaz, Nina Valerie Kolowratnik, Marcelo LópezDinardi, Marina Otero Verzier, and Keller Easterling, 89-90. New York, NY: GSAPP BOOKS, 2014.

34

Mocadvideo. «The Architectural Imagination with Curator Cynthia Davidson.» Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit - MOCAD. March 24, 2017. Accessed January, 2018. https:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcBaFEdqZK8.

52

53


35

Ryan, Zoë, and Paola Antonelli. As seen: exhibitions that made architecture and design history. Chicago, IL: The Art Institute of Chicago, 2017: 18.

55

Hollein, Hans. “Hollein vs. Biennale. Biennale vs. Fuksas.” Domus, 29 Sept. 2004. Accessed Nov. 2017.

36

Colomina, Beatriz. «Enclosed by Images: The Eameses’ Multimedia Architecture.» Grey Room, no. 2 (2001): 7. Accessed December, 2018. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1262540.

56

www.domusweb.it/en/architecture/2004/09/29/hollein-vs-biennale-biennale-vs-fuksas. html.

37

Johnson, Philip. Machine art Catalogue. NY: The Museum of Modern Art, 1934: 18.

57

38

Bergdoll, Barry. “In the Wake of Rising Currents: The Activist Exhibition”. Log, no. 20. New York, USA: Anyone Corporation, 2010: 160.

Molinari , Luca. “Architecture...More or Less.” Superexpotion, no. 330, 2000, pp. 54–55., www.larchitecturedaujourdhui.f r/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/VENISE-UK-ENTIER. pdf.

39

Barr Jr., Alf red. Machine art Catalogue. NY: The Museum of Modern Art, 1934: 19.

58

Lavin, Sylvia. «Showing Work.» Log, no. 20 (2010): 5-10.

40

Barr Jr., Alf red.. Machine art Catalogue. NY: The Museum of Modern Art, 1934: 19-21.

59

41

Ryan, Zoë, and Paola Antonelli. As seen: exhibitions that made architecture and design history. Chicago, IL: The Art Institute of Chicago, 2017: 18.

Fuksas , Massimiliano. “Hollein vs. Biennale. Biennale vs. Fuksas.” Domus, 29 Sept. 2004. Accessed Nov. 2017. www.domusweb.it/en/architecture/2004/09/29/hollein-vsbiennale-biennale-vs-fuksas.html.

60

Anyone Corporation. The Other Architect. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015: 337.

42

Johnson, Philip. Machine art Catalogue. NY: The Museum of Modern Art, 1934: 12-16.

61

Fischer, Ole W. The Other Architect. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015: 408.

43

“This Is Tomorrow.” Whitechapel Gallery, Accessed whitechapelgallery.org/exhibitions/this-is-tomorrow/

www.

62

Davidson, Cynthia. “About.” Anyone Corporation, anycorp.com/any-publications/about/

44

McSherry, Siof ra. “Whitechapel Gallery Retrospective of Its Exhibition ‘This Is Tomorrow’.”Thisistomorrow, 23 Sept. 2010, thisistomorrow.info/articles/whitechapelgallery-retrospective-of-its-exhibition-this-is-tomorrow.

63

Borasi, Giovanna. The Other Architect. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015.

64

Latour, Bruno. Reensamblar lo social una introducción a la teoría del actor-red. Buenos Aires: Manantial, 2008.

65

Anyone Corporation. The Other Architect. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015: 34

66

AMO. The Other Architect. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015: 46.

67

Mocadvideo. «The Architectural Imagination with Curator Cynthia Davidson.» Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit - MOCAD. March 24, 2017. Accessed January, 2018. https:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcBaFEdqZK8.

68

Ota, Kayoko. «Curating as Architectural Practice.» Log, no. 20 (2010): 141.

69

Levy, Aaron, and William Menking. Architecture on display: on the history of the Venice biennale of architecture. London: Architectural Association, 2010: 80.

70

Molinari , Luca. “Architecture...More or Less.” Superexpotion, no. 330, 2000, pp. 54. www. larchitecturedaujourdhui.f r/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/VENISE-UK-ENTIER.pdf.

November,

2017.

45

Smithson , Alison, and Peter Smithson . “The ‘As Found’ and the ‘Found’ .” The Independent Group: Postwar Britain and the Aesthetics of Plenty, MIT Press, 1990, p: 200.

46

Banham, Reyner. “Whitechapel Gallery Retrospective of Its Exhibition This Is Tomorrow” Thisistomorrow, 23 Sept. 2010, thisistomorrow.info/articles/whitechapel-galleryretrospective-of-its-exhibition-this-is-tomorrow.

47

Smithson , Alison, and Peter Smithson . “The ‘As Found’ and the ‘Found’ .” The Independent Group: Postwar Britain and the Aesthetics of Plenty, MIT Press, 1990, p: 200.

48

Simms, Gretchen. The 1959 American national exhibition in Moscow and the Soviet artistic reaction to the abstract art. PhD diss., Wien, Univ., Diss, 2007: 5. Colomina, Beatriz. «Enclosed by Images: The Eameses’ Multimedia Architecture.» Grey Room, no. 2 (2001): 3. Accessed December, 2018. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1262540.

Accessed September, 2017. www.

49

Ibidem

71

Ibidem

50

Ibidem page 4.

72

51

Borasi, Giovanna. The Other Architect. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015.

Fuksas , Massimiliano. Architecture on display: on the history of the Venice biennale of architecture. London: Architectural Association, 2010: 82.

52

Colomina, Beatriz. «Enclosed by Images: The Eameses’ Multimedia Architecture.» Grey Room, no. 2 (2001): 5. Accessed December, 2018. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1262540.

73

Levy, Aaron, and William Menking. Architecture on display: on the history of the Venice biennale of architecture. London: Architectural Association, 2010: 83.

74

Ibidem

75

Molinari , Luca. “Architecture...More or Less.” Superexpotion, no. 330, 2000, pp. 54. www.larchitecturedaujourdhui.f r/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/VENISE-UK-ENTIER. pdf.

53

Ibidem

54

Director. Cynthia Davidson, Shumon Basar - Editing vs. Curating.AASchoolArchitecture, YouTube - 4 Sept. 2015, Accessed July, 2017. www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7D5-FO jfWA.

54

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76

Borasi, Giovanna. The Other Architect. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015.

95

77

Fuksas , Massimiliano. Architecture on display: on the history of the Venice biennale of architecture. London: Architectural Association, 2010: 83.

Koolhaas, Rem. Proposal: Fundamentals. 14th International Architecture Exhibition Venice 2014: 7.

96

78

Bergdoll, Barry. “In the Wake of Rising Currents: The Activist Exhibition”. Log, no. 20. New York, USA: Anyone Corporation, 2010: 159.

OMA. “Venice Biennale 2014: Fundamentals.” OMA, 2014, oma.eu/projects/venicebiennale-2014-fundamentals.

97

Koolhaas, Rem. Proposal: Fundamentals. 14th International Architecture Exhibition Venice 2014: 6.

98

Paolo , Baratta. “Latest Details Released on Koolhaas’ Venice Biennale 2014 ‘Fundamentals.’” ArchDaily, 11 Mar. 2014, www.archdaily.com/484728/latest-detailsreleased-on-koolhaas-venice-biennale-2014-fundamentals.

99

Koolhaas, Rem. Proposal: Fundamentals. 14th International Architecture Exhibition Venice 2014: 9.

79 80 81 82 83 84 85

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87

88

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Lowry, Glenn D. Rising Currents. Museum of Modern Art, 2011: 7. Bergdoll, Barry. “In the Wake of Rising Currents: The Activist Exhibition”. Log, no. 20. New York, USA: Anyone Corporation, 2010: 162. Lowry, Glenn D. Rising Currents. Museum of Modern Art, 2011: 7. Bergdoll, Barry. “In the Wake of Rising Currents: The Activist Exhibition”. Log, no. 20. New York, USA: Anyone Corporation, 2010: 162-163 Lowry, Glenn D. Rising Currents. Museum of Modern Art, 2011: 7. Ibidem Director. Cynthia Davidson, Shumon Basar - Editing vs. Curating.AASchoolArchitecture, YouTube - 4 Sept. 2015, Accessed July, 2017. www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7D5-FO jfWA. George, Adrian. The Curator’s Handbook: Museums, Commercial Galleries, Independent Spaces. Thames and Hudson, 2016: 2. Director. Cynthia Davidson, Shumon Basar - Editing vs. Curating.AASchoolArchitecture, YouTube - 4 Sept. 2015, Accessed July, 2017. www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7D5-FO jfWA. Director. Cynthia Davidson, Shumon Basar - Editing vs. Curating.AASchoolArchitecture, YouTube - 4 Sept. 2015, Accessed July, 2017. www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7D5-FO jfWA. Miljacki, Ana. “Curating Architecture: On Exhibiting, Research and Criticism of Architecture.”Mit Architecture, 2015, Accessed November, 2017. www.architecture.mit. edu/subject/spring-2015-4s23-0. Scott, felicity, et al. Promiscuous Encounters. GSAPP BOOKS, 2014: 9. López-Dinardi, Marcelo. Promiscuous Encounters. GSAPP BOOKS, 2014: 11.

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“Interview with Giovanna Borasi.” The Other Architect, Het Nieuwe Instituut, Sept. 2017. Accessed January, 2018. www.theotherarchitect.hetnieuweinstituut.nl/en/home.

91

López-Dinardi, Marcelo. Promiscuous Encounters. GSAPP BOOKS, 2014: 11.

92

Díaz, Francisco. Promiscuous Encounters. GSAPP BOOKS, 2014: 12.

93

Ibidem

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Speakers: Felicity Scott, curator, educator, architect / Keller easterling: architect, writer and professor in yale university Andrés Jaque: Architect and researcher in madrid / Reinhold Martin: Architect - historian / Markus Miessen: Architect and writer in berlin / Mitch McEwen: unlicensed architect, curator / Pelin Tan: Sociology / Rodrigo tisi: architecture, art performance, teaching, curator.

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100 Koolhaas, Rem. Proposal: Fundamentals. 14th International Architecture Exhibition Venice 2014: 12. 101

Ibidem. page 9.

102

www.off iceus.org/

103

“Interview with Giovanna Borasi.” The Other Architect, Het Nieuwe Instituut, Sept. 2017. Accessed January, 2018. www.theotherarchitect.hetnieuweinstituut.nl/en/home.

104 Borasi, Giovanna. The Other Architect. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015: 362. 105

Ibidem. page 363.

106 Ibidem 107

“The Other Architect” Colombia GSAPP, Colombia University, September. 2016. Accessed January, 2018. www.arch.columbia.edu/environments/21-arthur-ross-architecturegalleryhttps://www.arch.columbia.edu/exhibitions/37-the-other-architect.

108

Zardini, Mirko. “The Other Architect”, Domus, Accessed January, 2018. www.domusweb. it/en/news/2015/10/30/the_other_architect.html.

109 Borasi, Giovanna.”The Other Architect”. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015: 365.

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3. THE FRONT: STO R E F R O N T FO R A RT & A R C H I T ECTU R E ARCHIVE During the 1980s and the 1990s artists and curators expressed their disappointment113 in the art institutions of the time114 with respect to “issues of marketing and credibility” 115, a disappointment, as Liam Gilliack has pointed out, that ‘takes place within f rameworks that reach out into the social and political sphere’ 116. The conf idence for these institutions were put into question since most of them were funded by political interests which resulted in limitations on how they could operate and the scope of experimentation they were permitted 117 and the urge to work under a more flexible

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environment gave rise to the ‘independent curator’ and the ‘artists-run spaces’, who became more ingenuitive in the way that they ‘organise themselves’.118 The term ‘Self-organised” describes how groups, and other networks of individuals can operate independently from institutional and corporate structures,119 and ‘experiment with alternative models for sustaining themselves’ 120. Noticeably important, the traditional figure of the curator devoted to the conservation of collections and the exhibition maker were still present, therefore, the museum as an art institution had not been abandoned. However, the tight ties that used to hold curating art in the white cube did not exist anymore, the curatorcould move f reely between typologies of projects, spaces and ideas.121

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Street, NY. the gallery original location locally. As Joseph Grima calls it, «a unique space, one of the f irst where the concept of merging art and architecture was addressed and explored by means of radically experimental shows on a shoestring budget.»125

Images from Performance A-Z

It was in this climate that the Architect Kyong Park four years after completing his post-graduate independent program at the Institute of Architecture and Urban Studies, in 1979, decided to found a nonprof it organization based in New York, known as Storef ront for Art & Architecture which aimed to continue his research focused on how the economic, political and cultural borders could influence the contemporary urban territories and its social interactions. Since then Storef ront has functioned as a experimental ground and exhibition space for up-and-coming artists and architects that do not f it into typical commercial line and work alongside the ideology of the gallery. The intentional intersection of architecture, art, and design fostered other formats, and encouraged overlaps and divergences between f ields and

The gallery-community mediation is reflected in how they create happenings to build relationships, “increase their public visibility, share common grounds to develop collaborations and a pedagogic role” for joint projects with their fellow citizens, artists and architects127 by promoting a space for open dialogue and display outside the walls of a gallery and more open the street in order to challenge and discuss issues “f rom new technology to the social and political forces that shape the built environment’.128 The gallery presented on September 18, 1982 its f irst program, Performance A-Z that consisted of a series of 26 consecutive nights of performances by 26 participating artists, performers and musicians.129

Park selected each of the participants and assigned a letter of the alphabet to each to carry out a performance in the gallery space or the nearby sidewalk. All performances started at the same time in evening,,and as part of Storef ront’s ideology, the events were f ree and open to everyone who had the purpose of integrating the community and providing an alternative cultural agenda.130 One of the most extreme pieces of performance art was undertaken by the artist Tehching Hsieh,131 which “consisted of entering his home” 132 after spending one year living outdoors in New York City and avoiding any kind of shelter and lived just with a sleeping bag.133 One Year Performance 19811982 was the only one at another location and a time-based personal experience display not only as art but as architecture,134 as Hsieh stated “I want for people to feel like this is a universal conversation. My work always touches on time and life.” 135 Hsieh work addressed the subject of homelessness and immigration which 3 years later would be part of the ongoing discussion at Storef ront.136

Sylvia Lavin’s description of Frederick Kiesler can be understood as closely paralleling Storef ront for Art & Architecture’s ideology. The following quote illustrates this: “the effects of a storef ront [are] analogous to how weather f ronts are understood today as the plane of negotiation between different atmospheric densities. The storef ront, in other words, was, for Kiesler, an opportunity to produce new kinds of urban happenings that might begin or be catalysed by the plane itself but that have their consequence elsewhere, out there.” 126

Newsletter from Performance A-Z - 1982 62

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Newsletter from the exhibition Homeless at Home: A Public Project, Images and Words about Homelessness - 1985

Newsletter from the Queer Space exhibition - 1994 Since Performance A-Z, Storef ront responded to social affairs in New York City such as the polluted Gowanus Canal ‘83, the previously mentioned homelessness(1985), public housing (1984), Queer Space (1994), all of them mixing art and architecture.137 The 64

independent space provided artists the possibility to create not just exhibition but cultural events, publications, critical dialogue, and in general offered an alternative to the cultural market.138

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A

A

A

STOREFRONT - DIMENSIONS

A

A

A

In 1993 the gallery changed its location to its renowned triangulated exhibition space “situated on the corner of a block that marks the intersection of three distinct neighborhoods: Chinatown, Little Italy and SOHO”.139 As a curatorial project, Storef ront commissioned a collaboration between artist Vito Acconci and architect Steven Holl to redesign the existing façade for the new location.140 Acconci and Holl proposed to blur the boundary between public and private space and to challenge the “symbolic exclusivity of the art world, where only those on the inside belong”, to achieve this idea they

created a series of twelve movable panels arranged in a puzzle-like conf iguration. The panels change vertically and horizontally by means of central pivots that can be locked in a certain position so the gallery façade can expand out on to the sidewalk or dissolve inside generating improbability and multiple ways to adapt to events.142 The flexible conf iguration of the panels allow visitors and guest participants to create their personal experience by choosing where to enter the space and how to interact with it.143

A

A

Storefront Floorplan - Steven Holl

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The expansion of Storefront proframming by Joseph Grima, from 2016 to 2017.

1998 was a critical period for the gallery since its founder Kyong Park left in order to found another project, the International Center for Urban Ecology in Detroit, therefore Storef ront was in a transitional state because its board did not know how to further develop the organization without Park.144 Thus, when they decided to make a call for a new curator, Sarah Herda was selected and came on as Storef ront second director, a task that involved “a lot of deep institutional work” 145 as she has expressed and a expansion of Storef ront Identity and agenda. Turning Storef ront into a cuttingedge forum for architectural and interdisciplinary discussions on the East Coast.” 146 Over the course of eight years, Herda’s works was oriented more to architecture and to address conflictive international political issues such as the exhibitions “A Civilian Occupation: The Politics of Israeli Architecture” 147 and “Architecture and Revolution in Cuba, 1959-1969” which was a topic that still was not openly discussed in the architecture circles.148

As part of the new programme, Herda oversaw 40 exhibitions, built a comprehensive mailing list to broaden the gallery network. Even though she inaugurated the f irst annual benef it gala,149 the typologies of the programme at Storef ront were still consisting on performances and exhibitions as the main venues to display architecture and art.150 In 2006 Herda stepped down at Storef ront to work at the Graham Foundation as their new director.151 Shortly thereafter, the italian based architect, writer and editor Joseph Grima was picked f rom an international search to assumed the role as the third director at the organization f rom 2007 to 2010, despite the fact that at the time he was relatively unknown.152 From 6 exhibitions previously produced by former director in 2006, Grima executed more than 50 events and exhibitions just in 2007,153 due to his impressive tenure he raised both his own and the institution’s visibility and expanded its international programming in both art and architecture.154 For Grima being a director at Storef ront “is more than just producing events that can happen in the space—it includes the online community that takes part in the programming at a distance.” 155 For him the international dialogue that occurs online is as important as the exhibition itself, presenting the idea that curating architecture goes beyond the role of an exhibition maker.156

SO-IL- Installation shrink wrapping in 2015

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The f irst Pop-up event was organized in association with LA Forum for Architecture and Urban Design in the backroom of a “print shop in Hollywood with some room to spare” where they hosted a discussion “centered around the the potential of photography as a tool for investigation and discovery, and as an instrument of archival preservation.” The discussions of the photographies were based on the experiences of the photographers Richard Pare and Frederic Chaubin who extensively documented the current state of 20th century Soviet architecture.

Driven by the idea that architecture blogging and online interactions can “help expand the bounds of architectural discussion” 157 hence influencing the museums, institutions, and higher education, in 2007 the event Postopolis! was proposed. It consisted in a f ive-day conversation about architecture, urbanism, landscape, and design held in New York and L.A. which “fused the informal energy and interdisciplinary approach of the architectural blogosphere”.158 Four bloggers, f rom four different cities, met in person to orchestrate a series of live discussions, interviews, slideshows, panels, talks, and other presentations. 159 So as to initiate discussion in an innovative fashion, Grima, in conjunction with “BLDGBLOG (Los Angeles), City of Sound (London), Inhabitat (New York City), and Subtopia (San

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Francisco)” 160, hosted people who had diverse ways of working, such as “architects, city planners, and urban theorists to military historians, game developers, and materials scientists”,161 thus offering them the opportunity to share their opinions concerning architecture, the web, and related subjects. Accordingly, the Postopolis! event could be regarded as a unique opportunity. To start with, it was the f irst conference of its kind, namely, one centered around blogs and the built environment. Furthermore, this event provided a stage for relevant discussions about the role of architecture blogs. Such discussions are deemed important as bloggers are the ones who are currently changing the way architecture is communicated owing to the medium’s speed and accessibility.162

With the purpose of raising the institution’s prof ile beyond the conf ines of New York City, Grima opted for a more unconventional method by proposing to operate a satellite space in a temporary location that would function only for a short period of time and then disappear.163 “«Pop-Ups avoids the conventional gallery format by temporarily taking over unoccupied spaces in unexpected neighborhoods, to exhibit and discuss pressing topics in art and architecture.” “Storef ront PopUps” became the new program typologie in 2008, which were presented the f irst year at three different locations; Los Angeles Pop Up Storef ront: CCCP, Milan Pop Up Storef ront:: Ring Dome Pavilion, and London Pop Up Storef ront: CPH Experiments.164

GALLERY POPS UP: Works by photographer Frederic Chaubin are on display at the «Storefront for Art and Architecture’s» Los Angeles «Pop-Up Storefront» at 7176 Sunset Blvd. (Crdit: ‘Storefront for Art and Architect’)

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The second version for the event was held in Milan with the collaboration of Abitare magazine at the 2008 Milan Furniture Fair, where they installed the previously presented Ring Dome pavilion at Storef ront Gallery in New York. During the f ive days of the Fair, the pavilion designed by Minsuk Cho/Mass Studies out of 1,500 hula-hoops, included a series of events namely, “100-minute dialogue between Hans Ulrich Obrist, Pierre Paulin and Rem Koolhaas; a day-long dominointerview with 50 participants, starting with Naoto Fukasawa; Gaetano Pesce in conversation with Oliviero Toscani; and a day-long open editorial meeting.” 168 The following Pops Ups events in the same year were in London in June and Yokohama, Japan, in September.169 Additionally, other noteworthy projects by the then director were: f irstly, the introduction of the Film Events with the presentation of Gets Under the Skin, a thesis project curated by Hajnalka Somogyi which showed a “selection of critical responses to the ideas and products of modernist architecture”.170 Secondly, the Storef ront Newsprints 1982-2009 publication which came at the end of Joseph Grima’s threeyear directorship171 collects over 150 of the abovementioned newsletters f rom its early days.172 The publication serves as historical documentation, focused on what could be considered Storef ront’s unintentional program catalogue since 1982 that contains unpublished essays by artists, architects and theorists such as Vito Acconci, Lebbeus Woods, Michael Sorkin, Beatriz Colomina, Michael Webb and Eyal Weizman, among others. 173 Shortly after, in 2010, Joseph Grima announced that he was stepping down as Storef ront director and heading to Italy to work as the editor of Domus Magazine,174 and continue his previous interest in editorial.175 For one of the board members at Storef ront, architect Charles Renf ro, said “Joseph set the bar high. He made the position one that will interest many people worldwide... and want to get an equally ambitious and smart director”.176 The international search for the new director took the organization’s

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board a four-month period, until f inally naming the former Catalan architect, researcher, and teacher, Eva Franch i Gilabert after more than 70 contenders having been vetted.177 Franch proposal for the organization was about the construction of futures, inasmuch as Storef ront is in a period where it could “produce new vectors to shape the future yet again.” 178 Undoubtedly, 2010 represents a new paradigm179 not just for Storefront but also for curating architecture. As the notion of the practice started to expand, more institutions began establishing architecture departments and opening architecture exhibitions. Moreover, the increased publications of academic investigations and writings regarding what it meant to put architecture on display were consolidating curating architecture as a practice in its own right.180 It will have become evident to the reader that whilst change was underway in curating architecture, Franch became the new director at Storefront, a role that represented an opportunity for invention and to introduced more characters in a moment which redefined both the practice and Storefront.181 The multiplicity of roles of the curator and director at the organization required of them to act in the capacity of: facilitator, iconographer and agitator;182 for in doing so they are rendered capable of facilitating and enabling ‘’people to actually express their ideas and to take their projects on; to produce projects that are representative of what I believe Storefront as an alternative institution should be doing, and to simultaneously shake and question the current state of affairs.” 183 Her directorship is characterized by her sense of collectivity which becomes an internal as much as an external condition of her practice. Franch’s approach to directing Storef ront involves inhabiting a tensile balance between individual action and collective engagement, as she said “Before I’m an architect...I’m a citizen of the world.” Hence, her practice could be described as being both distinctly individual and deeply involved in participation.

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We Like America: An Experimental Road Trip of the Spacebuster

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76 77

Cabaret series

Cabaret series


With the aim of generating a space for divergent thinkers and “productive disagreements” 186, the creation of new programs and events at the organization with the intention of producing different modalities of encounters that could unveil new realities was imminent.187 Among the new typologies, the following are worthy of mention: starter projects, Critical Halloween, Instant Architecture Manifesto Marathon, and Storef ront Series.188 These new ongoing conversations and events were not solely held with and hosted

3.2

191

PROGRAMMING

by artist and architects; included also were “anthropologists, philosophers, scientists, politicians, dancers, cooks, f ilmmakers, builders, writers” 189 By so bringing people together to instigate debates and dialogue, “people..who might perhaps be too focused within themselves” come to be part of a larger collective, or come to a more ample “ understanding of their work‘’ and in this way realizing‘’ what they carry as individuals to contribute into the larger whole of society in order to go beyond what we already know” 190

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Since Now From Then Instant Architecture

Instant Architecture

Paella Series

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Aesthetics/Anesthetics Exhibition

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3.3 PEOPLE

NO CURATOR CAN WORK ALONE

The idea portrayed by the media of the curator as a sole actor due to the reputation possessed by certain personalities, is far f rom the reality of the curatorial practice. In truth, the practice is more complex as it involves multiple agents who work in collaboration during the different phases of a curatorial project.The image below exemplif ies how clusters of important museums have an internal network which conf igures these organization. It likewise shows how these internal networks reach out towards other institutions, creating, as it were, an external network. 192 82

Owing to the nature of their tasks, curators, are inherently collaborative creatures.193 Interaction is a chief part of their work as is shown in their communication with other museums, the press and social media, artists, the public, and those who set up the events/exhibitions. Besides these, they also provide lectures, seminars, internships with academic institution, and they also work with fundraising activities. 194

Nevertheless, there are curators which are not tied to one single institution per say, but rather operate on an independent level. (Figure ->)195 depicts the workrelationship exchange among museums which are facilitated by these types of agents. In a sense, they weave together separate institutions, thus forming a greater, and yet abstract, institution which rests upon collaborations mediated by such agents.196

Graph mapping tweets 196 - showing the multiple scales of online interactions.

On a different scale, the working method used in Storef ront elucidates the diverse layers involved in the organization of such events, where the staff, board, participants, and supporters, each with their own subdivision, perform specif ic functions in the process.

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3.3.1 STAFF The staff represents the curatorial team at Storef ront. Beside the chief curator they include other sorts of curators and positions that work under specif ics tasks as,for instance, archive curators, f ilm curators, new media curators, literary curators, and temporary curators, to name a few.

As Eva Franch’s previous position was directing the master thesis studios at rice university, she believes that by guiding the Storef ront team, artists, temporary curators and other agents - by means of looking, listening, and then starting a conversation.the said groups of people might

more easily formalize their ideas. Accordingly, this formalization is one of their key roles.198 But how can curators go about helping others give a more welldef ined form to their ideas? This could sometimes be done “as a good f riend, ‘hey why didn’t you do it there or move it there?” 199 Such a casual approach is rooted in her belief that the most important role as a curator today is to be able to have a inf inite conversations200 and make connections. Franch is not alone in this notion; for in Ulrich’s experience nearly

everything he has done “was born out of conversation” 201 which, as he further states, creates “a fertile soil for future projects.” 202 Among Franch’s recent curatorial projects we can name Letters to the Mayor; Storef ront series; the Competition of Competitions; Storef ront TV; Off iceUS; and Manifesto, a new publication series. Recent exhibitions include Sharing Models; Measure; POP: Protocols, Obsessions, Positions; AestheticsAnesthetics; Past Futures, Present, Futures; No Shame: Storef ront for Sale; and Being. 203

ASSOCIATE CURATOR: CARLOS MÍNGUEZ CARRASCO Architect and curator Carlos Minguez Carrasco, based in New York, is best known for his work as Chief Curator with the After Belonging Agency for the Oslo Architecture Triennale. In 2012, after graduating f rom the Masters of Science in Critical, Curatorial,

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Jinny is a communications and development professional with extensive experience in events and marketing, as well as knowledge of a broad range of topics connecting architecture and design to societal issues. At Storef ront, she develops and implements funding strategies, communications, and outreach to sustain and expand the organization’s dynamic programming locally and globally. 206

A strategic developer, Khanduja takes charge of development efforts and ensures Storef ront has the f inancial capacity to meet its core mission and evolving goals. Moreover, she is responsible for planning, developing, organizing, and directing all Storef ront fundraising activity; this responsibility includes special events, and the benef it event.

Successful f inancing also entails working closely with the Board, Chief C Director, and other staff to develop and articulate the strategic direction of the gallery, and to implement the resulting strategies and initiatives. 207

ASSOCIATE CURATOR OF ARCHIVES AND GLOBAL NETWORKS: CHIALIN CHOU

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND CHIEF CURATOR: EVA FRANCH I GILABERT The chief curator’s role is not only curating exhibitions and events but also coordinating and guiding the whole team to ensure that all proposed projects and ideas maintain the ideology of the organization.

DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT: JINNY KHANDUJA

and Conceptual Practices in Architecture (CCCP) at Columbia University, he joined Storef ront as the associate curator. 204 At Storef ront, he has organized a wide range of exhibitions, events and competitions including BEING, Storef ront’s 30th

Anniversary exhibition, Letters to the Mayor, and the platform World Wide Storef ront. His work has been exhibited and published in different journals as Domus and Código, and he is editor of two forthcoming publications Off iceUS Manual. 205

Chialin Chou is an architect and design curator that focuses on the intersection of archival and digital media. She joined Storef ront as a Curatorial Fellow for the 2012 exhibition Past Futures, Present, Futures. Subsequently she became the Associate Curator of Archives and Global Networks. 208

As Archivist at Storef ront, she oversees the archive’s general operation, detailed archival processing and mediate with the diverse partners and their interests in order to achieve a common objective. 209 With the support f rom the New York State Archives and the Council on Library and

Information Resources, Chou established the Storef ront Archive in 2015 to preserve and process the archive for public access. 210 She describes her work as being “informed by contemporary curatorial and design practices that integrate art, architecture and technology.” 211

GALLERY MANAGER AND PROGRAMS PRODUCER: MAX LAUTER Max is an artist and curator focused on the relationship between technology and culture “to promote alternative spaces for public engagement and collaborative creation”. 212 His role in the gallery is to produce programs to “facilitate narrative development, media production,

and technology integration across institutional structures and programming to promote broader reach and productivity.” 213 He also design, going invited

manages “the production, and installation of onexhibition cycles with artists, architects, and

curators; facilitates all on-site and cloud technology, multimedia integration into all projects and programs; Prepares and facilitate live and studio-based public programs with invited hosts and participants; Facilitate curatorial projects and research...” 214 and so forth.

DEVELOPMENT AND OUTREACH ASSOCIATE: ANDREW EMMET Andrew joined Storef ront in 2016, and is involved in all aspects of outreach, communications, membership, event coordination, and development and fundraising efforts. He has extensive experience in the events and hospitality industries, most recently with Union Square Hospitality Group at the Whitney Museum of American Art. 215

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INTERNS BOARD OF DIRECTORS

KATE CHEN LAFINA EPTAMINITAKI YU-YANG HUANG YUKI HE YUKI ITO IARA PIMENTA

CHARLES RENFRO PRESIDENT

BOARD OF ADVISORS

CAMPBELL HYERS VICE PRESIDENT PHIL BERNSTEIN TREASURER LAUREN KOGOD SECRETARY SETH HARRISON NATASHA JEN AMIT KHURANA NICO KIENZL JAMES VON KLEMPERER MICHAEL MANFREDI THOM MAYNE SARA MELTZER WILLIAM MENKING SARAH NATKINS MARGERY PERLMUTTER LINDA POLLAK ROBERT M. RUBIN AMIE SIEGEL SYLVIA J. SMITH ARTUR WALTHER

DIRECTOR’S COUNCIL

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KYONG PARK FOUNDER SHIRIN NESHAT SARAH HERDA JOSEPH GRIMA

DIGITAL STRATEGY COMMITTEE GRAPHIC DESIGN LEGAL SERVICES

BARRY BERGDOLL STEFANO BOERI JEAN LOUIS COHEN BEATRIZ COLOMINA PETER COOK CHRIS DERCON ELIZABETH DILLER ANDREW FIERBERG BELMONT FREEMAN CLAUDIA GOULD DAN GRAHAM PETER GUGGENHEIMER RICHARD HAAS BROOKE HODGE STEVEN HOLL STEVEN JOHNSON TOYO ITO MARY JANE JACOB MARY MISS ANTONI MUNTADAS MICHAEL SORKIN BENEDETTA TAGLIABUE FREDERIEKE TAYLOR ANTHONY VIDLERJAMES WINES CAMPBELL HYERS TOBY BOUDREAUX BRIAN JONES DAVID RIFE ROB FALUDI STEVEN SANDERSON DOUGLAS WARSHAW

NATASHA JEN/PENTAGRAM

BRYAN CAVE

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3.3.2 SUPPORTERS

Storef ront identif ies itself as an Independent organization216 since “independence, is representative of the ability to move f reely within the marketplace.” 217 A condition that is made possible by gathering funds f rom sponsorships and special benef it programs that engage people to become a patron of the organization. 218 In this sense, the gallery’s possibility to produce

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projects that are not for sale but rather f ree for the taking - such as experiences, provocative ideas or outside-the-box propositions -219 are dependent on the general support of the public and the private sector, which helps the organization to “continue advocating for more challenging and critical programs”. 220 Storef ront’s supporters represent a long list divided on; Corporate Visionary, Visionary, Action Benefactor, Small Firm, BEYOND Patron, RADICAL + BEYOND, RADICAL Sustainer, ALTERNATIVE Supporter, EMERGING Supporter, and Friend. But also with the support f rom Arup; DS+R; F.J. Sciame Construction Co., Inc.; Gaggenau; KPF; ODA; Roger Ferris + Partners; the Foundation for Contemporary Arts; The Greenwich Collection Ltd.; the Lily Auchincloss Foundation; The Peter T. Joseph Foundation; and by Storef ront’s Board of Directors, members, and individual donors; New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature, as well as with public funds f rom the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. 221

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3.4 MEDIA

STOREFRONT FOR ART AND ARCHITECTURE I @STOREFRONT TOTAL SUBSCRIBERS 62,049 - TOTAL LIKES 62,760 4.6     

@STOREFRONTNYC Art institutions, aside f rom engaging through their exhibitions, events, lectures and publications, use social media as a platform to exchange ideas and communicate future and current projects with their audience. 223 Moreover utilizing social media is a way of seeing what is being shared or commented about the institution and their activities, content,and the like. Social platforms such as twitter, facebook, instagram, linkedin, allow institutions to expand their networks and visibility, and enables them to instantly update and receive information. 224 “Social media is increasingly the space in which public life takes place” 225 and it has become an alternative place for discussions and debates, changing the narrative of political or social issues, and therefore having the capacity to influence how things could be handled or perceived, rather than doing so in the built environment. 226 It could as well be perceived as a fertile ground for conversations by offering an interesting opportunity for curators to connect and produce projects in interactive fashion. Some may say that online platforms are just that, online, virtual, that they are not real space, however, our actions and interactions made in those online mediums can actually be traced back to a real person through multiple algorithms that could gather information on how social media is being used. Apple users, for example, provide their own personal f ingerprint so the“iPhone” reads your f ingerprint

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TWEETS 5,517 - FOLLOWING 1,583 FOLLOWERS 23.2K - LIKES 989 - LISTS 1

HTTPS://VIMEO.COM/USER1877785/VIDEOS

HTTPS://WWW.FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/STOREFRONT

and knows who you are’’ 227 and when logging into a particular application, such as a bank, “the online self becomes authentic”. 228 Bearing the above in mind, for an institution such as Storef ront, having a media presence is of great importance inasmuch as it allows them to operate as an online and open-to-all archive. Additionally, such online presence is a space for continuing conversations and sharing ideas. In the case of Storef ront, they go about this by making use of instagram, facebook, youtube, twitter, flickr and vimeo accounts where they upload current and upcoming projects.

@STOREFRONTNYC POSTS 2,523 - FOLLOWERS 38K

- FOLLOWING 3,879

STOREFRONTTV SUBSCRIBERS 340

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DOES NOT ADAPT TO DIFFERENT DEVICES

STATIC

MENU / STATIC

COMING EVENT

PAST EVENT / IMAGE

PAST EVENT / TEXT WEBSITE COLORS

OVERALL REVIEW WORKS AS AN ARCHIVE UPDATED CONTENT IMPORTANT INFORMATION EASILY LOCATED : SOCIAL NETWORKS, CONTACT AND LOCATION

OUTDATED DESIGN DOES NOT DEMONSTRATE THE GALLERY IDENTITY SPACE NO UX DESIGN WEBSITE DOES NOT REPRESENT THE BRANDING OF STOREFRONT

The design of the website is structured by a grid with four vertical axes that display the most recent events chronologically. Each event is presented with an image and a brief description, the date of publication and in some, the reference is shown. The website is designed under the blog type concept with inf inite scroll, since it seems to have no end, this illusion is due to the fact that while the user goes down on the page, the previous articles continue to appear. At the top of the website the menu can be found, classif ied as follows: The f irst section of the menu is for Programming, which contains all the typologies of the events individually; Secondly, we have the archive which organizes the programming and special announcements chronologically; The third section is dedicated to books that are for sale and a list of curated books by the organization; the fourth one is for general information about Storef ront, f rom a brief history, to the conf iguration of the people that make all the events possible - the staff, the supporters, and the board; and the last section is on action, to get involved in the organization by becoming a supporter, donating, educational partnerships, among others. When the user goes to another section, both the menu and the contact information and logo do not move or change. In each article you can f ind images, links and tags related to the shown program. Regarding the colors, the website is very simple, only using a grayscale tone, color is only used to give importance to the images of each article. Anyone interested in some type of art and architecture can f ind relevant information on this website. However, the website seems to have a few problems in regards to UX design, since it is not a responsible website and can only be seen appropriately through a computer. 229

INFINITE SCROLL - PAST ARCHIVE 94

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INSTAGRAM

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FOOTNOTE CHAPTER 3

108

Drabble, Barnaby. “On De-Organisation”, on Self-Organised. London: Open Editions, 2013: 20.

109 Gilliack, Liam. “The complete curator”, on Curating Research. London: Open Editions, 2015: 25.

126

https: //www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/oct/24/tehching-hsieh-extremeperformance-artist-i-give-you-clues-to-the.

127

Hsieh, Tehching. “One Year Performance 1981-1982”. Accessed January, 2018. http:// www.tehchinghsieh.com/

128

Ibidem

129

Storef ront for Art and Architecture. “Performance A-Z”. Accessed September, 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/programming/performance-a-z/

130

Delaney, Brigid. «Tehching Hsieh, extreme performance artist: I give you clues to the crime | Brigid Delaney.» The Guardian. October 24, 2017. Accessed January, 2018. https: //www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2017/oct/24/tehching-hsieh-extremeperformance-artist-i-give-you-clues-to-the.

134

Storef ront for Art and Architecture. “Performance A-Z”. Accessed September, 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/programming/performance-a-z/

135

Storef ront for Art and Architecture. “Performance A-Z”. Accessed September, 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/programming/performance-a-z/

136

Borasi, Giovanna.”The Other Architect”. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015: 261

137

Holl, Steven. “Storef ront for Art and Architecture” New York, United States 1993. Accessed August, 2017. http://www.stevenholl.com/projects/storef ront-for-art-and-architecture

138

Storef ront for Art and Architecture | About Storef ront, http://www.storef rontnews.org/ general-info/about-storef ront/

139

Holl, Steven. “Storef ront for Art and Architecture” New York, United States 1993. Accessed August, 2017. http://www.stevenholl.com/projects/storef ront-for-art-and-architecture

140

Ibidem

141

Storef ront for Art and Architecture | About Storef ront, http://www.storef rontnews.org/ general-info/about-storef ront/

142

Kats, Anna. The Woman Making Chicago America’s Architectural Epicenter (Again).» Metropolis. March 14, 2017. Accessed January, 2018. http://www.metropolismag.com/ ideas/arts-culture/sarah-herda-chicago-america-architecture-epicenter/.

143

Ibidem

144

Ibidem

145

Storef ront for Art and Architecture. «Archive: 2000s”. Accessed July, 2017. storef rontnews.org/archive/2000s/)

146

Kats, Anna. The Woman Making Chicago America’s Architectural Epicenter (Again).» Metropolis. March 14, 2017. Accessed January, 2018.

147

Ibidem

148

Storef ront for Art and Architecture. «Archive”. Accessed July, 2017. http://storef rontnews. org/archive/2000s/)

110 Ibidem 111

Fernández López, Olga. “What if an institution was curated? Intermediae as an institutional hypothesis”, on Curating Research. London: Open Editions, 2015: 92.

112 Hebert, Stine & Szefer Karlsen, Anne. “Self-Organised”. London: Open Editions, 2013 113 David Blamey. “Self-Organised”. London: Open Editions, 2013: 11. 114 Pryde-Jarman. “Curating the Artist-run Space: Exploring strategies for a critical curatorial practice”. PhD Thesis. Coventry University , 2013: 20. 115 Smith, Terry. Thinking contemporary curating. New York, NY: Independent Curators International, 2013: 19. 116 «Kyong Park.» Kyong Park | The Visual Arts Department at UC San Diego. Accessed January, 2018. http://visarts.ucsd.edu/faculty/kyong-park. 117 Gurina Puig, Núria. “Commercial galleries and non prof it art spaces: the thin red line”. Accessed January, 2018. http://www.talkinggalleries.com/2013/wp-content/uploads/ Nuria-Gurina-Puig.pdf. 118 Borasi, Giovanna.”The Other Architect”. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015: 261. 119

Pagel, David. «Pop over to Storef ronts L.A. outpost.» Los Angeles Times, 2008. Accessed January, 2018. http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-et-storef ront15apr15story.html.

120 Sylvia Lavin. “Kissing Architecture”. Princeton University Press, 2011: 89. 121 Gurina Puig, Núria. “Commercial galleries and non prof it art spaces: the thin red line”. Accessed January, 2018. http://www.talkinggalleries.com/2013/wp-content/uploads/ Nuria-Gurina-Puig.pdf 122 Storef ront for Art and Architecture | About Storef ront, storef rontnews.org/general-info/ about-storef ront/. 123 Ibidem 124 Storef ront for Art and Architecture. “Performance A-Z”. Accessed September, 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/programming/performance-a-z/ 125 Delaney, Brigid. «Tehching Hsieh, extreme performance artist: I give you clues to the crime | Brigid Delaney.» The Guardian. October 24, 2017. Accessed January, 2018. 98

99

http://


149

Volner, Ian. «AD Innovators: Joseph Grimes and Sarah Herda.» Architectural Digest. October 07, 2015. Accessed January, 2018. https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/ joseph-grima-sarah-herda-ad-innovators-2015-article.

150

Zeiger, Mimi.”Storef ront for Art and Architecture Director Grima Stepping Down” Architectmagazine.com. Accessed December, 2018. http://www.architectmagazine. com/design/storef ront-for-art-and-architecture-director-grima-stepping-down_o.

151

Storef ront for Art and Architecture. «Archive: 2000s”. Accessed July, 2017. storef rontnews.org/archive/2000s/)

152

Einsohn, Gabriel. “New Museum Appoints Joseph Grima as Director of IDEAS CITY”. newmuseum.org. Accessed December, 2018. https://235bowery.s3.amazonaws.com/ pressreleases/84/2014.10.24_IDEASCITY_DIRECTOR_PRESSRELEASE_V8.pdf

153

Ibidem

154

«Postopolis» Storef ront for Art and Architecture | Archive: 2007: Postopolis! Accessed November, 2018. http://storef rontnews.org/archive/2000s/2007/postopolis/.

155

Ibidem

156

«Postopolis» Storef ront for Art and Architecture | Archive: 2007: Postopolis! Accessed November, 2018. http://storef rontnews.org/archive/2000s/2007/postopolis/.

158

Ibidem

159

Ibidem

160

Fink Shapiro, Gideon. «Meet The Bloggers.» Architectmagazine.com. September 2007. Accessed January, 2018. http://www.architectmagazine.com/design/meet-thebloggers_o?o=2.

http://

161

Ibidem

162

«Pop-up Storef ronts» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. April 2008. Accessed November 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/archive/pop-up-storef ront-los-angelescccp/.

163

«Pop Up Storef ront Los Angeles: CCCP.» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. April 2008. Accessed November 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/archive/pop-up-storef ront-losangeles-cccp/.

164

Pagel, David. «Pop over to ‘Storef ront’s’ L.A. outpost.» Accessed January, 2018. http:// www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-et-storef ront15apr15-story.html.

165

Pop Up Storef ront Los Angeles: CCCP.» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. April 2008. Accessed November 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/archive/pop-up-storef ront-losangeles-cccp/.

169

«Gets Under the Skin.» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. April 2009. Accessed January 2018. http://storef rontnews.org/archive/gets-under-the-skin/

170

Manis, Yasmin. «Book Review: Storef ront Newsprints.» Architecture | Architectural Drawings. March 2010. Accessed November 2017. http://architecturalldrawing.blogspot. com.es/2010/03/book-review-storef ront-newsprints.html

171

«Storef ront Newsprints 1982-2009.» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. 2009. Accessed November 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/book/storef ront-newsprints-1982-2009/

172

Ibidem

173

«Joseph Grima.» Domus Academy. May 19, 2016. Accessed November 2018. http://www. domusacademy.com/en/joseph-grima/

174

Zeiger, Mimi.”Storef ront for Art and Architecture Director Grima Stepping Down” Architectmagazine.com. Accessed December, 2018. http://www.architectmagazine. com/design/storef ront-for-art-and-architecture-director-grima-stepping-down_o.

175

Ibidem

176

Amelar, Sarah. “Newsmaker: Eva Franch I Gilabert” Architectural Record. May, 2010. https://www.architecturalrecord.com/articles/5664-newsmaker-eva-f ranch-igilabert?v=preview

177

Franch I Gilabert, Eva. “Newsmaker: Eva Franch I Gilabert” Architectural Record. May, 2010. https://www.architecturalrecord.com/articles/5664-newsmaker-eva-f ranch-igilabert?v=preview

178

As previously mentioned in Chapter 1, The currents 2010-Now.

179

Director. Cynthia Davidson, Shumon Basar - Editing vs. Curating.AASchoolArchitecture, YouTube - 4 Sept. 2015, Accessed July, 2017. www.youtube.com/watch?v=H7D5-FO jfWA

180

Franch I Gilabert, Eva. “Newsmaker: Eva Franch I Gilabert” Architectural Record. May, 2010. https://www.architecturalrecord.com/articles/5664-newsmaker-eva-f ranch-igilabert?v=preview

181

“The new architect must step out of himself and into the role of the agitator—an agent not of ideology but of his own personal development. Only then can he produce a public to receive his projects, investors to fund them, and colleagues to instigate at his side. As the agitator of her projects, the architect can no longer act alone.” «Building and Using Restoring architecture’s public.» ARCH 211: Think Global, Build Social!, June 2013: 03.

182

Franch I Gilabert, Eva. «Innovation at the Storef ront: The Practice of Eva Franch i Gilabert.» Interview by Pia Ednie-Brown. Architectural Digest, Jan. & feb. 2013, 35.

183

Ibidem

166

Ibidem

184

Ibidem

167

Pop Up Storef ront Milan: Ring Dome Pavilion.» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. April 2008. Accessed November 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/archive/pop-up/2000s/ pop-up-storef ront-milan-ring-dome-pavilion/.

185

Franch I Gilabert, Eva. “Newsmaker: Eva Franch I Gilabert” Architectural Record. May, 2010. https://www.architecturalrecord.com/articles/5664-newsmaker-eva-f ranch-igilabert?v=preview

168

Pagel, David. «Pop over to ‘Storef ront’s’ L.A. outpost.» Accessed January, 2018. http:// www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-et-storef ront15apr15-story.html.

186

Franch I Gilabert, Eva. «Innovation at the Storef ront: The Practice of Eva Franch i Gilabert.» Interview by Pia Ednie-Brown. Architectural Digest, Jan. & feb. 2013, 36

100

101


9

187 188

189

“Archive: Programming 2010”. Storef ront for Art and Architecture. http://storef rontnews. org/ Franch I Gilabert, Eva. “Newsmaker: Eva Franch I Gilabert” Architectural Record. May, 2010. https://www.architecturalrecord.com/articles/5664-newsmaker-eva-f ranch-igilabert?v=preview Franch I Gilabert, Eva. «Innovation at the Storef ront: The Practice of Eva Franch i Gilabert.» Interview by Pia Ednie-Brown. Architectural Digest, Jan. & feb. 2013, 35. Storef ront for Art and Architecture | About Storef ront, storef rontnews.org/general-info/ about-storef ront/.

190

Lind, Maria. «Why mediate art?» In Ten fundamental questions of curating, by Jens Hoff mann. Milan, Italy: Mousse Publishing, 2013.

191

Whatsapp conversation with Miguel Guzmán

192

George, Adrian. The Curator’s Handbook: Museums, Commercial Galleries, Independent Spaces. Thames and Hudson, 2016.

193

Lind, Maria. «Why mediate art?» In Ten fundamental questions of curating, by Jens Hoff mann. Milan, Italy: Mousse Publishing, 2013.

194

Rogoff, Irit. “The Expanding Field.” The Curatorial, A Philosophy of Curating, Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 201ADAD, p. 41.

195

Lewandowska, Marysia. “Why Mediate Art?” Ten Fundamental Questions of Curating, Mousse Publishing, 2013: 126.

196

Franch I Gilabert, Eva. «Innovation at the Storef ront: The Practice of Eva Franch i Gilabert.» Interview by Pia Ednie-Brown. Architectural Digest, Jan. & feb. 2013, 35.

197

«Interview with Eva Franch I Gilabert.» Interview by Vikkie Chen and Eva Franch I Gilabert. Curating Architecture, Master Thesis, University of Waterloo. Ontario, Canada. 2014: 137

198 199

Franch I Gilabert, Eva. «Innovation at the Storef ront: The Practice of Eva Franch i Gilabert.» Interview by Pia Ednie-Brown. Architectural Digest, Jan. & feb. 2013, 36 Obrist, Hans Ulrich, and Asad Raz̤ā . Ways of curating. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2016, 55-59.

200 Ibidem 201

«Staff & Board: Eva Franch i Gilabert» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. Accessed August 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/general-info/staff-board/eva-f ranch-i-gilabert/

202 «Staff & Board: Carlos Mínguez Carrasco» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. Accessed September 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/general-info/staff-board/carlos-minguezcarrasco/ 203

«The After Belonging Curatorial Team.» Oslo arkitekturtriennale. Accessed July 2017. http://oslotriennale.no/en/team.

204 «Staff & Board: Jinny Khanduja.» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. Accessed September 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/general-info/staff-board/jinny-khanduja/. 205 Ibidem 102

206

«Staff & Board: Chialin Chou» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. Accessed September 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/general-info/staff-board/chialin-chou/

207

Chialin Chou. Linkedin prof ile. Accessed January 2018. https://www.linkedin.com/in/ chialinchou

208

«Staff & Board: Chialin Chou» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. Accessed September 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/general-info/staff-board/chialin-chou/

209

Chialin Chou. Linkedin prof ile. Accessed January 2018. https://www.linkedin.com/in/ chialinchou

210

Max Lauter. “About”. Accessed January 2018. https://maxlauter.com/about/

211

Ibidem

212

Ibidem

213

«Staff & Board: Andrew Emmet» Storef ront for Art and Architecture. Accessed September 2017. http://storef rontnews.org/general-info/staff-board/andrew-emmet/

214

“2017 Spring Benef it: ARTIFACT.” Storef ront for Art and Architecture | Programming: Benef it, May 2017, storef rontnews.org/benef it/

215

Ibidem

216

Gurina Puig, Núria. “Commercial galleries and non prof it art spaces: the thin red line”. Accessed January, 2018. http://www.talkinggalleries.com/2013/wp-content/uploads/ Nuria-Gurina-Puig.pdf

217

Pagel, David. «Pop over to ‘Storef ront’s’ L.A. outpost.» Accessed January, 2018. http:// www.latimes.com/entertainment/arts/la-et-storef ront15apr15-story.html.

218

“2017 Spring Benef it: ARTIFACT.” Storef ront for Art and Architecture | Programming: Benef it, May 2017, storef rontnews.org/benef it/

219

“Supporters.” Storef ront for Art and Architecture, storef rontnews.org/general-info/ supporters/.

220

Ibidem

221

Other institutions, artists, architects, its audience, ect.

222

Lewandowska, Marysia. “Why Mediate Art?” Ten Fundamental Questions of Curating, Mousse Publishing, 2013: 126.

223

Smith, Marc. “Virtual Public Spaces Are Not Public Spaces: Or, Studying the Social Life of Shopping Malls.” Connected Action, 7 May 2015. www.connectedaction.net/virtualpublic-spaces-are-not-public-spaces-or-studying-the-social-life-of-shopping-malls/.

224

Ibidem

225

Abegglen, Sandra, and Fabian Neuhaus. “The End of the Virtual? - Touch ID on the New IPhone 5s for the Real Online Self.” UrbanTick, UrbanTick, 25 Sept. 2013, urbantick. blogspot.com.es/2013/09/the-end-of-virtual-touch-id-on-new.html.

226

Ibidem

227

38 Mobile Marketing Statistics to Help You Plan for 2018. https://www.impactbnd.com/ blog/mobile-marketing-statistics 103


104 105

OfficeUS - Storefront for Art and Architecture facade - photo by: Pentagram


“recherché framing of the real”

4. BEYOND THE FRONT

CURATING RESEARCH Curating has faced many transitions throughout its history which correlate with the understanding of the role of the curator within society. Since concepts such as independent, collaborative, discursivity, performative, instructional, and research appeared during particular periods of time;230 In regards to the gained importance of research within the curatorial f ield, it is possible that it is due by establishment of academic programs, lectures and debates centered around curating that encourage the production of knowledge and the appreciation for informations and facts. 231 106

In this landscape of changing paradigms of museum programming and institutional outlook, the alliances between museums and universities are becoming more solidif ied. Nevertheless, when presenting the concept curating research, it is appropriate to clarify what is meant when using the term, as it could lead to a misunderstanding. For, the intention is not to focus on the concept of research applied in the canonical curatorial practice, which is used only as a medium to collect information. The intention is, however, for it to be used in reference to the expanded f ield of curating architecture - not just exhibition-making but as the main driving force of the curatorial project.

In order to further clarify the concept of research, reference will be made to the two classifications identified by the curator Simon Sheikh in the recent publication Curating Research, both of which are important as a way of presenting ideas, research results, and the project outcome. These two categories serve as a foundation to analyze the curatorial project OfficeUS to understand which method of research they apply. The first of these categories takes on the root of the word in french as recherché; the second from the germanic as forschung.232 The first term, recherché, operates with journalistic methods by looking for facts, stories, and witnesses in order to check the accuracy of the information found. “Research is not only about getting your facts straight but also about finding the right story and angle to work”232 and it is for this reason that it could be regarded both as manipulative method - insofar as the craft is used to sway perception,intentionally creating a biased narrative - but also “as truthful and brave”234 - insofar as it leads to presenting and questioning topics no one else wants to, or avoiding politically correct actions and taking risks in communicating ideas. In contrast, forschung is based on a scientific model of research that uses specific methods to carry on investigations. What is most Important is that the objective of the research is directed by a hypothesis and proposition, which can be proven or discarded depending on

the end results. Hence, forschung operates as an experimental space where research can entail risk of failure. “The procedures for research in the sciences thus constantly undergo transformations which, in turn, transform science itself and its paradigms of truth.”235 For both methods, the curatorial project should not only be thought of as a form of mediation of research but also as a site for carrying it around. However, research is not black or white since it could be carried out by combining different strategies during the different phases of the investigation.236 Having first described the methods of research, I will now address the OfficeUS project through the lense of the said classification. By so doing one will become aware of the driving force behind the project as the selection of the type of research is a determining factor on how the subject, image, information, and public are understood. Knowing the driving interest allows one to understand how they perceive communication and architecture, which, in turn, reveals the way the curator himself has framed a particular project.

American architectural firms have influenced the discipline worldwide by researching and remaking key architectural projects from a repository of 1,000 export projects created by 200 U.S.- based firms working globally between 1914 and 2014.237 In OfficeUS, research was not only undertaken for the collection of projects but also enacted in the very form of the exhibition throughout their identity, format and spatially, the team, and discourse, which will serve as classification to frame the analysis. By taking all of these into account one is able to determine the methodology used in order to interpret the intention of the curator as regards how the information was communicated.

We were interested in looking at the off ice space itself and what has changed over the last 100 years,” Schafer says. “Many of the images that the f irms used to represent themselves mostly showed men looking at models.”

For the 14th International Architecture Exhibition - la Biennale di Venezia, under the theme of Absorbing Modernity: 1914-2014, the curators Ana Miljački, Eva Franch i Gilabert and Ashley Schafer proposed the project OfficeUS with the aim to examine how exported forms, technologies, methods and products of 107


H a v i n g stated the cl a s s i f i c a t i o n s above, I will now touch on them individually in further detail.

“This office starts with an archive, with a library, as an archaeological excavation of the last hundred years” Eva Franch I Gilabert

The project is structured into two parts, in relation to the investigation and the spatial configuration: The Repository and The Office. The Repository used techniques of collecting and registering the information, where the curators ‘excavate’244 and search for the works produced in the set period of time in a global context. It could be inferred that the method used for this stage of the investigation was recherché, for several reasons. Firstly, for the curators registering information, especially historical data, it is a matter to be taken seriously as it is important to obtain accurate sources that could be verified in order to create a truthful historical narrative that could tell us “stories about individuals and forces that we are not always aware of in the construction process, from the ones who built the buildings, from the ones that commissioned the buildings, the bureaucratic aspect of the buildings.”245

DISCOURSE FORMAT AND SPATIALLY I D E N T I T Y THE TEAM

DISCOURSE In response to Koolhaas’s question, for the 14th Venice Architecture Biennale, about the fundamental elements in architecture, the curators of the american pavilion decided on proposing a continuous investigation as the curatorial project with the format and focus of the office, as a place of production and process. Given that they chose the concept of office, it is relevant to understand what the term means as it concerns the context of the project. The term office has it roots in the latin officium which means performance of a task.238 In other words, office represents an action to achieve a particular work; now how is this relevant for the project? Since the US installation was conceived as a working space to

produce, and register the history from a hundred year of architecture offices working abroad.239 It follows that the project could be understood as a space for action to generate content, encounters, collaborations, discussions and architecture projects.240 Therefore, the office represent an essential part for the production of architecture. OfficeUS wants to study how an office allows us to understand the construction of value, from ethical to business models in a globalized context in which the production of architecture is not happening simultaneously under the same cultural nor physical context.241 The aim is to determine the necessary knowledge an office should have in order to operate efficiently in a global scale.242

Secondly, the curators searched for possible projects and offices within the given frame, by asking questions as; who are the american offices working on projects beyond the borders of U.S? Are their projects relevant to our work? The 1000 projects from the 200 american offices, collectively “tell multiple, imbricated stories about U.S. firms, typologies, and technologies, as well as a broader narrative of modernization and its global reach.246 With regards to the second part of the project, the OFFICE, the methodologie to collect, analyze and produce the installation were varied. “OfficeUS is simultaneously a repository and a laboratory of ideas and criticism in the form of an alternative architecture office.”

“Contemporar y curators continually find themselves in different geographical, social, cultural and political contexts, to which they are expected to respond by deploying works of art, ideas and discourses originating from other contexts, which presupposes a significant capacity for translation.”243

The Repository - Archive 108

109


OfficeUS schedule The office space of the project 110

The office functioned as a collaborative working area where the ‘entire architecture field’247 could come together to share and receive experiences. This was achieved through the layout of the space and how people engage with it. The research method was not constrained to one particular approach, as the OFFICE; During the period of six months the staff working at the office studied and revisited a selection of the 1000 projects, through an analysis of labor, gender, economics, and government issues. This was done with the the following purpose: “to examine how architecture contributes not just to the built environment, but to the world as a whole. The intention is to think not just about how great design affects the world, but how the practice itself does.” It is important to note that whilst this part of the project is chiefly characterized by the recherché method owing to its “paramount importance in the revisiting of previous works”248, it does employ, in some measure, forschung; for the spatial factor is considered a laboratory, which implies an isolated viewing and experimenting with the information.

Furthermore, as the officeus project was, on the one hand, thought out differently from a canonical architectural curatoring project which have the results before creating the exhibition-project-installation, on the other hand, officeus was considered an experimental space since the final outcome of the project was presented at the end of the biennale when the ongoing research at the pavilion was finished. The installation itself was the research which was done based on a hypothesis and with a series of objectives to allow them to measure the results. “Treating facts as uncertainties and concepts that need to be defined and may contradict the pre-emp-

tive thesis about them.”249 As it was a continuous investigation, the spatial configuration and the experience of the pavilion changed as the process developed.

111


“Officeus is a project not an exhibition” - Eva Franch

For the design of the project, Storef ront commissioned the architectural studio Leong Leong, which stated that the design process took place over many conversations between them and storef ront. These resulted in a spatial conf iguration to experiment, observe “a new mode of architecture off ice that practice globally in order to rethinks the ways in which architecture is produced.” 251 Therefore, the space was intertwined with the program and structure for the off ice operations, becoming an active space with a diverse range of dynamics, experiences and temporalities happening throughout the investigation. Workshops, discussions, debates,

The pavilion was organized into four spaces to respond for the different modalities created for the Off iceus program- Namely, the repository became a place for discussion on the status of the presented objects and its specif ic mode of archiving and collecting. Far f rom an exhibition was,f irst,the off ice library, where the 1000 objects were presented in the form of an archive. Secondly, the off ice

Officeus - Central space by:Andrea Avezzú Office area

Rest area

Office area

Repository

The format of the project was an off ice, which in itself is a space within which a process takes place and owing to the fact that the process must take place in an off ice the spatial conf iguration for the project had to be an off ice itself. Therefore, the relationship between the spatial conceptualization and the methodology used for the investigation results could be seen, both being a continuous action throughout a period of time and by it “turns the pavilion f rom presentation to demonstration.” 250

rest, conversations, events, skype meetings, the archive, and investigating, all of which conforms Off iceus program. The f irst week was the most active in relation to the diverse activities they proposed, since for the curators the f irst week represents a different temporality, unlike the following weeks. This is due to the spatial experience being influenced by such factors as the quantity of people and the activities the staff were performing at the moment. The design exhibition was centered around a large working table we’re the Off iceus partners worked on the repository, and as well gathered for meetings, consultations and talks. 252

Repository

FORMAT & SPATIALITY

as an empirical research method to validate the proposed off ice model for a globalized world,which was designed around a big table that functions both as a working desk and display case.The third space contained a circular bed “as a central space for workground of the future.” which refers to the different modalities and locations the architect could produce work or reflect about the profession. Lastly, the exterior area of the project functions as a fertile ground for conversations, interactions.

Exterior table

OfficeUs floorplan - by Leong Leong 112

113


Officeus - Virtual and physical working area It could be said that the f ifth space of Off iceus was its website253, Why talk about the website in the spatial and programming section? Because, one can say that the virtual off ice was also part of the spatial and programmatic organization of Off iceus due to it having functioned alongside its physical counterpart.The website was the space where other and similar dynamics took place, where a hybrid typologie of off ice with different temporalities could perfectly function at the same time. 254 The online platform functioned as a place for shared creative process and a generator of knowledge, under the direction of Off iceus partners and Off iceus Outpost architects by providing their “key expertise, skills, production capabilities and strategic local knowledge for the development of projects.� 255 Consequently the web was also

114

a tool among the global off ices without the need to work at the same time or even in the same physical space, and ultimately becoming an expansion of the physical repository 256 Off iceU.S. was a representative part of the U.S, and it became Off iceus when they opened to the public, representing not only architectes but all the agents that constitute a building. Research = project - space & program- = research.

115


I D E N T I T Y

Pentagram designed the branding identity for the project Off iceus, based on the Fundamental Elements that represents the common image of a working space in USA. They concluded that the branding for Off iceus should follow the same visual language - and therefore, they utilized “the most widely-used fonts in workspaces” 257 specif ically Times New Roman and Arial which can be found both in Macs and PCs. “In addition to contributing to the context of off ice culture, the use of accessible fonts enables the partners and researchers to create documents and collateral that are inherently part of the graphic system” 258 - FONTS AS MEDIATION.

116

This proposal enabled the whole team to work with the graphic identity no matter what they produced or whether they were knowledgeable in the area, so f rom a team of four people it became a 30 member team. Moreover, other institutions or off ices that also used the selected font, were communicating with Off iceus in the same “visual language” thus expanding the “off ice” beyond its conf ines. Furthermore, the chosen black and white color palette complemented the fundamental aspect of the project, which is also a prefered color palette for most off ices to print or copy materials. 259

The entire corporate identity for Off iceus was designed f rom Postcards, business cards and posters, off ice binders, roll of tape, The Off iceUS tote bags, Placeholder card on the repository wall, to the stationary. Pentagram was also responsible for the design of the research publications the OFFICEUS Agenda, the OFFICEUS Atlas, the OFFICEUS Manual and the OFFICEUS New World. “A wide range of original content was created for the books, including detailed infographics, maps and timelines that reveal patterns and trends of U.S. export architecture” as a research outcome of off iceus,

117


DOES NOT ADAPT TO DIFFERENT DEVICES

BOXES RESPONSIVE TO MOUSE LINK

MENU

MENU - STATIC

ONLINE REPOSITORY EXPANDS

WEBSITE COLORS

W E B S I T E

SCHEDULE - THE PAGE HAS NOT BEEN UPDATED SINCE NOVEMBER 2014

OVERALL REVIEW WORKS AS AN ARCHIVE BRANDING OUTDATED WEBSITE NO UX DESIGN - CONFUNSING DOES NOT SHOW UP CORRECTLY ON MOBILE PARTNERS LOCATION MAP

118

SOUNDCLOUD

The design of the website has a superposition of boxes and information, which change in importance according to the preference of the visitor (mouseover/box). This provides the user to simultaneously view the context of the web page. The menu and the titles remain constant on the website and sometimes superpositioning with other boxes, thus making it hard to look at certain things. The purpose of the page is to present specif ic publications and the online Repository f rom the project.

119


THE

TEAM

Join usJob description: Outstanding skills relevant to global° architectural* tasks, which are indispensable for an experimental off ice˜. °,*,˜ Please include your def inition of globalization, architecture and off ice. 260 Off iceus team is composed of seven groups which are organised as follows: I Partners / II Outposts / III Interns / IV Experts / V Founders / VI Sponsors261 The importance of this section is not the description of each group but rather the methodology employed to select those who were to to become part of the team and to work in an eff icient manner within a large group, for, the organization of a research project is crucial in order to achieve the established objectives. 262 In Off iceus the curators, Eva Franch i Gilabert, Ana Miljački, Ashley Schafer organized, selected and guided all the members during the investigation. 263 Regarding their selection process an international open call was proposed and hosted in collaboration with Storef ront for Art & Architecture, to choose the 6 Partners and 90 Outposts, on the bases of having a demonstrable ability in architecture, design, and planning, as well a relevant skill on global issues and architecture. It did not matter if the applicant were an independent professional,

120

works on small f irms or big corporate off ices, nor if is f rom the academia. 264 Off iceus Outpost Architects participated f rom their local community in the development and implementation of 25 projects out of 1000, in collaboration with the 6 Off iceUS Partners in residence at the Off iceUS 265 Headquarters. In order to establish a method to communicate with one another, the curators opted for virtual meetings via skype as a medium, and additionally, the outpost architects possessed an online platform where they could upload, share and work with the whole team. 266 The curators also commissioned the spatial design to the architecture studio Leong Leong, whose selection was due to previous work experiences at Storef ront and the curators did not want to take any risks with someone they did not know since “When you’re going to war, you want to go with people that you know how to f ight with” 267 They work together over multiple conversations to design the pavilion and the role of the curator as a mediator of ideas, people and works fundamental so as to avoid any unnecessary conflict. 268

of every decision” in off iceus they prefer “new models based on collaboration and dialogue. To explore possible forms between collaborative groups, partnerships, fellowships, and networking” hence, these modalities are «better suited to engage with new f ields of investigation” 268 Due to their global community, collaboration and networking was a crucial aspect for the project. The curators went on multiple meetings with different f irms based in U.S.to invite them to form part of Off iceus; however, there were some f irms that perceived Storef ront as to experimental and they could not understand how their project was going to be included, for Eva Franch this process was one of the most challenging and at the same time rewarding since “Sometimes it would take us half an hour in a big room at a large corporate off ice to get someone to say, “We want to work with you.” 270 For the selection of the immediate team they opted to work inside their personal network because they wanted to create a f riendlier and relax environment to investigate and collaborate.

“In contrast to the typical condition of the architectural f irm with the architect at the centre

121


FOOTNOTE CHAPTER 4

251

McManus, David. «USA Pavilion - Venice Biennale 2014.» E-architect. May 10, 2014. Accessed January 31, 2018. https://www.e-architect.co.uk/venice/usa-pavilion-venicebiennale-2014.

252

Archdaily. AD Interviews: Leong Leong / US Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2014. July 2014, vimeo.com/101656313.

253

Off iceus. «OFFICEUS.» 2014. Accessed June 2017. http://www.off iceus.org/.

254

Off iceus. «OFFICEUS.» 2014. Accessed June 2017. http://www.off iceus.org/.

255

Martin, Reinhold. «How we talk about...» In Promiscuous encounters, by Nina Valerie Kolowratnik, Marcelo López-Dinardi, Marina Otero Verzier, and Keller Easterling, 31-32. New York, NY: GSAPP BOOKS, 2014.

230

NTranzit.hu. “curatorial dictionary: unpacking the oxymoron.» In Curating research, by Paul O’Neill and Mick Wilson, London: Open Editions, 2015: 234.

231

Sheikh, Simon. “Towards the Exhibition as Research.” In Curating research, by Paul O’Neill and Mick Wilson. London: Open Editions, 2015: 39

256

Sheikh, Simon. “Towards the Exhibition as Research.” In Curating research, by Paul O’Neill and Mick Wilson. London: Open Editions, 2015: 35.

Off iceUS | Call for Applications.» Zeroundicipiù.it. February 16, 2015. Accessed January 2018. http://www.zeroundicipiu.it/2014/04/28/off iceus-call-for-applications/.

257

Thomson, Steven. «The US Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale is Going Global-And You’re Invited - Architizer Journal.» Architizer - Journal. November 06, 2017. Accessed January 2018. https://architizer.com/blog/practice/tools/off ice-us-outpostarchitects/.

258

Stinson, Liz. «How to Design a Killer Logo With Super Lame Fonts.» Wired. June 06, 2014. Accessed January 2018. https://www.wired.com/2014/06/how-to-design-a-killerlogo-with-just-arial-and-times-new-roman/.

259

Jen, Natasha. «’Off iceUS’ - Story.» Pentagram. 2014. Accessed January, 2018. https:// www.pentagram.com/work/off iceus/story.

260

Ibidem

261

Off iceus. «JOIN» 2014. Accessed June 2017. http://www.off iceus.org/.

262

Off iceus. «TEAMS.» 2014. Accessed June 2017. http://www.off iceus.org/.

263

O’Neill, Paul, and Mick Wilson. Curating research. London: Open Editions, 2015.

264

McManus, David. «USA Pavilion - Venice Biennale 2014.» E-architect. May 10, 2014. Accessed January 31, 2018. https://www.e-architect.co.uk/venice/usa-pavilion-venicebiennale-2014.

265

«Off iceUS | Call for Applications.» Zeroundicipiù.it. February 16, 2015. Accessed January 2018. http://www.zeroundicipiu.it/2014/04/28/off iceus-call-for-applications/.

232 233

Ibidem

234

Ibidem

235

Ibidem: 37

236

Sheikh, Simon. “Towards the Exhibition as Research.” In Curating research, by Paul O’Neill and Mick Wilson. London: Open Editions, 2015: 37.

237

Off iceus. «OFFICEUS: History» 2014. Accessed June 2017. http://www.off iceus.org/.

238

«Off ice.» Off ice - Wiktionary. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/off ice#Etymology.

239

Ibidem

240

O’Neill, Paul, and Mick Wilson. Curating research. London: Open Editions, 2015.

241

KoreanPavilion2014. «Eva Franch, Interview Relay @ Korean Pavilion, 2014 Venice Biennale.» YouTube. August 20, 2014. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ruLUjU7Ikk.

242

Archi Snob. “Delirious Venice: Eva Franch i Gilabert.” Archi Snob, YouTube, 3 July 2014, www.youtube.com/watch?v=39SiiZ_PfTs&t=202s.

243

Hoare, Natasha, and Jonathan Watkins. “The Aspirational Narrative of the New Curator.”

244

The New Curator, Laurence King Publishing, 2016, p. 10.

266

Off iceus. «TEAMS.» 2014. Accessed June 2017. http://www.off iceus.org/.

245

Archi Snob. “Delirious Venice: Eva Franch i Gilabert.” Archi Snob, YouTube, 3 July 2014, www.youtube.com/watch?v=39SiiZ_PfTs&t=202s.

267

246

Ibidem

Martin, Reinhold. «How we talk about...» In Promiscuous encounters, by Nina Valerie Kolowratnik, Marcelo López-Dinardi, Marina Otero Verzier, and Keller Easterling, 31-32. New York, NY: GSAPP BOOKS, 2014.

247

Off iceus. «OFFICEUS: History» 2014. Accessed June 2017. http://www.off iceus.org/.

268

Tranzit.hu. “curatorial dictionary: unpacking the oxymoron.» In Curating research, by Paul O’Neill and Mick Wilson, London: Open Editions, 2015: 234.

248

Archi Snob. “Delirious Venice: Eva Franch i Gilabert.” Archi Snob, YouTube, 3 July 2014, www.youtube.com/watch?v=39SiiZ_PfTs&t=202s.

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Borasi, Giovanna. The Other Architect. Montreal: Spector Books, 2015: 362.

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Off iceus. «OFFICEUS: History» 2014. Accessed June 2017. http://www.off iceus.org/.

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“EVA FRANCH I GILABERT - Mentor Minds.” Mentor Minds, 18 Aug. 2015, vimeo. om/136667878.

Thomson, Steven. «The US Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale is Going Global-And You’re Invited - Architizer Journal.» Architizer - Journal. November 06, 2017. Accessed January 2018. https://architizer.com/blog/practice/tools/off ice-us-outpost-

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5. CONCLUSIONS

There were Important architectural exhibitions prior to the Modern Architecture: International Style Exhibition in 1932 at MOMA such as the Contemporary Art and Architecture exhibition in 1930, organized by Ateneo Guipuzcoano at San Sebastian, Spain. That is to say, even though, Johnson’s exhibition took as reference the display system designed at the Bauhaus school, it is still regarded by, the academy and institutions, as being the first architectural exhibition. Is it maybe because those exhibitions did not have a curatorial process? or maybe because none of them were presented at an international renown institution such as MOMA? Does the institutional validation at the time weigh more? Perhaps, the need for approval from the academia, and as well the art and architecture institutions are still relevant for some curators. It might by that it is for this reason some curators have opted to still produce exhibitions within the traditional methods and formats, or maybe is something quite different regarding how they are framing the concept of curating architecture? For what 124

we could acknowledged from the historical chapter is precisely that, framing a concept into a particular view can change the final outcome of the curatorial project. As stated before, curating architecture is constructed by the understanding of Architecture itself and the role of the architect. Most of the selected examples presented, questioned the notion of the architectural practice by experimenting with different mediums, formats and ways of communicating and collaborating. The role of curating architecture has expanded to become a ‘promiscuous’ practice, that combines and collaborates methods from other disciplines in order to produce new narratives and meanings. The curator is a communicator, a mediator, a researcher, a producer, a traveler, and even a therapist, taking multiple roles. “Now the architect is someone who makes architecture possible even when they do not construct anything.” As could be seen, Storefront projects instigate to explore pressing issues in architecture with the purpose to create new dialogues, an

experiments, to identify and understand the matters in questioned and possibly proposing a solution. Storefront’s experimental approach has defined the gallery and allows its curator, Eva Franch to create events and projects such as the International series, Cabaret series, la paella series, and so forth, that are rooted in issues as identity, global concerns, collaboration models, and ways of discussing difficult matters in a humorous and relaxed. For the International series, specifically is a site-specific event that produces encounters with cultures, ideologies, and people from different geographical locations thus producing More visitors to be “touched by” those experiences and conversations. It is a way of doing architecture without having to produce an object, because it produces common spaces and at the same time it is a research oriented practice in itself. The experimental approach is not driven to create the best big idea “before it goes viral”, but rather a form of research within the practice.

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6. REFERENCES

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Rogoff, Irit. “The Expanding Field.” The Curatorial, A Philosophy of Curating, Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 201ADAD, p. 41. Ryan, Zoë, and Paola Antonelli. As seen: exhibitions that made architecture and design history. Chicago, IL: The Art Institute of Chicago, 2017. Smithson , Alison, and Peter Smithson . “The ‘As Found’ and the ‘Found’ .” The Independent Group: Postwar Britain and the Aesthetics of Plenty, MIT Press, 1990. Smith, Terry. Thinking contemporary curating. New York, NY: Independent Curators International, 2013: 19.

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VIDEO INTERVIEWS & CONERENCES Archi Snob. “Delirious Venice: Eva Franch i Gilabert.” Archi Snob, YouTube, 3 July 2014, www.youtube.com/watch?v=39SiiZ_PfTs&t=202s. Brownlee, Linda. «Hans Ulrich Obrist: Morning Ritual». Nowness. 8, january,, 2014. https://www.nowness.com/story/hans-ulrich-obrist-morning-ritual Castro, Fernando.” Presentación de Estética a golpe de like.” Fernando Castro Flórez channel. 20, April, 2016. https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=P3dMUsbV8X4&t=2105s Colombia GSAPP. “Exhibition Models: Curating Architecture”. GSAPP channel. Nov, 2016. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLz7CkDLtHf3rsG9A7QQMN RspBkdlgGr6z Director. Cynthia Davidson, Shumon Basar - Editing vs. Curating. AASchoolArchitecture, YouTube - 4 Sept. 2015, Accessed July, 2017. www. youtube.com/watch?v=H7D5-FO jfWA. “EVA FRANCH I GILABERT - Mentor Minds.” Mentor Minds, 18 Aug. 2015, vimeo. com/136667878. KoreanPavilion2014. «Eva Franch, Interview Relay @ Korean Pavilion, 2014 Venice Biennale.» YouTube. August 20, 2014. https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=2ruLUjU7Ikk. Mocadvideo. «The Architectural Imagination with Curator Cynthia Davidson.» Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit - MOCAD. March 24, 2017. Accessed January, 2018. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcBaFEdqZK8. Tedx Talks. «TEDxMarrakesh - Hans Ulrich Obrist - The Art of Curating». Ted Talk Youtube. 10, October, 2011. https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=gyIVCqf23cA&t=16s

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HE FRO

Cured Architecture  

TFM - Marjorie Casado

Cured Architecture  

TFM - Marjorie Casado

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